ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The Chemistry of Cats"

November 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Ever wondered why cat urine is so pungent, or what causes felines to react so strongly to catnip? You’re not alone. Now a video reveals the answers - explaining how the psychoactive plant used in catnip works as well as revealing how litter is able to absorb the smell of the urine and clump faeces together. ‘One of the finest joys for cat owners is the feline insanity that comes from catnip,’ said the expert from the American Chemical Society.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000)
"Blueberries: Delicious, but not necessarily good at improving night vision"

November 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Blueberries are wonderful little things: They’re small, portable, delightful in pies, and beloved by bears; they even roll downhill. But as great as blueberries are, new research suggests they will not help you see in the dark like we previously thought, the American Chemical Society reports.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"First 3D LED printer could print heads-up-display contact lenses"

November 21, 2014

Here's a hypothetical question: would you rather have a head-up display on glasses or a contact lens? If you answered "contact lens", the bad news is that you may be waiting some time. But the good news is that it just got a little more feasible, with the invention of the world's first 3D printer that can print LEDs. … You can find the full study online in the journal Nano Letters.

Business Insider  (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemistry Reveals Why Sriracha Is Just So Good"

November 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

It adds kick to scrambled eggs, looks pretty on pasta, and even tastes good on pizza. Rumours that its southern California factory was closing spurned frightened fans to storm grocery stores and stockpile it by the box. An outside company even came out with keychain-sized bottles of the stuff so devotees could squirt it on their favourite foods on the go. But what explains our near-universal infatuation with Sriracha? As the American Chemical Society points out a recent video, it’s all about the chemistry.

Science Daily  (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"As winter approaches, switching to cleaner heating oils could prevent health problems"

November 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

With temperatures dipping, homeowners are firing up their heaters. But systems that require heating oil release fine particles outside that could have harmful health effects. Regulations to curb these emissions in New York City, however, could save hundreds of lives, a new study has found. The report in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology may have ramifications for the entire northeast, the country's largest consumer of heating oil.

More than 7 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Paper electronics could make health care more accessible"

November 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Flexible electronic sensors based on paper—an inexpensive material—have the potential to some day cut the price of a wide range of medical tools, from helpful robots to diagnostic tests. Scientists have now developed a fast, low-cost way of making these sensors by directly printing conductive ink on paper. They published their advance in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Wireless Design Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 36,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Blueberries Don't Help You See in the Dark"

November 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Blueberries are super stars among health food advocates, who tout the fruit for not only promoting heart health, better memory and digestion, but also for improving night vision. Scientists have taken a closer look at this latter claim and have found reason to doubt that the popular berry helps most healthy people see better in the dark. Their report appears in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits)
"Could hydrogen vehicles take over as the ‘green’ car of choice?"

November 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Now that car makers have demonstrated through hybrid vehicle success that consumers want less-polluting tailpipes, they are shifting even greener. In 2015, Toyota will roll out the first hydrogen fuel-cell car for personal use that emits only water. An article in Chemical & Engineering News(C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explains how hydrogen could supplant hybrid and electric car technology -- and someday, even spur the demise of the gasoline engine.

More than 6 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Research team developing injectable treatment for soldiers wounded in battle"

November 19, 2014

Internal bleeding is a leading cause of death on the battlefield, but a new, injectable material developed by team of researchers from Texas A&M University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology could buy wounded soldiers the time they need to survive by preventing blood loss from serious internal injuries. … The team's findings are detailed in the scientific journal ACS Nano and supported by the U.S. Army Research Office.

More than 3 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Clean Technica (682,000 unique monthly visits)
"Forget Perovskite, We’re Talking Iron Pyrite For Low Cost Solar Power"

November 19, 2014

Actually, don’t forget perovskite. We’ve been fangirling over perovskite all year as a new pathway to low cost solar power, and we’re not going to give it the old heave-ho just because some new kid shows up. However, this thing about iron pyrite just sailed across our radar for the first time in five years so naturally we had to drop everything and run after it. … Here’s some more detail about the methods used in the study, available online at the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 7 media outlets, incluidng Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits)
"New synthetic platelets for better bleeding control"

November 23, 2014

Scientists, including two of Indian-origin, have developed new synthetic platelets that mimic and outperform natural platelets at controlling bleeding. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara turned to the human body's own mechanisms for inspiration in dealing with the necessary and complicated process of coagulation. … The findings appear in the journal ACS Nano.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Molecular event mapping opens door to more tests 'in silico'"

November 18, 2014

A new approach to mapping and predicting the impact of chemical compounds in the body, which it is hoped could eventually reduce the need for toxicity tests in animals, has been trialed by scientists. … To prove the point, the new research, reported in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology ("Defining Molecular Initiating Events in the Adverse Outcome Pathway Framework for Risk Assessment"), mapped the pathways by which several well-known compounds, such as paracetamol, cause toxic outcomes.

More than 5 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Click Green
"Are hydrogen vehicles set to take over as the 'green' car of choice?"

November 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

California and Japan are places where the future arrives a bit early. And so it goes with the hydrogen economy. They are where hydrogen fuel stations are being built and where consumers will soon have the opportunity to purchase fuel-cell cars to use for personal transportation. … This article was first published in Chemical & Engineering News and was reprinted with the kind permission of the American Chemical Society.

Science Codex
"The chemistry of cats: On catnip, pheromones and kitty litter"

November 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

They are seemingly the most popular thing on the Internet, the subject of millions of videos and hundreds of memes: cats. This week Reactions answers some of the biggest kitty questions out there: Why does catnip make most cats go crazy? What does it mean when your cat rubs against your leg? How does kitty litter clump?

NIU Today
"Harnessing the sun"

November 18, 2014

How can you beat the power of the sun? NIU chemistry and biochemistry professor Tao Xu thinks you can’t. He believes solar power will be a big player on the energy scene in the future. … His team’s work is described in two new research publications, one in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C (describing the use of nickel) and another in Chemical Communications (describing the solar cell platform developed by the scientists).

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"How Garbage Kickstarted the Modern Chemical Industry"

November 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Throughout the history of science, some of the most important breakthroughs have come about through happy accidents. This certainly bears true in the video above, courtesy of the American Chemical Society, which explains how garbage kicked off the entire chemical industry.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Researchers Develop Needle-Free Ebola Vaccine"

November 12, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers have developed a single-dose, needle-free Ebola vaccine that protects monkeys against infection for more than four months. The vaccine is administered through the nose, protecting the primates via the respiratory tract. News of the vaccine is reported in Molecular Pharmaceuticals, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

io9 (Sydney, Australia: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Revolutionary Chemical Discoveries That Were Made By Complete Accident"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

While some scientific discoveries are made by following logical pathways, others are made by accident, often while the discoverer was trying to accomplish something else entirely. … The American Chemical Society teamed up with Chemical Heritage Foundation and animator Sean Parsons to bring this episode of the web series Reactions, outlining the surprising history behind products we often take for granted.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Beetle-inspired ink may thwart counterfeiters"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

On Nov. 5, it was reported by the American Chemical Society that researchers at China’s Southeast University have developed a powerful new weapon in the war against counterfeiting: a color-changing ink that, unlike previous incarnations, is light-resistant, hard to copy, and inspired by a beetle. … According to the journal ACS Nano, the version developed by Zhongze Gu, Zhuoying Xie, Chunwei Yuan, and colleagues is resistant to bleach and light, and can be applied quickly and cheaply with an inkjet printer to both hard and flexible surfaces.

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New progress toward high-tech artificial retinas"

November 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The loss of eyesight, often caused by retinal degeneration, is a life-altering health issue for many people as they age. Scientists are trying different approaches to develop an implant that can “see” light and send visual signals to a person’s brain, countering the effects of age-related retinal degeneration and related vision disorders. … Research on the new device is published in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

More than 40 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), NDTV Gadgets (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), IEEE Spectrum (New York, NY: 101,200 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), The Scientist (New York, NY: 56,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New electronic 'tongue' offers potential application in food testing, medical diagnostics, environmental monitoring"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An electronic "tongue" could one day sample food and drinks as a quality check before they hit store shelves. Or it could someday monitor water for pollutants or test blood for signs of disease. With an eye toward these applications, scientists are reporting the development of a new, inexpensive and highly sensitive version of such a device in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 40 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Design & Trend (New York, NY: 3.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), NDTV Cooks (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) and Azo Sensors (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Study: Fracking chemicals found in toothpaste and ice cream"

November 13, 2014

A study of one component found in the fracking fluid injected into shale to release oil and gas contains chemicals found in substances most people ingest all the time, including ice cream, laxatives and toothpaste, according to new research from the University of Colorado at Boulder. … The findings were recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

WedMD (Orlando, FL: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Signs of Toxic Flame Retardants Found in Americans"

November 12, 2014

Scientists report that they found evidence of six kinds of toxic flame retardants in Americans. The researchers tested urine samples from California residents and found detectable levels of a rarely studied group of flame retardants known as phosphates, and one -- tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) -- has never been seen in Americans before. … The findings were published online Nov. 12 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 50 media outlets, including Epoch Times (China: 17 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), Design & Trend (New York, NY: 3.8 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Philadelphia Inquirer  (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Find Signs of Toxic Flame Retardants in Americans"

November 12, 2014

Scientists report that they found evidence of six kinds of toxic flame retardants in Americans. The researchers tested urine samples from California residents and found detectable levels of a rarely studied group of flame retardants known as phosphates, and one -- tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) -- has never been seen in Americans before. … The findings were published online Nov. 12 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

ABC 7 News (San Francisco, CA: 2.2 million unique monthly visits)

"Microbeads In Toothpaste Pose Health Risks, Environmental Concerns"
November 11, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Something in your toothpaste could be harming your gums. It's a concern being raised by the trade group, the American Chemical Society. The concern is over something commonly referred to as microbeads. These tiny little beads are in your toothpaste and face cream. The beads are showing up in people's gums and the food chain. They're also going down the drain and into rivers and streams.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Finally, Science Explains Why No One Can Lift Thor’s Hammer"

November 12, 2014

These are exciting days for physics, with several recent experimental observations providing important information on some of the most important mysteries of nature. And a recent trailer for Avengers: Age of Ultron suggests an explanation for the long-standing open question: can the Hulk lift Thor’s hammer? … The above arguments were described in an article I wrote on “The Materials Science of the Avengers” for Hollywood Chemistry, a collection of essays published in 2014 by the American Chemical Society.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Needle-free Ebola vaccine provides four-month protection in monkeys"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have produced a single dose Ebola vaccine shown to provide primates with long-term protection from the deadly disease. What is most promising about the development is the delivery method, with the vaccine administered through the nose and lungs, mitigating the associated risk of spreading the disease through infected needles. … The research was published in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New Prosthetic Device Could Help Cure Retinal Degeneration Patients"

November 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A team of researchers from Israel and the UK are looking to add to the number of medical devices that can be used to treat visual impairments by developing a new prosthetic unit for use by retinal degeneration patients. Writing in a recent edition of the journal Nano Letters, researchers from the Tel Aviv University Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"This Electronic 'Tongue' Can Ensure Food Quality"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An electronic tongue can now sample food, testing for bacteria and other contamination during production or transport, as well as drive new procedures in medicine. … Tiny sensors detect substances in a sample and send signals to a computer for processing just as taste buds sense and transmit flavor messages to the brain," the American Chemical Society explained in a press release. … Development of the electronic tongue was profiled in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Bio-inspired bleeding control: Synthesized platelet-like nanoparticles created"

November 13, 2014

Stanching the free flow of blood from an injury remains a holy grail of clinical medicine. Controlling blood flow is a primary concern and first line of defense for patients and medical staff in many situations, from traumatic injury to illness to surgery. If control is not established within the first few minutes of a hemorrhage, further treatment and healing are impossible. … Results of the researchers' findings appear in the current issue of the journal ACS Nano.

More than 14 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Rutgers patents technology to advance stem cell therapeutics"

November 13, 2014

Rutgers University Chemistry Associate Professor Ki-Bum Lee has developed patent-pending technology that may overcome one of the critical barriers to harnessing the full therapeutic potential of stem cells. … ACS Nano, a publication of the American Chemical Society (ACS), has published Lee's research on NanoScript.

More than 10 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Microtubes are Cozy Space for Growing Neurons"

November 12, 2014

Tiny, thin microtubes could provide a scaffold for neuron cultures to grow so that researchers can study neural networks, their growth and repair, yielding insights into treatment for degenerative neurological conditions or restoring nerve connections after injury. … The team published the results in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"Regulatory and scientific complexity of generic nanodrugs could delay savings for patients"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Nanomedicine is offering patients a growing arsenal of therapeutic drugs for a variety of diseases, but often at a cost of thousands of dollars a month. Generics could substantially reduce the price tag for patients—if only there were a well-defined way to make and regulate them. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) details the challenges on the road to generic nanodrugs.

… From the Blogs

Lab Manager
"Electronic ‘Tongue’ to Ensure Food Quality"

November 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An electronic “tongue” could one day sample food and drinks as a quality check before they hit store shelves. Or it could someday monitor water for pollutants or test blood for signs of disease. With an eye toward these applications, scientists are reporting the development of a new, inexpensive and highly sensitive version of such a device in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Science 2.0
"6 Billion Dollar Man Progress: An Artificial Retina"

November 12, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The Six Billion Dollar Man is getting a little bit closer, not just to movie theaters, but in real life. A new development toward a prosthetic retina could help counter conditions that result from retinal degeneration, a life-altering health issue for many people, especially as they age. … Published in Nano Letters.

ACS Publications logo

ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.