How to Use ChemMatters in the Classroom

Integrate ChemMatters into daily instruction

After you have introduced a new concept in the classroom, use an article from ChemMatters to illustrate how it relates to students' everyday lives. Or consider starting with a concept in ChemMatters and working backward to incorporate  chemistry in your lesson plan.

Assign ChemMatters as supplemental reading

Because ChemMatters explains chemistry behind everyday phenomena, it makes great supplementary reading. Students will be able to see the applications behind chemical concepts and how these applications affect the world around them.

Give students an opportunity to earn extra credit

Assign the “Student Questions” found in the Teacher’s Guide from each issue as extra credit. Or consider giving students the opportunity to write their own ChemMatters article by explaining the chemistry concepts behind an everyday activity or product. Or allow students to read a ChemMatters article and ask them to develop a presentation for the entire class in which they explain the chemistry involved in the article.

Assign ChemMatters as a homework assignment

Use the questions found in the Teacher’s Guide from each issue as the basis for a homework assignment that requires students to read the article and respond to it.

Encourage students to use ChemMatters as a resource for research reports

Because ChemMatters covers a broad range of topics, it can be a great starting place for students to write a research report involving chemistry or science. Each ChemMatters article is written in an accessible manner, allowing students to grasp chemistry concepts that they can then research further or incorporate into a presentation or a research paper.

Provide ChemMatters as a resource for in-class reading and discussion

Because ChemMatters incorporates basic chemistry principles, it reinforces lessons from class while exposing students to new information.

Use ChemMatters as a key component of an emergency lesson plan

With sample questions and background information available in the ChemMatters Teacher's Guides, having an emergency lesson plan couldn’t be easier! Use the related ChemMatters article as the basis for instruction and background information as supplementary teaching material, and then have students answer the “Student Questions” in class.