Indianapolis News Media Coverage

September 9, 2013  

Breaking news from ACS’s 246th National Meeting  


The Indianapolis Star
(Indianapolis, IN: 929,700 unique monthly visits)

"'World Series of Science' offers first look at next great discovery"

September 6, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The gathering is often referred to as the “World Series of Science,” and cities love to host it. Thousands of scientists from around the world assemble to explain their latest discoveries, generating media coverage fit for a big game. The event, the American Chemical Society semiannual meeting, plays out next week in Indianapolis, and the 7,000 reports on new findings and applications are sure to make science news headlines again. A mosquito repellent derived from grapefruit. A heart monitor that takes the form of shrink wrap. A new water purifier the size of a ketchup packet. It took 13 years of planning for Indianapolis to host the event, and the payoff starts Sunday, when 12,000 participants start arriving in the city for the five-day convention.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Young hookah smokers near church picnic tables and children eating don't mix"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

It was surprising in Sacramento to go to a food and music festival held in the courtyard of a local church and see a hookah bar section set up right next to the picnic tables where food was being eaten. Yet hookah smoking and the ethnic community attending the church were a familiar scenario. … From the holistic health perspective, with water pipes or hookahs gaining popularity, scientists today described a step toward establishing their health risks. In a study that they said provides no support for the notion that hookahs are safer than cigarettes, they reported that hookah smoke and tobacco contain lower levels of four toxic metals. It was part of the 246th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held this week in September 2013.

More than 12 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Motherboard (164,600 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Smithsonian (Washington, D.C.: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)

"Why Does Cardiac Arrest Often Strike in the Morning?"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

For decades scientists have known that sudden cardiac death–a failure in the heart’s electrical system that leads people to, well, suddenly drop dead–occurs more often in the morning hours. … Now an international team of researchers has stumbled upon a lead. Mukesh Jain of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland and his colleagues recently identified a protein whose levels oscillate with the circadian clock and, in mice, cause the ion channels governing the heart’s electrical system to oscillate with the clock too. On September 8 in Indianapolis at a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Jain reported that these oscillations also occur in human heart cells. The results point to an era when doctors may be capable of preventing sudden cardiac death, which is the leading cause of natural death in the United States, killing more than 300,000 people each year.

More than 15 media outlets, including NewsDay (Melville, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Union-Tribune San Diego (San Diego, CA: 367,500 unique monthly visits)

"Recycled sewage safe for crops"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Crops grown with recycled sewage are safe to eat, according to a UC Riverside study released Monday. The study examined the potential harm of pharmaceuticals and personal care products left behind in recycled sewage. Even in foods eaten raw, such as carrots, tomatoes, spinach and bell peppers, the levels of these PPCPs were too low to represent a health hazard. … Study leader Jay Gan presented the results at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, held this year in Indianapolis. Chemicals tested included the anti-bacterial triclosan, caffeine, an anticonvulsant and a tranquilizer.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"New weapons on the way to battle wicked weeds"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A somber picture of the struggle against super-weeds emerged here today as scientists described the relentless spread of herbicide-resistant menaces like pigweed and horseweed that shrug off powerful herbicides and have forced farmers in some areas to return to the hand-held hoes that were a mainstay of weed control a century ago. The reports on herbicide resistance and its challenges, and how modern agriculture is coping, were part of a symposium on the topic at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting with almost 7,000 scientific and other reports continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels. Abstracts of the symposium presentations appear below.

More than 7 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ABC Science (Sydney, Australia: 369,700 unique monthly visits)

"Scientists develop 'artificial nose' able to sniff out blood-poisoning threats"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

An "artificial nose" capable of detecting the odour from germs that lead to blood poisoning could help save many lives and reduce medical costs. Scientists who developed the "nose" say it can show within 24 hours whether a patient's blood has bacteria that cause sepsis. … Unveiled at a conference in Indianapolis of the American Chemical Society, the "nose" entails a palm-sized plastic bottle filled with a liquid nutrient that helps bacteria to grow.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

AllVoices.com (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits)

"Better Tests for Liver Toxicity Would Mean More Medicines -- and Safer Medicines -- for Patients"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

How many breakthrough new drugs never reach patients because tests in clinical trials suggested a high risk of liver damage when the drug actually was quite safe? That question underpins major international research efforts to modernize tests for drug-induced liver injury, mentioned here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics, continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels.

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"A new approach to early diagnosis of influenza"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A new technology is showing promise as the basis for a much-needed home test to diagnose influenza quickly, before the window for taking antiviral drugs slams shut and sick people spread the virus to others, scientists reported here today. In a presentation at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they described how it also could determine the specific strain of flu virus and help select the most effective drug for treatment. Suri Iyer, Ph.D., explained that such a fast, inexpensive diagnostic test—similar to the quick throat swabs for strep throat and to home pregnancy tests—is especially important for flu, which causes widespread illness and an average of 36,000 deaths annually in the United States alone.

More than 7 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)

"New ‘Heroes of Chemistry’ developed products that improve health and protect food supply"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Scientists who developed medicines and crop protection products that improve life for millions of people around the world will be inducted into a scientific "Hall of Fame" today, becoming the newest Heroes of Chemistry, an honor bestowed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. Heroes of Chemistry recognizes scientists whose innovative work in chemistry and chemical engineering led to the development of commercial products that benefit humankind.

More than 5 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)

"Reverse combustion? Turning carbon dioxide from burning fossil fuel back into fuel"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

With almost 40 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) released each year from burning coal, gasoline, diesel and other fossil fuels in the United States alone, scientists are seeking ways to turn the tables on the No. 1 greenhouse gas and convert that troublesome CO2 back into fuel. Those efforts to unring one of the bells of global warming are the topic of a symposium here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. Thousands of scientists and others are expected for the meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics and continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)

"First uses of new solar energy technology: Killing germs on medical, dental instruments"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A revolutionary new solar energy technology that turns water into steam without boiling the entire container of water has become the basis for new devices to sanitize medical and dental instruments and human waste in developing countries, scientists said here today. Prototypes of the devices, which need no electricity or fuel, were the topic of one of the keynote addresses at the opening of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 7 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WXIN-IN (FOX) (Indianapolis, IN: Local Viewership 28,948)

"Chemistry in Motion"

September 6, 2013

kids can get their motors running... for science! a huge event will be held Sunday out at the Indianapolis motor speedway. It's being put on by celebrate science Indiana and the American Chemical Society. more than 60 booths and demonstrations will offer hands on scientific activities. the theme for the event is chemistry in motion. the goal is to show kids the science behind racing and other exciting things... hopefully getting them interested in science! the chemistry in motion event runs from 9 am to five p-m Sunday out at the speedway.

WBZ-AM (Boston, MA)

"Hookah"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

[Delaware 105.9 (Salisbury, MD), KRLD-AM (Dallas, TX), KCBS-AM (San Francisco, CA), and KXNT NewsRadio 840 (Las Vegas, NV) also covered the story.]

...is not necessarily any healthier than smoking tobacco researchers of the University of Cincinnati's evidence on hookah tobacco contains lower levels before toxic metal and cigarettes but it still contains toxic metals. Ryan Saadawi is a grad student presenter at the meeting of the American Chemical Society.

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0

"Science Has Improved Food In Multiple Ways"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

When people think about the benefits of science to agriculture, they often think about American dematerialization. Farmers are producing far more food on far less land with far less ecological footprint than dreamed about 30 years ago. But it isn't just more food at reasonable costs, which is better for everyone.  In an interview before his keynote address at the meeting of the American Chemical Society, Daniel Kittle, Ph.D., vice-president for research and development at Dow AgroSciences, cited the development of healthier foods as one part of the role science has played in supporting the growth of civilization through advances in agricultural technology.

Chemistry World Blog

"Conference and Community – Chemistry and the Indy 500"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Today, (8th September 2013) was the first day of formal science events at ACS Fall, the American Chemical Society’s annual autumnal conference. This year the host city is Indianapolis, and Emma Stoye and I have come along to cover the action. From now until the 12th, I should expect to see more chemistry in the news than is normal, as the press team here are working hard to get stories from the conference into the headlines.

Science Codex

"Nobel laureates and their research teams at American Chemical Society meeting"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

New discoveries from the labs of several Nobel laureates will be presented here this week during the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. Research from the laureates' teams will be among almost 7,000 presentations during the event. They are Ei-ichi Negishi, Ph.D.; Richard Schrock, Ph.D.; George A. Olah, Ph.D.; and Roald Hoffmann, Ph.D. Negishi, the Herbert C. Brown Distinguished Professor of Organic Chemistry at Purdue University, shared the 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for palladium-catalyzed cross couplings in organic synthesis." This helped develop techniques to synthesize complex carbon molecules that have had an enormous impact on the manufacture of medicines and other products.

Jersey Tribune

"Toward understanding the health effects of waterpipe or 'hookah' smoking"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

With water pipes or hookahs gaining popularity, scientists today described a step toward establishing their health risks. In a study that they said provides no support for the notion that hookahs are safer than cigarettes, they reported that hookah smoke and tobacco contain lower levels of four toxic metals. It was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society being held here this week.

Health Medicine Network

"A new approach to early diagnosis of influenza"

September 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A new technology is showing promise as the basis for a much-needed home test to diagnose influenza quickly, before the window for taking antiviral drugs slams shut and sick people spread the virus to others, scientists reported here today. In a presentation at the 246th National Meeting Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they described how it also could determine the specific strain of flu virus and help select the most effective drug for treatment. Suri Iyer, Ph.D., explained that such a fast, inexpensive diagnostic test—similar to the quick throat swabs for strep throat and to home pregnancy tests—is especially important for flu, which causes widespread illness and an average of 36,000 deaths annually in the United States alone.