Indianapolis News Media Coverage

September 10, 2013

Breaking news from ACS’s 246th National Meeting


NPR
(Washington, DC: 32.7 million weekly listeners)

"Purple Sweet Potato A Contender To Replace Artificial Food Dyes"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

We've grown accustomed to choosing our food from a spectacular rainbow — care for an impossibly pink cupcake, a cerulean blue sports drink or yogurt in preppy lavender? But there's a growing backlash against the synthetic dyes that give us these eye-popping hues. And now scientists are turning to the little-known (and little-grown) purple sweet potato to develop plant-based dyes that can be labeled as nonthreatening vegetable juice. … "Our work with purple sweet potatoes has been going for a couple of years, partially in response to a trend within the food industry to move away from synthetic colors — primarily shades of red," Talcott said Sunday at a press conference at the American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition. "Purple sweet potatoes are a great alternative."

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 11.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Spuds May Get Bugs Out of Food Coloring"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Produce-aisle pigments could replace synthetic dyes and insect-based food coloring. However, the extraction of the colorants from crops poses a challenge to chemists.

Purple sweet potatoes hold particular promise as pigments. Purple sweet potatoes contain anthocyanins, the same chemical that clothes concord grapes in purple and gives raspberries a ruby hue. … Talcott presented his teams’ advances at the American Chemical Society meeting occurring this week in Indiana. The left-overs from Talcott’s process can be fed to livestock, used to produce biofuel or composted.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Hookah Smoke May Be Less Harmful Than Cigarette Tobacco, Contains Lower Levels Of 4 Toxic Metals"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Hookahs, or water pipes, and the tobacco used in them may be considered "the first new tobacco trend of the 21st century" and may be less harmful than cigarettes. In new research presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, hookah tobacco and smoke contain lower levels of four toxic metals than those found in cigarettes. "Any form of smoking is dangerous, and our studies on toxic metals in hookah smoke are taking the first steps toward the necessary animal and human studies that will establish a clearer picture of the relative dangers of hookah and cigarette smoking," Joseph Caruso, Ph.D., who led the study, said in a statement. "It is very difficult to compare hookah smoking with cigarette smoking because they are done so differently."

US News and World Report (New York, NY: monthly circulation 1.27 million)

"Research May Lead to a Mosquito 'Invisibility Cloak'"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Whether a person has "sweet blood," exudes a certain odor or is wired differently genetically, the reason why mosquitoes target certain people remains somewhat of a scientific mystery. In an attempt to further examine this question, researchers have identified chemical compounds in humans that can make a person virtually invisible to the blood-sucking insects. In findings presented at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting Monday, researcher Ulrich Bernier explained that just as some chemical compounds found on a person's skin can lure mosquitoes to feast on a person's flesh, others can essentially block the mosquitoes' sense of smell.

Smithsonian (Washington, D.C.: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)

"This Next-Generation Bug Spray Could Make You Invisible to Mosquitoes"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Mosquitoes are utterly, stupendously annoying. They can also carry diseases, such as malaria and West Nile virus. Some people—those with type O blood and robust colonies of bacteria on their skin, among other traits—are especially prone to getting bitten by them, and there’s growing evidence that many of the insects are evolving resistance to DEET, the main repellant we’ve relied upon for years. … And as he announced today at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, his group has isolated a few chemicals that are naturally present on human skin in trace quantities and appear to inhibit mosquitoes’ capability to smell and locate humans.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), AllVoices.com (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits), and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Everyday Health (3.7 million unique monthly visits)

"New, Natural Food Dyes from Sweet Potatoes"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Orange sweet potato juice is already used to color and flavor some foods including vegetable juice blends. Now, scientists have figured out how to tap the purple sweet potato for natural red dyes and an added nutritional punch without using synthetic dyes. Hadn’t heard of the purple sweet potato? Me neither. But this weekend at the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting, Texas A & M researcher Steve T. Talcott reported that purple sweet potatoes are “becoming an industry standard for color stability with added benefits of a healthy halo that accompanies a vegetable juice concentrate.“

More than 25 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), TruthDive (Green Bay, WI: 24,600 unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Water-Purification Plant The Size Of A Fast-Food Ketchup Packet Saves Lives"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

An ambitious partnership among more than 100 organizations and governments led by Procter & Gamble’s (P&G’s) nonprofit program, Children’s Safe Drinking Water (CSDW), has helped provide more than 6 billion quarts of clean drinking water to families in developing countries, saving an estimated 32,000 lives. And they’re just getting started. CSDW Manager Allison Tummon Kamphuis, R.N., M.B.A., today described the organization’s latest accomplishments and future goals at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The meeting, which features almost 7,000 presentations on new discoveries in chemistry and other topics, continues here through Thursday.

More than 17 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Nature World News (77,100 unique monthly visits), and NewsTrackIndia (India) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Artificial lung to remove carbon dioxide — from smokestacks"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The amazingly efficient lungs of birds and the swim bladders of fish have become the inspiration for a new filtering system to remove carbon dioxide from electric power station smokestacks before the main greenhouse gas can billow into the atmosphere and contribute to global climate change. A report on the new technology, more efficient than some alternatives, is on the agenda today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 7 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"New ‘Artificial Nose’ Device Can Speed Diagnosis Of Sepsis"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Disease-causing bacteria stink — literally — and the odor released by some of the nastiest microbes has become the basis for a faster and simpler new way to diagnose blood infections and finger the specific microbe, scientists reported here today at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The new test produces results in 24 hours, compared to as much as 72 hours required with the test hospitals now use, and is suitable for use in developing countries and other areas that lack expensive equipment in hospital labs.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Chemical & Engineering News celebrates its 90th anniversary"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A weekly news magazine that has been around since before Time began celebrates its 90th anniversary this week with a special issue commemorating chemistry's contributions over the past nine decades to medicine, industry and other scientific advances that have improved people's lives. The magazine is Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), a publication of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. C&EN is also sponsoring a slew of celebratory events here at the ACS' 246th National Meeting & Exposition, which continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels. Among them: A webinar on food fraud and an appearance by Alton Brown, host of the popular Food Network series Iron Chef America.

More than 5 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MedIndia (Chennai, India: 1.2 million unique monthly visits)

"Understanding the Health Effects of Waterpipe and Hookah Smoking"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Hookahs and water pipes are now gaining popularity in the United States and other countries and it may just be the "the first new tobacco trend of the 21st century."  In a study that they said provides no support for the popular notion that hookahs are safer than cigarettes, they reported that hookah tobacco and smoke contain lower levels of four toxic metals than cigarette tobacco and smoke. It was part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, being held here this week.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Advance in using biopsy samples in understanding environmental causes of cancer"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

In an advance in determining the role of environmental agents in causing cancer, scientists today described development of a long-sought way to use biopsy samples from cancer patients to check on human exposure to substances that damage the genetic material DNA in ways that can cause cancer. Their report on the method, which taps into a treasure trove of medical information in biopsy samples of patients, was part of the 246th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 5 media outlets, including Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 828,600 unique monthly visits)

"A New Approach to Early Diagnosis of Influenza"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A new technology is showing promise as the basis for a much-needed home test to diagnose influenza quickly, before the window for taking antiviral drugs slams shut and sick people spread the virus to others, scientists reported. In a presentation at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they described how it also could determine the specific strain of flu virus and help select the most effective drug for treatment. The meeting of the world’s largest scientific society, which features almost 7,000 presentations on new discoveries in science and other topics, continues here through Thursday.

More than 15 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Zee News (India), and TruthDive (Green Bay, WI: 24,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

Indy 500 race cars showcase green fuels"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Mention cars that get barely 3 miles to a gallon and are built for speed rather than cleanliness, and images of gas-guzzling, pollution-belching environmental menaces burning leaded gasoline or nitro may spring to mind. But experts at a major scientific meeting today described how ethanol blends used as fuel in the race cars of the Indianapolis 500 actually make those emissions cleaner than cars on the street. They spoke at a symposium entitled "The Chemistry of Racing," part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting, which features almost 7,000 presentations on new discoveries in science and other topics, continues here through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels.

More than 7 media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

AllVoices.com (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits)

"Translating Nature's Library Yields Drug Leads for AIDS, Cancer, Alzheimer's Disease"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

An ingredient in a medicinal tea brewed from tree bark by tribal healers on the South Pacific island of Samoa — studied by scientists over the last 25 years — is showing significant promise as a drug lead in the long-sought goal of eliminating the AIDS virus from its sanctuaries in the body and thus eradicating the disease, a scientist said here today. Speaking at the 246th National Meeting & Exhibition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Paul A. Wender, Ph.D., described efficient new ways of making prostratin and related leads, as well as other drug candidates first discovered in sea creatures, that appear even more effective for AIDS and have applications for Alzheimer’s disease and cancer.

HealthDay (Norwalk, CT: 124,000 unique monthly visits)

"Recycled Wastewater Safe for Crop Irrigation, Study Says"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Recycled sewage water can safely be used for crop irrigation, according to new research.

In what's thought to be the first study conducted under realistic field conditions, researchers found that crops irrigated with the water discharged from sewage treatment plants contains only low levels of prescription drugs and ingredients commonly found in antibacterial soaps, make-up, shampoos and other personal care products. "The levels of pharmaceuticals and personal care products that we found in food crops growing under real-world conditions were quite low and most likely do not pose any health concern," study leader Jay Gan, from the University of California-Riverside, said in a news release from the American Chemical Society.
More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)

"New Solar Technology Sanitizes Medical Instruments"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

A revolutionary new solar energy technology that turns water into steam without boiling the entire container of water has become the basis for new devices to sanitize medical and dental instruments and human waste in developing countries, scientists say. Prototypes of the devices, which need no electricity or fuel, were the topic of one of the keynote addresses at the opening of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

AllVoices.com (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits)

"Scientific Symposium Today on Healthful Antioxidants in Plant-Based Foods"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

With millions of people tailoring their diets to include more healthful antioxidants — and these “polyphenols” getting tremendous attention among nutritionists, food scientists and physicians — the world’s largest scientific society today is holding a symposium on that topic today. The symposium, called “Polyphenolic Chemistry in Food Science: Flavor, Color, and Biofunctional Properties,” is part of the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The meeting continues through Thursday in the Indiana Convention Center and downtown hotels. Thousands of scientists and others are expected for the meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics.

More than 7 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)

"General in the Solar Army to High School and College Students: 'We Are Recruiting'"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

High school and college students got a recruiting call today to join the Solar Army and help solve one of the 21st century's greatest scientific challenges: finding the dirt-cheap ingredients that would make sunlight a practical alternative to oil, coal and other traditional sources of energy. Harry B. Gray, Ph.D., described the army's mission during the "Kavli Foundation Innovations in Chemistry Lecture" at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

… From the Blogs

Food Processing

"Root vegies the new source of natural colourings"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Heirloom vegetables such as purple sweet potatoes and black or purple carrots may have been embraced by the foodie movement in recent years, but they’ve also been adopted by another group: the food industry. These vegetables have become sources of a new generation of natural food colourings replacing traditional synthetic colours, as well as beetle-derived colours. Speakers at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) described how natural colours that were in use centuries ago are making a resurgence in response to consumer preferences, manufacturers’ needs and the potential health benefits of these antioxidant-rich substances.

Infection Control Today

"New 'Artificial Nose' Device Can Speed Diagnosis of Sepsis"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Disease-causing bacteria stink — literally — and the odor released by some of the nastiest microbes has become the basis for a faster and simpler new way to diagnose blood infections and finger the specific microbe, scientists reported Sept. 8, 2013 at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The new test produces results in 24 hours, compared to as much as 72 hours required with the test hospitals now use, and is suitable for use in developing countries and other areas that lack expensive equipment in hospital labs.

Nascar News Live

"Indy 500 track continues to foster better technology for everyday driving"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

The pavement recipe for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS), home of the Indianapolis 500, could be used to improve the smoothness, durability and safety of some of the 2 million miles of paved roads and streets where people move at ordinary speeds, scientists said here today. In reports at the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), they focused on IMS' heritage and future potential in testing new automotive technology suitable for general transportation use. The meeting, which features almost 7,000 reports on new discoveries in science and other topics, continues here through Thursday.

Science Codex

"21st century vision toxicity testing and risk assessment for agrochemicals"

September 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

How will emerging 21st century toxicity testing technologies impact agricultural products? How do they fit in the life cycle of discovery, regulatory registration and product defense or product stewardship? What's the outlook for improved, science-informed hazard prediction and risk assessment? Those and other topics are on the agenda here today at a symposium during the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society.