ACS in the News

PBS NewsHour (Washington, DC: 5.6 million unique monthly visits)
"In space, recycled urine has many uses"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Recycled urine is something astronauts are already psychologically prepared to consume when they go to outer space. But a new report published in the ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering journal suggests that rather than releasing wasted urine into space, scientist are working on a new technique that can convert the urine into drinking water and fuel. The reasoning behind this? Cost. Due to the high cost of delivering supplies to space, the recovery of potable water from spacecraft wastewater is critical for life support of crewmembers, the report said. The report’s authors Eduardo Nicolau, Carlos R. Cabrera and colleagues used their new Urea Bioreactors Electrochemical System, or UBE, to collect urine and shower wastewater and filtered out urea and water using forward osmosis.

More than 30 media outlets, including Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Outside Online (Santa Fe, NM: 2.0 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), and BioSpace (San Francisco, CA: 33,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Google Doodle Honors Chemist Dr. Percy Julian"

April 11, 2014

April 11, 2014 would have been Dr. Julian Percy’s 115th Birthday and it was a beautiful sight to behold – seeing today’s Google Doodle honoring the man and his science. “Dr. Julian’s story is a fascinating one and I encourage you to read over the ACS and Wikipedia entries. As you might imagine, he faced discrimination but also managed to find the opportunity for education, including his doctoral studies at the University of Vienna. Dr. Julian turned to private industry for employment after becoming frustrated with the academic pathway. Along the way he founded his own company and nonprofit research institute.”

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is Why You Get Spring Allergies"

April 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Spring has sprung, which means the arrival of chirping birds, sunny days, blooming trees and flowers and … spring allergies. But why do some people get allergies -- and all the miserable symptoms that accompany them -- while others don't? And what causes allergies, anyway? "Allergy is actually a mistake that the immune system is making," says Dr. Calman Prussin, M.D., of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, in the video above. "Normally we make antibodies to fight germs and to recognize germs, and in this case, the immune system has made a mistake and instead is making an antibody that recognizes harmless things, such as pollens or animal dander." For more on why we get spring allergies, watch the video above from the American Chemical Society.

More than 13 media outlets, including Canada Free Press Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Recycling Astronaut Urine: Technology Converts Pee to Energy"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It is the constant battle on a road trip: when to stop for a bathroom break? Men and women tend to have very different opinions on what works for traveling rest stops and what doesn’t. But in space travel, the question becomes much more serious than a battle of the stronger bladder. On long space trips, astronaut waste accounts for nearly half of the mission’s total waste. So two researchers at the University of Puerto Rico decided to tackle the task of recycling the human wastewater. … When supplies run low, the treated urine can become a source of drinking water, which would otherwise have to be delivered from Earth at a tremendous cost, according to the American Chemical Society.

Forbes (New York, NY: 9.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Google Doodle Honors Dr. Percy Julian, Pioneering Medicinal Chemist"

April 11, 2014

It’s not every day that you wake up, turn on the laptop, and see chemical structures in the doodle on the Google search landing page. Especially those of drugs isolated or made from plants, the subject of my own academic research for more than 20 years. … Not only did Julian and Pikl synthesize physostigmine in a process that could be scaled up for industry, but they also proved a famous British scientist’s synthesis incorrect: Sir Robert Robinson, 1947 Nobel laureate in chemistry. So significant was this work that the American Chemical Society dedicated the site of their DePauw laboratory as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in 1999 and named the work one of the top 25 accomplishments in chemistry.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Could Cooking With Beer Reduce The Risk Of Cancer?"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Beer lovers, tune in. We've just found one more good excuse to consume as much beer as possible. The American Chemical Society’s 'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry' has concluded that cooking meat in beer is a good idea. The researchers found that beer reduces polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are a group of chemicals that form on meat after it's been cooked at a high temperature, like when you barbecue. In experiments with laboratory animals, PAHs have been associated with a risk of cancer.

More than 10 media outlets, including The Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 2.7 million unique monthly visits) and FoodBeast (Orange County, CA: 1.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Guardian (London, U.K.: 57.5 million unique monthly visits)
"What on earth is this thing and how exactly can it help me? Disappearing devices"

March 28, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

From Parkinson's to hip replacements, we get to grips with some examples of the ways in which nanomedicine could help study, diagnose and treat a range of diseases and medical issues. … A tiny chip is injected in a wound at risk of infection; it releases heat to kill harmful bacteria, and then disappears. Physical chemist John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign has successfully tested a device inspired by this idea in rodents. "It is an example of what we call electroceuticals – small electronic implants that perform a medical function in the body under the remote control of radio signals," he explains. Rogers' devices have the advantage that they dissolve after performing their function.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Marinating meat in beer reduces cancer risk"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Who doesn’t love a cold beer at a BBQ on a hot summer day? Well your BBQ just got even better, because according to a new study, using it to marinate your meats before grilling can actually help reduce your risk of cancer. Studies have found that grilled meats can sometimes contain cancer-causing substances after cooking. Some may argue that grilling meat gives it great flavor. This taste, though, comes at a price, since the process creates molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which damage DNA, and thus increase your chances of developing colon cancer. But now, in a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers said they found a way around the problem. When barbecuing meat, they suggested, you should add beer.

Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
" 3 Reasons to Eat Some Chocolate Right Now"

April 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Do you like chocolate? If so, I have some good news for you! Get yourself a little piece of good, dark chocolate, and check out these fun chocolate facts below. If you’re trying to watch your sugar intake, you might have given chocolate the boot along with the rest of the sweets in your life. While plowing through a pint of chocolate ice cream is still not a healthy choice, a few squares of dark chocolate once in a while is actually good for you! … A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry looked at how the flavonols in cocoa impacted weight gain. The result? Mice who ate a diet rich in the compounds found in cocoa gained less weight and processed insulin better. The latter result suggests that chocolate may also help prevent type 2 diabetes.

GeekoSystem (New York, NY: 8.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New Method Could Turn Astronaut Pee Into Drinking Water and Fuel"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Pee and other human waste (poop) are a problem in space. Processing astronaut urine for useable drinking water is nothing new on board the International Space Station, but a new process can recycle that urine into both water and energy—and it’s not just limited to space. We could all soon be generating pee-fuel. A NASA-funded report in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering by Eduardo Nicolau, Carlos R. Cabrera, and their colleagues explains their new Urea Bioreactor Electrochemical System (UBE) that converts the urea in pee to ammonia, and then converts the ammonia to energy using a fuel cell using a process called forward osmosis.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists discover promising agents to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In the fight against "superbugs," scientists have discovered a class of agents that can make some of the most notorious strains vulnerable to the same antibiotics that they once handily shrugged off. The report on the promising agents called metallopolymers appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Chuanbing Tang and colleagues note that the antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is responsible for a significant fraction of the infections that patients acquire in hospitals. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MRSA usually spreads in hospitals when a health care provider with contaminated hands unknowingly passes it along to a patient.

More than 18 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New agents may revitalize antibiotics to fight superbugs"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The Journal of the American Chemical Society has published a new study that suggests it may be possible to fight superbugs with conventional antibiotics. By pairing the drugs with a new class of metal-based agents called metallopolymers, which revitalize their potency, researchers believe they may be able to overcome drug resistance. The drug-resistant bacterium MRSA (short for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is one of the biggest causes of hospital-acquired infections in the US. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say the superbug commonly spreads in hospitals when contaminated health workers unwittingly pass it to patients via their hands. Once vulnerable patients acquire MRSA, they can become seriously ill with pneumonia and other potentially fatal conditions.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Pharma firms turn attention to hearing loss"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hearing loss affects 36 million Americans to some degree, often leaving them feeling isolated, but it has received little attention from the pharmaceutical industry — until now. Small firms have brought a handful of potential therapies to the development pipeline, and pharmaceutical heavyweights are taking notice, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly magazine of the American Chemical Society. The story states that the most common cause of hearing loss is loud noise, either from a single event like the bang of a firecracker or from chronic exposure, say daily listening to a cranked-up iPod. Although severe hearing loss can be treated with a hearing aid or cochlear implants, options are scarce for those suffering from milder damage. But there is growing interest to fill the void and to even develop preventative treatments.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Google Glass Maps Future of Medical Testing"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

A team of researchers at UCLA has transformed Google Glass into a powerful, wearable medical testing laboratory. Aydogan Ozcan and his team developed an application that reads dozens of different types of diagnostic tests for malaria, prostate cancer and HIV, to name a few. Glass uploads the results to secure servers and provides anonymous data to epidemiologists. In the American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) newest Breakthrough Science video, Ozcan demonstrates how the app works, and explains the broad impact it could have on medicine.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RiverHead News-Review (New York, NY: 67,300 unique monthly visits)
"Dark chocolate does the body good"

April 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Everyone knows a taste of chocolate is good for the soul. But not everyone knows that it’s also good for the heart. … Maryann Birmingham, nutrition educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, said health experts had long believed in chocolate’s positive effects on the heart, but the reason behind its benefits had remained a mystery — until now. The benefits of dark chocolate, according to the study, begin when the cocoa reaches the colon, according to the study. Louisiana researchers discovered that certain bacteria in the gut chow down on the chocolate, fermenting it into anti-inflammatory compounds that are good for the heart, according to the American Chemical Society, which promotes chemistry-related research.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Develop Short, Flexible, Reusable AFM Probe"

April 10, 2014

JILA researchers have engineered a short, flexible, reusable probe for the atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables state-of-the-art precision and stability in picoscale force measurements. Shorter, softer and more agile than standard and recently enhanced AFM probes, the JILA tips will benefit nanotechnology and studies of folding and stretching in biomolecules such as proteins and DNA. … The new probe design, described in ACS Nano, is the JILA research group’s third recent advance in AFM technology. JILA is jointly operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and University of Colorado Boulder.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Synthetic collagen promotes natural clotting"

April 9, 2014

Synthetic collagen invented at Rice University may help wounds heal by directing the natural clotting of blood. The material, KOD, mimics natural collagen, a fibrous protein that binds cells together into organs and tissues. It could improve upon commercial sponges or therapies based on naturally derived porcine or bovine-derived collagen now used to aid healing during or after surgery. The lab of Jeffrey Hartgerink, a chemist and bioengineer based at Rice's BioScience Research Collaborative, developed synthetic collagen several years ago. The lab's analysis of KOD for use as a hemostat, or clotting agent, appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal Biomacromolecules.

More than 12 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"More insights from tissue samples: Researchers demonstrates advantages of the HOPE fixation strategy"

April 8, 2014

A new way of preparing patient tissue for analyses might soon become the new standard. This is what researchers of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and the Research Center Borstel recommend in their current publication in the Journal of Proteome Research. They discovered that the so-called HOPE method allows tissue samples to be treated such that they do not only meet the requirements of clinical histology, but can still be characterised later on by modern methods of proteomics, a technique analyzing all proteins at once. This is successful, since the structure of the tissue is "fixed" in a way that the protein molecules remain accessible for systematic analysis. This technique therefore meets current requirements in terms of a more personalized medicine and thus opens up new opportunities for researching diseases and their therapies.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

MIT Technology Review (Cambridge, MA: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Tiny Particles May Pose Big Risk"

April 8, 2014

Thousands of consumer products — including cosmetics, sunscreens, and clothing — contain nanoparticles added by manufacturers to improve texture, kill microbes, or enhance shelf life, among other purposes. However, several studies have shown that some of these engineered nanoparticles can be toxic to cells. … The findings, published in a recent issue of the journal ACS Nano, relied on a high-speed screening technology to analyze DNA damage. This approach makes it possible to study nanoparticles’ potential hazards at a much faster rate and larger scale than previously possible.

More than 10 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), and Health Canal (NC: 23,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Clean Technica (1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Moth Eyeballs Inspire Glare-Dimming Gold-Coating For Solar Panels"

April 8, 2014

The glare from commonly used objects such as solar panels or electronics displays can be greatly reduced with the use of a newly developed transparent film black inspired by moth eyeballs. The new film — created by researchers at UC Irvine — can also aid in the main tangency of a clean surface, as it can also keep grime in raindrops and other moisture from sticking. … The findings are detailed in two new papers, one published in Nano Letters, and one in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 6 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits), and Daily Fusion (21,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)
"Scalable CVD process for making 2-D molybdenum diselenide"

April 8, 2014

Nanoengineering researchers at Rice University and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have unveiled a potentially scalable method for making one-atom-thick layers of molybdenum diselenide -- a highly sought semiconductor that is similar to graphene but has better properties for making certain electronic devices like switchable transistors and light-emitting diodes. The method for making two-dimensional molybdenum diselenide uses a technique known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and is described online in a new paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano. The finding is significant because CVD is widely used by the semiconductor and materials industries to make thin films of silicon, carbon fibers and other materials.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Photonics.com (Pittsfield, MA: 53,400 unique monthly visits)
"Solar Power, Biofuel Production Could Complement Each Other"

April 11, 2014

Photovoltaic installations may be able to give a boost to biofuels production — and vice versa — particularly in sunny and dry regions of the US. Computer simulations developed by scientists at Stanford University show that growing certain plants around photovoltaic equipment in southern California could help conserve water used to keep windblown dirt off the solar panels to ensure they operate as efficiently as possible. The crops would capture water runoff and help anchor the soil. … The work was supported by the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy at Stanford. The research was published in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), and Daily Fusion (21,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WLOX (ABC) (Biloxi, MS: Local Viewership 21,430)
"The precise reason for the health benefits of dark chocolate: mystery solved"
April 13, 2014

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

[Transcript] ...bacteria break down that material... producing anti- inflammatory compounds in the process... which can be absorbed by the body and aid in heart health. the team presented their results to the American Chemical Society... where it got national attention.

… From the Blogs

BioScholar
"Astronauts’ Pee To Get Recycled Into Clean Water"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In between the news about water on Mars, clues of life on Jupiter or new stars being formed at our galaxy’s edge, there is a less glamorous side of space exploration: what to do with astronauts’ urine! Human waste on long-term journeys into space makes up about half of the mission’s total waste. Recycling it is critical to keeping a clean environment for astronauts. … “The system was designed with space missions in mind, but the results showed that the UBE system could be used in any wastewater treatment systems containing urea and/or ammonia,” Nicolau said in a report that appeared in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

Infection Control Today
"Promising Agents Burst Through Superbug Defenses to Fight Antibiotic Resistance"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In the fight against superbugs, scientists have discovered a class of agents that can make some of the most notorious strains vulnerable to the same antibiotics that they once handily shrugged off. The report on the promising agents called metallopolymers appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Chuanbing Tang and colleagues note that the antibiotic-resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for a significant fraction of the infections that patients acquire in hospitals. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MRSA usually spreads in hospitals when a health care provider with contaminated hands unknowingly passes it along to a patient. It can cause serious problems such as pneumonia, and can lead to death.

MedGadget
"Google Glass App Reads, Interprets Chromatographic Medical Tests"

April 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Back in February we profiled a Google Glass application developed at UCLA for automatic interpretation of chromatographic tests such as lateral flow assays that are commonly used to detect a variety of analytes. The American Chemical Society just released a video with the researchers showing off and discussing the new technology.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Periodic Puns: Chemists Crack Wise for April Fool’s Day"

March 31, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Every April first, we are barraged with April Fool’s Day humor of widely varying quality. Not to be outdone, the American Chemical Society gets into the act this year with some highly-specialized jokes and puns. Some will laugh, many will groan, but everyone gets a quick refresher on the Periodic Table. And who doesn’t want that?

Forbes (New York, NY: 9.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Eat Chocolate To Get Thin? Study Touts Cocoa For Weight Loss"

April 2, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers have identified the specific ingredient in chocolate that may be most responsible for its newly recognized weight loss and anti-diabetes benefits. The announcement was made today in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Scientists have known for some time that cocoa leads the pack when it comes to flavanol-rich foods, with the potential to boost heart health, lower blood sugar, and decrease body fat. What they haven’t known is which flavanols are responsible for which health benefits.

More than 25 media outlets, including Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly views), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Glamour (U.S.: 452,000 unique monthly views), The State Column (U.S.: 897,000 unique monthly views), University Herald (New York, NY: 40,000 unique monthly views), First Post (India: 74,700 unique monthly views), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly views) covered the story.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"No, It’s Not Safe to Pee in the Pool, Says Science"

April 1, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Olympic swimmer Michael Phelps has admitted to doing it, saying “chlorine kills it, so it’s not bad.” Peeing in the pool is inarguably a gross habit, but now science is telling us that it’s also harmful to our health. A new study says chlorine doesn’t, in fact, kill the contents of our urine, but rather reacts with it to create potentially dangerous byproducts. The research, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, used a technique called membrane introduction mass spectrometry to measure the presence of dangerous byproducts in pools. Uric acid from human urine mixes with chlorine to create the cyanogen chloride (CNCI) and trichloramine (NCl3). CNCI is a toxic compound that can harm organs like the lungs, heart, and central nervous system. NCl3 has been linked with acute lung injury.

More than 15 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Latin Post (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly views) covered the story.

The Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly views)
"April Fool's Day Means It's Time For Some Chemistry Jokes. Just Don't Expect Much Of A Reaction"

April 1, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Just in time for April Fool's Day, the American Chemical Society has released a new video featuring its favorite chemistry jokes. A few might evoke a mild HeHe (get it?), but none is likely to yield a true laugh reaction. You might say they're chemically comically inert. The video leads off with this joule jewel: I don't want to seem like I have this thing where, you know, certain elements can only be with other ones or whatever, but whenever I see copper [chemical symbol Cu] and tellurium [Te] together, they're just cute.

More than 25 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Holy Kaw! (621,000 unique monthly views), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly views) covered the story.

The Economist (8.6 million unique monthly views)
"A marriage made in heaven"

April 5, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Grilling meat gives it great flavour. This taste, though, comes at a price, since the process creates molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which damage DNA and thus increase the eater’s chances of developing colon cancer. For those who think barbecues one of summer’s great delights, that is a shame. But a group of researchers led by Isabel Ferreira of the University of Porto, in Portugal, think they have found a way around the problem. When barbecuing meat, they suggest, you should add beer. This welcome advice was the result of some serious experiments, as Dr. Ferreira explains in a paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The PAHs created by grilling form from molecules called free radicals which, in turn, form from fat and protein in the intense heat of this type of cooking. One way of stopping PAH-formation, then, might be to apply chemicals called antioxidants that mop up free radicals. And beer is rich in these, in the shape of melanoidins, which form when barley is roasted. So Dr Ferreira and her colleagues prepared some beer marinades, bought some steaks and headed for the griddle.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 4.9 million unique monthly views)
"Chocolate could PREVENT obesity: Scientists say antioxidant in cocoa stops weight gain and lowers blood sugar"

April 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It has long been maligned as a source of weight gain. But chocolate could help prevent obesity and Type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. Scientists found that an antioxidant in cocoa can prevent weight gain and help lower blood sugar levels. The researchers say there is also evidence to suggest eating dark chocolate can improve thinking, decrease appetite and lower blood pressure. The latest study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, revealed that an antioxidant in cocoa can prevent mice from gaining weight and that it also lowered their blood sugar levels. Dr Andrew Neilson and his colleagues explained this is because cocoa, the basic ingredient of chocolate, is one of the most flavanol-rich foods available.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly views)
"Beer Marinade Cuts Grilling Carcinogens"

April 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Grillmasters already know that a cold brew is a fine companion at the barbecue. So here's some science to toast to—marinating meat in beer actually cuts the number of potentially cancer-causing compounds that form, as chops sizzle on the grill. So says a report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. [Olga Viegas et al, Effect of Beer Marinades on Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Charcoal-Grilled Pork] The study started out like any barbecue—with pork chops, charcoal, and beer. Researchers marinated the chops for four hours in either regular or non-alcoholic pilsner, or a dark ale. Then they fired up the grill. After cooking, they analyzed the chops for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs, which are found in smoked and grilled meats, and may up your risk of cancer.

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 4.0 million unique monthly views)
"Happy April Fool's Day! Scientists have a sense of humor too"

April 1, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Happy April Fool’s Day! Why not celebrate with a little humor from the world of science? No, that's not an April Fool’s joke. It really IS possible to blend humor with science and math. The American Chemical Society proves it in the video above. You may find some of the jokes funnier than others. One of my favorites: “Never trust an atom – they make up everything.” There’s another gem about two glasses of water concerned about the too-cool-for-school behavior of their ice-cube son. The punch line requires a junior-high understanding of chemistry.

New York Post (New York, NY: daily circulation 502,000)
"CSI tool calls shots"

March 31, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers at the State University at Albany report developing a fast method for investigators to detect and recover gunshot residue from a crime scene or suspect. Chemists Igor Lednev and Justin Bueno's approach combines tape lifting and infrared spectroscopic imaging, the university says. When a gun is fired, bullet particles discharge onto the shooter and other surfaces. That residue can show where a gun was fired. The new method creates a molecular "fingerprint" identifying a wider range of residue than typically used. Their findings appear this month in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

LifeHacker.com (U.S.: 20.9 million unique monthly views)
"The Most Nutritious Types of Apples, Ranked by Antioxidant Levels"

April 2, 2014

Some apples might be better than others when it comes to keeping the doctor away. Canadian researchers analyzed the antioxidant levels in eight different apple varieties to find which ones have the highest concentrations of those disease-fighting compounds. Blue Jack Orchards reports the study results published by the American Chemical Society. It's interesting to note that Red Delicious had more than twice the antioxidants as Empire apples. The researchers chose these varieties because they all grew on the same orchard in Ontario, so the growing conditions were the same.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly views)
"Zombie Apocalypse Survival Chemistry: Death Cologne"

April 6, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

I’m really loving the new ‘Reactions‘series from the American Chemical Society. Those of us involved in the world of science communication are well aware that effective science-storytelling involves a lot of creativity and style. Some subjects lend themselves toward visual storytelling much more than others. For example, it’s fairly easy to come up with awesome visuals to accompany a story on organismal biology, engineering or even several aspects of physics. It’s not quite as easy to do this with chemistry.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly views)
"New "3D" method could reduce the need for animal testing"

April 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

To determine whether new medicines are safe and effective for humans, researchers must first test them in animals, which is costly and time-consuming, as well as ethically challenging. In a study published in ACS' journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, scientists report that they've developed a simple, "3D" laboratory method to test asthma and allergy medications that mimics what happens in the body, which could help reduce the need for animal testing. Amir Ghaemmaghami and colleagues note that respiratory conditions, such as asthma and allergies, are becoming more common. These conditions affect the lungs and the airway leading to the lungs, making it difficult to breathe.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), MedIndia (Chennai, India: 1.2 million unique monthly views), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly views) covered the story.

The Columbus Dispatch (Columbus, OH: daily circulation 131,200)
"Chemical Abstracts owes much to Massie"

March 31, 2014

Robert Massie will retire today from Chemical Abstracts Service, a division of the American Chemical Society, after serving 21 years as president. His contributions to the world of scientific endeavor, not to mention his personal contributions to our community, are monumental. ... He changed Chemical Abstracts; it became the only organization to comprehensively "find, collect and organize all publicly disclosed chemical substance information." Its databases allow exploration of scientific articles, patents, chemical structures and much more in 50 different languages.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly views)
"Planet’s Watery Story Emerges From Martian Rocks"

April 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

After 18 months on Mars, the rover Curiosity has taken more than 120,000 measurements of surface rocks and soil, painting a more detailed image of how much water was once on the Red Planet. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) describes the technique scientists are using to analyze the rocks and what they’ve found. Celia Arnaud, a senior editor at C&EN, notes that Curiosity has traveled nearly 4 miles since it landed in 2012 and is more than halfway to its destination, Mount Sharp. But in the meantime, its onboard equipment is collecting a treasure trove of information about the Red Planet’s surface. The rover is equipped with an instrument called ChemCam, short for “Chemistry & Camera.”

More than 7 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly views), and TruthDive (Green Bay, WI: 24,600 unique monthly views) covered the story.

The Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)
"Champagne contains one million bubbles in every glass"

April 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A glass of champagne may contain approximately one million bubbles — much lower than previously estimated, researchers have found. The importance of fizz, more technically known as effervescence, in sparkling wines and champagnes contributes to the complete sensory experience of a glass, or flute, of fine bubbly, researchers said. Researchers have now closely examined the factors that affect these bubbles, and he has come up with an estimate of just how many are in each glass. The study appears in American Chemical Society's The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly views), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly views) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"A wristband for a different kind of cause — environmental health"

April 2, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

From “Livestrong” to “Purple Paws,” trendy wristbands have come to represent causes from cancer to ending cruelty to animals. Add a new wristband of a different sort: one that could close the loop on determining the potential disease risks of exposure to substances like pesticides. Scientists reported the development in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology. Kim Anderson and colleagues note that people breathe, touch and ingest a mix of many substances at low levels every day. But figuring out if natural and synthetic compounds can lead to disease is difficult. Thousands of these compounds are in common consumer products and industrial processes, but not all of them have been tested for toxicity.

… TV and Radio News

WNYW-NY (FOX) (New York, NY: Local Viewership 102,333)
"An answer to the perennial question: Is it safe to pee in the pool?"

April 2, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] going to the loo in the pool is actually harmful to our health. Researchers with the American Chemical Society say chlorine, in fact, does not kill the contents of our urine. That’s a misconception because people think that it does. >> This is terrible. >> It’s not good. It mixes to create a toxic compound that harms the organs like lungs, heart, and central nervous system. Are you kidding me? >> I’m never going to the pool again for the rest of my life.

WAND (NBC) (Champaign, IL: Local Viewership 21,422)
"Key chocolate ingredients could help prevent obesity, diabetes"

April 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] more reasons to eat chocolate! Researchers identified compounds in chocolate researchers identified compounds in chocolate that could lead to weight loss and anti-diabetes benefits. The announcement made today in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Researchers tested several groups of cocoa compounds. They found that a group of compounds called o-p-c's... help regulate blood glucose levels. Which might be useful in treating diabetes and helping with weight loss?

WMTW (ABC) (Portland, ME: Local Viewership 14,847), WDAF-KC (FOX) (Kansas City, MO: Local Viewership 11,115), and News 12 Long Island (New York, NY) also covered the story.

WDAF-KC (FOX) (Kansas City, MO: Local Viewership 53,902)
"Beer marinade could reduce levels of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats"

March 31, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] need a cancer-fighting boost? Consider barbecuing in beer. The American Chemical Society published a study showing marinating meat in beer lowered the levels of p-a-h in meat. That’s a carcinogen generated when cooked at high temperature. Black beer had the best effect, followed by pilsner beer.

KABB-SAT (FOX) (San Antonio, TX: Local Viewership 29,490), WDAY (ABC) (Fargo, ND), and WDAZ (ABC) (Minot, ND) also covered the story.

WAFB-BTR (CBS) (Baton Rouge, LA: Local Viewership 46,370)
"The precise reason for the health benefits of dark chocolate: mystery solved"

April 2, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

[Transcript] an LSU study on chocolate is getting praise from the American Chemical Society. This study took chocolate and cocoa powder a step further and their results are good news for chocolate lovers. They re-created the digestion process in the lab and found bacteria breaks down cocoa and produces anti-inflammatory compounds in the process. Which is good for the body and your heart?

KPLC (NBC) (Lafayette, LA) and KSLA-SHV (CBS) (Shreveport, LA) also covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Zip Trials
"More Health Concerns Related to E-Cigarettes"

March 31, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Electronic cigarette use is on the rise in the United States. In fact, a new report published in Chemical & Engineering News says that sales are expected to hit $1.5 billion this year. But as e-cigarettes pick up more and more steam, many wonder about the potential health concerns. E-cigarettes are battery-operated devices that generate an inhalable vapor, which may or may not contain nicotine. Unregulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the devices come in a variety of styles.

The Poultry Site
"Beer Marinade Could Reduce Levels of Harmful Substances in Grilled Meats"

March 31, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers are reporting that beer can help reduce the formation of potentially harmful substances in grilled meats when used as a marinade. I.M.P.L.V.O. Ferreira and colleagues explain that past studies have shown an association between consumption of grilled meats and a high incidence of colorectal cancer. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are substances that can form when meats are cooked at very high temperatures, like on a backyard grill. And high levels of PAHs, which are also in cigarette smoke and car exhaust, are associated with cancers in laboratory animals, although it's uncertain if that's true for people. … The study appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Food World News
"Dark Chocolate May Prevent Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes"

April 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Do you like dark chocolate? Then you may be in luck. It turns out that key ingredients in chocolate can actually help prevent diabetes. The findings come just as researchers start looking at the healthful benefits of this yummy treat. In order to find out a little bit more about the health benefits of chocolate, the researchers fed groups of mice different diets-including high-fat and low-fat diets. These diets also included a high-fat diet supplemented with different kinds of flavanols, one of the ingredients in chocolate. … The most recent findings were published in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.

Green Car Congress
"Nanodiamond-based thermal fluids outperform others"

March 31, 2014

A mixture of diamond nanoparticles and mineral oil easily outperforms other types of fluid created for heat-transfer applications, according to new research by a team led by researchers at Rice University. The results appeared this month in the American Chemical Society journal Applied Materials and Interfaces. Rice scientists mixed very low concentrations of diamond particles (about 6 nanometers in diameter) with mineral oil to test the nanofluid’s thermal conductivity and how temperature would affect its viscosity. They found it to be much better than nanofluids that contain higher amounts of oxide, nitride or carbide ceramics, metals, semiconductors, carbon nanotubes and other composite materials.