Indianapolis News Media Coverage

September 12, 2013  

Breaking news from ACS’s 246th National Meeting


Yahoo! News
(Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)

"Now, 'artificial nose' to sniff out deadly blood diseases"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Researchers have developed a new faster and simpler way to diagnose blood infections and finger the specific microbe, with the help of the odour released by some of the nastiest microbes. The new test produces results in 24 hours, compared to as much as 72 hours required with the test hospitals now use, and is suitable for use in developing countries and other areas that lack expensive equipment in hospital labs. The study was reported at the 246th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits)

"Purple sweet potatoes may replace dyes made with bugs"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Spuds could be the answer to brightly colored food that doesn't contain crushed beetles. Amid the push for widespread use of natural food coloring, scientists are turning to root crops like purple sweet potatoes and black carrots as potential alternatives to insect-based and synthetic dyes. … The research was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)

"E-Waste Trashing Bans Don't Work, Researcher Says"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

What do you do when you want to trade that cellphone, computer or television in for a newer model? Too often, Americans simply throw these items away, even though many types of electronic waste are technically illegal to trash in many states, said Jean-Daniel Saphores, an applied economist at the University of California-Irvine. But these bans basically don't work, his research has shown, Saphores told LiveScience. Saphores studied the rates of recycling around the United States, and presented his research on the topic, and his proposals to improve e-waste recycling, at a talk yesterday (Sept. 9) at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis.

National Geographic (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 8 million)

"Panda Poop Might Help Turn Plants Into Fuel"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Can panda poop help power the greener vehicles of tomorrow? It just might, scientists say, by yielding microbes that efficiently turn plant waste into biofuel—and the research just might help protect pandas at the same time. “We have discovered microbes in panda feces might actually be a solution to the search for sustainable new sources of energy," Mississippi State University biochemist Ashli Brown, who led the study, told attendees at a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) Tuesday. "It's amazing that here we have an endangered species that's almost gone from the planet, yet there's still so much we have yet to learn from it. That underscores the importance of saving endangered and threatened animals."

More than 10 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits) and Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News (New Rochelle, NY: 22,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits)

"Electric vehicles seen as future racetrack competitors"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Already noted for saving gasoline and having zero emissions, electric cars have a new goal, a U.S. expert says -- success on the world's racetracks. Electric vehicle pioneer John E. Waters said the ability to reach blazing speeds that rival the 0-to-60 performance of a typical Porsche or BMW means electric cars can compete on some racecourses with the world's best gasoline-powered cars. Waters made the remarks at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis.

Mother Nature Network (New York, NY: 2.0 million unique monthly visits)

"Solving the e-waste problem: Trash bans aren't the answer"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

What do you do when you want to trade that cellphone, computer or television in for a newer model? Too often, Americans simply throw these items away, even though many types of electronic waste are technically illegal to trash in many states, said Jean-Daniel Saphores, an applied economist at the University of California-Irvine. But these bans basically don't work, his research has shown, Saphores told LiveScience. Saphores studied the rates of recycling around the United States, and presented his research on the topic, and his proposals to improve e-waste recycling, at a talk yesterday (Sept. 9) at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis.

More than 10 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical Daily (868,200 unique monthly visits)

"Purple Sweet Potato Pigments Could Be Used To Color Foods; Replacing Synthesized Dyes And Bugs"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Last year, Starbucks stopped using cochineal extract to make its Frappuccino pink. In July, it was reported that Dannon yogurt was also using the extract, which is made from crushed up cochineal beetles, to color some of its yogurts. The extract, along with other synthesized food coloring — shades of red, mostly — have long been used to color foods. … “The natural colors industry for foods and beverages is gaining in value as U.S. and international companies move toward sustainable and affordable crop alternatives to synthetic red colors and red colors derived from insects,” Dr. Stephen Talcott, a food chemist at Texas A&M who spoke at a press conference at the American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition, said in a statement.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)

"Artificial Lung Removes CO2 from Smokestacks"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The amazingly efficient lungs of birds and the swim bladders of fish have become the inspiration for a new filtering system to remove carbon dioxide from electric power station smokestacks before the main greenhouse gas can billow into the atmosphere and contribute to global climate change. A report on the new technology, more efficient than some alternatives, was presented at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Nature World News (77,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Obesity combined with exposure to cigarette smoke may pose new health concerns"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

In addition to well-publicized tobacco-related health risks like cancer and cardiovascular disease, new research suggests that obese men and women exposed to smoke could experience issues with their prescription medication or other medical problems. Speaking at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Indianapolis on Wednesday, Aaron Wright of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) explained that those health threats might also apply to “passive” or “second-hand” smoke.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Daily Me (104,400 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Substance that gives grapefruit its flavor and aroma could give insect pests the boot"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The citrus flavor and aroma of grapefruit -- already used in fruit juices, citrus-flavored beverages, and prestige perfumes and colognes -- may be heading for a new use in battling mosquitoes, ticks, head lice and bedbugs thanks to a less expensive way of making large amounts of the once rare and pricey ingredient, scientists say. … The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,993 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Edible coatings for ready-to-eat fresh fruits and vegetables"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Advances in food technology responsible for bringing ready-to-eat fresh-cup apple slices into school cafeterias, grocery stores and fast-food restaurants could soon expand to include other types of fruits and vegetables. Speaking at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Dr. Attila E. Pavlath of the USDA’s Western Regional Research Center in California discussed how edible coatings make it possible to help keep other foods fresh, flavorful and safe for longer periods of time.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"University nonprofit poised to bridge ‘Valley of Death’ and spur drug development"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

With the "Valley of Death" looming as an increasingly serious obstacle to introducing better ways of preventing, diagnosing and treating diseases, a noted scientist today described a new approach for moving promising discoveries out of laboratories and into the hands of patients and physicians. He recently spoke at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis.

More than 10 media outlets, including Daily Me (104,400 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LiveScience (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Can airport security scanner technology help detect skin cancer?"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The technology that is used in airport security scanners has the potential to be a skin cancer diagnostic tool, a scientist is claiming. The scanners use so-called terahertz radiation ("t-rays"), which has the ability to look through human skin and tissue. T-rays are considered non-ionizing, similar to visible light. That means the rays don't have enough energy to remove electrons from molecules, which means they won't mutate our cells. … Rahman discussed the topic at the 246th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Daily Me (104,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Latest research on ingredients that make chocolate, olive oil, tea healthful foods"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The scientific spotlight focuses today on the healthful antioxidant substances in red wine, dark chocolate, olive oil, coffee, tea, and other foods and dietary supplements that are enticing millions of consumers with the promise of a healthier, longer life. The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is holding a symposium on those substances during its 246th National Meeting & Exposition. Reports in the symposium involve substances that consumers know best as "antioxidants," and that scientists term "phenolic derivatives." These ingredients, found naturally in certain foods and sold as dietary supplements, have been linked with health benefits that include reducing the risk of heart disease and cancer.

More than 7 media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)

"American Chemical Society presidential symposium: Career advancement opportunities"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Even though the Great Recession officially ended more than three years ago in the U.S., lingering effects continue to impact careers for thousands of scientists. Advancing those careers for chemists and other scientists is the topic today of a special presidential symposium at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

… TV and Radio News

WWJ-AM (Detroit, MI)

"T-rays offer potential for earlier diagnosis of melanoma"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Technology that underneath clothing at airports that security screening checkpoint has great potential for looking underneath human skin to diagnose cancer at its earliest and most treatable stages. Speaking at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, lead researcher Dr. Anis Rahman explains why Terahertz radiation or T-rays can be very effective when used for diagnostic purposes on humans.

KVIA (ABC) (El Paso, TX: Local Viewership 5,028)

"Could mosquito bites soon be a thing of the past?"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Could mosquito bites soon be a thing of the past? scientists at the American Chemical Society meeting in Indianapolis have announced that a natural substance found in humans may be able to create an "invisibility cloak" to repel the pesky blood- sucking insects. how? by impairing their sense of smell. lactic acid, a component of human sweat, is what makes a person attractive to mosquitoes.

… From the Blogs

Food Ingredients First

"Edible Coatings for Ready-To-Eat Fresh Fruits and Vegetables"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The scientist who turned fresh-cut apple slices into a popular convenience food, available ready-to-eat in grocery stores, school cafeterias and fast-food restaurants, today described advances in keeping other foods fresh, flavorful and safe for longer periods of time through the use of invisible, colorless, odorless, tasteless coatings. The overview of these edible films was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting, which continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels, features almost 7,000 presentations on advances in science and other topics.

The Green Optimistic

"Millions Across The U.S. Unaware of How To Dispose of E-Waste"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Does the Cell Phone Recycling Act from 2003 really work? Apparently not, as research by Jean-Daniel M. Saphores, Ph.D., an economist from University of California, indicates. In his attempt to propose improvements to electronic waste (e-waste) recycling practices, Saphores questioned the U.S. nation about their e-waste recycling habits, their knowledge of policies and penalties and whether people are at all aware of what to do with their unneeded electronic devices. … The findings of the study were presented at the annual National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society held this week in Indianapolis.

Science 2.0

"Substance Behind Flavor And Aroma Of Grapefruit Could Battle Mosquitoes"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Nootkatone, the substance behind the citrus flavor and aroma of grapefruit that is already used in beverages and prestige perfumes, may be heading for a new use in battling mosquitoes, ticks and other pests thanks to a less expensive way of making large amounts of the once rare and pricey ingredient. … "A new product based on nootkatone would have multiple advantages over existing mosquito repellants based on DEET," said Richard Burlingame, Ph.D.,  of Allylix, Inc., a renewable-chemical firm in Lexington, Ky., who presented the report at the meeting of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis.

Science Codex

"Scientific symposium on the toxicology of alternate fuels"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

"Biofuel" has become a global buzzword, with cars and trucks powered by fuel made from corn, corncobs and stalks, switchgrass and even waste oil from cooking french fries, envisioned as a way to stretch out supplies of crude oil and cope with global warming. A symposium being held here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, considers a topic that has received less attention: What are the health and environmental effects of green gasoline, biodiesel and other alternative fuels, and how do they stack up against conventional gasoline and diesel?

Breakthrough Energy News

"The new allure of electric cars: Blazing-fast speeds"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Already noted for saving gasoline and having zero emissions, electric cars have quietly taken on an unlikely new dimension—the ability to reach blazing speeds that rival the 0-to-60 performance of a typical Porsche or BMW, and compete on some racecourses with the world’s best gasoline-powered cars, an authority said here today at a major scientific conference. Speaking at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, electric vehicle pioneer John E. Waters said that relatively recent advances in engineering and use of lithium-ion batteries are producing electric vehicles (EVs) capable of leaving traditional internal combustion engine race cars in the dust.