ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"This foam could save lives"

June 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

More Americans under 45 died from injuries in 2013 than died from disease, making trauma the leading cause of death for that age group….They tested it out on pigs and published the results in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering on May 29.

More than 20 media outlets, including Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Geek.com (New York, NY: 514,000 unique monthly visits) and Health News Digest (New York, NY: 10,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"DOE Study Finds Elevated Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Canadian Crude"

June 23, 2015

A new peer-reviewed study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy says oil extracted from Canada’s oil sands produces greenhouse-gas emissions that are an average 20% higher than for conventional U.S. crude….The Energy Department has yet to officially announce the results, but an abstract was published this month by Environmental Science & Technology, an academic journal.

More than 30 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), NASDAQ (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits) and Morningstar (Chicago, IL: 2.4 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"This Battery Can Charge Itself Using Only Light"

June 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

We are increasingly hearing about solar-powered devices being able to store their extra power in a battery, however, those batteries still have to be connected to another device in order to charge. …."Under normal indoor lighting it discharges electric current that can run a small fan. Within 30 seconds, it recharges without an external power source," says a video report by the American Chemical Society.

Six media outlets, including HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Video: The science behind the smell of the sea"

June 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

There's nothing like the smell of salty sea air over summer vacation. But instead of frolicking on the beach, a group of chemists is researching the compounds inside that air. Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) are created with every breaking wave. Kimberly Prather, Ph.D., and her team have discovered in research published in ACS Central Science that SSAs have a huge impact on the planet's climate.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Finally, science explains that doggy smell"

June 28, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

We all know how wet dogs smell, but what causes the odor? The American Chemical Society explains that when water hits your dog's skin or fur, it mixes with the yeast, bacteria and oils on it, breaking down the chemical bonds and releasing that oh-so-distinctive houndy smell.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"What Adderall is actually doing to your body"

June 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

More than 25 million people rely on Adderall™ and other similar drugs to help treat narcolepsy, depression and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). But how does amphetamine, the active ingredient in Adderall™, work?...Video courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Newsweek (U.S.: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Oil Sands Crude From Canada Is 20% Worse for Environment Than Conventional American Crude"

June 24, 2015

Extracting and refining Canadian oil sands crude oil produces 20 percent more climate-warming greenhouse gas emissions than the same processes for conventional American crude, according to a peer-reviewed study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy….The study, published this month in Environmental Science & Technology, is the largest of its kind to look at wheel-to-wheel emissions from oil sands, meaning the emissions involved in the full life cycle of the oil: extracting, transporting, refining and ultimately burning the fuel for use in vehicles.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"NCSE Endorses a Call to Action: Innovation, an American Imperative"

June 24, 2015

The National Center for Science Education was recently invited to endorse Innovation: An American Imperative (PDF) -- a "call to action by American industry, higher education, science, and engineering leaders urging Congress to enact policies and make investments that ensure the United States remains the global innovation leader."...That's why thousands of them are members of NCSE, and why a dozen major scientific societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, are official supporting organizations of NCSE.  

"Video: The science behind the smell of the sea"
June 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

There's nothing like the smell of salty sea air over summer vacation. But instead of frolicking on the beach, a group of chemists is researching the compounds inside that air. Sea spray aerosols (SSAs) are created with every breaking wave. Kimberly Prather, Ph.D., and her team have discovered in research published in ACS Central Science that SSAs have a huge impact on the planet's climate.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"'Jelly' Clothes May Reduce Agricultural Waste"

June 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

From gummy bears to silky mousses, gelatin is essential for making some of our favorite sweets. Now, scientists are exploring another use for the common food ingredient: spinning it into yarn so it can be made into clothing….The report appears in the ACS journal Biomacromolecules.

Six media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)
"All-plastic solar cell could help power future flexible electronics"

June 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you picture a solar panel, it’s most likely dark blue or black, and rigid and flat. Now imagine one that’s semi-transparent, ultra-thin and bendable. Scientists are closing in on making the latter version a reality. They report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a see-through, bendable solar cell made entirely out of plastic.

Nature.com (London, U.K.: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Earth science wrestles with conflict-of-interest policies"

June 24, 2015

The undisclosed industry ties of some authors of Earth-science papers have raised ethical questions about how the field handles conflicts of interest…. “The Earth-science community doesn’t really have a coherent set of policies for dealing with this,” says Naomi Oreskes, a science historian at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, who co-authored a 12 June commentary in Environmental Science & Technology calling for stronger disclosure rules.

Good Housekeeping (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Foods That Fight Off All Your PMS Symptoms"

June 24, 2015

Chamomile Tea Start brewing! According to a study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, this soothing drink may relieve menstrual cramps. "This tea may increase levels of glycine, an amino acid that's been found to provide muscle spasm relief," explains Palinski-Wade.

MIT News (Cambridge, MA: 2.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop a new means of killing harmful bacteria"

June 25, 2015

The global rise in antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health, damaging our ability to fight deadly infections such as tuberculosis….In a paper published online in the journal Nano Letters, researchers at MIT, the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and Harvard University reveal that they have developed a new means of killing harmful bacteria.

More than 25 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 45,000 unique monthly visits), Medical Design Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 39,600 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 34,700 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanowires could be the LEDs of the future"

June 23, 2015

The latest research from the Niels Bohr Institute shows that LEDs made from nanowires will use less energy and provide better light. The researchers studied nanowires using X-ray microscopy and with this method they can pinpoint exactly how the nanowire should be designed to give the best properties. The results are published in the scientific journal, ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Compound Semiconductor (London, U.K.: 2000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Fetuses more vulnerable to some environmental contaminants penetrating into cord blood"

June 26, 2015

Toxic environmental contaminants are increasingly known to cause a number of severe health problems, in particular on fetuses, including heart failure, low cognitive ability, delayed development, and neurobehavioral disorders. A new research featured in the Environmental Science and Technology published by the American Chemical Society suggests that the fetus is more vulnerable to some pollutants with certain properties because they penetrate further into the feto-maternal system.

Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 18,900 unique monthly visits)
"As The Use of Phthalates Wanes, Chemical Companies Race to Find Alternatives"

June 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Increasing consumer wariness and regulatory attention regarding phthalates helped the market for alternative plasticizers explode in recent years….A series of articles in the latest edition of Chemical & Engineering News, however, notes that the market declined amid concerns that phthalates disrupt hormones in the body and cause detrimental health effects.

The Daily Californian (Berkeley, CA: 301,100 unique monthly visits)
"UC Berkeley researchers use ‘secret code’ to lock GMOs within labs"

June 24, 2015

Utilizing methods that originated in the 1940s, UC Berkeley researchers have developed an efficient way to contain genetically modified organisms and debilitate them if they escape from a lab setting….By modifying E. coli bacteria for dependence on the compound benzothiazole, the research, published June 15 in journal ACS Synthetic Biology, ensures that the organism would die in the event of escape.  

Science News (U.S.: 281,200 unique monthly visits)
"Oil-munching microbes cleaning up Gulf marshes faster than expected"

June 26, 2015

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill left the Gulf Coast’s vast and delicate marshlands in desperate need of cleaning. But soil microbes are on the job. Since the spill, populations of oil-degrading microbes have boomed in some of Louisiana’s most heavily oiled marsh soils. These invisible-to-the-eye janitors are breaking down the goopy brown oil faster than expected, scientists report June 19 in Environmental Science & Technology.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)
"New process forms 3-D shapes from flat sheets of graphene"

June 23, 2015

Researchers from the Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new approach for forming 3-D shapes from flat, 2-D sheets of graphene, paving the way for future integrated systems of graphene-MEMS hybrid devices and flexible electronics....“Our method utilizes wet-transfer and adaptive substrate-engineering, providing several key advantages over other fabrication/integration methods of 3-D graphene,” stated Jonghyun Choi, a graduate student in Nam’s research group and first author of the article appearing in Nano Letters.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (IL: 55,900 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 34,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Giving atoms their marching orders with nanotubes"

June 24, 2015

Chemistry professor Linda Shimizu oversees a series of crowd-pleasing chemistry demonstrations in middle and high schools throughout central South Carolina every year….Working in collaboration with Russ Bowers' lab at the University of Florida, Shimizu and her team recently published a paper in ACS Nano ("Crystalline Bis-urea Nanochannel Architectures Tailored for Single-File Diffusion Studies") that demonstrated the unique gas-flow properties of the molecular tubes.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

I-Connect007.com
"Plastic Solar Cell to Power Flexible Electronics"

June 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you picture a solar panel, it’s most likely dark blue or black, and rigid and flat. Now imagine one that’s semitransparent, ultra-thin and bendable. Scientists are closing in on making the latter version a reality. They report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces the development of a see-through, bendable solar cell made entirely out of plastic.

The Raw Food World
"Sauerkraut as a superfood – studies show powerful anti-cancer, pro-health benefits"

June 23, 2015

Sauerkraut, which is essentially just pickled cabbage, is a tart and tasty treat that you can eat all on its own, paired with other foods, in sauces, or packed into a yummy sandwich (Reuben, anyone?)....In 2011, a Finnish study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, found that the fermentation of cabbage creates certain compounds that prevent cancer growth.

Tech Fragments
"Flat Sheets of Graphene Formed Into 3-D Shapes With New Process"

June 23, 2015

A new strategy for forming 3D shapes from flat, 2D sheets of graphene, has been developed by researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign….Reference:...Nano Letters., DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.5b01036

NPR (Washington, DC: 131 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Scream For Gelato Instead Of Ice Cream? Here's The Scoop"

June 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Back in the day, this saying applied to pretty much everyone: "I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream."...At the most basic level – the molecular level – any frozen dessert is a mix of water and fat molecules, according to a 2014 video by the American Chemical Society. These molecules form crystals as the mixture freezes. And the longer it take for ice cream to freeze, the bigger the crystal, resulting in that crunchy mouthfeel.

Yahoo! Health (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Is Peeing in the Pool Really All That Bad?"

June 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

There’s no chemical that will change color — and blow your spot — if you pee in the pool. And doing so is pretty common: Nearly one in five American admits to relieving themselves in a swimming pool, according to a recent Water Quality and Healthy Council survey…. In a 2014 study, published in Environmental Science & Technology, he and co-investigators found that uric acid — one of the primary chemicals in urine — reacts with chlorine to generate potentially hazardous chemicals.

The Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 8.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's what everyone gets wrong about aspartame sweetener"

June 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Aspartame is the artificial sweetener that people love to hate. It's also one of the most common alternatives to sugar, found in over 6,000 products and sold as NutraSweet® and Equal®….Do these claims actually hold water? In its Reactions video series, the American Chemical Society put the rumors to scientific scrutiny.

More than 30 media outlets, including Connecticut Post (Bridgeport, CT: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), Softpedia News (1.4 million unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 405,000 unique monthly visits), The News-Times (Danbury, CT: 193,300 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 117,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 91.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's the real reason your wet dog smells funky"

June 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Most people know the smell. That wet-dog smell. The smell that wafts off a dog after they go for a swim or bath. It's not particularly pleasant. A recent video from the American Chemical Society explains just how the chemistry behind this unique smell works.

More than 20 media outlets, including Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits) and The News-Times (Danbury, CT: 193,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Cleaner air would save two million lives a year: study"

June 16, 2015

Cleaner air worldwide would save two million lives a year and not only in the most polluted countries, a study found. "We were surprised to find the importance of cleaning air not just in the dirtiest parts of the world -- which we expected to find -- but also in cleaner environments like the US, Canada and Europe," co-author Julian Marshall of the University of Minnesota said in the study published by Environmental Science & Technology, on Tuesday.

More than 50 media outlets, including The San Diego Union-Tribune (San Diego, CA: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), The University of Texas News (Austin, TX: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Newser (Miami, FL: 2.2 million unique monthly visits), South China Morning Post (Hong Kong, China: 768,200 unique monthly visits), Times Live (Johannesburg, South Africa: 733,900 unique monthly visits) and The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 21.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Study Maps Concentrations of Antibiotics in Chinese Waterways"

June 21, 2015

Rivers near Beijing and Tianjin in the north and in the Pearl River Delta in the south contain some of the highest concentrations of antibiotics in China’s waterways, according to a study that cites the overuse of the drugs in humans and farm animals….The study, which was published last month in Environmental Science & Technology, a journal of the American Chemical Society, is one of the first comprehensive studies of the problem in China, examining 58 river basins.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanorobots wade through blood to deliver drugs"

June 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Nanorobots hold great potential in the field of medicine. This is largely due to the possibility of highly-targeted delivery of medical payloads, an outcome that could lessen side effects and negate the need for invasive procedures....The research is published in the journal Nano Letters.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Novel battery uses light to produce power"

June 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

To move the world toward sustainability, scientists are continuing to explore and improve ways to tap the vast power of sunlight to make fuels and generate electricity. Now they have come up with a brand-new way to use light—solar or artificial—to drive battery power safely. Their "photo battery," reported in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, uses light and titanium nitride for the anode.

Eight media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Tiny Robots Will Be Able To Swim Through Your Bloodstream To Deliver Drugs"

June 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Soon, the term "little swimmers" will refer to more than what, um, it usually refers to right now, with the latest development in nanorobot technology — namely nanoswimmers, robots that can swim through the bloodstream to deliver drugs. This latest advent in nanotechnology would be entirely medical (so, sorry, intravenous drug users, I guess?), primarily used to treat diseases where drugs would need to be delivered to localized points in the body, rather than pumping the entire bloodstream full of chemicals, explained a press release issued by the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 16 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 34,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

National Post (Toronto, Canada: 810,500 unique monthly visits)
"Chocolate is healthy, prevents diabetes, improves thinking and keeps you skinny, scientists say"

June 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Perhaps chocolate shouldn’t be such a guilty pleasure. A study this week shows eating 100 grams a day — two bars — lowers the risk of heart disease and stroke.  Of course, some were skeptical….The American Chemical Society, in its April 2014 Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry, found chocolate could help fight weight gain and type-2 diabetes.

PBS.org (Washington, DC: 5.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemistry debunks the biggest aspartame health myths"

June 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Aspartame has a bad rap. It has been suspected of causing cancer and depression. However, a new video from the American Chemical Society pulls together the latest research on the food additive, and it’s not as bad as you might think.

The Weather Channel (Atlanta, GA: 29.6 million unique monthly visits)
"WHO Pollution Guidelines Could Save 2.1 Million Lives Per Year"

June 18, 2015

Improved air quality — both in heavily polluted and relatively clean places — could save millions of lives per year, researchers report in a new paper. A team of environmental engineering and public health researchers designed a model to quantify how changes in outdoor air pollution levels would affect related deaths from causes including heart attack, stroke, lung disease, lung cancer and respiratory infections...The journal Environmental Science & Technology published the paper, "Addressing Global Mortality from Ambient PM2.5," online on June 16.

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Axalta Scientist Presents Rheological Characterization of Drying Process for Automotive Coatings"

June 16, 2015

Dr. Vicki Cheng, a Senior Chemist at Axalta Coating Systems, a leading global manufacturer of liquid and powder coatings, presented her research at the 89th American Chemical Society Colloidal Surface Science Symposium, held at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, on June 15.

AOL (New York, NY: 54.9 million unique monthly visits)
"WHO pollution guidelines could save 2.1 million lives per year"

June 19, 2015

Improved air quality — both in heavily polluted and relatively clean places — could save millions of lives per year, researchers report in a new paper….The journal Environmental Science & Technology published the paper, "Addressing Global Mortality from Ambient PM2.5," online on June 16.

Woman’s Day (New York, NY: 1.5 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Foods That Fight Off ALL Your PMS Symptoms"

June 19, 2015

Start brewing! According to a study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, this soothing drink may relieve menstrual cramps. "This tea may increase levels of glycine, an amino acid that's been found to provide muscle spasm relief," explains Palinski-Wade.  

Refinery29 (New York, NY: 10.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Is Aspartame Actually Bad For You?"

June 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

In a matter of months, Pepsi will replace aspartame with sucralose in their Diet Pepsi drinks — even Wild Cherry will not be spared….The American Chemical Society set out to answer those questions in the video below, the latest in their Reactions video series.

Medical News Today  (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists show how nanostructure of dentin stops teeth cracking"

June 17, 2015

Several theories have attempted to explain how our teeth manage to withstand the huge stresses we inflict on them every day of our lives….In the journal Nano Letters, researchers led by members from the Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin in Germany describe how they examined the mechanical properties of tiny nanoparticle and fiber structures inside dentin - the layer of softer, porous material that lies under the much harder enamel covering of teeth.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists explain the existence of intrinsic chirality in ordinary nanocrystals"

June 18, 2015

A team of scientists from ITMO University and Trinity College Dublin published first experimental results showing that ordinary nanocrystals possess intrinsic chirality and can be produced under normal conditions as a half-and-half mixture of mirror images of each other….The results of the study were published in Nano Letters.

Four media outlets, including Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Shortcut Gives Champagne a Fruitier Aroma"

June 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The best sparkling wines take months to ferment to perfection. In recent years, many winemakers have turned to commercial yeast products to give this process a boost. How they ultimately affect bubbly has been an open question, but now scientists have stepped in to find out. They have reported their findings in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)
"On the road to needle-free medicine"

June 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Needle injections have been around since 1657 and remain a key delivery method for many drugs, including vaccines that have prevented countless illnesses. But for patients that require daily pricks or for people in remote locations, the syringe model has major drawbacks. An article in Chemical & Engineering News looks at potential alternatives, their successes and their roadblocks.

Four media outlets, including Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Register (London, U.K.: 445,400 unique monthly visits)
"Flexible PRAM: Not a bendy baby carriage, but infinitely cooler"

June 16, 2015

Bendy humans pose problems for wearable IT as devices break when they’re deformed. Flexible computers would be ideal – and a group of Korean boffins has devised some flexible PRAM tech to help with the problem….Check out the KAIST boffin’s work in the March issue of ACS Nano: “Flexible One Diode-One Phase Change Memory Array Enabled by Block Copolymer Self-Assembly.”

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

University of Texas at San Antonio News (San Antonio, TX: 282,100 unique monthly visits)
"UTSA researchers warn about damaging effects of do-it-yourself brain stimulation"

June 18, 2015

Three UTSA College of Sciences researchers are warning the public about a new controversial self-help medical treatment called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS).... Recent research published in the American Chemical Society publication Langmuir provided evidence that even at such a low voltage, the current could cause significant changes in the conformation of the proteins tested in the laboratory.

… TV and Radio News

WTOP (Washington, DC)
Problems with meeting travel restrictions for scientists
"Problems with meeting travel restrictions for scientists"

June 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

The transcript was not available, but to listen to the audio go to mms.tveyes.com.

… From the Blogs

Printed Electronics World
"Toward 'green' paper-thin, flexible electronics"

June 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The rapid evolution of gadgets has brought us an impressive array of "smart" products from phones to tablets, and now watches and glasses. But they still haven't broken free from their rigid form. Now scientists are reporting in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a new step toward bendable electronics.

Oye! Times
"Is Aspartame Actually Bad For You?"

June 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

In a matter of months, Pepsi will replace aspartame with sucralose in their Diet Pepsi drinks — even Wild Cherry will not be spared….The American Chemical Society set out to answer those questions in the video below, the latest in their Reactions video series.

ACS Publications logo

ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.