ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"E-Cigarettes May Be Just As Addictive As Cigarettes"
July 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Vapers—or e-cigarette smokers—aren’t any safer from developing addiction, finds a new study released Thursday. The basis of the pro-vaping argument has been that e-cigarettes don’t contain the harmful chemicals in and byproducts of tobacco cigarettes. There’s nicotine, to be sure, but not all nicotine is the same. … But a new study, published in the American Chemical Society’s Chemical Research in Toxicology, indicates that nine out of 17 common, commercially available e-cigarettes contained the most addictive kind of nicotine.

More than 100 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, D.C.: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 798,200), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 18,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists are working with the light of fireflies to improve medical diagnoses"
July 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Luciferase: Few people could say what it is, but just about anyone venturing outside on a summer night would be familiar with it. It's the protein that makes fireflies glow, and a group of researchers thinks it will someday be used to detect cancer and other diseases. … A group of researchers from Connecticut College and Yale University published a study this week in the Journal of the American Chemical Society that shows the light is the result of a highly reactive molecule, called superoxide ion.

More than 24 media outlets, including Science magazine  (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"These Sea Sapphires Can 'Disappear' Before Your Eyes, And Scientists Finally Know How"
July 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Sea sapphires live by a "now you see 'em, now you don't" mantra. But when they do make an appearance, they're the crown jewel of the undersea world. … But members of Israel's Weizmann Institute of Science have finally discovered the secret: "alternating layers of hexagonal-shaped guanine crystals and cytoplasm," according to a study they published last month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including Slate (New York, NY: 8.4 million unique monthly visits), Wired (U.K.: 5.7 million unique monthly visits) and WN.com (3.3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"E-cigarettes could be just addictive, research suggests"
July 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

While electronic cigarettes are seen by many as a way to wean off traditional cigarettes, new research suggests that the "e" version may be just as addictive as its smoky counterpart. … In a new study appearing in the American Chemical Society journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers set out to determine the predominant type of nicotine found in commercial samples of the liquids used with e-cigarettes.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The chemistry that makes your wine taste good (or bad)"
July 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

When it comes to wine, the devil is in the details. No matter how fancy, every bottle of wine is mostly water and alcohol -- only 2 percent of the chemical composition allows for any variety. But oh, how that 2 percent can vary. The latest video from the American Chemical Society's Reactions series can help you arm yourself with science facts to throw at your pretentious, wine-swirling friend at the next Rosé soirée.

More than 13 media outlets, including Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits) and Softpedia News (2.7 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Could 'Harry Potter'-like invisibility cloaks really exist?"
July 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

One of the coolest things in the "Harry Potter" movies and books was the invisibility cloak Harry wore when he needed to not be seen. Sadly, such devices don't exist in the real world, at least not yet. A new "Reactions" video out this week from the American Chemical Society explores how teams of scientists and researchers are making advances in cloaking technology so that one day cloaking devices might become a reality.

More than 11 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

National Geographic (Washington, DC: 8.1 million unique monthly visits)
"How do fireflies glow? Mystery Solved After 60 Years"
July 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Think of the firefly abdomen like a black box of bioluminescence. For around 60 years, scientists have known what basic ingredients go into the box—things like oxygen, calcium, magnesium, and a naturally occurring chemical called luciferin. … The discovery, published recently in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, provides the most detailed picture yet of the chemistry involved in firefly bioluminescence.

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 39.1 million unique monthly visits)
"E-cigarettes may be just as addictive as traditional cigarettes"
July 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

While electronic cigarettes are seen by many as a way to wean off traditional cigarettes, new research suggests that the "e" version may be just as addictive as its smoky counterpart. … In a new study appearing in the American Chemical Society journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers set out to determine the predominant type of nicotine found in commercial samples of the liquids used with e-cigarettes.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"This Sea Sapphire Can Become Transparent in the Blink of an Eye"
July 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Now you see it, now you don’t. But the disappearing act performed by this small sea sapphire isn’t magic: it manage to flex its body to reflect frequencies of light that the human eye simply can’t see. … [Journal of the American Chemical Society].

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"This Wine Chemistry Video Explains What Connoisseurs Rant About"
July 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

This video will let you hold a conversation with the wine snob at your next office party. "No matter how much you paid for it, a bottle of wine is about 98 percent water and ethanol. It's the remaining couple of percent that make wine taste like wine" says this YouTube by Reactions, a series by the American Chemical Society.

The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Material developed to turn car engine’s heat into electricity"
July 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces announces the development of a material that could convert engine heat that’s otherwise wasted into electrical energy to help keep a car running – and reduce the need for fuels. The researchers started with a material called strontium titanium dioxide and added a small amount of graphene, a stable material with excellent conductive properties.

More than 18 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Do your dog's paws smell of POPCORN? Bacteria and yeast growing on your canine's feet may be creating that 'comforting' aroma, experts reveal"
July 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Perhaps the most obvious question might be why you would be smelling your dog's paws in the first place, but if you do happen to give them a cursory sniff, you might find they smell of popcorn. … Chemists from the American Chemical Society have revealed this is due to the microorganisms that live in dog fur - and they show just why dog food is so offensive to our noses.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Polluting Power Plant Unexpectedly Cleanses Air Using Mercury Scrubbers"
July 21, 2015

Researchers unexpectedly found that a major source of air pollution has contributed in reducing scattered air pollutants for two years. … But the researchers found, unexpectedly, that the coal-fired power plant that only intended to reduce the amount of its mercury emission surprisingly reduced another class of harmful emissions as well, according to the study published this month, July, in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Eight media outlets, including Popular Science  (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits)
Scientists arm cells with tiny lasers
July 21, 2015

In a feat of miniaturization that makes your Apple Watch look lame, scientists have implanted tiny lasers within living cells. The lasers can be used to track individual cells for days and weeks, the researchers report this week in Nano Letters.

More than 16 media outlets, including CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits) and UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Metro.co.uk (London, U.K.: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"These amazing pictures show what catnip does to cats"
July 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Catnip has a secret power over cats, it seems. And a set of images uploaded on social media sites shows just how much. While scientists remain baffled about why the plant sends pets so loopy, it’s nice to see them enjoying themselves. They certainly look hyped up. A high for a cat can last from 10 minutes to an hour, and The American Chemical Society says around 70 per cent of them are susceptible to its powers.

Four media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)
"What Makes Red Meat Red?"
July 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

We've all heard the admonitions of nutrition experts warning against eating too much red meat. But what exactly gives red meat its dark hue, while chicken and fish stay relatively white? You may think of a super-raw steak as "bloody," but gore has nothing to do with it. It's all chemistry. … The American Chemical Society’s video series Reactions explains the science of grilling red meat.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Suspected Meth Lab Explodes in U.S. Government Building"
July 23, 2015

Yesterday, Congress requested more information about a July 18 explosion in one of the buildings operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology outside Washington, D.C. … “The fact that this explosion took place at a taxpayer-funded NIST facility, potentially endangering NIST employees, is of great concern,” says Lamar S. Smith, a congressmen from Texas and chairman of the Science, Space & Technology Committee in the U.S. House of Representatives told Chemical and Engineering News.

More than 14 media outlets, including The Verge (New York, NY:10.6 million unique monthly visits), Rickey.org (New York, NY:797,000 unique monthly visits) and Genomeweb (New York, NY:125,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Cleaner Bluefish Suggest Coal Rules Work"
July 20, 2015

Mercury levels in bluefish caught off the U.S. Atlantic coast dropped more than 40 percent over the past four decades thanks to federal restrictions on coal emissions, according to a new study. … Concentrations decreased 43 percent. The drop is similar to reductions of mercury observed in "atmospheric deposition, riverine input, sea water, freshwater lakes and freshwater fish across northern North America,” Barber and colleagues wrote in the study published this month in the Environmental Science and Technology journal.

Eight media outlets, including Quartz (4.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News-Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists report new way to mimic the body's natural approach to programming stem cells to treat muscular dystrophy"
July 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Stem cells hold great potential for addressing a variety of conditions from spinal cord injuries to cancer, but they can be difficult to control. Scientists are now reporting in the journal ACS Nano a new way to mimic the body's natural approach to programming these cells. Using this method, they successfully directed adult stem cells to turn specifically into muscle, which could potentially help treat patients with muscular dystrophy.

More than 13 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New battery technologies take on lithium-ion"
July 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Lithium-ion batteries remain the technology-of-choice for today's crop of electric cars, but challengers are revving up to try to upset the current order. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at two of the top contenders vying to erode lithium-ion's dominance.

Five media outlets, including ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"Mighty Mussel Glue for Surgery"
July 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Inspired by biological functions seen in mussels and insects, Korean scientists have manufactured a nontoxic surgical glue, which seals surgical openings within one minute, and may become a viable replacement for sutures and staples. … Researchers later determined a part of the “mussel ‘glue’ molecule, called catechol, pushes water molecules out of the way to bind directly to (a) wide variety of surfaces,” according to the American Chemical Society.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Smart Window Material Advancements for Improved Light and Energy Efficiency"
July 22, 2015

Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin are one step closer to delivering smart windows with a new level of energy efficiency, engineering materials that allow windows to reveal light without transferring heat and, conversely, to block light while allowing heat transmission, as described in two new research papers. … In this paper, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Milliron proved that a coating containing a single component ¬— doped titania nanocrystals—could demonstrate dynamic control over the transmittance of solar radiation.

More than 20 media outlets, including Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits)
"American Chemical Society expands reach to include rapidly emerging area of sensor science"
July 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Sensors research encompasses the study of miniaturized devices that can detect specific biological, chemical, or physical processes; compounds; or ions in complex samples and that transmit real-time information. With the global sensors market estimated to reach over $110 billion by 2019, the foreseen impact of various sensors is significant. As sensors continue to shrink in size, decrease in cost and require less power, the need for sustained innovation is paramount, and fundamental chemistry research forms the basis for diverse applications.

… From the Blogs

Free Press Journal
"E-cigarettes may be as addictive as traditional ones"
July 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

E-cigarettes may be as addictive as traditional ones as they contain nicotine in the most addictive form, researchers say. Electronic cigarettes or “e-cigs” have been touted as a tool smokers can use to wean themselves off of traditional cigarettes, which many believe are more harmful than their “e” counterparts. But because e-cig liquid also contains nicotine and emits carcinogens, researchers wonder whether that perception is really true. … The study was published in the American Chemical Society (ACS)’s journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

Business2Community
"Christopher Columbus Wants To Direct Another Harry Potter; Invisibility Cloaks Could Exist"
July 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Could fans get a new Harry Potter movie? That would be the desire of Christopher Columbus. …. In awesome related news, The American Chemical Society released a video called “Reactions” that explores how teams of scientists and researchers are making advances in cloaking technology (you know like Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak) so that one day cloaking devices might become a reality.

Connecticut College
"Professor talks to National Geographic about firefly research"
July 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Chemistry Professor Bruce Branchini recently spoke to National Geographic about his latest paper, which reveals new evidence of how firefly chemistry works. … The research by Branchini and his team was initially reported in a paper featured in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Their findings have broad implications that could apply to other bioluminescent organisms and could help inform new discoveries in medicine, military technology and other important fields.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Love the Beach? What You Should Know About Fecal Contamination"

July 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If your response to learning the local beach is closed due to fecal contamination is to wrinkle your nose and lay out your blanket for sunbathing on the sand, you may want to reconsider. A new study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, notes that scientists have for a decade known what many beachgoers don’t: that the fecal bacteria that lurks in sand can be as much as 100 times higher than what’s in the adjacent seawater.

More than 125 media outlets, including Salon (U.S: 17.6 million unique monthly visits), Drugs.com (Auckland, NZ: 16.1 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Jezebel (U.S.: 5.9 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Newser (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), Men’s Fitness (U.S.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), Empire State Tribune (U.A.E.: 194,600 unique monthly visits), Daily Times Gazette (Israel: 165,400 unique monthly visits), Science World Report (128,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and NYC News (New York, NY: 73,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"The Surprising Reason Your Feet Smell"

July 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

You don't have to be a teenage athlete to have a case of stinky feet. But we have a feeling you already know that. As explained in the Reactions video above, the bottoms of your feet are covered in sweat glands. Sweat doesn't have any stank on its own, but it does facilitate the growth of bacteria that release foul-smelling gasses. Wearing shoes exacerbates the odors because the footwear provides an ideal environment for the bacteria.

More than 45 media outlets, including Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits), Ask Men (Canada: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Softpedia News (2.7 million unique monthly visits), Metro (London, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and BT (London, U.K.: 149,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Does bathing in red wine do anything besides waste good booze?"

July 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

A lot of high-end spas around the world offer some weird health and beauty treatments that involve bathing in liquids that you usually don't see coming out of faucets, unless you can afford to install such plumbing or have a really bad plumber. … The folks over at Chemical & Engineering News' online series "Speaking of Chemistry" decided to give it a try and determine if the chemical properties of red wine make for good bathwater.

More than 22 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits),  Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Science magazine (Washington, DC: 971,000 unique monthly visits) and LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ABC News (New York, NY: 21.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Contaminated Sand May Make Beachgoers Sick, New Study Says"

July 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

When beaches are closed due to pollution, a few fearless beachgoers may think that they're safe as long as they remain on land. But a newly published study says even the sand may not be safe from dangerous bacteria, and can potentially recontaminate the water. Researchers from the University of Hawaii created microcosms of contaminated beaches by making models where both sand and water were tainted with waste water. In the study published this month in Environmental, Science and Technology journal, the researchers found that dangerous bacteria that can cause diarrhea or other gastrointestinal problems for beachgoers remain present in the sand for far longer than they do in the water.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Cancer Can Now Be Diagnosed For Less Than $2, Thanks To Harvard University's 'Paper Machine'"

July 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A new portable disease-detecting “paper machine” has been developed by a team of researchers at Harvard University. … "The prototype device integrates paper microfluidics (to enable fluid handling) and a multilayer structure, or a 'paper machine,' that allows a central patterned paper strip to slide in and out of a fluidic path and thus allows introduction of a sample, wash buffers, an amplification master mix, and detection reagents with minimal pipetting, in a handheld, disposable device intended for point-of-care use in resource-limited environments," the researchers reported in the study, which has been published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 50 media outlets, including Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), NDTV Food (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science magazine (Washington, DC: 971,000 unique monthly visits)
"Solving the mystery of the invisible 'sea sapphire'"

July 17, 2015 
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Male “sea sapphires” are a study in extremes. While swimming in tropical and subtropical waters around the world, the ant-sized crustaceans, known as Sapphirina copepods, blaze between brilliant shades of color and near invisibility. … Whereas the stacks of crystal among the different shades of copepods were all about 70 nanometers thick, the cytoplasm spacing ranged between 50 and 200 nanometers, the researchers report this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 25 media outlets, including New Scientist (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

PBS.org (Washington, DC: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The science of caffeine"

July 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Millions of Americans use caffeine, the world’s most popular drug, every day to boost their energy. Caffeine can produce heightened brain activity, increase athletic performance, increase the flow of oxygen to the brain and raise your heart rate and ability to concentrate. Although useful, the drug can cause jitters, anxiety and discomfort if higher doses are consumed. Show your class this video from the American Chemical Society, then have them answer the following questions.

CBS News (New York, NY: 12.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The worst place for bacteria at the beach"

July 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Heading to the beach this weekend? A new study finds that when it comes to germs, beachgoers may have more to fear from the sand they sit on than the water they swim in. … The study was published online recently in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

The Associated Press (New York, NY: “seen by half the world's population on any given day”)
"Study finds contaminants in California public-water supplies"

July 15, 2015

Nearly one-fifth of the raw groundwater used for public drinking water systems in California contains excessive levels of potentially toxic contaminants, according to a decade-long U.S. Geological Survey study that provides one of the first comprehensive looks at the health of California's public water supply and groundwater. … The findings, published by the Environmental Science & Technology journal of the American Chemical Society, draw on data from state monitoring of public supply wells and from well testing by the U.S. Geological Survey and others. A public water supply is any source serving three or more people.

More than 25 media outlets, including ABC News (New York, NY: 21.2 million unique monthly visits), The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Times (Washington, DC: 4.9 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Chocolate Made With Beer Yeast Tastes Even Better, Plus 4 Other Ways Science Is Making Chocolate More Awesome"

July 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

… Chocolate on its own is already has a lot of health benefits if eaten in moderation; however, a study released earlier this year from the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society found that changing the way we make chocolate can retain some of the nutritional benefits of cocoa in it that are often lost in the current chocolate-making process.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The science behind stinky feet: Video reveals the processes that cause a nasty stench, and how to stop it"

July 13, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Soaring temperatures can transform your feet into a sweaty mess. And for many, this added perspiration could be making your feet produce some nasty odours. Now a new video has revealed the science behind stinky feet – and it even provides some tips to help you combat it. The video, by the American Chemical Society, explains how the bacteria that live on your skin and in your shoes eats your sweat, producing an acid by-product that reeks.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists Invent New Letters for Nature’s Genetic Alphabet"

July 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

DNA stores our genetic code in an elegant double helix. But some argue that this elegance is overrated. “DNA as a molecule has many things wrong with it,” said Steven Benner, an organic chemist at the Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution in Florida. … In two papers published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society last month, the researchers have shown that two synthetic nucleotides called P and Z fit seamlessly into DNA’s helical structure, maintaining the natural shape of DNA.

Smithsonian (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"What’s the Deal With Wine Baths?"

July 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Wine baths seem to be all the rage these days. NBA star Amar'e Stoudemire swears by the practice, and made headlines last October when he took posted a picture of himself mid-wine bath. … Wine baths can be pretty expensive. So, is there any science to back them up or is this just a fruitless fad of the rich and famous? That’s a question Chemical & Engineering News’ Matt Davenport aims to answer in this week’s episode of “Speaking of Chemistry.”

Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 3.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists uncover how this tiny sea creature becomes invisible"

July 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Sea sapphires are tiny crustaceans that belong to the Sapphirina genus of copepods. The males of some species are shimmery, and even have the ability to seemingly disappear from plain sight. … These findings are published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New hand-held paper machine could be used for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, cancer"

July 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In the U.S. and other industrialized nations, testing for infectious diseases and cancer often requires expensive equipment and highly trained specialists. In countries where resources are limited, performing the same diagnostics is far more challenging. To address this disparity, scientists are developing a portable, low-cost "paper machine" for point-of-care detection of infectious diseases, genetic conditions and cancer. Their report appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Platinum Alternative For Fuel Cells Could Facilitate Hydrogen-Powered Cars"

July 15, 2015

Hydrogen power is a tantalizing green energy solution, but the need for expensive materials such as platinum in hydrogen fuel cells has held the technology back commercially. … The new nonmetal catalyst materials can produce hydrogen power with efficiency comparable to that of platinum, researchers report in the journal ACS Central Science.

More than 23 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The Feds Created a Helium Problem That’s Screwing Science"

July 15,2015

So you may have heard about a helium shortage. Helium is indeed so light that it can float up and out of Earth’s atmosphere—but that’s not the real problem. The trouble, says a new report, is actually political, a string of bad decisions that threw helium prices into chaos. … In 2014, the American Physical Society and the American Chemical Society connected with the Defense Logistics Agency, which buys helium for the military, to broker lower costs for researchers.

Softpedia News (2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Why We Love and Adore Music, As Explained by Science"

July 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Some of us are quite good at it, others not so much. Then again, it's the thrill that we're after and, with the perfect song ringing in our ears, that's bound to happen. In a new video, available below, researchers with the American Chemical Society detail the effect that music has on our brain and try to explain why it is that we humans love it as much as we do.

Phys.Org  (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Lessons learned from the Exxon Valdez and Deepwater Horizon oil spills"

July 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Five years ago this week, engineers stopped the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill—the largest one in U.S. history, easily displacing the Exxon Valdez spill from the top spot. Now, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the lessons scientists are learning from these accidents to improve clean-up efforts and, perhaps, prevent spills altogether.

The News & Observer (Raleigh, NC:988,000 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists create film to keep stinky food under wraps"

July 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Some of the world’s most popular foods and seasonings can also be the smelliest – including garlic, onions, certain cheeses and the notoriously stinky Asian durian fruit. No amount of plastic wrap seems to contain their stench, but Swedish scientists have developed a new film that could finally neutralize the odors of even the most pungent fare. Their report is in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Eight media outlets, including Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Implantable 'artificial pancreas' could help diabetes patients control their blood sugar"

July 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Living with Type 1 diabetes requires constant monitoring of blood sugar levels and injecting insulin daily. Now scientists are reporting in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research the development of an implantable “artificial pancreas” that continuously measures a person’s blood sugar, or glucose, level and can automatically release insulin as needed.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Duke University researchers devise new method for making potential nanoscale cancer treatment"

July 14, 2015

In a move akin to adding chemical weapons to a firebomb, researchers at Duke University have devised a method for making a promising nanoscale cancer treatment even more deadly to tumors. … The technique is described in a paper published in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering on July 13, 2015, and was highlighted as an ACS Editor's Choice.

More than 17 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

TV Newsroom
"Beach goers warned: Beach sand contains fecal bacteria"

July 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

So, the next time you go to the beach, think twice about venturing too far to the water, as that is where the risk of infection is most high. Team leader Tao Yan noted that “wastewater-contaminated marine beach sand may act as a chronic source of wastewater bacteria to the beach seawater”.  … The findings of the study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, show that the microbial groups decompose at a slower pace in a beach sand environment model compared with when they are placed in the water.

Military Tech
"Lessons learned from the Exxon Valdez and Deepwater Horizon oil spills"

July 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Five years ago this week, engineers stopped the Deepwater Horizon oil spill -- the largest one in US history, easily displacing the Exxon Valdez spill from the top spot. Now, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the lessons scientists are learning from these accidents to improve clean-up efforts and, perhaps, prevent spills altogether.

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