Water Chemists

Opportunities

  • Industrial opportunities exist in developing countries.
  • Opportunities exist in the water treatment industry, and government positions for water chemists include those at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • In academia, water chemists are teachers and researchers.

Education

  • A career in water chemistry or hydrology may require an advanced degree (master’s or Ph.D.), and currently a small number of schools offer such programs.
  • Lab experience and as much hands-on experience as possible is vital, and experience with computer modeling, data analysis, and digital mapping is desirable.

Salaries

Median annual wage: $75,530 (2012)









Overview

water plant

Water is one of the most versatile of all chemicals. It comprises about 75% of the Earth’s surface and is an integral part of every ecosystem—we drink it, play in it, and use it in a wide variety of manufacturing processes. Water chemists study the impact of water on other elements in these systems and vice versa. Water chemists also contribute to the design and implementation of processes and policies to manage areas of impact.

Hydrology is the study of the movement, distribution, and quality of water on Earth and other planets, including the hydrologic cycle, water resources and environmental watershed sustainability. A practitioner of hydrology is a hydrologist, working within the fields of earth or environmental science, physical geography, geology, or civil and environmental engineering.

Chemists in this field can work as bench chemists or data review chemists and can be in government or with private sector environmental management companies.

Water chemists undertake a variety of responsibilities. Their titles vary as well—some of which reflect the interplay of disciplines, as in hydrologists, hydrogeologists, and hydrobiogeochemists. Additional titles include water purification chemist, wastewater treatment plant chemist, surface water chemist, and groundwater chemist. Water chemists often use their specific knowledge about water for applications that affect entire ecosystems.

Typical Job Duties

  • Ensure that water processed at filtration plants is safe.
  • Evaluate ecosystems—collect samples periodically and monitor the condition of streams, lakes, and other bodies of water over time. They use the data they collect to review trends, interpret them, and make projections.
  • Review and evaluate data and make recommendations for regulations and policy, such as the Clean Air Act Amendments and the Safe Drinking Water Act.
  • Research hydrologists investigate surface, watershed, and regional water contamination.
  • Study groundwater that has been contaminated by crude oil or gasoline leaks or monitor radioactive elements in groundwater and water flow in aquifers.
  • Develop processes to remove contaminants from water (water remediation).

Education

Because this field is highly interdisciplinary, it is important to be conversant in a range of disciplines including microbiology, geology, aqueous geochemistry, geochemical kinetics, hydrogeology, and microbial ecology, among many others. Lab experience and as much hands-on experience as possible is vital. Students interested in this area should take as many courses as possible in environmental policy to supplement their technical expertise and understand how the data they collect affects into public policy. A career in water chemistry or hydrology may require an advanced degree (master’s or Ph.D.), and currently a small number of schools offer such programs.

Geographic information systems (GIS), remote sensing, and global positioning system (GPS) equipment can be used for some types of monitoring, so experience with computer modeling, data analysis, and digital mapping is desirable.


Licensing

Some states require hydrologists to obtain a license to practice, which generally requires certain education, experience, and successful completion of an exam.


Workspace

Water Sampling

Most positions include fieldwork, other than industrial water chemists who spend the majority of their time in the lab. Work hours may be nine to five but can extend into the night and weekends when projects require. The flexibility to travel overseas is important in some industries, as chemists may be asked to interact with business managers as well as provide expertise and service at customer sites.

Opportunities exist in the water treatment industry, which is quite substantial since most manufacturing companies use water as part of their production or cooling processes. Government positions for water chemists include those at the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Geological Survey. In academia, water chemists are teachers and researchers. Environmental management firms employ water chemists for consulting and remediation projects.


Is This Career a Good Fit for You?

Water chemists often express a personal interest in, and a commitment to, the environment that goes beyond their scientific work. Chemists in industry say they enjoy doing work that safeguards water quality and that solves complex problems. Water chemists often describe themselves as very practical people with good analytical skills. They underscore the importance of being objective scientists.


Technical Skills

  • If the job includes field sampling, physical stamina to carry equipment into remote areas may be required
  • Analytical and critical thinking skills are needed to review and understand the results of the tests they conduct, and good judgment is necessary to develop appropriate responses
  • Oral and written communication skills to convey the results and conclusions not only to other scientists but to those without a scientific background such as government officials or the general public.
  • Ability to work as part of a team, with others of diverse backgrounds.

Career Path

Depending on educational level, water chemists generally start out working in the field or at the bench. As they progress in their career, they may take on more responsibility for higher profile and more complex projects or may supervise more people.


Future Employment Trends

Despite strong environmental consciousness and concerns about water purity in the United States, staff reductions in industry have resulted in a very competitive job market. Environmental consulting firms may have more openings than other areas. For those willing to live overseas, industrial opportunities exist in developing countries that need to build water treatment facilities. As the population grows and expands into new areas, the need for water chemists and hydrologists to ensure adequate water quality is expected to grow.

 

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