ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 22.3 million unique monthly visits)
"What Could We Build With Extra-Strong, See-Through Wood?"
April 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Wood is a great building material because it is strong, affordable and renewable. If only it were transparent! That, at least, was the thought that occurred to a team of scientists in Sweden, who went ahead and made it so—after a fashion. … “Optically Transparent Wood from a Nanoporous Cellulosic Template: Combining Functional and Structural Performance,” Yuanyuan Li, Qiliang Fu, Shun Yu, Min Yan and Lars Berglund, Biomacromolecules (March 4).

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA:146.2 million unique monthly visits) maybe not mentioned
"Touchy feely: New force-detecting synthetic skin gives robots a sense of touch"
April 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Engineers have long sought to create synthetic skin that can detect pressure as sensitively as the real thing to help robots get in touch with the world around them. The problem is this “smart skin” tends demand impractical energy and expense — but robots may soon have an energy-efficient and cost-effective means to feel their surroundings, thanks to a group of researchers who’ve developed simpler, cheaper synthetic smart skin (Links to American Chemical Society).

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 127.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Those Silicone Bracelets Track Which Chemicals You've Been Exposed To"
April 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Those Livestrong bracelets might have gone out of fashion after Lance Armstrong’s doping scandal, but scientists have come up with a new reason to bring them back. The bracelets are made of silicone, which can trap toxic pollutants that the wearer encounters. Researchers from Oregon State University recently tested the bracelets on 92 preschool children and were surprised by the number of harmful toxins the kids encountered in a week. The researchers published a study in the May issue of the journal Environmental Research, as Chemical and Engineering News reports this week.

More than 20 media outlets, including Engadget (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"This New Technology Could Help Batteries Last Longer Than They Ever Have Before"
April 23, 2016

Imagine a battery that can be recharged hundreds of thousands of times without ever corroding. A team of researchers at the University of California, Irvine, recently has invented just that using a nanowire-based battery material. … For the research, published in the journal Energy Letters on Wednesday, gold nanowires were coated with a manganese dioxide shell and encased in an electrolyte made of a Plexiglas-like gel.

More than 90 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Christian Science Monitor (Boston, MA: 24.5 million unique monthly visits), The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits), Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 14.1 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.6 million unique monthly visits), PC Magazine (New York, NY: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 7.0 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 5.1 million unique monthly visits), The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Metro (London, U.K.: 2.2 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Caller (Washington, DC: 16.4 million unique monthly visits), Engadget (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY:15.6 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits), Computer World (Framingham, MA: 4.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), BGR (New York, NY: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Free Republic (1.2 million unique monthly visits), IT World (Framingham, MA: 883,000 unique monthly visits), Science World Report (New York, NY: 185,500 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

How Stuff Works  (Atlanta, GA: 40 million unique monthly visits)
"Newly Created Transparent Wood Could Change How We Build"
April 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you prefer natural lighting to electric indoor lights, imagine how great it would be if you could have transparent walls and roof beams. … In a study just published in the American Chemical Society journal BioMacromolecules, scientists from Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology describe their creation of a "nanoporous cellulosic template."

Popular Science (New York, NY: 7.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Those Silicone Bracelets Track Which Chemicals You've Been Exposed To"
April 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Those Livestrong bracelets might have gone out of fashion after Lance Armstrong’s doping scandal, but scientists have come up with a new reason to bring them back. … The researchers published a study in the May issue of the journal Environmental Research, as Chemical and Engineering News reports this week.

Ask Men (Montreal, Canada: 3.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Is Cheese Actually Good For You?"
April 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Cheese gets a pretty bad rap in the media and from many nutritionists, but it seems that the tide may be turning in its favor…. A study at Aarhus University in Denmark last year and published by the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry also supported the suggestion that cheese could be good for the heart.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Resistance-proof antiviral that targets several diseases in development"
April 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Many efforts to fight viral diseases like Zika and Ebola focus on targeting the specific virus. But now, a new study reports progress toward a different solution - a universal antiviral that targets several diseases and relies on a mechanism that appears to be resistance-proof. A paper on the new approach, led by scientists at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore and the National University of Singapore, is published in the journal Macromolecules.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 96,600 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits) and Homeland Security Newswire (Mineola, NY: 27,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Making biodiesel with used cooking oil and a microwave"
April 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Weaning cars and trucks off of gasoline and diesel made from fossil fuels is a difficult task. One promising solution involves biodiesel, which comes from natural oils and fats, but it is costly. Using a microwave and catalyst-coated beads, scientists have devised a new way to convert waste cooking oil into biodiesel that could make it more affordable. They report how they did it in ACS' journal Energy & Fuels.

Six media outlets, including Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"A banana a day may keep blindness away!"
April 24, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you love apples, so also love the humble banana. Eating a banana daily is likely to boost eye health and prevent vision-related diseases, a study has found. … The findings, published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, can someday help in the development of banana varieties with enhanced health benefits.

More than 20 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits),
Indian Express (India: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Hindustan Times (India: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), India Today (India: 572,400 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Web India 123 (India: 27,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"You are what other people pee; reclaimed wastewater irrigation passes on drugs"
April 23, 2016

If you are what you eat, what does drinking drug-infused pee make you? That probably doesn’t sound very nice, but you may have done so without even knowing it. … A study by Israeli researchers first published in Environmental Science & Technology compared the relative amounts of an anticonvulsant drug in crops irrigated with wastewater with fresh-water irrigated produce.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 8.4 million unique monthly visits), Ars Technica (San Francisco, CA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits)
"This Video Explains the Chemistry of Snake Venom"
April 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Venom is kind of like pie, in that it’s one word that means a lot of different things (and that's where their similarities end, thankfully). Boston Cream Pie, pizza, and apple pie are all circular and contain flour, but they branch pretty dramatically from there. Similarly, a cytotoxin and a neurotoxin may both drip down a snake’s fangs and into a puncture wound, but there’s a big difference in what happens next. In the video above, the crew at the American Chemical Society breaks it all down (that’s a cytotoxin joke).

Six media outlets, including YubaNet.com (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Marijuana Advocates Want to Establish a Standard Unit of Highness"
April 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

In the last few years, marijuana advocates have made impressive strides. … "As far as potency goes, it's been surprising how strong a lot of the marijuana is," researcher Andy LaFrate says in a video released by the American Chemical Society as reported by CBS News. "We've seen potency values close to 30 percent THC, which is huge."

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Newly-developed ‘Teslaphoresis’ technique causes nanotubes to self-assemble into wires"
April 19, 2016

For the past few years, scientists at Rice University have kept a secret, which they’ve only just announced. While toying with Tesla coils and nanotubes, a group of researchers noticed something unusual – nanotubes would self-assemble into web-like patterns when met with the coil’s electrical current. It’s a new phenomenon called “Teslaphoresis” and it may pave the way for fascinating applications of nanotechnology, according to a paper published in ACS Nano.

Seven media outlets, including Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 8.4 million unique monthly visits) and News Everyday (New York, NY: 319,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Insider (New York, NY: 4.5 million unique monthly visits)
"This simple trick lets you sharpen a knife without a sharpener"
April 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Every spring I look forward to the weekend that empty stalls at my neighborhood farmer's market transform into a colorful bouquet of delicious bounty. … In a YouTube video for their Reactions Channel, The American Chemical Society shows that you can use something as simple as a plate, a mug, or really any porcelain serving ware as long as it has a rough edge on the bottom.

Country Living (Birmingham, AL: 3.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The Crazy Cooking Hack that Slashes the Calories in Rice by Half"
April 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Whether you think rice is a friend or foe to your diet, there's one thing we can all agree on: It's delicious. … New research was presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, and revealed that adding a teaspoon of coconut oil to boiling water with a half-cup of non-fortified white rice, letting it simmer for 20 to 40 minutes, then refrigerating it for 12 hours may reduce the number of calories your body takes in by 50 to 60 percent.

Bustle (New York, NY: 119.3 million unique monthly visits)
"11 Things To Do Daily For Your Mental Health, So You Can Stay Balanced & Happy"
April 18, 2016

When it comes to taking care of ourselves, we often focus more on our physical body. … Even just spending five minutes in nature can boost not only your mood, but your self-esteem as well, according to research published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 14.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Could We Turn Coal Into Electronics?"
April 22, 2016

Thanks to the availability of cheap, abundant, and cleaner-to-burn natural gas, U.S. use of coal to generate electricity has fallen to lows not seen since 1949, when the federal government first started keeping statistics. … In an article in the journal Nano Letters, the MIT scientists describe how various types of coal could be used to create thin films with adjustable electrical properties.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Breitbart (8.0 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), I4U News (Lewes, DE: 553,700 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits), Cosmos Magazine (Australia: 308,000 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 213,400 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.
Motherboard (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New Technology May Beat the 'Memory Bottleneck' with Plain Old Silicon"
April 19, 2016

Among the holy grails of computer engineering is a concept/technology called non-volatile universal memory. … While ultra-thin ferroelectric materials are hardly a novel target for universal memory, the new scheme, which is described in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, adds the highly desirable feature of silicon integration.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Advances in extracting uranium from seawater announced in special issue"
April 21, 2016

The oceans hold more than four billion tons of uranium--enough to meet global energy needs for the next 10,000 years if only we could capture the element from seawater to fuel nuclear power plants. Major advances in this area have been published by the American Chemical Society's (ACS) journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists want to use nanobots to suck pollutants from the ocean"
April 19, 2016

Swarms of graphene-coated nanobots could be our best hope yet of cleaning up the murky oceans, with scientists demonstrating that new microscopic underwater warriors can remove up to 95% of lead in wastewater in just 1 hour. … The group's work has been published in Nano Letters.

Eight media outlets, including Cosmos Magazine (Australia: 308,000 unique monthly visits) and Lifeboat Foundation (Minden, NV: 136,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New tool calculates economic costs of methane leak detection"
April 20, 2016

A new "virtual gas field simulator" developed by Stanford scientists aims to help companies and government agencies weigh the economic costs and benefits of different methane leak detection technologies and pick the best one for a given situation. The tool, detailed online in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, examines the cost associated with implementing four different detection technologies and calculates the economic benefit from the sale of additional gas saved.

Six media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

HNGN (3.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Climate Change May Be Curbed By Farmers By Locking Carbon Away In Soil"
April 19, 2016

Earth's soil may be part of the climate change solution. Scientists found that dirt could be a huge part of storing carbon in order to mitigate climate change. … The findings were published in the April edition of the journal Chemical & Engineering News.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists blend coinage metals to obtain alloys better than gold"
April 21, 2016

A peer-reviewed paper based on the study was published recently on the cover of the journal ACS Photonics. Previous work on tuning the amount of light materials absorb has been constrained by the inherent properties of pure metals.

Eight media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop new semiconducting polymer for forthcoming flexible electronics"
April 20, 2016

Polymer semiconductors, which can be processed on large-area and mechanically flexible substrates with low cost, are considered as one of the main components for future plastic electronics. … The research outcome was published in Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS) as a cover article and highlighted by the editors in JACS Spotlights.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Asian Scientist
"Robots Could Get Touchy-Feely With This Transparent Smart Skin"
April 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Smart synthetic skins have the potential to allow robots to touch and sense what’s around them, but keeping them powered up and highly sensitive while controlling costs is a challenge. Now, scientists in China report in ACS Nano a self-powered, transparent smart skin that is simpler and less costly than many other versions that have been developed.

The News Independent
"Scientists Accidentally Discovered A Way To Extend Battery Life By 400%"
April 22, 2016

Researchers from the University of California, Irvine have accidentally made a battery that can last up to 200,000 cycles of recharging and can last up to 400 times longer. According to their study that was published in the journal ACS Energy Letters, the initial concept of the research was to come up with a solid-state battery by replacing the commonly used liquid in the lithium batteries with an electrolyte gel that is much thicker.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 85 million unique monthly visits)
"Cutting food and carbon waste-lines for healthy climate"
April 7, 2016

Reducing food waste and changing the way people consume calories will help deliver a sustainable food system and reduce emissions, a study suggests. The global demand for food could more than double by the middle of the century, yet an estimated one third of produce is lost or wasted each year. By cutting this waste will help food security and reducing agriculture's climate burden, the researchers added. The findings appear in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 100 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits), Reuters (New York, NY: 49.8 million unique monthly visits), Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Newsweek (U.S.: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), The Guardian (London, U.K: 23.5 million unique monthly visits), The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 2.8 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (3.9 million unique monthly visits), NDTV Food (New Delhi, India: 2.8 million unique monthly visits) and Grist (Seattle, WA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Popular Mechanics (New York, NY: 4.5 million unique monthly visits)
"The Wood You Can See Through"
April 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

You know what the old adage says about people living in glass houses. But how about people living in houses made of transparent wood? … "We have talked to a lot of architects, and they are very interested in using these panels in housing," Berglund says. His team published the results of their year-long work in Biomacromolecules this March.

More than 12 media outlets, including Core 77 (1.5 million unique monthly visits) and Palm Beach Daily News (Palm Beach, FL: 178,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Paper-based test could help prevent food poisoning"
April 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Food poisoning is a stomach-churning, miserable condition that sends thousands of Americans to hospital emergency rooms every year. Now scientists report in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry a simple, paper-based test that could help detect pathogens hitchhiking on food before they reach store shelves, restaurants and, most importantly, our stomachs.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Daily Caller (Washington, DC: 16.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Batteries Of The Future Could Be Made Of Bacteria"
April 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists announced Wednesday they developed a rechargeable battery powered by bacteria. … The research appeared in an American Chemical Society publication, and was performed by scientists at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 127.0 million unique monthly visits)
"The Hops in Your Beer Could Help Fight Cancer"
April 5, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Hops, the magical little cone-shaped plants that add flavor your favorite beers, aren’t just for giving beer that pleasant dose of bitterness anymore. … The American Chemical Society stated in a press release that researchers are discovering more about how to extract healthful chemicals from hops, most specifically humalones, “alpha acids that have anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties.”

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"How bioceramics could help fight gum disease"
April 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Severe gum disease known as periodontitis can lead to tooth loss, and treating it remains a challenge. But new approaches involving silicon nitride, a ceramic material used in spinal implants, could be on the way. The surface of silicon nitride has a lethal effect on the bacteria that commonly cause periodontitis. Now scientists, reporting in ACS' journal Langmuir, are examining why this happens. Their findings could help inform future efforts to treat the disease.

More than 12 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and BioSpace (San Francisco, CA: 187,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 213,400 unique monthly visits)
"Understanding the scent of death"
April 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Well-trained cadaver dogs can be remarkably adept at discerning the smell of human remains from those of animals. Mimicking these canines' abilities in an artificial nose would be a huge help in disasters when thousands of people go missing. So scientists are trying to figure out what precise odors distinguish a human corpse from an animal one, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"When wasps ATTACK: Experts reveal why the evil insects target you, how to avoid being stung and whether killing one will cause an army to swarm"
April 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

If you've ever been stung by a bee or wasp, you might think the attack came out of nowhere, but bees and wasps will only sting when they feel threatened. They are social animals and often their attacks are as a response to a particular chemical given off by other members of their hive. Now the science behind these attacks have been explained in a video by The American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Metro (London, U.K.: 2.2 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

National Geographic (Washington, DC: 10.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Pesky plastic: The true harm of microplastics in the oceans"
April 4, 2016

Pollution is evidently a major concern when talking about environmental protection in light of human development, but waste that ends up in the oceans is oftentimes overlooked. … A study completed in 2015 from Environmental Science & Technology alarmingly found that eight trillion microbeads were entering aquatic environments throughout the United States every day.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Fracking Can Contaminate Drinking Water"
April 4, 2016

Former EPA scientist Dominic DiGiulio … published a comprehensive, peer-reviewed study last week in Environmental Science and Technology that suggests that people’s water wells in Pavillion were contaminated with fracking wastes that are typically stored in unlined pits dug into the ground.

More than 12 media outlets, including Ars Technica (San Francisco, CA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Week (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Why tap water is often the best kind of water for brewing coffee"
April 5, 2016

Brewing the perfect cup of coffee is both an art and a science. … Conventional wisdom will tell you filtered water is your best bet, but science says otherwise. According to a study by chemist Christopher H. Hendon in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, minerals found in tap water can greatly enhance your cup of coffee.

The Daily Meal (New York, NY: 1.5 million unique monthly visits)
"The Ultimate Ranking of the 11 Best Cheeses for Grilled Cheese Sandwiches"
April 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Grilled cheese is one of those rare foods that is both universally beloved and also incredibly easy to make. … There’s actually a fair amount of science behind which cheeses melt better than others. As explained in this handy video from the American Chemical Society, the melt factor of a specific cheese comes down to its pH level, or the level of acidity.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Fracking Wells Can Cut Their Toxic Chemical Use"
April 8, 2016

When oil and gas companies extract fuel from the earth via fracking, they routinely add biocides such as glutaraldehyde to the high-pressure water they use to fracture rock formations deep underground. … This article is reproduced with permission from Chemical & Engineering News.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanoparticles can grow in cubic shape"
April 4, 2016

Use of nanoparticles in many applications, e.g. for catalysis, relies on the surface area of the particles. Now scientists show how originally spherical nucleus can transform into cube with high surface-to-volume ratio. These nanocubes are available to be used in practice, and may interest many designers of new materials. The research has recently been reported in ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Quantum dots enhance light-to-current conversion in layered semiconductors"
April 8, 2016

Harnessing the power of the sun and creating light-harvesting or light-sensing devices requires a material that both absorbs light efficiently and converts the energy to highly mobile electrical current. … One paper, just published in the journal ACS Nano, describes a fundamental study of the hybrid quantum dot/tin disulfide material by itself.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Purdue Newsroom (West Lafayette, IN: 810,900 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers cook up new battery anodes with wild mushrooms"
April 6, 2016

Carbon fibers derived from a sustainable source, a type of wild mushroom, and modified with nanoparticles have been shown to outperform conventional graphite electrodes for lithium-ion batteries. Researchers at Purdue University have created electrodes from a species of wild fungus called Tyromyces fissilis. … Findings are detailed in a paper appearing online March 17 in the American Chemical Society's Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering journal.

Eight media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits)  covered the story.

Drexel Now (Philadelphia, PA: 834,600 unique monthly visits)
"Dressed to kill: Tailoring a suit for tumor-penetrating cancer medications"
April 8, 2016

For more than a decade, biomedical researchers have been looking for better ways to deliver cancer-killing medication directly to tumors in the body. … In research recently published in the journal Nano Letters, lead author Hao Cheng, PhD, an assistant professor with an appointment in Drexel’s College of Engineering, and affiliation with School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems; reports that the way to get past the tumor’s front door has everything to do with how the tiny particle is suited up for the journey.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Stanford News (Stanford, CA: 599,400 unique monthly visits)
"Stanford scientists improve perovskite solar-cell absorbers by giving them a squeeze"
April 6, 2016

Solar cells made of artificial crystalline structures called perovskites have shown great promise in recent years. Now Stanford University scientists have found that applying pressure can change the properties of these inexpensive materials and how they respond to light. … Karunadasa and Stanford colleague Wendy Mao presented their findings in the April 6 online edition of the journal ACS Central Science.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs
 
Maine News Online
"Huge amount of Food Wasted Globally Adversely Impacting Climate Change"
April 8, 2016

There is an extreme food shortage in some parts of the world whereas in other regions food items go waste due to surplus production. … A study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology on Thursday suggests that food wastage is troubling the planet in terms of increasing level of greenhouse gasses.

Nanotechnology Now
"ORNL tracks how halogen atoms compete to grow 'winning' perovskites"
April 9, 2016

Photovoltaic cells that convert sunlight directly into electricity are becoming increasingly prominent in the world's renewable energy mix. … A new study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society demonstrates that in the presence of reactive iodide ions, negatively charged bromine and chlorine are left out of the final perovskite crystal structure - like not making the team in gym class.

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