The Appropriate Use of Science in Public Policy


Panelists
October 27, 2010
Presentation and discussion, 4:00 - 5:30 pm
American Association for the Advancement of Science Auditorium
1200 New York Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C.

Summary

The federal government relies on scientific studies to craft regulations intended to protect the health and safety of American workers, the general public, and our environment. But amid charges of ideology-driven agendas and politicization of science, already-tenuous public faith in the regulatory process can easily be lost. What can be done to improve the process, to ensure that the widest possible range of knowledge and expertise is utilized, that conflicts of interest and inappropriate influence are minimized, and that science is used appropriately to help inform public policy? This event will explore ways to make the regulatory process more open, consistent, and credible to all stakeholders.

Sponsor

Speakers

Welcome

Paul Almeida Department for Professional Employees, AFL-CIO Bio │ Email

http://web.2.c2.audiovideoweb.com/va92web25028/PftPI/10-27-10/Speaker01.flv

Josh Trapani, moderator Association of American Universities Bio │ Email

http://web.2.c2.audiovideoweb.com/va92web25028/PftPI/10-27-10/Speaker02.flv

Susan Wood Jacobs Institute of Women’s Health, George Washington University School of Public Health and Human Services Bio │ Email

http://web.2.c2.audiovideoweb.com/va92web25028/PftPI/10-27-10/Speaker03.flv

Michael Holsapple Health and Environmental Sciences Institute Bio │ Email

http://web.2.c2.audiovideoweb.com/va92web25028/PftPI/10-27-10/Speaker04.flv

Carol Henry George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services And Consultant Bio │ Email

http://web.2.c2.audiovideoweb.com/va92web25028/PftPI/10-27-10/Speaker05.flv

Jennifer Sass Natural Resources Defense Council And George Washington University Bio │ Email

http://web.2.c2.audiovideoweb.com/va92web25028/PftPI/10-27-10/Speaker06.flv

Welcome

Watch Video of the Question & Answer Session

Related Content

  • White House Memorandum to Heads of Departments and Agencies, December 17, 2010
  • White House Blog: “Scientific Integrity: Fueling Innovation, Building Public Trust”, John Holdren, December 17, 2010
  • White House Memorandum on Scientific Integrity, March 9, 2009
  • Office of Science and Technology Policy blog post, June 18, 2010
  • U.S. Department of the Interior Inspector General evaluation report,
    “Interior Lacks a Scientific Integrity Policy” , April 2010
  • Bipartisan Policy Center
    Improving the Use of Science in Regulatory Policy , August 5, 2009
  • The Scientists in Government Project
    George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services
    “Strengthening Science in Government: Advancing Science in the Public’s Interest,” March 2010
    Executive Summary
    Full Report
  • “Scientific and Legal Perspectives on Science Generated for Regulatory Activities” , Environmental Health Perspectives, Volume 116, No. 1, January 2008
  • “Enhancing the Credibility of decisions based on Scientific Conclusions: Transparency is Imperative,” Schreider J, Barrow C, Birchfield N, Deerfield K, Devlin D, Henry S, Kramer M, Schappelle S, Solomon K, Weed D, Embry M. 2010. Toxicological Sciences. 116(1):5-7 (2010). Abstract