Indianapolis News Media Coverage

September 11, 2013

Breaking news from ACS’s 246th National Meeting


NPR
(Washington, DC: 32.7 million weekly listeners)

"Rye Bother? An Inside-The-Barrel Look At American Whiskeys"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Ten years ago rye whiskey was on the brink of extinction. Despite its venerable history as the whiskey made by George Washington, only a handful of distillers were bottling this quintessentially American spirit. And you definitely couldn't order a rye Manhattan at your local cocktail lounge. My, how times have changed. Now craft distilleries have popped up across the country devoted solely to making the golden liquor. And hipsters from Brooklyn to San Francisco can impress their friends by commenting on the peppery notes imparted by the rye in their Old Fashioned. … Through their analysis, Collins and his colleagues discovered about 4,000 unique compounds in the 70 American whiskeys, they said Monday at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting in Indianapolis.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: daily circulation 2.1 million)

"Could a tea drunk by Samoan tribes help eradicate AIDS? Scientists create antiviral drug from the bark of the mamala tree"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A compound found in tea brewed from tree bark could lead the way in the fight to eradicate AIDS, researchers claim. Scientists have found a way to isolate the chemical, prostratin and synthesise it so it is 100 times as potent, the meeting of the American Chemical Society was told. The bark of the mamala tree, which contains prostratin, has been used by tribal healers in Samoa to treat patients with hepatitis. The same technique could be used on naturally occurring drug candidates, some found in sea creatures, leading to new treatments for cancer and Alzheimer’s, said Dr Paul Wender, of Stanford University. Dr Wender said his research represents a ‘fundamentally new approach to some of the most serious unmet health challenges of our time'.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Could Panda Poop Fuel The Future? Bamboo-Busting Bacteria Could Speed Biofuel Production"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Innovative energy sources of the future: wind, solar, nuclear and … panda poop? For at least one scientist, it's not such a crazy idea. … Brown is presenting her work at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis, Ind. Through their inspection of panda waste, Brown and her colleagues have identified more than 40 microorganisms living in the digestive tracts of Memphis Zoo pandas Ya Ya and Le Le that could transform biofuel production.

 More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits),

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Climate Central (Princeton, NJ: 153,000 unique monthly visits), and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Slate (New York, NY: 8.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Do-Gooder Chemists Sniff Out Sepsis, Snuff Out Deadly Diarrhea"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Rampant disease, dirty water, limited medical access, poor sanitation—when you look at some of the problems facing the developing world, their staggering scope seems to call for equally large solutions. But in fact it’s the small, simple fixes that provide some of the biggest gains. At least, that seems to be the theme this year at the meeting of the American Chemical Society, where two new tools are making waves for the potential they hold for the developing world. First up, everybody’s favorite whole-body inflammation—sepsis! Caused by severe infection, sepsis afflicts millions of people each year where it kills as many as 1 in 4. In the United States alone, it’s responsible for 250,000 deaths and $20 billion in medical bills each year.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Popular Science (New York, NY: monthly circulation 1.3 million)

"Chemical Analysis Finds A Whiskey's Unique Fingerprint"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Just as Scottish and Irish accents are clearly different from American English ones, so are Scotch and Irish whiskeys chemically distinct from their American counterparts, and ongoing research is analyzing exactly how. Food science researchers at the University of California at Davis have been studying different whiskies to determine whether they can tell them apart, scientifically. Research director Thomas Collins gave a talk at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting today about the university's work, especially on American whiskeys.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Endocyte Announces Presentations at the 246th American Chemical Society Meeting & Exposition"

September 9, 2013

Endocyte, Inc. (Nasdaq:ECYT), a biopharmaceutical company and leader in developing targeted small molecule drug conjugates (SMDCs) and companion imaging diagnostics for personalized therapy in cancer and other serious diseases, today announced that three posters featuring Endocyte's platform technology for the generation of SMDCs for multiple diseases will be presented by Endocyte scientists at the 246th American Chemical Society (ACS) Meeting & Exposition to be held in Indianapolis, Sept. 8 -- 12, 2013. "Over the past years, impressive clinical data have demonstrated the significance and potential of Endocyte's highly versatile technology platform for developing SMDCs toward folate-receptor (FR)-specific targeting," said Iontcho Vlahov, Ph.D., vice president of discovery chemistry.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Reverse Combustion? Turning Carbon Dioxide From Burning Fossil Fuel Back Into Fuel"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

With almost 40 billion tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) released each year from burning coal, gasoline, diesel and other fossil fuels in the United States alone, scientists are seeking ways to turn the tables on the No. 1 greenhouse gas and convert that troublesome CO2 back into fuel. Those efforts to unring one of the bells of global warming are the topic of a symposium here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. Thousands of scientists and others are expected for the meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics and continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels.

More than 10 media outlets, including Truth Dive (Green Bay, WI: 24,600 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Edible coatings for ready-to-eat fresh fruits and vegetables"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The scientist who turned fresh-cut apple slices into a popular convenience food, available ready-to-eat in grocery stores, school cafeterias and fast-food restaurants, today described advances in keeping other foods fresh, flavorful and safe for longer periods of time through the use of invisible, colorless, odorless, tasteless coatings. Attila E. Pavlath, Ph.D., pointed out that the use of edible films has grown dramatically since the mid-1980s, when only 10 companies were in the business, to more than 1,000 companies with annual sales exceeding $100 million today. Ready-to-eat fruits and vegetables now account for about 10 percent of all produce sales, with sales exceeding $10 billion annually. … The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Indy 500 track continues to foster better technology for everyday driving"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The pavement recipe for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS), home of the Indianapolis 500, could be used to improve the smoothness, durability and safety of some of the 2 million miles of paved roads and streets where people move at ordinary speeds, scientists said here today.

In reports at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they focused on IMS' heritage and future potential in testing new automotive technology suitable for general transportation use. The meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics, continues here through Thursday.

More than 10 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"State e-waste disposal bans have been largely ineffective"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

One of the first analyses of laws banning disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in municipal landfills has found that state e-waste recycling bans have been mostly ineffective, although California's Cell Phone Recycling Act had a positive impact on cell phone recycling. However, e-waste recycling rates remain "dismally low," and many demographic groups remain unaware of their alternatives for properly disposing of e-waste, according to the study. Presented in Indianapolis today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), it found that providing more information to women and older people could increase the effectiveness of e-waste disposal bans and recycling programs.

More than 7 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MedIndia (Chennai, India: 1.2 million unique monthly visits)

"Translating Nature's Library Yields Drug Lead for AIDS  Read more: Research: Translating Nature's Library Yields Drug Lead for AIDS"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A scientist has said that an ingredient in a medicinal tea brewed from tree bark by tribal healers on the South Pacific island of Samoa is showing significant promise as a drug lead in the long-sought goal of eliminating the AIDS virus. Speaking at the 246th National Meeting & Exhibition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Paul A. Wender, Ph.D., described efficient new ways of making prostratin and related leads, as well as other drug candidates first discovered in sea creatures, that appear even more effective for AIDS and have applications for Alzheimer’s disease and cancer.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits),

Daily Me (104,400 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"The real reason to worry about bees"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Honeybees should be on everyone's worry list, and not because of the risk of a nasty sting, an expert on the health of those beneficial insects said here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Set aside the fact that the honeybee's cousins—hornets, wasps and yellow jackets—actually account for most stings, said Richard Fell, Ph.D. Despite years of intensive research, scientists do not understand the cause, nor can they provide remedies, for what is killing honeybees.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Daily Me (104,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)

"Biopsy Samples Shed Light on Environmental Causes of Cancer"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

In an advance in determining the role of environmental agents in causing cancer, scientists have described the development of a long-sought way to use biopsy samples from cancer patients to check on human exposure to substances that damage the genetic material DNA in ways that can cause cancer. Their report on the method, which taps into a treasure trove of medical information in biopsy samples of patients, was part of the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

WomensHealth.gov (Washington, DC: 277,700 unique monthly visits)

"Recycled Wastewater Safe for Crop Irrigation, Study Says"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Recycled sewage water can safely be used for crop irrigation, according to new research.

In what's thought to be the first study conducted under realistic field conditions, researchers found that crops irrigated with the water discharged from sewage treatment plants contains only low levels of prescription drugs and ingredients commonly found in antibacterial soaps, make-up, shampoos and other personal care products. "The levels of pharmaceuticals and personal care products that we found in food crops growing under real-world conditions were quite low and most likely do not pose any health concern," study leader Jay Gan, from the University of California-Riverside, said in a news release from the American Chemical Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Health 24 (South Africa: 74,400 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine  (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)

"The new allure of electric cars: Blazing-fast speeds"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Already noted for saving gasoline and having zero emissions, electric cars have quietly taken on an unlikely new dimension—the ability to reach blazing speeds that rival the 0-to-60 performance of a typical Porsche or BMW, and compete on some racecourses with the world’s best gasoline-powered cars, an authority said here today at a major scientific conference. Speaking at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, electric vehicle pioneer John E. Waters said that relatively recent advances in engineering and use of lithium-ion batteries are producing electric vehicles (EVs) capable of leaving traditional internal combustion engine race cars in the dust.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)

"American Chemical Society presidential symposium: Innovation and entrepreneurship"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

An historic shift is occurring in traditional innovation in chemistry -- which touches more than 96 percent of all the world's manufactured goods -- away from large companies and toward smaller entrepreneurs and startups. Amid that new landscape for transforming ideas and inventions into goods and services, the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, today hosts a special symposium on innovation and entrepreneurship at its 246th National Meeting & Exposition.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,500 unique monthly visits)

"ACS Issues Guidelines for Safer Research Laboratories"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The American Chemical Society (ACS) issued guidelines to better ensure the safety of the tens of thousands of personnel who work in research laboratories around the country. The ACS issued the report, requested by a federal safety board, during its 246th National Meeting & Exposition. The meeting, which includes almost 7,000 reports on new advances in science and other topics, continues here through Thursday.

More than 7 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0

"Edible Coatings Will Keep Fresh Fruits And Vegetables Ready To Eat Longer"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Attila E. Pavlath, Ph.D., who turned fresh-cut apple slices into a popular convenience food, outlined advances in keeping other foods fresh, flavorful and safe for longer periods of time through the use of invisible, colorless, odorless, tasteless coatings. … At the American Chemical Society (ACS) meeting in Indianapolis, Pavlath noted that the use of edible films has grown dramatically since the mid-1980s, when only 10 companies were in the business. Today, more than 1,000 companies in that industry have annual sales exceeding $100 million while ready-to-eat fruits and vegetables now account for about 10 percent of all produce revenue, with sales exceeding $10 billion annually.

Science Codex

"Electronic shrink wrap for the heart and other topics at American Chemical Society meeting"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Electronic sutures that monitor surgical incisions for healing and infection. Electronic films that cling to the heart like shrink wrap, monitoring and regulating the heartbeat and alerting the patient and cardiologist when medical attention is needed. Flexible plastic electronic appliques that stick to the skin like temporary tattoos and monitor hydration in athletes. Those and other futuristic advances that marry electronics with the human body in ways that could enhance human health and performance are on the agenda here today at a symposium during the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society.

Water Online

"New Research Provides Early Indications That Recycled Sewage Water Is Safe For Crop Irrigation"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The first study under realistic field conditions has found reassuringly low levels of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in crops irrigated with recycled sewage water, scientists reported here recently at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The research, which eases some concerns over using treated wastewater for agriculture, was one of almost 7,000 reports on new advances in science at the ACS meeting. The sessions, held in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels, continue through Thursday.

Many Years Young

"New ‘artificial nose’ device can speed diagnosis of sepsis"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Disease-causing bacteria stink -- literally -- and the odor released by some of the nastiest microbes has become the basis for a faster and simpler new way to diagnose blood infections and finger the specific microbe, scientists reported in Indianapolis today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). … The new test produces results in 24 hours, compared to as much as 72 hours required with the test hospitals now use, and is suitable for use in developing countries and other areas that lack expensive equipment in hospital labs.