Student Transitions to Four-Year Institutions and the Workplace

According to the National Center for Education Statistics, the number of students enrolling in college is projected to increase 22% over the current decade. A National Science Foundation report notes that more than 40% of students earning bachelor’s or master’s degrees in science or engineering have attended a two-year college. Regardless of what institution they attend or what degree they earn, most of these students enter the workforce.

Instructors at all types of programs are increasingly preparing their students for both types of transitions: into four-year programs and into the workforce. The following resources are designed to provide instructors and administrators with the information they need to facilitate these critical transitions.

Transitions to Four-Year Institutions

Across the board, the number of students at two-year colleges and the number of “swirling” students (students who attend more than one college or university to achieve their degree) are on the rise. However, the 2009 National Survey of Student Engagement found that transfer students are less engaged and less satisfied with their college experience. Consequently, improving student transfers is a topic of interest for all institutions.

Whether you are working at a two- or four-year institution, the following resources can help you create a richer educational experience for transfer students, while ensuring they are ready for the changes they will face.

ACS Resources

External Resources*

* These resources are provided for informational purposes only. Listing of a product or service on this website does not constitute an endorsement by ACS.

Transitions to the Workforce

According to a report by National Center for Education Statistics, over 40% of students enrolling in a two-year college do so with the express goal of acquiring or improving jobs skills. Whether you are incorporating employability skills into a chemistry-based technology program or adding value to a transfer program, the following resources can help you prepare your students for the workplace.

ACS Resources

External Resources*

  • O*NET online
    Career and skill information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • Process technology course objectives
    Course objectives for the PTEC™ process technology curriculum, developed by Gulf Coast Process Technology Alliance
  • Skill standards: biotechnology
    Biotechnology skill standards compiled by Bio-Links, an NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Center
  • CTE™ Career Clusters
    Curriculum resources for careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics from the National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc)
  • WorkKeys
    ACT’s system for identifying workplace knowledge and skills and incorporating them into a curriculum

* These resources are provided for informational purposes only. Listing of a product or service on this website does not constitute an endorsement by ACS.

Contact Us

Have a question? Want to suggest a resource? Email 2YColleges@acs.org or undergrad@acs.org.