News Media Coverage

News and social media coverage of the American Chemical Society’s 245th ACS National Meeting & Exposition in New Orleans set a record. The combined circulation and unique monthly visits for print and electronic media in which stories appeared totaled 5.3 billion. The previous record for a National Meeting was 4.3 billion in Philadelphia. This extraordinary coverage resulted from ACS Office of Public Affairs’ press releases, press conferences, and other publicity. Stories appeared in newspapers, magazines, online news sites, blogs and newsletters, and on cable and commercial TV networks, local station TV and radio stations. We are delighted to share highlights of the coverage, with links to a sampling of the stories.

Glenn Ruskin
Director, Office of Public Affairs
Office of the Secretary and General Counsel
American Chemical Society

National Meeting News, April 8, 2013

Breaking news from ACS’s 245rd National Meeting

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)

"'Patent medicines' study X-rays old-time remedies"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) National Meeting press release


The long-lost secrets of "patent medicines" - products that claimed health benefits in the era prior to regulation - are being revealed. Scientists reporting at the American Chemical Society meeting have examined the contents of dozens of century-old remedies held at a US museum. Some contained high levels of "helpful" elements such as iron or calcium, while others contained arsenic or mercury. The exact recipes are still to be determined by the ongoing project. Mark Benvenuto of the University of Detroit Mercy was approached by staff of the Henry Ford Museum, which houses a vast archive of patent medicines.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)

"Fruit Juice Can Replace Fat in Chocolate, Chemists Say"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Ah, the rich taste of chocolate: cocoa beans, sugar and … fruit juice? Yes, fruit juice could be a new chocolate ingredient, according to research presented Sunday (April 7) at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans. This isn't some gourmet fad like bacon chocolate — it's an attempt to make the sweet treat healthier. Chemistry professor Stefan Bon of the University of Warwick and his colleagues say they've found a way to infuse chocolate with fruit juice, diet cola or vitamin C water to replace up to half the fat normally found in the confection.

More than 25 media outlets, including All Voices (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Royal Society of Chemistry (Cambridge, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and e! Science News  (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)

"'Skinny' Chocolate Made With Fruit Juice Has Half The Fat Of Normal Bars"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

A Willy Wonka-style discovery could lead to "skinny" chocolate bars made with fruit juice instead of fat. Scientists at the University of Warwick have come up with a way to cut half the fat from the confectionery while retaining its "chocolatey" feel. The secret is juice in the form of micro-bubbles that preserve a texture that is firm to bite yet melts in the mouth. Lead researcher Dr. Stefan Bon said: "We have established the chemistry that's the starting point for healthier chocolate confectionery. ... The research was presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, the US.

The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Chemistry conference discusses food, oil, myriad of other subjects in New Orleans"

April 6, 2013

A world-class array of chemical science will be unveiled in New Orleans beginning Sunday, as more than 14,000 scientists gather for the American Chemical Society’s 245th national meeting and exhibition. The five-day conference will feature the results of 12,000 scientific studies involving chemistry on topics ranging from astronomy to zoology. Its sessions will be held at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center and at a number of hotels in downtown New Orleans.

More than 5 media outlets, including Bayoubuzz.com (New Orleans, LA: 78,800 unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)

"Does the Heart Have a Sense of Smell?"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Your nose may not be the only organ able to sense the enticing aromas of roasted coffee or freshly baked bread. Such sensors are also found in the heart, lungs and blood, research shows. "But does this mean that, for instance, the heart 'smells' the steak you just ate? We don't know the answer to that question," Peter Schieberle, a food chemist at the Technical University of Munich and the German Research Center for Food Chemistry, in Germany, said in a statement. Schieberle described the fragrant findings Sunday (April 7) at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 2.1 million unique monthly visits)

"Cells Throughout Body May Detect Smells, Chemists Say"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Your blood may be able to "smell" that fresh coffee or cinnamon bun, a new study suggests.

Scientists have found that blood cells have the same receptors for sensing smells as the nose, and they said there is increasing evidence that these odor receptors are also present in the heart, lungs and other parts of the body. The surprising findings, presented April 7 at an American Chemical Society meeting in New Orleans, suggest that odors may play a far more important role in life than previously believed.

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 11.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Heart, Lungs May Be Able to Smell Food"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Ever get that warm feeling in your chest when you get a whiff of brewing coffee or fresh cinnamon rolls baking in the oven? It could, in fact, be your heart "smelling." New research has found that some of our internal organs, including our hearts and lungs may have the ability to smell foods and drinks. Olfactory receptors, previously thought to only exist in the nose and which allow us to sense odors, have been found in other parts of the human body, according to the research, presented this week at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 2.1 million unique monthly visits)

"Potions From the Past Held More Than a Snake-Oil Promise"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Researchers applying 21st-century science to investigate a collection of 19th-century medicines discovered that the antique jars held both noxious and promising potions once sold as quick cures for everything from commonplace to dreaded diseases. The colorful collection of old and ornate medicine jars was stored in the back halls of the Henry Ford Museum, in Dearborn, Mich., as part of the facility's "Health Aids" collection. Mark Benvenuto, a professor of chemistry at the University of Detroit, Mercy, worked with undergraduate students to analyze the contents of 25 of the containers. Using X-ray fluorescence for the solid materials and nuclear magnetic resonance for the liquids, they spent only about five minutes per container to identify each container's chemical content, he said. The results of their findings are slated to be presented April 7 at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

Health Magazine  (New York, NY: Monthly circulation 6 million)

"Potions From the Past Held More Than a Snake-Oil Promise"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Researchers applying 21st-century science to investigate a collection of 19th-century medicines discovered that the antique jars held both noxious and promising potions once sold as quick cures for everything from commonplace to dreaded diseases. The colorful collection of old and ornate medicine jars was stored in the back halls of the Henry Ford Museum, in Dearborn, Mich., as part of the facility’s “Health Aids” collection. Mark Benvenuto, a professor of chemistry at the University of Detroit, Mercy, worked with undergraduate students to analyze the contents of 25 of the containers. Using X-ray fluorescence for the solid materials and nuclear magnetic resonance for the liquids, they spent only about five minutes per container to identify each container’s chemical content, he said. The results of their findings are slated to be presented April 7 at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

Guardian (London, U.K.: daily circulation 283,063)

"Food Security: enough on our plates?"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

American households, according to a speaker at the American Chemical Society's meeting in New Orleans on Sunday, throw away 40% of the food they buy. For the average family of four, that adds up to 20lb by weight, or $2,000 (£1,300) a year. This is food uneaten and spoiled in refrigerators, or scraped off the plate into the waste bin. This happens in a country in which 46 million people cannot be sure of a decent meal and in which one child in five lives in poverty. Britain is not much better: half of all the food discarded in this country goes into domestic dustbins: altogether, 7m tonnes of food is wasted every year. Here, one child in four lives in poverty.

More than 10 media outlets, including Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), and Phys.Org  (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

EveryDayHealth.com  (New York, NY: 5.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Potions From the Past Held More Than a Snake-Oil Promise"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Researchers applying 21st-century science to investigate a collection of 19th-century medicines discovered that the antique jars held both noxious and promising potions once sold as quick cures for everything from commonplace to dreaded diseases. The colorful collection of old and ornate medicine jars was stored in the back halls of the Henry Ford Museum, in Dearborn, Mich., as part of the facility's "Health Aids" collection. Mark Benvenuto, a professor of chemistry at the University of Detroit, Mercy, worked with undergraduate students to analyze the contents of 25 of the containers. Using X-ray fluorescence for the solid materials and nuclear magnetic resonance for the liquids, they spent only about five minutes per container to identify each container's chemical content, he said. The results of their findings are slated to be presented April 7 at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.


More than 20 media outlets, including U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: monthly circulation 1.27 million), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Royal Society of Chemistry  (Cambridge, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits), and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)

"Does heart `smell` food we eat?"  

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Scientists have found that heart, blood, lung and other cells in the body have the same receptors for sensing odours that exist in the nose. The discovery suggests that odours may have a far more important role in life than previously believed. ... He presented the study at the 245th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.


More than 25 media outlets, including ABC Science (Sydney, Australia, 391,000 unique monthly visits), Live Science (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress  (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Indian Express (India: 218,000 unique monthly visits), e! Science News  (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex  (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Royal Society of Chemistry (Cambridge, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits)

"Beer filtration could add arsenic"           

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

The Germans take the purity of their beer seriously. Back in the 16th century the Reinheitsgebot, or beer purity law, specified that the only ingredients that could be used in beer were water, barley and hops. Once it was realized that yeast was involved in the brewing process that was allowed as well. Today, the Provisional German Beer Law allows slightly different components but it certainly doesn't specify that arsenic can be added to the beer. ... The puzzle was that when the team analyzed the water, malt and hops used, they couldn't make the amount of arsenic in those ingredients add up to the level of arsenic in the beers. The answer, says Coelhan at the 245th ACS National Meeting & Exposition in New Orleans, US, lies in the material used to filter the beers after fermentation, kieselguhr.


More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Communicating the Science of the '6x°C Egg'"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Why does the "65-degree egg" and its "6X°C" counterparts continue to entice chefs and diners at chic restaurants, when the science underpinning that supposed recipe for perfection in boiling an egg is flawed? It all boils down to the need for greater society-wide understanding of basic scientific concepts, an expert said in New Orleans on April 7 at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. And in one of the keynote addresses at the meeting, which features almost 12,000 scientific reports, César Vega, Ph.D., explained why cooking ranks as an ideal way of fostering broader awareness about science.


More than 5 media outlets, including e! Science News  (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Engineering algae to make the 'wonder material' nanocellulose for biofuels and more"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Genes from the family of bacteria that produce vinegar, Kombucha tea and nata de coco have become stars in a project—which scientists today said has reached an advanced stage—that would turn algae into solar-powered factories for producing the "wonder material" nanocellulose. Their report on advances in getting those genes to produce fully functional nanocellulose was part of the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits),

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Zee News (India: 758,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

 

WYPR-FM (Baltimore, MD)

"Chocolate"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

 

[KOPB-FM (Portland, OR) also covered the item.]

A new method of making chocolates that enables them to cut the fat content, researchers told a meeting of the American Chemical Society that liquid can replace the fat. Jason, reports here's the problem with chocolate what makes it velvety and smooth in the mouth is exactly what ends up elsewhere. Low-fat versions disappoint because it's difficult to replace globules of fat with anything else that disperses within the chocolate and maintained its texture. The trick it seems is to use agar to widely available gelling agent thoroughly blended bits of it. The researcher say practice tiny sponges would soak up any liquid fruit juice plain water even alcohol. Stephan Bon, the research, said the method opens up whole new markets for chocolate and additives such as fruit juice could further increase chocolate health credentials. 

 

… From the Blogs

 

Biofuels Digest

"Nanocellulose and biofuels highlighted at ACS Exposition"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

In Louisiana, Dr. R. Malcom Brown, Jr. presented on nanocellulose’s applications in the world of biofuels at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. Brown’s research team has already genetically engineered cyanobacteria to produce one form of nanocellulose, which can become the raw material for biofuels. Despite advances in the industry, Brown expressed concern that “one of the major barriers to commercializing nanocellulose fuels involves national policy and politics, rather than science.”

Skeptic Blog

"What was in patent medicines"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

What was actually in Thompson’s Cattle Powder, Hostetter’s Stomach Bitters, or Hamlin’s Wizard Oil? Prior to regulation by the FDA, over-the-counter medicine in this country was largely a creation of small businesses. There was a large variety of so-called “patent medicine,” each a proprietary blend of – what? … A study presented recently at a meeting of the American Chemical Society reports the analysis of 50 different patent medicines from a collection in the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn Mich. 

Science Blog

"Wonks test olde timey medicines to see what they actually do"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

What was in Dr. F. G. Johnson’s French Female Pills and other scientifically untested elixirs, nostrums and other quack cures that were the only medicines available to sick people during the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries? Scientists provided a glimpse today based on an analysis of a museum collection of patent medicines used in turn-of-the-century America. It was part of the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, which is being held here this week.

 

National Meeting News

April 9, 2013

 

Breaking news from ACS’s 245th National Meeting

 
TIME
(New York, NY: 70.5 million unique monthly visits)

"One Step Closer to Guilt-Free Chocolate"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) National Meeting press release

It may soon be possible to have your chocolate and eat it too, thanks to a “healthier” version with all the benefits and half the fat. Reporting at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, researchers from the University of Warwick in Britain say they have developed a way of infusing the rich sweet with fruit juice, vitamin C water, and diet cola that replaces up to 50% of chocolate’s fat content but still maintains that smooth, melt-in-your-mouth taste.

NPR (Washington, D.C.: 32.7 million weekly listeners)

"Reduced Guilt? Chocolate Gets A Healthy, Fruity Makeover"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Chocoholics, rejoice! British scientists have developed a new fruit-juice-infused chocolate that they say has up to 50 percent less fat than the regular stuff. And it's tasty, too. The scientists, led by University of Warwick's Stefan Bon, created the hybrid chocolate using a blender to generate microscopic droplets of fruit juice fine enough to blend into molten chocolate. Bon and his team presented their research on Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans. According to Bon, these "micro-bubbles" of juice preserve that oh-so-satisfying velvety texture of chocolate, while also replacing much of the fat content. "This approach maintains the things that make chocolate 'chocolatey,' but with fruit juice instead of fat," he explains.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)

"Chocolate and agar recipe can halve the fat"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Chemists have found a new way to halve the fat of chocolate using liquids which does not change the "mouthfeel". Low-fat preparations of chocolate are well known, but their textures tend not to match the real thing. A report at an American Chemical Society meeting described a method using the popular gelling agent agar to make tiny "sponges" that displace fat. University of Warwick researchers said water, fruit juice or even alcohol could replace up to half the fat. When used with alcohol, Stefan Bon said they were like "tiny vodka jellies".

NBC News (New York, NY: 40.1 million unique monthly visits)

"Fruit juice for healthier chocolate? Sweet!"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Ah, the rich taste of chocolate: cocoa beans, sugar and … fruit juice? Yes, fruit juice could be a new chocolate ingredient, according to research presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans. This isn't some gourmet fad like bacon chocolate — it's an attempt to make the sweet treat healthier. Chemistry professor Stefan Bon of the University of Warwick and his colleagues say they've found a way to infuse chocolate with fruit juice, diet cola or vitamin C water to replace up to half the fat normally found in the confection.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)

"Now chocolate can be one of your five-a-day: Scientists create bars without the fat that are made from fruit juice"

April 7, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Struggling to get the kids to eat their five-a-day? Scientists may well have invented a novel solution that will certainly provide a small boost to their intake - chocolate made with fruit juice. And it is better for their waistline too, as the tiny droplets of juice - apple, orange and cranberry - are used to replace up to half of the bar's fat content. ... Speaking about the technique at national meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, lead researcher Dr Stefan Bon said: 'We have established the chemistry that's a starting point for healthier chocolate confectionary.


More than 30 media outlets, including International Business Times ( U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, D.C. : 972,800 unique monthly visits), Red Orbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Express (U.K. 114,400 unique monthly visits), and E Max Health (Hickory, NC:  148,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)

"An explosion in oil-munching bacteria made fast work of BP oil spill, scientist says"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Much of the oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico after the Deepwater Horizon explosion in 2010 disappeared within weeks of the capping of BP Macondo well on July 15, digested by a massive explosion in oil-eating microorganisms, said Terry Hazen, a professor of environmental biology at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, during a Monday panel at the national conference of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), All Voices (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Reducing food waste could feed millions"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

The Times of India has reported on April 8, 2013, Reducing food waste may feed hungry billions. An expert described what is an often-invisible waste in food, 4 out of every 10 pounds produced in the United States alone, and the challenges which exist in feeding a global population of nine billion people, in a keynote talk at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. John Floros, Ph.D., has said, "We will need another "Green Revolution" to feed the world by 2050." Dr. Floros was referring to the development of high-yield, disease-resistant breeds of grain and other agricultural innovations which took root back in the 1960s.


More than 5 media outlets, including Red Orbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 unique monthly visits)

"Does the heart have a sense of smell?"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Your nose may not be the only organ able to sense the enticing aromas of roasted coffee or freshly baked bread. Such sensors are also found in the heart, lungs and blood, research shows. "But does this mean that, for instance, the heart 'smells' the steak you just ate? We don't know the answer to that question," Peter Schieberle, a food chemist at the Technical University of Munich and the German Research Center for Food Chemistry, in Germany, said in a statement. Schieberle described the fragrant findings Sunday, April 7, at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

Discover Magazine (New York, NY: 850,000 monthly circulation)

"Blood Cells Are Attracted to Good Food Smells"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

The nose is made for whiffing odors, but apparently it is not the only organ in the human body with a sense of smell. Researchers in Germany have found that heart, lung and blood cells, among others, also have olfactory receptors. ... But in recent years scientists have learned that your nose is not alone when it comes to its ability to sniff. For example, human sperm rely on olfactory cells to interpret chemical cues that help them find and wiggle their way toward unfertilized eggs. Now researchers in Germany say cells in our blood, heart and lungs share a similar sense of smell, according to their findings presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society over the weekend.


More than 20 media outlets, including Red Orbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits) and The National (Abu Dhabi, UAE: 286,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

 

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)

"New chocolate recipe halves the fat"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Scientists have found a way to halve the fat content of chocolate without compromising the treat's silky texture.  New technology allows manufacturers to replace up to 50 percent of the fat with fruit juice, vitamin C, water or diet cola.  Stefan A. F. Bon, from the University of Warwick, said: "This approach maintains the things that make chocolate 'chocolatey', but with fruit juice instead of fat. ... Dr Bon unveiled his research at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)

"The Next World-Changing Supermaterial Is Grown, Not Made"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Watch out graphene; something’s coming to eat your supermaterial lunch. Nanocellulose is poised to be the kevlar-strength, super-light, greenhouse gas-eating nanomaterial of the future. And the best part? It’s made by nothing but algae. Already being heralded as a “wonder material” by scientists involved, nanocellulose was shown off last week at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, a meeting of the world’s largest scientific society. R. Malcolm Brown, Jr., who’s been involved in the material’s development for some 40 years, is pretty stoked about the recent progress.

Smithsonian (Washington, D.C. : 1.7 million unique monthly visits)

"What’s in Century-Old ‘Snake Oil’ Medicines? Mercury and Lead"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

If you suffered from a medical ailment in the year 1900, your treatment options were varied: You could take everything from Dr. Tutt’s Liver Pills to Hollister’s Golden Nugget Tablets, Dr. Sawen’s Magic Nerving Pills or Dr. Comfort’s Candy-Covered Cathartic Compound. ... But now, at least, we do. Mark Benvenuto, a chemist at University of Detroit Mercy, recently led a research group that chemically analyzed several dozen patent medicines dating to the late 1800s and early 1900s from the Henry Ford Museum‘s collections. Their findings, which they presented yesterday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Atlanta, were that many of the pills, powders and ointments tested had beneficial ingredients like calcium and zinc—but that others had toxins such as lead, mercury and arsenic.

Red Orbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Dissolvable Electronics May Be The Wave Of The Future"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Imagine a world where an electronic device disappears after it’s no longer needed. That world may be closer than you think. New “transient electronics” are in experimental stages, and were presented at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) annual meeting in New Orleans. The new transient electronics were shown among 12,000 reports on new scientific advances and other presentations. Transient electronics have a number of uses, including medical devices injected to relieve pain, or fight an infection; or producing products with a pre-engineered service life. After use, these small chips simply disintegrate. In the case of a medical use, it might dissolve harmlessly in the bloodstream or tissue to be processed out by the body.

More than 10 media outlets, including Geek O System (New York, NY: 865,700 unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex(US: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Egyptian Wedding Certificate Key to Authenticating Controversial Biblical Text"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

A scientist who helped verify authenticity of the fabled Gospel of Judas today revealed how an ancient Egyptian marriage certificate played a pivotal role in confirming the veracity of inks used in the controversial text. The disclosure, which sheds new light on the intensive scientific efforts to validate the gospel, was made in New Orleans on April 8 at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).


More than 3 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)

"American Chemical Society's highest honor goes to pioneer of 'Lego-like' molecules"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Peter J. Stang, Ph.D., distinguished professor of chemistry at the University of Utah and editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), has been named winner of the 2013 Priestley Medal by the American Chemical Society (ACS). It is the highest honor bestowed by the world's largest scientific society. Stang will receive the award and present an address tonight during a banquet and ceremony that are part of the ACS' 245th National Meeting & Exposition, being held here this week. The ceremony will honor recipients of other ACS national awardrecipients for outstanding contributions to chemistry.


More than 3 other media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)

"“Artificial leaf” gains ability to self-heal damage, produce energy from dirty water"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Another innovative feature has been added to the world’s first practical “artificial leaf,” making the device even more suitable for providing people in developing countries and remote areas with electricity, scientists reported  at the American Chemical Society’s National Meeting & Exposition this week. It gives the leaf the ability to self-heal damage that occurs during production of energy. Daniel G. Nocera, Ph.D., described the advance during the “Kavli Foundation Innovations in Chemistry Lecture” at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. About 14,000 scientists and others are expected for the meeting, which continues through Thursday with almost 12,000 reports on advances in science.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

 

 Great Lakes Echo

"Toxic chemicals turn up in Great Lakes plastic pollution"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Toxic chemicals clinging to plastics could cause health problems for fish and other organisms in the Great Lakes. They were discovered in samples from the first-ever Great Lakes plastic survey in Lake Erie, Lake Huron and Lake Superior last summer, Lorena Rios Mendoza, an assistant chemistry professor at the University of Wisconsin – Superior, announced Monday. And instead of just sitting in sediments as some scientists previously thought, those pollutants might be traveling with plastics to other parts of the Great Lakes. Rios Mendoza presented the survey results at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting.

The Verge

"Born to die: how self-destructing electronics will transform medicine, war, and more"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Right now, electronics are built to last. Soon, however, their lifespan might be more fleeting — courtesy of burgeoning research into "transient electronics," or devices meant to serve a specific function before completely dissolving into their environment over a predetermined span of weeks, months, or even years. In fact, your own body might be one of the first places these devices are deployed. ... Research into such devices has made rapid progress, meaning that preliminary versions of vanishing electronics might be available within the next few years. In a presentation at the annual conference of the American Chemical Society, Rogers shared tantalizing details of new progress in transient electronic development, including successful tests on animal subjects and wireless power systems integrated into the devices, offering energy without relying on an external electricity source.

Food World News

"Heart and Lungs Can Smell Food; Blood Cells Attracted to Pungent Aromas"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

A new research study presented at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans has shown some shocking new evidence in regards to the ways we smell foods, according to Discovery News. Previously, researchers thought humans could only smell food through the nose. However, new research shows that we possess olfactory receptors in other organs throughout our body, such as the heart and lungs.

National Meeting News, April 10, 2013

 

Breaking news from ACS’s 245th National Meeting

 

BBC (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)

"US chemistry meeting tackles science of booze"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

It was a cocktail party of a decidedly muted and academic sort. The session called Chemistry at the Bar proved popular with some of the 14,000 scientists at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans - itself the birthplace of some powerful concoctions. And if you've ever made a cocktail, that puts you in league with them. "Making cocktails is something like chemistry at its simplest… adding different ingredients together, experimenting - that's how they've evolved over the years to become as popular as they have," said Neil Da Costa of International Flavors and Fragrances.

More than 15 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.:10.4 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (US: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)

"National Awards for Incorporating Sustainability Into Chemical Education"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Strolling down Decatur Street in the French Quarter on a sunny spring day, it's not hard to appreciate New Orleans as "The Big Easy." Easy jazz mixes with Cajun aromas wafting out wide-open doors of bistros, restaurants, and pubs. The weather is quite agreeable this week as New Orleans plays host to both the NCAA Women's Final Four and the spring National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ... Part of the ACS mission is to "advance the broader chemistry enterprise and its practitioners for the benefit of Earth and its people." I would like to shine the spotlight on a select group of these "practitioners"; namely, educators.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: daily circulation 2.1 million)

"Another reason to go to work on an egg - it could lower your blood pressure"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Egg whites could lower blood pressure in the same way as medication, new research has found. A key component found in the whites was found to have the same blood pressure lowering properties as Captopril, a high blood-pressure drug. Dr Zhipeng Yu, who led the research at China's Jilin University, said: 'Our research suggests that there may be another reason to call it 'the incredible, edible egg'. ...The findings were presented to the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in New Orleans.

UPI (Washington, D.C.: 972,000 unique monthly visits)

"U.S. family trashes 20 lbs. of food/month"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


The average U.S. family throws away 20 pounds of food a month or about $2,000 worth every year for a family of four, a researcher says. John Floros, dean of the College of Agriculture at Kansas State University, said U.S. households, supermarkets, restaurants, other food-service providers throw away about 4 out of every 10 pounds of food produced each year. ... Floros presented his findings at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.


BBC
(London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)

"Deepwater Horizon: Gulf of Mexico 'deep-cleaned' itself"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

New details have emerged about "self-cleaning" effects in the Gulf of Mexico witnessed in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Researchers reporting at the American Chemical Society conference revealed details of a cascade of micro-organisms that spring into action to degrade oil. Research has also outlined how chemical "dispersants" used in clean-up efforts actually frustrate these processes. However, the long-term effects of the weeks of oil exposure remain unknown.

EveryDayHealth.com (New York, NY: 5.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Green Coffee Supplements: Science Doesn't Support the Buzz"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Green coffee bean supplements, the latest weight loss craze to lure dieters, may also improve blood sugar levels, according to new research. The latest findings could send people with type 2 diabetes flocking to the drugstore to pick up a bottle, but experts say you’re better off waiting to see if the science catches up to the hype. ... The results were presented today at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans. The study, like Vinson's earlier weight loss trial, was conducted in India and funded by Applied Food Sciences, Inc., a company that manufactures green coffee extract.


More than 15 media outlets, including Red Orbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), and  Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Polluting Plastic Particles Invade The Great Lakes"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Floating plastic debris — which helps populate the infamous “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” in the Pacific Ocean — has become a problem in the Great Lakes, the largest body of fresh water in the world. Scientists reported on the latest findings from the Great Lakes here today at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. “The massive production of plastic and inadequate disposal has made plastic debris an important and constant pollutant on beaches and in oceans around the world, and the Great Lakes are not an exception,” said Lorena M. Rios Mendoza, Ph.D., who spoke on the topic at the meeting. It continues here through Thursday, with 12,000 presentations on new advances in science and other topics.

More than 15 media outlets, including UPI (Washington, D.C.: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)

"Egg white protein can lower blood pressure"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Here is another reason why you should include eggs in your diet! Egg white protein can lower your blood pressure as effectively as low doses of medication, according to a new study. "We have evidence from the laboratory that a substance in egg white - it's a peptide, one of the building blocks of proteins - reduces blood pressure about as much as a low dose of Captopril, a high-blood-pressure drug," said study leader Zhipeng Yu, of Jilin University. ... The study was presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily(Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Health24.com (Cape Town, South Africa: 157,000 unique monthly visits)

"Blood cells 'smell' like your nose"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Your blood may be able to "smell" that fresh coffee or cinnamon bun, a new study suggests. Scientists have found that blood cells have the same receptors for sensing smells as the nose, and they said there is increasing evidence that these odor receptors are also present in the heart, lungs and other parts of the body. The surprising findings, presented at an American Chemical Society meeting in New Orleans, suggest that odors may play a far more important role in life than previously believed.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)

"'Artificial leaf' gains the ability to self-heal damage and produce energy from dirty water"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Another innovative feature has been added to the world’s first practical “artificial leaf,” making the device even more suitable for providing people in developing countries and remote areas with electricity, scientists reported here today. It gives the leaf the ability to self-heal damage that occurs during production of energy. Daniel G. Nocera, Ph.D., described the advance during the “Kavli Foundation Innovations in Chemistry Lecture” at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. About 14,000 scientists and others are expected for the meeting, which continues through Thursday with almost 12,000 reports on advances in science.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

 

… TV and Radio News

 

WMAQ-CHI (NBC) (Chicago, IL: daily viewership 203,261)

"You may actually smell with your whole body"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

[KTVT-DAL (CBS) (Dallas, TX: daily viewership 112,399) and WVUE-NO (FOX) (New Orleans, LA: daily viewership 32,603) also covered the story.]

When something stinks, you hold your nose. But new research finds that you may actually smell with your whole body. Research from the American Chemical Society finds that receptors for smell are located in our blood cells, in our heart and in our lung as well as the nose. It's not clear what purpose these receptors would serve but scientists would like to know if the heart can sniff out the difference between a rose and a garbage dump.

WGN (Chicago, IL: daily viewership 124,907)

"Green coffee beans can help you stave off diabetes"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

[CLTV (Chicago, IL: daily viewership 30,293) also covered the story.]

Green coffee beans can help you stave off diabetes and lose weight. They are available and scientists put them to the test. Findings presented at the American Chemical Society revealed there is a natural substance in unroasted coffee beans that controls blood sugar levels. Drinking coffee can protect from type two diabetes but the effect is more powerful from unroasted coffee beans.

WVUE-NO (FOX) (New Orleans, LA: daily viewership 37,874)

"Replace up to 50 percent of the fat in with fruit chocolate juice"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

[KVIA (ABC) (El Paso, TX: daily viewership 8,963) also covered the story.]

Replace up to 50 percent of the fat in with fruit chocolate juice, vitamin c, water or diet cola. They also say the process does not compromise the treat's silky texture. The scientists are presenting their findings at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

… From the Blogs

 

Biofuels Digest

"A new suit for the Man of Steel?"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

A long-known, biobased, microscopic “super-material” may become highly affordable and scalable. Perfect for both Superman’s needs and Clark Kent’s budget. ... Imagine something with even a wider set of uses, but all those characteristics. In fact, we could even use it as a food, or as a basis for energy. And, we’re getting quite close to a process to make it abundantly. Using primarily water and CO2. By now, you might have guessed that we are referring to the strange world of nanocellulose. As was reported this week out of an American Chemical Society symposium.

Nanotechnology Now

"New approach to testing health, environmental effects of nanoparticles"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Earlier efforts to determine the health and environmental effects of the nanoparticles that are finding use in hundreds of consumer products may have produced misleading results by embracing traditional toxicology tests that do not take into account the unique properties of bits of material so small that 100,000 could fit in the period at the end of this sentence. That was among the observations presented here today at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, by one of the emerging leaders in nanoscience research. The talk by Christy Haynes, Ph.D., was among almost 12,000 presentations at the gathering, which organizers expect to attract more than 14,000 scientists and others.

Science Codex

"Natural soil bacteria pump new life into exhausted oil wells"

April 8, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Technology that enlists natural soil bacteria as 21st century roughnecks now is commercially available and poised to recover precious oil remaining in thousands of exhausted oil wells, according to a scientist who spoke here today. His report on a process termed microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) was part of the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society.

Special National Meeting Edition: ACS in the News

April 15, 2013

 

Breaking news from ACS’s 245th National Meeting

 

MSN News (New York, NY: 116.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Researchers replace half the fat in chocolate with fruit"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) National Meeting press release

Researchers said they were able to make chocolate healthier by replacing up to 50 percent of its fat content with fruit juice. Scientists are close to removing the guilt from chocolate while keeping the pleasure. At a meeting of the American Chemical Society, researchers described a method of swapping some of the fat content of chocolate with liquids. That could replace up to half the fat in chocolate with something healthier, according to the report at the ACS meeting.

 

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)

"I Went to the Great Lakes and All I Got Was This Lousy Pile of Plastic"

April 13, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

I grew up on Lake Michigan and have spent hundreds of days trolling its northern white sand beaches on foot and by small boat. Gazing out at the horizon from its shore—like any of the Great Lakes, including Erie, Superior, Huron and Ontario, the largest collection of fresh water lakes in the world—it feels like you are standing on the edge of a vast ocean. In fact, the Great Lakes are referred to by some as America’s “third coast.” Now, thanks to a report by the American Chemical Society, the Great Lakes have more in common with the oceans than just the appearance of an endless horizon.


More than 15 media outlets, including UPI (Washington, D.C.: 972,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)

"Lead Found In Rice Imported From China, Taiwan, Bhutan, Indian, Italy, And Thailand"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Rice imported from some countries contains high levels of lead that could pose a health risk to children, researchers have claimed. US experts detected concentrations of lead ranging from six to 12 milligrams per kilogram in rice from several sources. ... The findings were presented today at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans.

BBC News (London, UK 55 million unique monthly visits)

"US rice imports 'contain harmful levels of lead'"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Analysis of commercially available rice imported into the US has revealed it contains levels of lead far higher than regulations suggest are safe. Some samples exceeded the "provisional total tolerable intake" (PTTI) set by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by a factor of 120. The report at the American Chemical Society Meeting adds to the already well-known issue of arsenic in rice.

TIME (New York, NY: weekly circulation 3.36 million)

"Worrisome Levels of Lead Found In Imported Rice"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

An analysis of imported brands found surprising levels of the metal. Reporting at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, a group of researchers lead by Tsanangurayi Tongesayi, an associate professor of chemistry at Monmouth University in New Jersey announced the results of their analysis of rice from Asia, Europe and South America. The imports, which currently make up about 7% of rice consumed in America, contained higher than acceptable levels of lead.

NPR (Washington, D.C: 32.7 million weekly listeners)

"Patent Medicines Get A Belated Chemical Checkup"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

The patent medicines sold in days gone by may, contrary to the name, not have had real government patents. But that didn't stop their makers from claiming the concoctions could cure ailments ranging from indigestion to jaundice and fever. ... Because the mixture of organic substances proved to be a challenge, research on them is ongoing. The preliminary results were recently presented at the American Chemical Society's National Meeting & Exposition in New Orleans.

 

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)

"Egg White Protein May Help Lower Blood Pressure"

April 14, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

A compound in egg whites may help lower blood pressure as effectively as a common medication, according to new research presented at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans. The findings, which have not been independently reviewed, suggest that combining egg whites with medicine could be a potent one-two punch in fighting high blood pressure in humans, the researchers said.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits),

News Max Health (Florida: 1.6 million unique monthly visits), Hindustan Times (India: 339,000 unique monthly visits), Zee News (India: 799,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

 

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)

"High levels of lead have been detected in some imported rice"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Mayo Clinic writes that lead poisoning occurs when lead builds up in the body, generally over a period of months or years. Even small amounts of lead can lead to serious health problems. Children who are under the age of six are particularly vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can severely affect mental and physical development. At extremely high levels, lead poisoning can be fatal. In a press release on April 10, 2013, the American Chemical Society has reported, High levels of lead detected in rice imported from certain countries.


More than 25 media outlets, including LA Weekly (Los Angeles, CA: 112,000 unique monthly visits), The Scotsman (Edinburgh, U.K: daily circulation 45,352), and Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 11.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Implantable Electronics Disappear in the Body"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Imagine pain-relieving electronics devices that go into your body, work, and then disappear completely when they’re done. This week scientists showed off advancements in what they’re calling “transient electronics.” Materials scientists and biomedical engineers presented key advancements they’d made in creating disappearing devices at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans on Monday. Engineering professor John A. Rogers is leading the research with colleagues from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He’s known for creating unusual electronics, including ones that can be printed on skin.

NBC News (New York, NY: 10 million unique monthly visits)

"We need more research on hangovers, scientist argues"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Everyone seems to have a go-to hangover remedy. Some people swear a Prairie Oyster—raw egg, Worcestershire sauce, and a splash of hot sauce—makes the nausea and headache subside (or maybe the beverage is so disgusting people forget they’re hung over?). Others believe a greasy breakfast makes them feel OK again. Still some crack open a beer, believing that only the hair of the dog can help them. But are all these efforts useless? Is it even possible to get rid of a hangover? Every year U.S. companies lose an estimated $148 billion on hangovers, says Alyson Mitchell, but experts know little about them. Hangovers cost so much because so many people miss work and if they do show, they flub basic tasks because being hung over makes people a bit, well, stupid. That's just one example of why we need more research on hangovers, Mitchell argued during a presentation at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting.

 

CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

""Hangover soup" Yak-a-mein actually works, scientist says"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Hangovers can be very unpleasant, causing nausea, pounding headaches and exhaustion after a big night out on the town. One remedy that's popular in some parts of the country such as New Orleans is chowing down on a big bowl of Yak-a-mein soup, a dish sometimes called "old sober" because of its supposed hangover-curing powers. ...Her research was presented April 9 at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting, which also happened to be in New Orleans.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)

"How substances natural to green coffee beans help control blood sugar levels"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Scientists have found new evidence that natural substances in green coffee beans help control blood sugar levels. Researchers on April 9, 2013 described evidence that natural substances extracted from unroasted coffee beans can help control the elevated blood sugar levels and body weight that underpin type 2 diabetes. Be aware when looking at research to see who funds the research. Funding came from Applied Food Sciences, Inc., which markets a green coffee antioxidant product. Their presentation on chlorogenic acids -- widely available as a dietary supplement -- was part of the 245th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, being held this week in New Orleans. Researchers presented the new research at this week's annual meeting of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 600,449 daily circulation)

"Horse manure yields secret to ethanol fuel"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Michelle O'Malley knows good horse poop when she sees it. While at MIT, the chemical engineer scooped up some manure from Finn, a grass-fed horse at a sustainable farm in Concord, Mass. ... “It’s been known for a long time that the digestive tract of large herbivores have been good at turning crude cellulose into sugars,” said O'Malley, who presented her findings Thursday at the American Chemical Society's annual convention in New Orleans.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)

"The Great Garbage Lakes? Pollution plagues the water"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Everyone knows not to be a litter bug in theory, but it doesn't always make it into practice. A recent discovery in the Great Lakes is the latest example of previously unobserved trash in our ecosystem. According to new research coming out of the National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, floating plastic debris, similar to the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch" has been found in the Great Lakes.

Popular Science (New York, NY: monthly circulation 1.3 million)

"Can We Smell With Our Hearts?"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

In the back of your nasal cavity, you have special sensory cells that grab onto the various airborne compounds that constitute "a smell." They interpret those chemicals, shoot the result over to your brain, and you get the sense of smelling something. But researchers have recently discovered that it's not only these nasal cells that can interpret smells. ... The research was undertaken by a team at the Technical University of Munich and presented in New Orleans this weekend at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

 

UPI (Washington, D.C: 972,800 unique monthly visits)

"Agriculture blamed in ocean 'Dead Zone'"

April 9, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

A water pollution problem in the Gulf of Mexico doesn't come from oil rigs but from farm fields a thousand miles away in the U.S. Midwest, scientists say. ... "The Dead Zone is a vast expanse of water, sometimes as large as the state of Massachusetts, that has so little oxygen that fish, shellfish and other marine life cannot survive," oceanographer Nancy N. Rabalais told a meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans. "The oxygen disappears as a result of fertilizer that washes off farm fields in the Midwest into the Mississippi River.

 

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)

"Cost-Saving Measure to Upgrade Ethanol to Butanol -- A Better Alternative to Gasoline"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Scientists today reported a discovery that could speed an emerging effort to replace ethanol in gasoline with a substantially better fuel additive called butanol, which some experts regard as "the gasoline of the future." Their report on this discovery, which holds potential to reduce the costs of converting ethanol factories to production of butanol, came at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.


More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)  covered the story.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.14 million daily circulation)

"Why no one can eat just one potato chip"

April 15, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

The scientific secrets underpinning that awful reality about potato chips — eat one and you're apt to scarf 'em all down, has now been revealed. The research presented at the 245th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, which news media have termed "The World Series of Science," features almost 12,000 presentations on new discoveries and other topics.


More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Codex (US, 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)

"GUMBOS technology promises new drugs, electronic devices"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Mention a breakthrough involving "gumbo" technology in this city, and people think of a new twist on The Local Dish, the stew that's the quintessence of southern Louisiana cooking. But scientific presentations at a meeting of the world's largest scientific society this week are focusing on what may be an advance in developing GUMBOS-based materials with far-reaching medical, electronic and other uses. The talks at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society focused on what the scientists call a "Group of Uniform Materials Based on Organic Salts" (GUMBOS) and the nanoGUMBOS materials — particles so small that 100,000 could fit across the width of a human hair.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada:82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI:84,500 unique monthly visits)

"Understanding the life of lithium ion batteries in electric vehicles"

April 10, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Scientists today answered a question that worries millions of owners and potential owners of electric and hybrid vehicles using lithium-ion batteries: How long before the battery pack dies, leaving a sticker-shock bill for a fresh pack or a car ready for the junk heap? Their answer, presented at the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), being held here this week, may surprise skeptics.

… TV and Radio News

 

WBZ-BOS (CBS) (Boston, MA: Local Viewership 133,946)

"Lead in rice"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

On the health watch, rice imported from Taiwan and China contains high level of lead and could pose health risks. Those are the findings presented at the meeting of the American Chemical Society. Only 7% of rice consumed in the U.S. is imported, but rice imports, David, are on the rise.  

[More than 175 media outlets, including KCTV-KC (CBS) (Kansas City, MO: Local Viewership 128,862), WISH-IN (CBS) (Indianapolis, IN: Local Viewership 87,845),  KUSA-DEN (NBC) (Denver, CO:  Local Viewership 70,247), WSPA (CBS) (Greenville, SC: Local Viewership 65,124), KWTV-OKC (CBS) (Oklahoma City, OK: Local Viewership 62,747), WFOR-MIA (CBS) (Miami, FL: Local Viewership 61,823), KGMB-HON (CBS) (Honolulu, HI: Local Viewership 53,145), WBTV-CLT (CBS) (Charlotte, NC: Local Viewership 50,870), WMSN (FOX) (Madison, WI: Local Viewership 36,439), WIVB-BUF (CBS) (Buffalo, NY: Local Viewership 32,184), WBTW (CBS) (Myrtle Beach, SC: Local Viewership 31,723), WFSB-HFD (CBS) (Hartford-New Haven, CT: Local Viewership 23,290), WHIO (CBS) (Dayton, OH: Local Viewership 22,094), WBNG (CBS) (Binghamton, NY: Local Viewership 22,088), WFSB-HFD (CBS) (Birmingham, AL:  Local Viewership 20,608), WOIO-CLE (CBS) (Cleveland, OH:  Local Viewership 19,541), WTOC-SAV (CBS) (Savannah, GA: Local Viewership 18,492), KNOE (CBS) (Monroe, LA: Local Viewership 17,653), KXII (CBS) (Sherman, TX: Local Viewership: 15,503), KBAK (CBS) (Bakersfield, CA: Local Viewership 14,941), WCIA (CBS) (Champaign, IL: Local Viewership 8,219),  WOWK (CBS) (Charleston, WV: Local Viewership 7,127), WLFI (CBS) (Lafayette, IN: Local Viewership 7,477), WTOL (CBS) (Toledo, OH: Local Market Viewership: 6,278), WISC (CBS) (Madison, WI: Local Viewership 5,721), and WMAZ (CBS) (Macon, GA: Local Viewership 5,187) covered the story.]

 

 … From the Blogs

 

Science 2.0

"Why You Can't Stop Eating After One Potato Chip - The Science"

April 11, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release

Why can you not stop eating until you scarf down a whole bag of Doritos?  Is it a special gene? Epigenetics, like your mom ate one when she was pregnant with you, or is Frito-Lay just fiendishly clever? Ban-happy critics blame fat and carbohydrate content but a new study found that was not the case. If it were, we could just add ingredients to unpopular foods like Brussels sprouts and affect the rewards center in the brain positively so people eat more of those. At the American Chemical Society meeting in New Orleans, Tobias Hoch, Ph.D., tackled the causes of a condition (because everything is a condition with a label these days) called "hedonic hyperphagia" that plagues hundreds of millions of people around the world. Namely, they like to eat. So they don't just eat due to hunger, they eat for pleasure.

The Daily Green
"First Arsenic, Now Lead Found in Rice"

April 14, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting press release


Rice imported from Asia, Europe and South America was found to have high levels of lead, and consuming it daily would result in exposure to levels many times greater than the Food and Drug Administration recommends. ... The study's author, Tsanangurayi Tongesayi of Monmouth University, who presented his findings at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, said an infant who consumed the imported rice would be exposed at 30-60 times the level recommended by the FDA to avoid damaging exposure. Asian infants, who consume more rice, might be exposed at levels 60-120 times that level, and even adults--who are less susceptible to lasting effects from lead exposure--might be exposed at levels 20-40 times that level.

And more national meeting news…

CNN Money (Atlanta, GA: 38 million unique monthly visits)

"The fuel that could be the end of Ethanol"

April 12, 2013

Publicized in: Office of Public Affairs (OPA) National Meeting Press Release

In 2007 we reported on biobutanol, a biofuel with the potential to solve many of the problems associated with ethanol. Since then, industry players like BP have been seeking ways to make a cost-efficient transition to the "advanced biofuel," and now a scientific breakthrough might finally make that possible. ... At the annual American Chemical Society meeting in New Orleans, Wass presented research -- funded by BP (BP) -- on a family of new catalysts that produced 95% butanol in the lab. "They hold the prospect of being able to convert ethanol to butanol in high yield, high selectivity and at large-scale," Wass says.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)

"Why can’t you eat just one chip?"

April 21, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Why people can't stop after eating one potato chip? You can blame it to a condition called hedonic hyperphagia" that plagues hundreds of millions of people around the world. At the 245th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, held on Thursday, which featured almost 12,000 presentations on new discoveries and other topics, a team from University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, in Erlangen, Germany, probed the condition with an ingenious study in which scientists allowed one group of laboratory rats to feast on potato chips. Another group got bland old rat chow. 

… TV and Radio News

 

KTVX-SLC (ABC) (Salt Lake City, UT: Local Viewership 28,000)

"Hangover Soup"

April 17, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

..."so, the electrolytes in a sports drink are potassium and sodium, so those will re-hydrate you if you're dehydrated from alcohol." the soup is often sold from sidewalk carts during festivals in some of the major cities... and the findings were presented at the national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society.

[FM News 101 KXL (Portland, OR), KOH-AM (Reno, NV), Delaware 105.9 (Salisbury, MD), WIBC-FM (Indianapolis, IN) also covered the story.]

WAMU-FM (Washington, D.C.)

"Nanocellulose"

April 22, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

...be made into houses cargo ships you name it if they can perfect the process are Malcolm Brown Junior a professor of plant cell biology UT Austin shared his progress at the recent annual meeting of the American Chemical Society and will and will and macromolecule are almost anyway implant is made of cellulose so it is you want the material people don't realize the strength of silos what might be good for I'm very happy about the ongoing success of the material in the medical field it makes the world a burn dressing and the I mean you can put it over burn and it doesn't call any paint spills some ideas taking this to the different level of which is the electronic nano cellulose we found that we could put electrochromic dye inside of cellulose we added Baldrige to it being absorbed light so the next thing I did was to develop an electronic backplane where you can make a small region turned dark and never become a pixel seek hole with this special material used as wallpaper across it and I could essentially screen I guess I am building food you would only need one book David Leah one hundred page book you will . you want to have it added by stable meaning does not take any power to to to keep the image it only takes power to change the image to take it up the area where it really bringing back you are renal of image data in all that we make our rocket casings for at all police and the Mars and you know cellulose can also be digested by enzyme and if you break it down the components called sugar they this they would have multiple Mars within digest the rocket casing in the liver the garage is you know what someone said they were moderately well if you do not have.

[KNOW-FM (Minneapolis, MN) and WESA-FM (Pittsburgh, PA) also covered the story.]

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0

"'Seeing' The Flavor Of Food"

April 20, 2013

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Are the eyes more accurate than the nose and tongue in determining the taste of food? ...  "There have been important new insights into how people perceive food flavors," said Terry E. Acree, Ph.D at his American Chemical Society talk on the matter. "Years ago, taste was a table with two legs — taste and odor. Now we are beginning to understand that flavor depends on parts of the brain that involve taste, odor, touch and vision. The sum total of these signals, plus our emotions and past experiences, result in perception of flavors, and determine whether we like or dislike specific foods."

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