ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131 million unique monthly visits)
"Chew On This: The Science Of Great NYC Bagels (It's Not The Water)"

May 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

One of the first life lessons I picked up in college was this: The secret to the shiny crust and chewy bite prized in New York bagels is boiling. Any other way of cooking them, my Brooklyn born-and-raised, freshman-year roommate told me, is simply unacceptable. Now, many years later, it turns out she was pretty much right. In a new video, the American Chemical Society breaks down the chemistry of what makes New York bagels superior to the also-rans — the disappointing "bagels" you often encounter outside of New York that merely taste like bread with a hole in it.

More than 75 media outlets, including PBS.org (Washington, DC: 5.6 million unique monthly visits), Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits), Vox (U.S.: 15.4 million unique monthly visits), The Oregonian (Portland, OR: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Mother Jones (San Francisco, CA: 3.3 million unique monthly visits), Quartz (New York, NY: 2.5 million unique monthly visits), Palm Beach Post (West Palm Beach, FL: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 117,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Trucks Powered by Natural Gas: Help or Hindrance to Emissions-Reduction Efforts?"

May 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As a strengthening U.S. economy has boosted freight volumes, more commercial trucks are taking to the open road—all of them subject to new, stricter federal emissions standards….The study—published this week in “Environmental Science & Technology” and conducted by researchers with nonprofit advocacy group the Environmental Defense Fund—found that shifting to natural gas from diesel in the nation’s trucking sector “leads to damages to the climate” for anywhere from 50 to 90 years, depending on the type of natural-gas engine.

More than 25 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), Environmental Defense Fund (New York, NY: 222,400 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Manufacturing.net (U.S.: 119,000 unique monthly visits), Fleet Owner (U.S.: 54,300 unique monthly visits) and DC Velocity (North Attleboro, MA: 25,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Report Progress in Making All Blood Types Universally Accepted"

May 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists are closing in on a way to transform any type of donated blood into type O, the universal blood type that can safely be given to any patient. Researchers have created a special enzyme that can shear off the substances on red blood cells that are responsible for potentially fatal immune reactions if a patient receives the wrong type of blood, according to a new study….Results of the study were published online recently in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Hyperthyroidism in cats may be caused by certain flame retardants"

May 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Certain flame retardants may be contributing to the increase of hyperthyroidism in cats. A study published in the American Chemical Society's journal, "Environmental Science & Technology" looked at blood samples from 37 cats with hyperthyroidism, and 23 with normal thyroid function. It found that the cats with hyperthyroidism had elevated levels of these flame retardants in their bloodstreams.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"How Chemistry Gives New York City Bagels an Edge"

May 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

In the great hierarchy of bagel quality, New York City seems to reign supreme. But why, exactly, the Big Apple reigns supreme is a matter of debate, as narrator Noel Waghorn states in the American Chemical Society's latest explainer video above. For years, some New York residents have been touting city water, as the primary source of their bagel success. And it's true, the water does make a difference. But it's not the only thing that influences the taste, Waghorn says.

The Guardian (London, U.K.: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Flame retardants may be coming off of furniture, but they're still in your TV sets"

May 19, 2015

“When’s the last time you watched TV by candlelight?” asks Arlene Blum, founder of the Green Science Policy Institute. Blum questions the logic of television sets being coated in chemicals that are either known health hazards or under-researched. … Roughly a dozen flame-retardant chemicals are commonly used in electronics, according to the American Chemical Society.  

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Cat thyroid ills: Blame chemicals?"

May 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology found that hyperthyroidism in cats might be linked to exposure to flame retardants used in plastics and furniture. Researchers at Sweden's Stockholm University found high levels of the chemicals - known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers - in blood samples from cats with hyperthyroidism.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Toward ‘green’ paper-thin, flexible electronics"

May 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The rapid evolution of gadgets has brought us an impressive array of "smart" products from phones to tablets, and now watches and glasses. But they still haven't broken free from their rigid form. Now scientists are reporting in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a new step toward bendable electronics.

More than 50 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), Sci-News.com (182,100 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 117,700 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Techie News (Ahmedabad, India: 22,100 unique monthly visits), Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits)
"Experimental Ebola treatment boosts survival in mice"

May 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The number of new Ebola cases is tapering off, but the search for new treatments continues. Now, one research team has found potential drug candidates that successfully treated up to 90 percent of mice exposed to the Ebola virus. They report their findings in the journal ACS Infectious Diseases.

More than 20 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Deccan Herald (Bangalore, India: 92,100 unique monthly visits), TerraDaily (Sydney, Australia: 52,300 unique monthly visits), Infection Control Today (U.S.: 35,700 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Ocean Microbes Can Influence Atmosphere - What Does This Mean For Climate Change?"

May 18, 2015

Ocean microbes could influence the atmosphere, according to a new study. This new finding could alter how climate models are produced and interpreted, as well as our understanding of climate change. … "Freshly emitted SSA are composed of both sea salt and organic material, and under certain conditions the organic species comprise a substantial fraction of the total particle mass, especially for smaller diameter particles," researchers wrote in a research article published by the American Chemical Society's Central Science.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), The Science Times (Irvine, CA: 183,100 unique monthly visits) and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Wearables may get boost from boron-infused graphene"

May 18, 2015

A microsupercapacitor designed by scientists at Rice University that may find its way into personal and even wearable electronics is getting an upgrade. The laser-induced graphene device benefits greatly when boron becomes part of the mix. … The research is detailed in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Medical Design Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 40,300 unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 29,900 unique monthly visits), Wireless Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 25,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)
"Survey on academic diversity shows little progress"

May 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Despite efforts over decades to diversify the ranks of university faculty, only 4% of chemistry professorships at 50 leading U.S. colleges and universities are held by underrepresented minorities. That key finding and others related to diversity in academia came from a new survey conducted by a program called Open Chemistry Collaborative in Diversity Equity (OXIDE) in partnership with Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).

HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial Muscles Could Be Made More Durable Using Graphene"

May 22, 2015

Scientist have discovered a way to create more durable artificial muscles using a newly-developed electrode composed of a single-atom-thick layer of carbon called graphene. The findings were published in a recent edition of the journal ACS Nano.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"New Catalysts Are Cheaper, Greener"

May 19, 2015

Yale Univ. chemists have helped develop a family of new chemical catalysts that are expected to lower the cost and boost the sustainability of the production of chemical compounds used by a number of industries. The new catalysts are based on palladium, a rare and expensive metal. Palladium catalysts are used to form an array of chemical compounds in pharmaceuticals, plastics, agrochemicals and many other industries. The researchers describe the new technology in an article published in ACS Catalysis.
Eight media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Manufacturing.net (U.S.: 119,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

WKMS (Murray, KY)
"Western Kentucky a Birthplace of Steel: A WKMS News Documentary"

May 18, 2015

The production explores the history and mystery of western Kentucky’s early 19th century iron industry and how one of the men behind it, William Kelly, developed the process of refining iron into steel that kickstarted America’s rise to industrial might. … "Western Kentucky A Birthplace of Steel" was inspired by information in a successful nomination authored by MSU Chemistry professor Dr. Bommanna Loganathan that resulted in Kentucky's first ever National Historic Chemical Landmark designation from the American Chemical Society.

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong, China: 459,300 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers use gold nanoparticles to detect cancer risk"

May 17, 2015

Qun "Treen" Huo grew up in Hunan province, tagging along with her grandparents to government farm fields to work, picking peanuts and whatever was in season. From those days, she harvested lessons for a lifetime. … The study, funded by the Department of Defence Prostate Cancer Research Programme, was published in the journal of Applied Materials and Interfaces.

… TV and Radio News

WBRC-BIRM FOX (Birmingham, AL: local viewership 73,599)
"Transforming all donated blood into a universal type"

May 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] ...blood type that can safely be given to any one. researchers have created a special enzyme that can take off the substances on red blood cells that may cause immune reactions if a patient is given the wrong blood type. their report appears online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society."

More than 15 media outlets, including KHON-HON FOX (Honolulu, HI: local viewership 55,097), WIBX-AM (Utica, NY), WROC-AM (Rochester, NY) and KIRO-AM (Seattle, WA) covered the story.

KABB-SAT FOX  (San Antonio, TX: local viewership 41,096)
"Beer marinade could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats"

May 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] barbecue marinade. according to the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, a beer barbecue marinade reduces the formation of potentially harmful substances.

KTEJ PBS (Jonesboro, AR: local viewership 2,607)
"Why does bacon smell so good?"

May 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] ...where you help bacon man restore his rightful place on the meat throne. scientists have even tracked down why bacon smells so good the American Chemical Society says 150 volatile organic compounds work together to create a delicious combination.

… From the Blogs

Compound Semiconductor
"Toward ‘green’ paper-thin, flexible electronics"

May 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists in China have reported what they claim is the first light-emitting, transparent and flexible paper made out of environmentally friendly materials. In the journal ACS Applied Materials, Yu-Zhong Wang, Fei Song and colleagues from Sichuan University describe using a simple suction filtration method to develop a thin, clear nanocellulose paper made out of wood flour and infused with quantum dots made out of zinc and selenium.

Lab Manager
"Disposable Wipes are Costing Sewage Systems Millions of Dollars"

May 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Several class-action lawsuits filed recently against the makers of flushable wet-wipes have brought to light a serious — and unsavory — problem: The popular cleaning products might be clogging sewer systems. But whether the manufacturers should be held accountable is still up in the air, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News(C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Here’s How to Cut Avocados For Maximum Health Benefits"

May 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

You already knew avocados were good for you, but did you know that a simple trick can maximize its health benefits? This video from the American Chemical Society offers a tutorial on how to cut and peel the fruit (yes, it’s a fruit) to get the most nutrients. Oh, the video also explains why your guacamole tends to turn brown quickly, and offers several tips to keep your dip as green as possible.

More than 18 media outlets, including Food & Wine (New York, NY: 2.3 million unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 117,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Now keep your appetite in check with this new obesity treatment"

May 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A new study has shed light on a new treatment for potential obesity that targets the two sides of appetite i.e. hunger and feeling full. Scientists at American Chemical Society (ACS) have designed a hormone-like compound to suppress hunger and boost satiety, or a full feeling, at the same time.

More than 30 media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Coffee grounds may make food healthier"

May 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

There was a time when drinking coffee was viewed as basically having nothing of value to offer for your health while also being a possible contributor to high blood pressure. In recent years health benefits of drinking coffee have emerged. The American Chemical Society reported on May 13, 2015, even used coffee grounds could make some food healthier.

More than 35 media outlets, including Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Science World Report (New York, NY: 101,700 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"How To Peel An Avocado: The Correct Way To Prepare The Fruit In Five Simple Steps"

May 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Avocados can be tricky to prepare, but boy are they worth the trouble. If you've been taking a somewhat haphazard approach to opening the fruit - and, as a result, end up with a pile of creamy mush on your plate - then take note. There's a super simple way to peel the green foodstuff, says the American Chemical Society (ACS), which means that you can get the maximum health benefits from it.

Newsweek (U.S.: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Fracking Could Increase Risk of Cancer, New Study Finds"

May 14, 20154

Living near to active fracking sites could increase the risk of cancer as the process harmful chemicals into the air, a new study has found. Researchers from Oregon State University (OSU) and the University of Cincinnati found that hydraulic fracturing, commonly known as fracking, releases polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are linked to cancers and respiratory diseases. The study found that moving just one mile away from active sites reduced the levels of the dangerous chemicals in the air by up to 30%. … The study was published in Environmental Science & Technology.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The material with the MIDAS touch: New supercooled liquid instantly glows gold when it's touched"

May 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A material has been demonstrated that crystallises and produces light as soon as it is touched. Called an organic supercooled liquid, a video captures the moment the material becomes extremely bright after being rubbed by a crystal. And the results may be useful in creating better memory storage systems for computers or medical sensors. The research, reported by the American Chemical Society, was carried out by Kyeongwoon Chung and Dr Jinsang Kim from the University of Michigan.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Perfect Science (Cleveland, OH: 31,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Mic.com (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"What Adderall Really Does to Your Brain — in One Stunning Video"

May 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

In the United States, few medicines get as much attention as Adderall. The drug is well-known as a treatment for millions living with ADHD, and as a widely used study aid for untold numbers of students looking for an edge on their exams, whether or not they have diagnosed condition. But for those who have wondered what exactly Adderall is, and how taking a stimulant reduces ADHD symptoms, the American Chemical Society has produced a new video that should help.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Baby Wipes, The Least Likely Menace To America's Infrastructure"

May 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Baby wipes aren't just for infants anymore. In case you haven't heard, the New York Times highlighted the trend in 2013, and the New Yorker followed suit in a discussion of the adult moist wipes. However you're using the wipes, these moistened sheets of cleanliness are wreaking havoc on America's sewer systems. The American Chemical Society has a new report detailing how wipes are becoming a multimillion-dollar nuisance for cities and states.

Eight media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 5.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Where to Find the Best (Scientific) Explosions on the Web"

May 15, 2015

HUGE CONSTRUCTIONS, LOUD NOISES, insane visual effects, mad geniuses, and liberties taken with the laws of physics. It’s not a summer blockbuster—it’s science!  Spectacular science—or big fat kaboom kablooeys—is essential to support discoveries in energy, physics, and materials testing for buildings, weapons and more....Chemical & Engineering News hosts an eye-popping Tumblr photoblog of the most visually stunning photos in current chemistry research and demonstrations.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"How 75 Years Ago Nylon Stockings Changed the World"

May 11, 2015

Major technological innovations such as gunpowder, GPS and freeze dried ice cream are more likely to be credited to military research than to women’s undergarments, but one humble pair of lady’s stockings in the Smithsonian collections represents nothing less than the dawn of a new age—the age of synthetics...The name may have become synonymous with stockings, but hosiery was merely the market of choice for nylon’s introduction. According to the American Chemical Society it was a well calculated decision.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is What Adderall Does To Your Brain"

May 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

It's a little pill that can make you hyper-focused, suppress your appetite, and improve your mood and energy levels. Sound familiar? Adderall is used by over 25 million people worldwide to treat ailments including ADHD, narcolepsy and depression -- and increasingly, the pills are being taken without a prescription to boost performance at school or work. So what happens in your brain when you pop one? A new video from the American Chemical Society's series, Reactions, has some answers. In short: It's all about the dopamine.

More than 25 media outlets, including Refinery29 (New York, NY: 10.6 million unique monthly visits) and New York Magazine (New York, NY: 6.5 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Inquisitr (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Fracking May Affect Human Health And Air Quality, Study Finds"

May 15, 2015

Fracking may expose people living or working near active natural gas wells to pollutants. Higher levels of certain pollutants may increase the risk of respiratory ailments and cancer for people in the immediate area where fracking takes place, according to a recent study by researchers at the University of Oregon and University of Cincinnati….The team of researchers published their study in the online version of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits)
"It's Healthy To Eat Coffee Grounds, Study Shows, So Stop Throwing That Antioxidant-Packed Goodness Away"

May 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Coffee bounces back and forth between being portrayed as an unhealthful vice and a health-boosting habit. Fortunately, right now, the energy-giving brew appears to be on the upswing....Researchers publishing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry analyzed used coffee grounds and discovered that they are full of antioxidants (namely, “dietary phenolic compounds,” which help to protect cardiovascular health).

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Feather-inspired nanomaterials create color with light"

May 14, 2015

Drawing inspiration from the way physical structure, not pigments, determines the colors of bird feathers, a team of researchers has developed a type of nanomaterial capable of reflecting the pure colors of light based on their thickness and density. As they explain in a recent edition of the journal ACS Nano, University of California, San Diego chemistry and biochemistry professor Nathan Gianneschi and colleagues studied the way structural colors arise from the way that bird feathers interact with light.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"A nano-transistor assesses your health via sweat"

May 15, 2015

Made from state-of-the-art silicon transistors, an ultra-low power sensor enables real-time scanning of the contents of liquids such as perspiration. Compatible with advanced electronics, this technology boasts exceptional accuracy – enough to manufacture mobile sensors that monitor health. … Published in the journal ACS Nano, the device is based on transistors that are comparable to those used by the company Intel in advanced microprocessors.

Seven media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Epoch Times (China: 17 million unique monthly visits)
"The Things You Can Do With Lemon Peels and Juice"

May 12, 2015

In the US, lemons have been grown since the 16th century in Florida, after being brought to the New World by Christopher Columbus….As noted in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry: “The anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of Citrus flavonoids can play a key role in their activity against several degenerative diseases and particularly brain diseases.”

Yale University News (New Haven, CT: 2.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Within colors of bees and butterflies, an optical engineer’s dream is realized"

May 14, 2015

Evolution has created in bees, butterflies, and beetles something optical engineers have been struggling to achieve for years — precisely organized biophotonic crystals that can be used to improve solar cells, fiber-optic cables, and even cosmetics and paints, a new Yale-led study has found….They found that the architecture of these nanostructures are identical to chemical polymers engineered by chemists and materials scientists, according to the report published May 14 in the journal Nano Letters.

Three media outlets, including Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Berkeley Lab News  (Berkeley, CA: 312,100 unique monthly visits)
Berkeley Lab News

May 14, 2015

Soft matter encompasses a broad swath of materials, including liquids, polymers, gels, foam and – most importantly – biomolecules. At the heart of soft materials, governing their overall properties and capabilities, are the interactions of nano-sized components. … Observing these dynamics at sufficient resolution has been a major challenge, but this challenge is now being met with a new non-invasive nanoscale imaging technique that goes by the acronym of CLAIRE. … A paper describing the most recent work on CLAIRE has been published in the journal Nano Letters.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WGN (Chicago, IL: local viewership 79,371)
"How used coffee-grounds could make some food more healthful"

May 13, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript]  ...rich source of antioxidants called by flavonoids. Some making their way into the brew coffee you drink but even more stay in the spent grounds. that is why scientists writing in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry say save the grounds and add them to food.

WTVR-RIC CBS (Richmond, VA: local viewership 59,429) and WTKR-NFK CBS (Norfolk, VA: local viewership 46,409) also covered the story.

… From the Blogs

The News Reports
"Potential obesity treatment will suppress hunger and boost satiety"

May 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers are working on a potential treatment for obesity that will target two facets of appetite – feeling hungry and feeling full – by creating a molecule that suppresses hunger....Reported in the ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, the study found that obese mice given the compound for 14 days had a tendency to eat less than the other groups.

Green Car Congress
"ORNL team demonstrates first large-scale graphene composite fabrication"

May 15, 2015

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have fabricated polymer composites containing 2-inch-by-2-inch sheets of graphene using chemical vapor deposition….While graphene has enormous commercial potential, it has been impractical to employ on a large scale, with researchers limited to using small flakes of the material. The ORNL findings, reported in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, could enable large-scale fabrication of graphene composites.

Energy Harvesting Journal
"New shortcut to solar cells"

May 18, 2015

Rice University scientists have found a way to simplify the manufacture of solar cells by using the top electrode as the catalyst that turns plain silicon into valuable black silicon.   The Rice lab of chemist Andrew Barron disclosed the research in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

ACS Publications logo

ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.