ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)

"Here’s Your New Science-Backed Reason to Eat More Cheese"

April 13, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Americans have long been bewildered by the French paradox: that despite consuming a dream diet full of cheese, baguettes and red wine, people in France have generally low rates of coronary heart disease...Some point to the resveratrol in red wine as one possibility; a more likely reason, say a growing number of experts, is that we were wrong—or at least partially wrong—to condemn saturated fat as a primary cause of heart disease. A small new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests yet another delicious possibility: cheese.

Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Better spring cleaning through chemistry"

April 13, 2015

Publicized in: OPA news release

Cleaning up your space can help you feel more energetic and less stressed. The springy weather we're having can do the same, so why not double down on your spring cortisol boost and clean up a bit? In the latest installment of the American Chemical Society's "Reactions" series, you can learn about the chemistry behind some of the best DIY cleaning hacks.

More than 20 media outlets, including Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), The Bulletin (Bend, OR: 251,300 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Philadelphia Magazine (Philadelphia, PA: 953,600 unique monthly visits)

"Good News for Cheese Lovers: Science Says Cheese Might Be Good for Your Gut"

April 14, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

And now, a new study shows cheese could be the key to changing your gut bacteria for the better. Best news you’ve heard all week, right? As TIME reports, during the study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 15 healthy young men ate three different diets, all the same in calories and fat, for two weeks each.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)

"Forget white wine, remove red wine stains with GIN: Chemist reveals how alcohol, vinegar and SPIT can replace expensive cleaning products"

April 14, 2015

Publicized in: OPA news release

There is an old wives' tale that says the best way to tackle red wine stains on carpets and clothes is to cover them in white wine. And while alcohol is the key to removing a spilled glass, the solution doesn't lie in a glass of Pinot Grigio. In a video, a scientist has revealed how gin and vodka dilute red wine stains, why vinegar is so good at removing mineral deposits on glass, and how spit tackles stubborn food stains in your kitchen. The video was created by the Washington-based American Chemical Society (ACS) as part of its Reactions series.

Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)

"List Of Healthy Foods For Gut Bacteria Expands To Include Cheese"

April 14, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Cheese has gotten a bad rap lately, mainly because when you think of cheese, you imagine Kraft American singles slapped onto buttery bread or cheeseburgers...In a new study, researchers out of the American Chemical Society have found new evidence to vouch for cheese’s health benefits — and they also believe it explains the French paradox.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Motion-powered 'smart' fabric could charge your electronics"

April 13, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Options for a wearable, portable charging solution include a jacket with solar panels stuck on the back and shoes that collect kinetic energy -- but a new type of fabric taps into something we usually find undesirable -- static electricity. Image from ACS Nano.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Life Hacks And Cleaning Tips That Give A New Meaning To 'Spit Polish'"

April 15, 2015

Publicized in: OPA news release

No one likes cleaning up -- particularly if you're in a hurry and you're running out of a cleaning product but don't have time to go to a store. Sometimes, it's a last-minute project before a party and you need to clean everything before the guests arrive. Don't worry too much because chemistry has you covered. The American Chemical Society has released a new video that tells you how to make your own glass cleaner, remove tough stains and why "spit polish" is really a thing.

Vice (U.S.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)

"Scientists Have Figured Out How to Get Almost Infinite Flavor from One Grapefruit"

April 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA national meeting news release

Squeeze a particularly ripe lemon half, and a surprisingly generous amount of juice will trickle out. Ditto half a Ruby Red when placed into a juice press. Mmm, juicy. But collecting nootkatone is another story. ...  Richard Burlingame, PhD, who presented a report on nootkatone’s uses at the 2013 National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, described it thusly: “Nootkatone is a broad-spectrum ingredient that has been shown to be effective as a control agent for mosquitoes, ticks and bedbugs.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)

"Kimchi-based preservative used in cosmetics is not so natural"

April 16, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Some consumer groups concerned about the safety of synthetic preservatives such as parabens have pushed for natural alternatives. Industry has responded with a slew of options, including preservatives from kimchi, a popular Korean staple made out of fermented cabbage and radish. But scientists are now reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that at least one commercial, kimchi-based preservative marketed as "all-natural" contains synthetic ingredients.

Five media outlets covered the story, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits).

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Artificial Photosynthesis System Created From A Nanowire-Bacteria Hybrid"

April 17, 2015

In a move that could potentially herald an era of clean, sustainable energy, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a nanosystem that successfully mimics the natural process of photosynthesis. … “We believe our system is a revolutionary leap forward in the field of artificial photosynthesis,” Peidong Yang, a chemist with the lab’s Materials Sciences Division and one of the authors of the study, published in the journal Nano Letters, said, in a statement.

More than 13 media outlets, including Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Berkeley Lab News (Berkeley, CA: 262,600 unique monthly visits), News Everyday (245,400 unique monthly visits) and Sci-News.com (U.S.: 168,200 unique monthly visits).

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)

"Nanoparticles May Save Soldiers After Explosions"

April 16, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Soldiers who suffer internal trauma from explosions might one day benefit from a new treatment now under development. Researchers report in the journal ACS Macro Letters that injecting a certain type of nanoparticle helped reduce lung damage in rats experiencing such trauma. The potential treatment, which could be given at the most critical moment immediately after a blast, could save lives.

Four media outlets covered the story, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits).

Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits)

"How probes into the Chemical Safety Board could hurt its mission"

April 15, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The head of the embattled Chemical Safety Board (CSB) was forced to step down in March just three months shy of his planned exit. But rather than signal an end to an era, the ouster has instead served to highlight the ongoing troubles of the independent agency, which is charged with investigating industrial accidents. Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, parses the political fray.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)

"China’s thriving export industry comes with a high cost"

April 17, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

China has become the world’s largest exporter, leading to the country’s rapid economic development—and notorious pollution that’s harmful to human health. For the first time, scientists have estimated this trend’s health cost. They report in Environmental Science & Technology that in 2007, export-related emissions in China led to almost 160,000 deaths.

Four media outlets covered the story, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits).

Medical Design Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 42,200 unique monthly visits)

"Nanoparticles Fight Tooth Decay"

April 15, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Nanotechnology may sound futuristic, but it has already found its way into household products, from cosmetics to cleaning solutions. And with a little help from a School of Dental Medicine scientist, consumers may one day even find nanoparticles in a tube of toothpaste. A recent study co-led by Hyun (Michel) Koo, a professor in Penn Dental Medicine’s Department of Orthodontics, found that a cavity-fighting drug worked better when encapsulated in a nanoparticle carrier, dramatically reducing the severity and number of cavities in an animal model. The work was published last month in the journal ACS Nano.

Phys.Org  (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)

"Researchers use plant oils for novel bio-based plastics"

April 15, 2015

Washington State University researchers have developed a new way to use plant oils like olive and linseed oil to create polyurethane, a plastic material used in everything from foam insulation panels to tires, hoses and sealants. The researchers, led by Michael Kessler, Berry Family director and professor in WSU's School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, have published a paper on the work in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Three media outlets covered the story, including Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits).

… TV and Radio News

WKRN-NAS ABC (Nashville, TN: local viewership 57,117)

"Rosemary and oregano contain diabetes-fighting compounds"

April 17, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] ...are you already? Not chicken. Oregano! this is from a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry looking at oregano and found help reduce levels of glucose in the body that can help stabilize blood sugar levels, that has been suggested maybe oregano can be a great segue to help manage blood sugar levels. The great thing to use, dried and fresh oregano found them both equally effective. Isn’t oregano better than a pill in many ways? Sprinkle some oregano on your meal tonight, it will make you taste better and may make you feel better.

More than 22 media outlets, including KRON-SF MyTV (San Francisco, CA: local viewership 9,012), WXYZ-DET ABC (Detroit, MI: local viewership 42,741), KYW-PHI CBS (Philadelphia, PA: local viewership 44,503), KFOR-OKC NBC (Oklahoma City, OK: local viewership 20,454), WCNC-CLT NBC (Charlotte, NC: local viewership 17,639), KARE-MIN NBC (Minneapolis, MN: local viewership 21,103), WMAR-BAL ABC (Baltimore, MD: local viewership 12,274), KSLA-SHV CBS (Shreveport, LA: local viewership 12,222) and XETV-SD CW (San Diego, CA: local viewership 11,813) covered the story.

RFD-TV (U.S.: national viewership 17,475)

"Why does bacon smell so good?"

April 16, 2015

Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] ...there's even the bacon man video game, where you help bacon man restore his rightful place on the meat throne. Scientists have even tracked down why bacon smells so good the American Chemical Society says 150 volatile organic compounds work together to create a delicious combination.

… From the Blogs

The News Report

"Cheese to lower cholesterol levels and reduce ‘risk of heart problems’"

April 13, 2015

Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The French diet – rich in cheese – brie, camembert, Roquefort, or any other variety, is a healthy lifesaver, claims a new study, detailed in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. According to the researchers, French, even with the intake of diet high in saturated fats, have low cardiovascular diseases, as consumption of cheese of any variety, led to higher fecal levels of butyrate produced by gut bacteria, cutting the dangerous levels of cholesterol and reducing the risk of heart attack.

IOL Lifestyle

"How to cut the calories in rice"

April 14, 2015

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

In Asia, where an estimated 90 percent of all rice is consumed, the pillowy grains are part of almost every meal. In the Caribbean, where the starch is often mixed with beans, it's a staple too. … "What we did is cook the rice as you normally do, but when the water is boiling, before adding the raw rice, we added coconut oil - about 3 percent of the weight of the rice you're going to cook," said Sudhair James, who presented his preliminary research at National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The fantastic chemistry of Valyrian steel, the ‘Game of Thrones’ super material"

April 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Spring may be coming, but so is "Game of Thrones," the wildly popular TV adaptation of George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series. Even though Martin's books are fantasy — featuring dragons and clairvoyant priestesses — the fantasy world seems tantalizingly close to our own, inviting tons of "scientific" explanations for different phenomena in the show and books. In the latest of the American Chemical Society's Reaction videos, cosplayer and science geek Ryan Consell dives into the chemistry behind Valyrian steel, a rare and treasured material in the "Game of Thrones" universe.

More than 55 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), Nerdist (U.S.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 215,000 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), Newsminer (Fairbanks, AK: 180,400 unique monthly visits), Stuff.co.nz (Wellington, New Zealand: 140,700 unique monthly visits), Winnipeg Free Press (Winnipeg, Canada: 107,200 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Quel fromage! French cheese diet 'reduces the risk of a heart attack'"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Sacre bleu! The French diet - rich in cheese - has been hailed a healthy lifesaver.

Experts claim that brie, camembert, roquefort - and any other variety - helps cut the amount of dangerous cholesterol in people's bodies, leading to a reduced risk of suffering a heart attack.

The discovery is being hailed a new piece in the 'French paradox' puzzle which already shows that drinking red wine cuts cardiovascular disease rates. … The findings were published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 60 media outlets, including Treehugger (New York, NY: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 184,600 unique monthly visits), TV3 (Dublin, Ireland: 63,700 unique monthly visits), Food Navigator (Crawley, U.K.: 55,200 unique monthly visits), Jagran Post (New Delhi, India: 42,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Have Figured Out How to Significantly Reduce the Calories in Rice"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

If you add coconut oil to the boiling water before cooking your rice, the starch will break down and you'll have a healthier meal. Who doesn't love a big bowl of sticky white rice? Now you can munch to your heart's content -- without the guilt. … The revelation comes from Dr. Pushparajah Thavarajah, a professor at the University of Sri Lanka, and undergraduate student Sudhair James, who presented their research to the American Chemical Society.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 38 million unique monthly visits)
"Can squid help make soldiers invisible?"

April 11, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

One of the world's oldest organism groups, cephalopods, like squid, octopus and cuttlefish, have survived in Earth's oceans for millions of years. They key to their survival: mastering the art of camouflage. Now, scientists say, these ancient invertebrates may hold the key to developing a combat technology that will allow soldiers to avoid infrared detection. … The researchers' work was recently presented at the 2015 American Chemical Society national meeting.

More than 13 media outlets, including WFMZ 69 News (Allentown, PA: 1.3 million unique monthly visits), FOX 13 (Salt Lake City, UT: 714,700 unique monthly visits) and Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NBC News (New York, NY: 32.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Treatment for Cotton Makes Fabric Waterproof and Fire-Resistant"

April 10, 2015

Researchers in China have devised a treatment for cotton that makes the fabric both flame-resistant and waterproof. The scientists, from Jilin University, were attempting to extend the life of fire-retarding treatments, and hit on the idea of following the flame-proofing with a water-proofing...This super-advanced cotton probably won't be on the store racks for a while, but it may make its way to things like firefighters' coats or military textiles. The research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemistry of Game of Thrones' Valyrian steel sword: Scientists reveal how the super-strong weapon could be made"

April 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

In Game of Thrones, the secret to forging super-light and strong Valyrian steel swords was said to have been lost with the Doom of Valyria. But, despite its fictional basis, a scientist has investigated whether it would be possible to make a similar weapon using bona fide chemistry. … The findings and conclusions were made by materials scientist Ryan Consell in the latest Reactions video for Washington-based American Chemical Society.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Genetically-Engineered Bacteria Can Keep Mice From Getting Fat "

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists now know that gut microbes almost certainly play a role in us getting fat, and poop transplants are sometimes touted as a potential route to weight loss. But if that’s a little too icky for you, Vanderbilt scientists have been experimenting with more refined microbiome tinkering in mice using genetically modified E. coli. … A recent obesity study presented at American Chemical Society meeting and reported on by MIT Technology Review also involves gut microbes, but its guiding principle is quite different.

Popsugar (U.S.: 7.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Coconut Water or Sports Drink: Which Is Better After a Workout?"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Coconut water is touted as nature's sports drink for good reason; just like Gatorade or Powerade, it contains high levels of electrolytes like sodium, magnesium, and potassium. But a recent study suggests that when it comes to the coconut water vs. sports drink debate, you may be better off keeping the coconut water for lighter workouts and reaching for a sports drink for your sweatier exercises. The study, presented at an American Chemical Society meeting, found that coconut water contains less sodium than the manufactured sports drinks: 400 mg/litre vs. 600 mg/litre.

Vice (U.S.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists May Have Figured Out Why Cheese Doesn’t Make French People Fat"

April 10, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The “French Paradox” has long been a source of wonder for us fat-assed Americans. How the hell are the Frenchies eating a high-fat, decidedly un-Paleo diet laden with bread, Brie, and Bourdeaux, and still maintaining an obesity rate that, despite growing in recent years, is dwarfed by those of the US and UK? … A new study published Wednesday in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry sheds new light on why fromage might be the ticket to understanding the French Paradox.

The Motley Fool (Alexandria, VA: 7.4 million unique monthly visits)
"A Possible Glimpse Into the Future: Is a $1 Prostate Cancer Test on the Way?"

April 11, 2015

Behind breast cancer, there is no cancer diagnosis more common than prostate cancer. … According to a recently published report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Dr. Qun "Treen" Huo of the University of Central Florida's NanoScience Technology Center has developed a new, more accurate type of prostate cancer test that could wind up costing a dollar or less!

More than 18 media outlets, including NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 184,600 unique monthly visits), Youth Health (New York, NY: 83,600 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 25,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Cheese could be the reason why the French eat more fat but don’t get heart disease"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The French are a perplexing bunch for scientists who study diet and nutrition — and for cheese lovers who want to stay healthy. On average, the French eat more saturated fat than the World Health Organization says is good for them. They also ate more cheese, which can be high in saturated fat, than any other country in the world in 2014. … But a new paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests another aspect of the French diet that may play a role in the paradox: all that cheese.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Trying to Make Game of Thrones Valyrian Steel Sword With Real Materials"

April 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Nothing reigns consistently in HBO’s Game of Thrones (and George R.R. Martin’s “Song of Ice and Fire” book series that inspired it) except Valyrian steel, a magical sword material. Valyrian steel is, of course, extremely not real. But materials scientist Ryan Consell took a look at its chemistry anyway.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Turning to freshwater sources to fight drug-resistant tuberculosis, other infections"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The discovery of antibiotics produced by soil fungi and bacteria gave the world life-saving medicine. But new antimicrobials from this resource have become scarce as the threat of drug resistance grows. Now, scientists have started mining lakes and rivers for potential pathogen-fighters, and they've found one from Lake Michigan that is effective against drug-resistant tuberculosis. Their report on the new compound appears in the journal ACS Infectious Diseases.

More than 10 media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (U.S.: 37,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Color-changing windows harvest energy from wind, rain"

April 8, 2015

Smart windows that can harvest electricity from wind or precipitation could be a future source of renewable energy, according to new research published recently in the journal ACS Nano. According to Science, the windows were able to produce up to 130 milliwatts per square meter, which would be enough to power a smartphone in sleep mode, and Dr. Zhong Lin Wang, co-developer of the technology and a nanoscientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and his colleagues believe that it could ultimately serve as a power source for some electronics.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Tension between politics and science soothed — for now"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Over the past two years, politicians have questioned the value of dozens of projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), many of which focus on social sciences and climate change. But a new agreement on transparency has led to an apparent truce between Congress and the agency, according to Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. How stable that truce is, however, remains to be seen.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists identify chemical compounds that block cancer-causing oncoprotein"

April 10, 2015

A team of scientists at the University of Kansas has pinpointed six chemical compounds that thwart HuR, an "oncoprotein" that binds to RNA and promotes tumor growth. The findings, which could lead to a new class of cancer drugs, appear in the current issue of ACS Chemical Biology.

41 KSHB (Kansas City, MO: 878,400 unique monthly visits) and Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment  (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"How unwanted CDs and DVDs could help cut carbon emissions"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Now that most consumers download and stream their movies and music, more and more CDs and DVDs will end up in landfills or be recycled. But soon these discarded discs could take on a different role: curbing the release of greenhouse gases. In the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report a way to turn the discs into a material that can capture carbon dioxide (CO2), a key greenhouse gas, and other compounds.

More than 18 media outlets, including Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), NewKerala.com (India: 29,300 unique monthly visits), Bangalore Mirror (Bengaluru, India: 22,200 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Washington State University News (Pullman, WA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Study points the way toward producing rubber from lettuce"

April 6, 2015

Prickly lettuce, a common weed that has long vexed farmers, has potential as a new cash crop providing raw material for rubber production, according to Washington State University scientists. Writing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they describe regions in the plant’s genetic code linked to rubber production. The findings open the way for breeding for desired traits and developing a new crop source for rubber in the Pacific Northwest.

More than 16 media outlets, including The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA: 545,500 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), Manufacturing.net (U.S.: 119,800 unique monthly visits), Capital Press (Salem, OR: 50,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How can you see an atom?"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Since ancient Greek times, philosophers and scientists have pondered the atom. For a couple thousand years, humans could only speculate on the structure and other properties of the smallest unit of matter. It wasn't until the 1980s that chemists saw individual atoms. Bestselling author Sam Kean takes us through the nearly 2,400-year quest to see the atom in a new episode of the Reactions sub-series, "Legends of Chemistry."

The People’s Pharmacy  (U.S.: 342,000 unique monthly visits)
"Vitamin D May Keep the Lid on Prostate Cancer"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Some men diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer may be able to keep it from progressing by taking extra vitamin D. In a study, 37 men who had chosen prostatectomies were randomly assigned to take either 4,000 IU of vitamin D per day or a placebo. After two months, they underwent the operations. … 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

NASDAQ (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"A Possible Glimpse Into the Future: Is a $1 Prostate Cancer Test on the Way?"

April 11, 2015

Behind breast cancer, there is no cancer diagnosis more common than prostate cancer...According to a recently published report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Dr. Qun "Treen" Huo of the University of Central Florida's NanoScience Technology Center has developed a new, more accurate type of prostate cancer test that could wind up costing a dollar or less!

The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC: 320,800 unique monthly visits)
"Air pollution’s impact on health is being studied, even though you may not hear about it"

April 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Even as an eighth grader running along the frontage roads of Southfield Freeway in Detroit, I wondered about the air I was breathing and if exercising in it would do me harm. … As spring allergies leave many of us sneezing and sniffling, it may not come as a surprise that certain air pollutants may boost the potency of tree pollen. ... The research is still in the early stages and was scheduled to be presented at an annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Santa Fe New Mexican (Santa Fe, NM: 273,200 unique monthly visits)
"The subtle difference between sugar and high-fructose corn syrup"

April 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

For decades, Americans have sipped on fountain sodas, wondering, at least occasionally but likely much more often, what exactly that thing that makes the drink so sweet is. It’s called high-fructose corn syrup, that much we have known. … In response to the ubiquity of these very questions, the American Chemical Society put together a short video that walks anyone watching through a simple, scientific explanation of the difference between high-fructose corn syrup and sugar.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)
"Water makes wires even more nano"

April 6, 2015

Water is the key component in a Rice Univ. process to reliably create patterns of metallic and semiconducting wires less than 10 nm wide...A paper on their technique, called meniscus-mask lithography, has been published online by Nano Letters.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits)
"Erupting electrodes: how recharging leaves behind microscopic debris inside batteries"

April 9, 2015

An eruption of lithium at the tip of a battery's electrode, cracks in the electrode's body, and a coat forming on the electrode's surface reveal how recharging a battery many times leads to its demise. Using a powerful microscope to watch multiple cycles of charging and discharging under real battery conditions, researchers have gained insight into the chemistry that clogs rechargeable lithium batteries. The work, appearing in the March issue of the journal Nano Letters, will help researchers design cheaper and more powerful rechargeable batteries with metals more common and safer than lithium.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Lab Manager  (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits)
"The Science of Stress"

April 10, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

It’s supposed to help keep our bodies healthy in stressful situations. But the constant stress of our everyday lives means we’re getting overexposed to cortisol. Raychelle Burks, Ph.D., explains why too much cortisol is bad for you in the latest episode of the Reactions series Get To Know A Molecule.

… TV and Radio News

WDAF-KC FOX (Kansas City, MO: local viewership 44,624)
"Lettuce Could Be New Rubber Source"

|April 8, 2015

[Transcript] ...shortage, Washington state university researchers say the use of prickly lettuce can manufacture rubber! The pesky weed produces a white sap that is similar to rubber's polymers. The study is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

WTVQ ABC (Lexington, KY: local viewership 19,953) also covered the story.

… From the Blogs

The Free Press Journal
"Have cheese for super heart health"

April 10, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Do you know why the French have low cardiovascular diseases despite having a diet high in saturated fats? It is not because of wine or their lifestyle but another French staple: Cheese and its metabolism, reports IANS...A recent study had also found that cheese reduced “bad” cholesterol when compared to butter with the same fat content. The results were detailed in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

News Today
"Fabric fights off fire and water at the same time"

April 2015

Firefighters are set to save a fortune on laundry bills. Researchers have come up with a coating for cotton fabric that is both flame-retardant and water-repellent, making it self-cleaning. Fabrics with flame-retardant coatings are firefighter chic, but they are also used for curtains and furniture upholstery. The problem is that these coatings are water soluble, so can be worn away by washing...Journal reference: ACS Nano

HealthNewsDigest.com
"A New Piece in the 'French Paradox' Puzzle — Cheese Metabolism"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Figuring out why the French have low cardiovascular disease rates despite a diet high in saturated fats has spurred research and many theories to account for this phenomenon known as the "French paradox." Most explanations focus on wine and lifestyle, but a key role could belong to another French staple: cheese. The evidence, say scientists in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, is in cheese metabolism.

The Hans India
"How CDs, DVDs can help cut carbon footprints"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A new study has revealed that unwanted CDs and DVDs can help cut carbon emissions. Now that most consumers download and stream their movies and music, more and more CDs and DVDs will end up in landfills or be recycled, but soon these discarded discs could take on a different role by curbing the release of greenhouse gases...The study appears in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering.

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