Indianapolis News Media Coverage

September 13, 2013

Breaking news from ACS’s 246th National Meeting


Time
(New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Honeybees Are Still Hurting, But Backyard (and Rooftop) Beekeepers Can Help"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

As I wrote in my cover story last month, the news has not been good for honeybees, which are still dying off in large and unexplained numbers. New data from Canada underscores the fact that the problem isn’t just American—the major agricultural province of Manitoba lost 46% of its honeybee colonies over the past winter, and nationally, Canadian beekeepers lost 29% of their colonies, around the same rate seen in the U.S.  The one benefit from the now multi-year uptick on bee deaths is that the media and scientists alike are paying more attention to our favorite pollinators. Earlier this week honeybee health was a major focus of the 246th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, which bills itself as the world’s largest scientific society.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)

"Why chocolates, olive oil and tea are healthy for you"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Researchers are focusing on the healthful antioxidant substances in red wine, dark chocolate, olive oil, coffee, tea, and other foods and dietary supplements. The American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, is holding a symposium on those substances during its 246th National Meeting and Exposition. Reports in the symposium involve substances that consumers know best as 'antioxidants,' and that scientists term 'phenolic derivatives.'

More than 10 media outlets, including Deccan Chronicle (India) and Zee News (India) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)

"Cigarette Smoking Among Obese Could Pose Additional Risks, Animal Study Suggests"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Cigarette smoking could pose additional health risks to people who are obese, a new animal lab study suggests. Researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that cigarette smoke could affect metabolism -- including the metabolism of prescription drugs -- and also has the potential to be more carcinogenic for the obese than the non-obese. These findings are based on lung and liver tissues from obese and lean mice that were either not exposed to smoke, that were exposed to direct cigarette smoke, or that were exposed to secondhand smoke. … The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society; because they have yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, they should be considered preliminary.

More than 25 media outlets, including Everyday Health (3.7 million unique monthly visits) and MedIndia (Chennai, India: 1.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

 PBS (U.S.: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)

"Purple sweet potatoes may replace bugs for food coloring"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The spectacular colors in foods on grocery store shelves comes from synthetic dyes, but scientists are now trying to figure out how to extract color from food itself. Some of the more spectacular red colors - like the pink hue of your strawberry-flavored Frappucino - come from the crushed shells of bugs. But naturally purple sweet potatoes, a rarely grown variety, may offer a new food coloring alternative. But extracting that purple is not an easy task, said Stephen Talcott, a food chemist at Texas A&M University. He presented his research on extracting dyes from sweet potatoes at the American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition on Sunday.

Slate (New York, NY: 8.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Save the Pandas! We Need Their Poop."

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

People love pandas. Well OK, not the editor of Slate. But most Americans tend to afford the panda a level of celebrity comparable to that of the British royal family. Which is to say, we want to know about every birth, death, and pregnancy … And yes, now we’re digging through their poo. At least this new level of pandevotion has less to do with cult and more to do with science. At the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society this week, researchers from the University of Mississippi gave a presentation on how microbes in the bear’s feces might help us better break down plant material for biofuel. (Yes, scientists say that pandas really are bears.) Or as the headline of the press release put it, “Panda Poop Microbes Could Make Biofuels of the Future.”

Salon (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits)

"Very important panda poop research"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

It’s been a few years since Ashli Brown and her colleagues began combing through panda poop and got their first signs that the stuff might harbor a renewable energy breakthrough.  Now the researchers are sounding even more confident in the possibilities. They reported from the American Chemical Society meeting in Indianapolis this week that the feces of everyone’s favorite, rare zoo animal, Ailuropoda melanoleuca, “might actually be a solution to the search for sustainable sources of energy.”


More than 25 media outlets, including Earth Techling (Portland, OR: 131,000 unique monthly visits), The Atlantic Cities (Washington, DC: 77,600 unique monthly visits), and Zee News (India) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"DuPont Scientists Receive “Heroes of Chemistry” Honor"

September 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

DuPont scientists who developed the insect control product DuPont™ Rynaxypyr® were named the newest “Heroes of Chemistry,” an award bestowed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The recognition honored the DuPont Crop Protection team for creating Rynaxypyr® – an innovative insect control product that has an excellent environmental profile and protects the global food supply from damaging insects to help feed a global growing population.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Scientific symposium on healthful antioxidants in plant-based foods"

September 12, 2013                                                

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

With millions of people tailoring their diets to include more healthful antioxidants - and these "polyphenols" getting tremendous attention among nutritionists, food scientists and physicians - the world's largest scientific society held a symposium on that topic. The symposium, called "Polyphenolic Chemistry in Food Science: Flavor, Color, and Biofunctional Properties," is part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The meeting continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels. Thousands of scientists and others are expected for the meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Move Over Brita, Cilantro Is Nature’s Water Purifier"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

One favorite ingredient in salsa has been shown to help purify drinking water, according to findings presented at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. Douglas Schauer of Ivy Tech Community College says that cilantro is an inexpensive way to purify drinking water, helping to remove lead and other potentially toxic heavy metals from contaminated H2O. The spice, also known as coriander and Thai parsley, is cheap, widely available, and commonly used in Mexican and Southwest Asian dishes.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), i4u.com (Lewes, DE: 302,600 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Advance in using biopsy samples in understanding environmental causes of cancer"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

In an advance in determining the role of environmental agents in causing cancer, scientists today described development of a long-sought way to use biopsy samples from cancer patients to check on human exposure to substances that damage the genetic material DNA in ways that can cause cancer. Their report on the method, which taps into a treasure trove of medical information in biopsy samples of patients, was part of the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting features almost 7,000 reports on new advances in science and other topics. Being held at the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels, it continues through Thursday.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Sewage treatment removes widely used home and garden insecticides from wastewater"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Even though sewage treatment plants are not designed to remove tiny amounts of pesticides, they do an excellent job of dealing with the most widely used family of home and garden insecticides, scientists have reported. Their study on pyrethroid insecticides -- used in more than 3,500 products -- was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), held in Indianapolis this week.

More than 25 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and i4u.com (Lewes, DE: 302,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Green Building Elements (969,200 unique monthly visits)

"E-Waste Report"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

One of the first analyses of laws banning disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in municipal landfills has found that state e-waste recycling bans have been mostly ineffective, although California’s Cell Phone Recycling Act had a positive impact on cell phone recycling. However, e-waste recycling rates remain “dismally low,” and many demographic groups remain unaware of their alternatives for properly disposing of e-waste, according to the study. Presented here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), it found that providing more information to women and older people could increase the effectiveness of e-waste disposal bans and recycling programs.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)

"Instant Water Purification from a Portable Packet"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

An ambitious partnership among more than 100 organizations and governments led by Procter & Gamble’s (P&G’s) nonprofit program, Children’s Safe Drinking Water (CSDW), has helped provide more than six billion quarts of clean drinking water to families in developing countries, saving an estimated 32,000 lives. And they’re just getting started. CSDW Manager Allison Tummon Kamphuis, has described the organization’s latest accomplishments and future goals at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Toward Making People Invisible to Mosquitoes"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

In an advance toward providing mosquito-plagued people, pets and livestock with an invisibility cloak against these blood-sucking insects, scientists today described discovery of substances that occur naturally on human skin and block mosquitoes' ability to smell and target their victims. … The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 20 media outlets, including Innovation Toronto (Toronto, Canada), and Daily Me (104,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,300 unique monthly visits)

"T-rays Can Potentially Diagnosis Early Melanoma"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The technology that peeks underneath clothing at airport security screening check points has great potential for looking underneath human skin to diagnose cancer at its earliest and most treatable stages, according to new research. The report on efforts to use terahertz radiation— “T-rays”— in early diagnosis of skin cancer was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

… From the Blogs

Daily Democrat

"OK, Jack Daniels, we've found your fingerprints all over that bottle"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Researchers at UC Davis have used the latest analytical tools to develop chemical fingerprints for 60 American whiskeys, providing distinct chemical signatures that reflect the combinations of grains, barrels, aging and other factors that played a role in their distilling. The findings were presented Sept. 9 at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in Indianapolis by Thomas Collins, director of the UC Davis Food Safety and Measurement Facility.

Science 2.0

"Induced Hyposmia In Mosquitoes May Make Humans 'Invisible' To Them"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Mosquitoes may seem like just a nuisance but they are more deadly to humans than any other animal. The Anopheles mosquito, for example, transmits malaria. Ulrich Bernier, Ph.D., who gave the talk at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, said, "Repellents have been the mainstay for preventing mosquito bites. The most widely used repellant, DEET, is quite effective and has been in use for a long time. However, some people don't like the feel or the smell of DEET. We are exploring a different approach, with substances that impair the mosquito's sense of smell. If a mosquito can't sense that dinner is ready, there will be no buzzing, no landing and no bite."

SpectroscopyNOW.com

"ACS issues safety guidelines for research labs"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The American Chemical Society (ACS) has issued new guidelines to help ensure the safety of personnel working in research laboratories. 'Guidelines and standard operating procedures are common in industrial settings where chemicals and pharmaceuticals are manufactured in large amounts, but they are much less common in research laboratories, particularly in academia,' said Kimberly Jeskie, a hazards analysis expert at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and chair of the 12-member task force that developed the guidelines . 'Often, students and staff working in research labs do not identify and evaluate all potential hazards, especially physical hazards, when devising experiments. That is crucial to keep everyone safe and reduce the potential for harm.'

Cooking with Kathy

"New Generation of Natural Colours for Food and Beverages"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Mention purple sweet potatoes, black carrots or purple carrots, and people think of dining on heirloom or boutique veggies. But those plants and others have quietly become sources of a new generation of natural food colorings that are replacing traditional synthetic colors and colors derived from beetles. That back-to-the-future trend is on the agenda here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics, continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels.

…Additional national meeting news stories

NPR (Washington, DC: 32.7 million weekly listeners)

"Chemistry Research Roundup"

September 13, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Chemistry is sometimes called the central science because it sort of connects physics, medicine, astronomy and more and that was on display at the American Chemical Society Conference that wrapped up yesterday. And there was a bunch of really interesting research presented at the meeting from eradicating bed bugs, to using biotechnology for a better insect repellant, to finding a new way to treat AIDS. But you know what we're going to start off with? Whiskey, yeah. They talked about whiskey there. What is the difference chemically between rye, whiskey, bourbon? How does it get its nice mellow flavor and just what's going on in the 53 gallon oak barrel aging for decades? Here to talk about that is Thomas Collins. He's the director of research for the food safety and measurement facility, University California, Davis.

The Wall Street Journal (New York: NY: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)

"A Chemist Sorts Whiskey"

September 14, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

At last, some research you can drink to. A food chemist at the University of California, Davis has teased out the chemical "fingerprints" of 60 American whiskeys in research that could eventually lead to new ways of identifying counterfeit products and customizing whiskeys to appeal to specific market segments. The scientist, improbably named Tom Collins ("that's why I don't work on gin," he says), notes that similar work has focused on the volatile compounds--the stuff you can smell--in whiskeys, but he believes he's the first to identify individual whiskeys using their many nonvolatile compounds, which are more directly related to taste and mouth feel. … Presentation by Thomas Collins to the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, Indianapolis.

More than 25 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and UC Davis (California) covered the story.

Men’s Fitness (U.S.: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Kitchen Herb Could Help Clean Water"

September 14, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Who'd have thought that the same culinary herb used to spice up your salsa could suck hazardous heavy metals out of your tap water, too? That's right—cilantro just might be nature's own Brita filter, according to new research presented at the American Chemical Society national meeting. Cilantro—also known as coriander and Thai parsley—acts as a very effective "biosorbent," a material that absorbs heavy metals in your H20, like lead, copper, and mercury. Douglas Schauer, Ph.D., challenged his students at Ivy Tech Community College to find a low-cost water purification alternative for developing countries. Small-scale experiments conducted by the undergrads, in conjunction with scientists at a Mexican university, found that cilantro might be even more effective than pricier activated carbon, the stuff found in home water filtration systems.

More than 25 media outlets, including MedIndia (Chennai, India: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), and Chemistry World (London, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Edible coatings for ready-to-eat fresh fruits and vegetables"

September 13, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The scientist who turned fresh-cut apple slices into a popular convenience food, available ready-to-eat in grocery stores, school cafeterias and fast-food restaurants, today described advances in keeping other foods fresh, flavorful and safe for longer periods of time through the use of invisible, colorless, odorless, tasteless coatings. The overview of these edible films was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting, which continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels, features almost 7,000 presentations on advances in science and other topics.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Sewage Treatment Removes Widely Used Home And Garden Insecticides From Wastewater"

September 13, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Even though sewage treatment plants are not designed to remove tiny amounts of pesticides, they do an excellent job of dealing with the most widely used family of home and garden insecticides, scientists reported here today. Their study on pyrethroid insecticides — used in more than 3,500 products — was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. “We found that advanced sewage treatment reduced the levels of pyrethroids by more than 97 percent,” said Kurt N. Ohlinger, Ph.D., who presented the results of the study. “That’s a reduction to less than one part per trillion, and pretty impressive.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Translating nature's library yields drug leads for AIDS, cancer, Alzheimer's disease"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

An ingredient in a medicinal tea brewed from tree bark by tribal healers on the South Pacific island of Samoa - studied by scientists over the last 25 years - is showing significant promise as a drug lead in the long-sought goal of eliminating the AIDS virus from its sanctuaries in the body and thus eradicating the disease, a scientist has said. Speaking at the 246th National Meeting & Exhibition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Paul A. Wender, Ph.D., described efficient new ways of making prostratin and related leads, as well as other drug candidates first discovered in sea creatures, that appear even more effective for AIDS and have applications for Alzheimer's disease and cancer.

More than 15 media outlets, including i4u.com (Lewes, DE: 302,600 unique monthly visits) and InnovationToronto.com (Toronto, Canada) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"General in the Solar Army to high school and college students: ‘We are recruiting’"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

High school and college students got a recruiting call today to join the Solar Army and help solve one of the 21st century's greatest scientific challenges: finding the dirt-cheap ingredients that would make sunlight a practical alternative to oil, coal and other traditional sources of energy. It came at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, from a great scientist and pioneer in solar energy research, whose leadership in the Solar Army movement has seen his title sometimes morph from "doctor" to "general."

Chemistry World (London, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits)

"Mosquito repellents from skin secretions"

September 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Those plagued by mosquitoes may one day be able to ditch the DEET in favour of substances naturally produced by skin, according to researchers in the US. Ulrich Bernier, and colleagues, at the US Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, have identified compounds that scramble the senses of mosquitoes so they can’t detect people nearby. They say safer, more effective repellents based on these substances could help reduce the spread of mosquito-borne diseases like malaria. … ‘We’ve looked at different human subjects that varied in attractiveness to mosquitoes, and looked at the chemicals coming off the skin,’ Bernier told the 246th ACS National Meeting & Exposition in Indianapolis, US. ‘From that research we were able to identify about 270 chemicals which we all produce.’         

Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 92,500 unique monthly visits)

"Artificial lung to remove carbon dioxide -- from smokestacks"

September 14, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The amazingly efficient lungs of birds and the swim bladders of fish have become the inspiration for a new filtering system to remove carbon dioxide from electric power station smokestacks before the main greenhouse gas can billow into the atmosphere and contribute to global climate change. A report on the new technology, more efficient than some alternatives, is on the agenda today at the 246th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting, which features almost 7,000 presentations on new advances in science and other topics, continues here through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)

"The Dark Secret of Electric Cars: Astounding Speed"

September 22, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

His colleagues at General Motors thought he was joking when John Waters challenged them to a race: Their high powered Corvettes against his EV1, powered by nothing but an electric motor. The EV1, the first electric car built by GM, was a nice-looking compact, but when parked beside a Corvette, it looked a little like a shy bug. Waters had one rule. The race had to be done in a parking lot, which limited the top speed to about 30 mph. The frequent races became somewhat of a sensation, especially among high school students who would flock to the scene to see the mighty slaughter the weak. … "Experimental electric cars already have achieved sustained speeds of more than 180 miles per hour, and established world speed records above 300 mph," Waters told the national meeting of the American Chemical Society earlier this month in Indianapolis.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Science “Wine Snobs”"

September 17, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Alton Brown’s got our science communication conundrum solved. Brown, celebrity host of Food Network’s Good Eats, Iron Chef America, and Cutthroat Kitchen, recently dropped by the American Chemical Society’s Fall Meeting in Indianapolis. His mission? To celebrate the 90thanniversary of Chemical & Engineering News, long a preferred portal for what’s cool in chemistry each week. Ace C&EN reporter Lauren Wolf cornered Brown in the ACS Bytesize Science studio. She asked him a simple question: How can scientists become better communicators?

Science (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000)

"What Happens When Weed Killers Stop Killing?"

September 20, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Farmers in the United States are heading for a crisis. In parts of the country, weeds resistant to the world's most popular herbicide, glyphosate, now grow in the vast majority of soybean, cotton, and corn fields. Weeds that can shrug off multiple other herbicides are also on the rise. At an American Chemical Society symposium, chemists said they have little to offer: Few new weed killers are near commercialization, and none with a novel molecular mode of action for which there is no resistance.

ABC News (New York, NY: 21 million unique monthly visits)

"The Dark Secret of Electric Cars: Astounding Speed"

September 22, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

His colleagues at General Motors thought he was joking when John Waters challenged them to a race: Their high powered Corvettes against his EV1, powered by nothing but an electric motor. The EV1, the first electric car built by GM, was a nice-looking compact, but when parked beside a Corvette, it looked a little like a shy bug. Waters had one rule. The race had to be done in a parking lot, which limited the top speed to about 30 mph. The frequent races became somewhat of a sensation, especially among high school students who would flock to the scene to see the mighty slaughter the weak. … "Experimental electric cars already have achieved sustained speeds of more than 180 miles per hour, and established world speed records above 300 mph," Waters told the national meeting of the American Chemical Society earlier this month in Indianapolis.

… From the Blogs

Society of Chemical Industry

"Speed and sustainability"

September 12, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Fittingly, the theme of this year’s American Chemical Society (ACS) meeting in Indianapolis, US, and home of the Indy 500 race, is Chemistry in Motion. Speed, perhaps not too surprisingly, also features high on the agenda, as does the environment and sustainability. And now, according to scientists speaking at the meeting, it appears that the two no longer have to be mutually exclusive when it comes to racing cars.

Bubble News

"The Real Reason to Worry About Bees"

September 14, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Honeybees should be on everyone's worry list, and not because of the risk of a nasty sting, an expert on the health of those beneficial insects said in Indianapolis today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Set aside the fact that the honeybee's cousins -- hornets, wasps and yellow jackets -- actually account for most stings, said Richard Fell, Ph.D. Despite years of intensive research, scientists do not understand the cause, nor can they provide remedies, for what is killing honeybees.

Technology.org

"Advance in using biopsy samples in understanding environmental causes of cancer"

September 14, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

In an advance in determining the role of environmental agents in causing cancer, scientists today described development of a long-sought way to use biopsy samples from cancer patients to check on human exposure to substances that damage the genetic material DNA in ways that can cause cancer. Their report on the method, which taps into a treasure trove of medical information in biopsy samples of patients, was part of the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.