ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"How Garbage Kickstarted the Modern Chemical Industry"

November 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Throughout the history of science, some of the most important breakthroughs have come about through happy accidents. This certainly bears true in the video above, courtesy of the American Chemical Society, which explains how garbage kicked off the entire chemical industry.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Researchers Develop Needle-Free Ebola Vaccine"

November 12, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers have developed a single-dose, needle-free Ebola vaccine that protects monkeys against infection for more than four months. The vaccine is administered through the nose, protecting the primates via the respiratory tract. News of the vaccine is reported in Molecular Pharmaceuticals, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

io9 (Sydney, Australia: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Revolutionary Chemical Discoveries That Were Made By Complete Accident"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

While some scientific discoveries are made by following logical pathways, others are made by accident, often while the discoverer was trying to accomplish something else entirely. … The American Chemical Society teamed up with Chemical Heritage Foundation and animator Sean Parsons to bring this episode of the web series Reactions, outlining the surprising history behind products we often take for granted.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Beetle-inspired ink may thwart counterfeiters"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

On Nov. 5, it was reported by the American Chemical Society that researchers at China’s Southeast University have developed a powerful new weapon in the war against counterfeiting: a color-changing ink that, unlike previous incarnations, is light-resistant, hard to copy, and inspired by a beetle. … According to the journal ACS Nano, the version developed by Zhongze Gu, Zhuoying Xie, Chunwei Yuan, and colleagues is resistant to bleach and light, and can be applied quickly and cheaply with an inkjet printer to both hard and flexible surfaces.

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New progress toward high-tech artificial retinas"

November 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The loss of eyesight, often caused by retinal degeneration, is a life-altering health issue for many people as they age. Scientists are trying different approaches to develop an implant that can “see” light and send visual signals to a person’s brain, countering the effects of age-related retinal degeneration and related vision disorders. … Research on the new device is published in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

More than 40 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), NDTV Gadgets (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), IEEE Spectrum (New York, NY: 101,200 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), The Scientist (New York, NY: 56,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New electronic 'tongue' offers potential application in food testing, medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An electronic "tongue" could one day sample food and drinks as a quality check before they hit store shelves. Or it could someday monitor water for pollutants or test blood for signs of disease. With an eye toward these applications, scientists are reporting the development of a new, inexpensive and highly sensitive version of such a device in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 40 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Design & Trend (New York, NY: 3.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), NDTV Cooks (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) and Azo Sensors (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Study: Fracking chemicals found in toothpaste and ice cream"

November 13, 2014

A study of one component found in the fracking fluid injected into shale to release oil and gas contains chemicals found in substances most people ingest all the time, including ice cream, laxatives and toothpaste, according to new research from the University of Colorado at Boulder. … The findings were recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

WedMD (Orlando, FL: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Signs of Toxic Flame Retardants Found in Americans"

November 12, 2014

Scientists report that they found evidence of six kinds of toxic flame retardants in Americans. The researchers tested urine samples from California residents and found detectable levels of a rarely studied group of flame retardants known as phosphates, and one -- tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) -- has never been seen in Americans before. … The findings were published online Nov. 12 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 50 media outlets, including Epoch Times (China: 17 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), Design & Trend (New York, NY: 3.8 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Philadelphia Inquirer  (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Find Signs of Toxic Flame Retardants in Americans"

November 12, 2014

Scientists report that they found evidence of six kinds of toxic flame retardants in Americans. The researchers tested urine samples from California residents and found detectable levels of a rarely studied group of flame retardants known as phosphates, and one -- tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) -- has never been seen in Americans before. … The findings were published online Nov. 12 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

ABC 7 News (San Francisco, CA: 2.2 million unique monthly visits)

"Microbeads In Toothpaste Pose Health Risks, Environmental Concerns"
November 11, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Something in your toothpaste could be harming your gums. It's a concern being raised by the trade group, the American Chemical Society. The concern is over something commonly referred to as microbeads. These tiny little beads are in your toothpaste and face cream. The beads are showing up in people's gums and the food chain. They're also going down the drain and into rivers and streams.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Finally, Science Explains Why No One Can Lift Thor’s Hammer"

November 12, 2014

These are exciting days for physics, with several recent experimental observations providing important information on some of the most important mysteries of nature. And a recent trailer for Avengers: Age of Ultron suggests an explanation for the long-standing open question: can the Hulk lift Thor’s hammer? … The above arguments were described in an article I wrote on “The Materials Science of the Avengers” for Hollywood Chemistry, a collection of essays published in 2014 by the American Chemical Society.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Needle-free Ebola vaccine provides four-month protection in monkeys"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have produced a single dose Ebola vaccine shown to provide primates with long-term protection from the deadly disease. What is most promising about the development is the delivery method, with the vaccine administered through the nose and lungs, mitigating the associated risk of spreading the disease through infected needles. … The research was published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New Prosthetic Device Could Help Cure Retinal Degeneration Patients"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A team of researchers from Israel and the UK are looking to add to the number of medical devices that can be used to treat visual impairments by developing a new prosthetic unit for use by retinal degeneration patients. Writing in a recent edition of the journal Nano Letters, researchers from the Tel Aviv University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"This Electronic 'Tongue' Can Ensure Food Quality"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An electronic tongue can now sample food, testing for bacteria and other contamination during production or transport, as well as drive new procedures in medicine. … Tiny sensors detect substances in a sample and send signals to a computer for processing just as taste buds sense and transmit flavor messages to the brain," the American Chemical Society explained in a press release. … Development of the electronic tongue was profiled in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Bio-inspired bleeding control: Synthesized platelet-like nanoparticles created"

November 13, 2014

Stanching the free flow of blood from an injury remains a holy grail of clinical medicine. Controlling blood flow is a primary concern and first line of defense for patients and medical staff in many situations, from traumatic injury to illness to surgery. If control is not established within the first few minutes of a hemorrhage, further treatment and healing are impossible. … Results of the researchers' findings appear in the current issue of the journal ACS Nano.

More than 14 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Rutgers patents technology to advance stem cell therapeutics"

November 13, 2014

Rutgers University Chemistry Associate Professor Ki-Bum Lee has developed patent-pending technology that may overcome one of the critical barriers to harnessing the full therapeutic potential of stem cells. … ACS Nano, a publication of the American Chemical Society (ACS), has published Lee's research on NanoScript.

More than 10 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Microtubes are Cozy Space for Growing Neurons"

November 12, 2014

Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve connections after injury. … The team published the results in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"Regulatory and scientific complexity of generic nanodrugs could delay savings for patients"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Nanomedicine is offering patients a growing arsenal of therapeutic drugs for a variety of diseases, but often at a cost of thousands of dollars a month. Generics could substantially reduce the price tag for patients—if only there were a well-defined way to make and regulate them. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) details the challenges on the road to generic nanodrugs.

… From the Blogs

Lab Manager
"Electronic ‘Tongue’ to Ensure Food Quality"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An electronic “tongue” could one day sample food and drinks as a quality check before they hit store shelves. Or it could someday monitor water for pollutants or test blood for signs of disease. With an eye toward these applications, scientists are reporting the development of a new, inexpensive and highly sensitive version of such a device in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Science 2.0
"6 Billion Dollar Man Progress: An Artificial Retina"

November 12, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The Six Billion Dollar Man is getting a little bit closer, not just to movie theaters, but in real life. A new development toward a prosthetic retina could help counter conditions that result from retinal degeneration, a life-altering health issue for many people, especially as they age. … Published in Nano Letters.

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits)
"Proteins other than gluten could trigger celiac disease"

November 5, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Could something other than gluten trigger flare-ups in people with celiac disease? Scientists think so. In the American Chemical Society's Journal of Proteome Research, Armin Alaedini and his colleagues report that they found five groups of non-gluten proteins that triggered an immune reaction in celiac patients.

More than 50 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Voxxi (Miami, FL: 316,100 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NBC News (New York, NY: 40.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Nose Spray Ebola Vaccine Protects Monkeys"

November 3, 2014

Needle-free Ebola vaccine protects monkeys 100 percent of the time from the virus, even a year after they’ve been vaccinated, researchers reported Monday. … It’s only a small study, but the results are encouraging, said Croyle, whose findings are published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics and being discussed at the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists meeting in San Diego this week.

More than 75 media outlets, including New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits), Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Health Magazine (New York, NY: 6.4 million), The Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: monthly circulation 1.27 million), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

WebMD (Orlando, FL: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Gluten Not the Only Celiac Disease Culprit"

November 6, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It's known that gluten -- found in wheat, rye and barley -- is the cause of health problems in people with celiac disease. Now, new research suggests these folks may also react to non-gluten wheat proteins. The discovery could improve understanding of celiac disease and how to treat it, the researchers said. A large number of people with celiac disease had an immune reaction to five groups of non-gluten proteins, they reported recently in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Aluminum Was Once One of the Most Expensive Metals in the World"

November 7, 2014

Charles Martin Hall was 22 when he figured out how to create pure globs of aluminum. Paul Héroult was 23 when he figured out how to do the same thing, using the same strategy, that same year. Hall lived in Oberlin, Ohio; Héroult lived in France. But the lure of shiny, valuable metal had captured the imagination of both. … Why did these two men hit upon the exact same idea, across an ocean? The American Chemical Society suggests that all the right information to make this discovery was converging—someone was bound to put it together.

The Atlantic (Washington, DC: 5.8 million unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Gluten Isn't the Only Culprit in Celiac Disease, Study Says"

November 6, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It's known that gluten -- found in wheat, rye and barley -- is the cause of health problems in people with celiac disease. Now, new research suggests these folks may also react to non-gluten wheat proteins. The discovery could improve understanding of celiac disease and how to treat it, the researchers said. A large number of people with celiac disease had an immune reaction to five groups of non-gluten proteins, they reported recently in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Healthline (San Francisco, CA: 4.1 million unique monthly visits)
"These Unpronounceable Chemicals Are Just About Everywhere and We Have No Idea What They Do"

November 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chemicals are all around us, especially in our homes. While not all of them are harmful, many are untested, and scientists are striving to get a better idea of which ones can pose a threat we may not be aware of. A recent study in Environmental Science & Technology looked at about 8,000 chemicals and came up with a new method to classify how often humans are exposed to them.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"First nasal spray Ebola vaccine found to 'offer long-term protection against deadly virus'"

November 4, 2014

A nasal spray being developed as a potential vaccine for the deadly Ebola virus has been found to be effective. Scientists at the University of Texas discovered the breathable vaccine offers long-term protection during pre-clinical trials with monkeys. … The study was published in the online edition of the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

Bloomberg Businessweek (New York, NY: 4 million unique monthly visits)
"Where Do Fracking Fluids Go? Scientists Create the First Detector"

November 6, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Despite the concerns about wastewater from hydraulic fracturing, it can be difficult to keep track of where the drilling fluids end up. Now a team of researchers claims to have figured out how to trace leaks and spills of fracking fluids—and even detect their presence in treated water. The method, detailed in a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, relies on identifying a specific combination of geochemical characteristics unique to fracking wastewater.

WTOP (Washington, DC: 2.3 million unique monthly visits)
"All in the chemistry: Science says pizza is delicious"

November 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Pizza is the world's most popular food for a reason: It's delicious. And that's not an opinion; it's science. According to the American Chemical Society (ACS), pizza's pleasing taste comes from special properties in its basic ingredients and a major chemical reaction that takes place when the pie is baked. It doesn't matter whether you're eating New York-, New Haven- or Chicago-style pizza; the end result is pure pleasure.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)
"A nasal vaccine spray may help protect from Ebola virus"

November 5, 2014

There has been an international scare surrounding the threat from Ebola virus with frantic efforts to try to protect people from this potentially deadly infection. The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists reported on Nov. 3, 2014 a nasal spray vaccine has potential for long-lasting protection from Ebola virus. … This study has been published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Anti-counterfeiting tech inspired by color-changing beetle"

November 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

British scientists have already looked to principles employed by butterfly wings, as a means of thwarting currency counterfeiters. Now, researchers from China's Southeast University have developed another such technology, that's inspired by a different insect – a color-changing longhorn beetle known as Tmesisternus isabellae. … A paper on the research was published this week in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Breaking down BPA and similar pollutants with sunlight, nanoparticles and graphene"

November 5, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Many pollutants with the potential to meddle with hormones -- with bisphenol A (BPA) as a prime example -- are already common in the environment. In an effort to clean up these pollutants found in the soil and waterways, scientists are now reporting a novel way to break them down by recruiting help from nanoparticles and light. The study appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 10 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Jet-Fueled Electricity At Room Temperature"

November 7, 2014

University of Utah engineers developed the first room-temperature fuel cell that uses enzymes to help jet fuel produce electricity without needing to ignite the fuel. These new fuel cells can be used to power portable electronics, off-grid power and sensors. A study of the new cells appears online Nov. 5 in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Catalysis.

More than 20 media outlets, including Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.6 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Thirdhand smoke: Toxic airborne pollutants linger long after the smoke clears"

November 3, 2014

Ever walked into a hotel room and smelled old cigarette smoke? While the last smoker may have left the room hours or even days ago, the lingering odors—resulting from noxious residue that clings to walls, carpets, furniture, or dust particles—are thanks to thirdhand smoke. … Their study, "Inhalable Constituents of Thirdhand Tobacco Smoke: Chemical Characterization and Health Impact Considerations," has been published online in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Sun Sentinel (Fort Lauderdale, FL: 953,900 unique monthly visits)
"It's OK to 'go' in the ocean"

November 5, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Feel guilty about going wee in the sea? Don't! As a fun new video from the American Chemical Society explains, "It's absolutely OK to go in the ocean." Perhaps more research needed to be done. A video on the society's "Reactions" YouTube channel, points out that human urine is more than 95 percent water, and that its sodium and chloride content poses no threat to seawater or the plants and animals that live in it.

National Monitor (Washington, DC: 879,400 unique monthly visits)
"Newly developed ‘micro-rockets’ can degrade chemical weapons"

November 5, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A study recently released in the journal ACS Nano reveals the development of seawater-powered micro-rockets that have the ability to neutralize chemical and biological warfare agents such as anthrax and sarin. Researchers of the study, led by Joseph Wang of the University of California, San Diego, say that the highly effective micromotors are driven through water propulsion to swim naturally in water without the need for external fuel.

The Jerusalem Post (Israel: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Hybrid ‘patch’ instead of heart transplants"

November 8, 2014

Because heart cells can’t multiply and cardiac muscles contain only a small number of stem cells, heart tissue is unable to repair itself after a heart attack. Now Tel Aviv University researchers are literally setting a new gold standard in cardiac tissue engineering. … In a study published recently by Nano Letters, Dvir’s team presented their model for a superior hybrid cardiac patch that incorporates biomaterial harvested from patients, as well as gold nanoparticles.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Shape of things to come in nanoparticle platelet mimicry”

November 5, 2014

Artificial platelet mimics developed by a research team from Case Western Reserve University and University of California, Santa Barbara, are able to halt bleeding in mouse models 65 percent faster than nature can on its own. … The new technology, reported in the journal ACS Nano ("Platelet-like Nanoparticles: Mimicking Shape, Flexibility, and Surface Biology of Platelets To Target Vascular Injuries"), is aimed at stemming bleeding in patients suffering from traumatic injury, undergoing surgeries or suffering clotting disorders from platelet defects or a lack of platelets.

More than 6 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (58,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Counsel & Heal
"Celiac Disease can be Triggered by Non-Gluten Proteins, Study Finds"

November 6, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Medical experts have believed that gluten triggers celiac disease, which is a health condition caused by the body's inability to digest the protein composite. Even though gluten, which is commonly found in wheat, barley and rye, can hurt the lining of the small intestine, a new study is reporting that gluten is not the only culprit. … The study, "Specific Non-Gluten Proteins of Wheat are Novel Target Antigens in Celiac Disease Humoral Response," was published in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Science World Report
"Inhalable Ebola Vaccine Helps Protect Monkeys"

November 5, 2014

A potentially breathable, respiratory vaccine is in development to help provide long-term protection for non-human primates against the deadly Ebola Virus, according to recent findings published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

Science Blog
"Enzymes make electricity from jet fuel without ignition"

November 5, 2014

University of Utah engineers developed the first room-temperature fuel cell that uses enzymes to help jet fuel produce electricity without needing to ignite the fuel. These new fuel cells can be used to power portable electronics, off-grid power and sensors. A study of the new cells appears online today in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Catalysis.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.