ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Get Rid of Fruit Flies With This Kitchen Hack"

September 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Those pesky bugs that flit about your kitchen, the ones that come from heaven knows where? The American Chemical Society is here to help you get rid of the irritating insects once and for all. Here’s what to do: Pour some apple cider vinegar and a few drops of dish soap into a small dish, then cover tightly with plastic wrap. Poke a few small holes, then wait for those troublesome gnats to meet their maker.

More than 20 media outlets, including Refinery29 (New York, NY: 8.6 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"'Chemistry Life Hacks' Will Let You Chill Beer Faster Than You Ever Dreamed Possible"

September 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

You bring home a case of beer, and all you want to do is crack open a cold one. But you have to wait more than an hour for your beer to cool down in the fridge. Sound familiar? Never fear -- chemistry has a solution for you. In the latest installment of its Reactions video series that's "one-part MacGyver, one-part Mendeleev," the American Chemical Society reveals how to chill your beer in under 20 minutes -- along with other "chemistry life hacks." Check out the video above.

The Epoch Times (China: 17 million unique monthly visits)
"Bad News for Chocolate Lovers"

September 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The heart-health benefits of chocolate are well documented in the scientific literature. But a new review by scientists from the University of Campinas in Brazil casts a shadow on commercial chocolate as a safe source for obtaining these benefits, having found that many of the chocolate products sold in Brazil contain worrying amounts of both lead and cadmium. Published in the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the research looked at 30 different brands of milk, dark and white chocolate products sold throughout Brazil — some of these products are also sold in the U.S. Researchers tested each of the products for the two metals, both of which can cause brain damage and other health problems, particularly in children.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists develop "electronic skin" for earlier identification of breast cancer"

September 11, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an "electronic skin" that "feels" and images small lumps that fingers can miss. Knowing the size and shape of a lump could allow for earlier identification of breast cancer, which could save lives. They describe their device, which they've tested on a breast model made of silicone, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Newsmax Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Prickless blood sugar test on horizon for diabetics"

September 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Eventually, people with diabetes won't need to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood sugar levels, if researchers have their way. … The other is that a biosensor beneath the skin could give continuous updates, rather than spot checks of blood samples. That kind of information would be particularly helpful for monitoring people with diabetes who are critically ill, or undergoing surgery, the research team points out in the journal ACS Chemical Biology.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"A Mexican plant could lend the perfume industry more green credibility"

September 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The mere whiff of a dreamy perfume can help conjure new feelings or stir a longing for the past. But the creation of these alluring scents, from the high-end to the commonplace, can also incur an environmental toll. That could change as scientists, reporting in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, examine a more sustainable way to produce a key perfume ingredient and supply it to fragrance makers around the world.

More than 5 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)
"Now, electronic skin to detect breast cancer"

September 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Ravi F. Saraf and Chieu Van Nguyen pointed out that early diagnosis of breast cancer, the most common type of cancer among women, could help save lives. Clinical breast exams performed by medical professionals as an initial screening step are inexpensive, but typically don't find lumps until they're 21 millimeters in length, which is about four-fifths of an inch. Detecting lumps and determining their shape when they're less than half that size could improve a patient's survival rate by more than 94 percent. … The study is published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)
"ACS offers free high school energy curriculum"

September 8, 2014

Here's another helpful science resource that's free online. The American Chemical Society offers a free high school level curriculum on energy that contains lesson plans, handouts, experiments, video links and more. The curriculum can be viewed online or downloaded as a 152 page PDF file.

LifeHacker.com (U.S.: 20.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Avoid a Nasty Mildew Smell Around Your Sink by Using Two Sponges"

September 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

If you have a potent stench coming from your sink, it could be your poor, abused sponge. You can keep two of them around and rotate use so your sponges won't develop a mildew smell ever again. The Reactions channel on YouTube took a look at the chemistry behind a smelly sponge. Reactions explains that constant moisture is what's letting the sponge stink up the place. It's important you thoroughly rinse a sponge after each use and let it dry before each use, otherwise bacteria take residence and release odorous chemicals.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 18.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Pesticide Levels in Waterways Have Dropped, Reducing the Risks to Humans"

September 11, 2014

The development of safer pesticides and legal restrictions on their use have sharply reduced the risk to humans from pesticide-tainted rivers and streams, while the potential risk to aquatic life in urban waters has risen, according to a two-decade survey published on Thursday. The study, conducted by the United States Geological Survey and published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, monitored scores of pesticides from 1992 to 2011 at more than 200 sampling points on rivers and streams. In both of the last two decades, researchers reported, they found insecticides and herbicides in virtually all of the waterways.

More than 10 media outlets, including Observer-Reporter.com (Washington, PA: 269,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Method Enables Portable Detection of Bath Salts"

September 11, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Despite being outlawed in 2012 in the U.S., the synthetic drugs known as bath salts — which really aren't meant for your daily bath — are still readily available in some retail shops, on the Internet and on the streets. To help law enforcement, scientists are developing a novel method that could be the basis for the first portable, on-site testing device for identifying the drugs. They report their advance in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 8 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News(Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists express concern over long-term vision for satellite-based research"

September 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The U.S. has more than 30 civilian, Earth-observing satellites circling the planet, providing scientists with a torrent of crucial environmental and climate information. More satellites are on deck to launch in the next few years. But, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, scientists have registered serious concerns over the lack of a long-term, cohesive vision for the scientific missions.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists discover way nose perceives common class of odors"

September 10, 2014

Biologists claim that humans can perceive and distinguish a trillion different odors, but little is known about the underlying chemical processes involved. Biochemists at The City College of New York have found an unexpected chemical strategy employed by the mammalian nose to detect chemicals known as aldehydes. … Researchers from Duke University and Hebrew University in Israel were also involved in the study. The research at CCNY was funded by U.S. Army Research Laboratory and Office. The results will be published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology.

More than 9 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News(Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Two-dimensional phosphorus a promising semiconductor"

September 8, 2014

Defects damage the ideal properties of many two-dimensional materials, like carbon-based graphene. Phosphorus just shrugs. That makes it a promising candidate for nano-electronic applications that require stable properties, according to new research by Rice University theoretical physicist Boris Yakobson and his colleagues. In a paper in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters ("Two-Dimensional Mono-Elemental Semiconductor with Electronically Inactive Defects: The Case of Phosphorus"), the Rice team analyzed the properties of elemental bonds between semiconducting phosphorus atoms in 2-D sheets.

More than 6 media outlets, including Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Create World’s Largest DNA Origami"

September 11, 2014

Researchers from North Carolina State University, Duke University and the University of Copenhagen have created the world's largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging from biomedical research to nanoelectronics. … The paper, "Toward Larger DNA Origami," is published online in Nano Letters. The paper was co-authored by Dr. Ishtiaq Saaem, a former Ph.D. student at Duke; Dr. Briana Vogen, a former postdoctoral researcher at NC State; and Dr. Stanley Brown at the University of Copenhagen.

… TV and Radio News

WFIE (NBC) (Evansville, IN: Local Viewership 4,092)
"Get Rid of Fruit Flies With This Kitchen Hack"

September 11, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] ...about your kitchen, the ones you have no idea where they come from? Here’s a remedy to help you get rid of them. The American Chemical Society says pour some apple cider vinegar and a few drops of dish soap into a small dish, then cover tightly with plastic wrap. Poke a few small holes, then wait for those troublesome gnats to meet their maker.

WITI-MILW (FOX) (Milwaukee, WI: Local Viewership 11,302)
"Sleep and smartphones: The chemistry that keeps you awake"

September 12, 2104
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] ...body that makes you feel sleepy. just a few months ago, the American Chemical Society posted a video explaining that exposure to blue light at night essentially tricks your body into thinking its morning, which messes with your circadian rhythm and makes it harder to fall asleep.

… From the Blogs

Daily Me
"'Electronic skin' could improve early breast cancer detection"

September 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

For detecting cancer, manual breast exams seem low-tech compared to other methods such as MRI. But scientists are now developing an "electronic skin" that "feels" and images small lumps that fingers can miss. Knowing the size and shape of a lump could allow for earlier identification of breast cancer, which could save lives. They describe their device, which they've tested on a breast model made of silicone, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Zee News
"Mexican plant has key to create 'green' perfumes"

September 11, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers says that the key to create ''green'' perfumes lies with a Mexican plant. A more sustainable way to produce a key perfume ingredient has been provided by the plant. It also supply to fragrance makers around the world. Fixation, a key ingredient in perfumes, allows a scent to linger on the wearer's skin rather than quickly dissipate. It comes with a hefty price tag. This particularly coveted fixation comes from ambergris, a rare whale digestive excretion. … The study was published in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering.

Nature World News
"Discovered Microbes Could Help Dispose of Nuclear Waste"

September 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Researchers have recently stumbled upon tiny single-celled organisms living underground that could aid in the disposal of radioactive waste, potentially making "green" power plants that are more viable and less harmful to the environment. … It was suggested back in March at National Meeting of the American Chemical Society that shale and other clay-rich rocks could be used for long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel without much risk of the contaminant spreading. In fact, it would take millions of years for radionuclides to diffuse through shale.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Stemming the Tide of E-Waste"

September 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An article published in the American Chemical Society journal Chemical and Engineering News, notes that people around the world purchase more than 1.8 billion new mobile phones per year, with many replacing older models that wind up as e-waste instead of being recycled or reused. Precious metals such as gold and silver, which are used to manufacture cell phones that are sold this year alone are said to be worth more than $2.5 billion, according the article.

More than 13 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits) and ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Weather Channel (28.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Chocolate May Not Be As Good For You As You've Been Told"

September 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Just when you were buying into the idea that chocolate is healthy for you, a new report shows the other side of the coin. Numerous studies have demonstrated the health benefits of eating chocolate. It contains high levels of flavonoids and antioxidants that may help reduce heart disease and cancer risk. But now scientists report that some chocolate can contain high levels of lead and cadmium, two naturally occurring metals that can cause health problems. Brazilian researchers tested 30 milk, dark, and white chocolate products sold in their country, some of which are exported to the U.S. … The scientists published their findings in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 25 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), NDTV Cooks (India: 554,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.3 million unique monthly visits)
"NC clean air law saved lives, study finds"

September 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

North Carolina’s 2002 crackdown on power plant emissions may have saved 1,700 lives a decade later, UNC Chapel Hill researchers say. The Clean Smokestacks Act, adopted in 2002, was aimed at pollutants billowing from coal-fired power plants. Power plants are major sources of the fine sulfate particles the study targeted. By 2012, the UNC research shows, the risk of premature death from the particles had dropped 63 percent – preventing an estimated 1,700 deaths in the state…It appeared in the print edition of the journal Environmental Science & Technology this week.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"There's $2.5 Billion Worth of Silver and Gold in Phones Sold This Year"

September 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Your gadgets contain tiny specks of precious and rare earth metals—we rely on these dust-sized particles, which are so small they're often not recycled because the cost of recycling outweighs the value of the metals. But according to the American Chemical Society, the overall value of these minute materials is massive. In a report published Monday in Chemical & Engineering News, a materials scientist at Sheffield Hallam University does the math on just how much precious metal is in your phone—and how much, overall, is in the phones sold in a single year.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists find that samples of chocolate purchased in Brazil contain lead and cadmium"

September 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have found that commercial samples of chocolate purchased in Brazil contain varying levels of lead and cadmium, which can cause health problems, and that those levels are linked to how much cocoa a product contains. They reported their findings, which could have health implications - particularly for children - in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Burning Trash Bad for Humans and Global Warming"

September 2, 2014

When atmospheric scientist Christine Wiedinmyer first went to Ghana in 2011 to investigate air pollution produced by burning different materials — from crop stubble to coal used in stoves — she noticed an unexpected potential source: burning piles of trash. … Wiedinmyer set out to produce the first global estimates of burn-related pollution. The result, detailed in July in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, suggests that burning trash isn’t just bad for human health -- it could pump more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere than had been realized.

The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, MD: 1.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Prostate cancer drug candidate shows great promise"

September 6, 2014

A white powdered chemical compound emerged from two University of Maryland School of Medicine laboratories more than 10 years ago with a name destined for oblivion, but a future that now looks promising as a treatment for the most challenging cases of prostate cancer. … The triple threat showed impressive results in tests with mice about 10 years ago. Brodie and Njar and their research team published results in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry in 2005, concluding that the compound "is a potent inhibitor of human prostate tumor growth and is remarkably more effective than castration."

The Motley Fool (Alexandria, VA: 9.5 million unique monthly visits)
"How the Shale Gas Revolution Could Save Almost 2 Million Lives Per Year"

September 6, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," has proven to be one of the most controversial issues in the oil and natural gas industry. The main arguments against the practice are that it pollutes groundwater and causes earthquakes if done near geological fault lines. … Water contamination due to fracking is a valid concern. According to the American Chemical Society, the industry uses 190 chemicals, of which there is insufficient toxicity data for one-third. The state of Pennsylvania has confirmed 106 cases of water contamination over the past nine years. However, those cases mostly involved well water and were out of over 5,000 wells drilled.

More than 5 media outlets, including NASDAQ (New York, NY: 997,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000)
"More than twice as much mercury in environment as thought'

September 4, 2014

The most comprehensive estimate of mercury released into the environment is putting a new spotlight on the potent neurotoxin. By accounting for mercury in consumer products, such as thermostats, and released by industrial processes, the calculations more than double previous tallies of the amount of mercury that has entered the environment since 1850. … All told, Horowitz and her co-authors say, they have accounted for 540,000 additional tons of mercury in the environment, including in soil and water. That’s two-and-a-half times more than the amount suggested by the previous estimates, they report in the 2 September issue of Environmental Science & Technology.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The Disappearing Spoon Author Sam Kean takes on the Megalodon myth"

September 2, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Best-selling author Sam Kean stops by Reactions this week to debunk the myth of the Megalodon, the 50-foot super shark that, despite what "Shark Week" may lead you to believe, is long extinct. Learn all about it at http://youtu.be/KhFygIoW_MA. Kean's book, "The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements," is getting the Reactions treatment in a 10-episode video series produced for the newly launched American Association of Chemistry Teachers (AACT). In this episode, Kean unravels the myth of a living Megalodon, explaining how the element manganese holds the key.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)
"Why using your smartphone at night is destroying your sleep"

September 5, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

It's a common habit most of us fall into. Who doesn't send a few text messages or check their Facebook feed one last time before they fall asleep? While it may sound harmless, using your smartphone, tablet, or any other electronic device before bed on a regular basis can actually have a detrimental long-term effect on your health. … Just a few months ago, the American Chemical Society posted a video explaining that exposure to blue light at night essentially tricks your body into thinking its morning, which messes with your circadian rhythm and makes it harder to fall asleep.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"NYBC’s Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Drug Design Lauded for Efforts to Combat HIV"

September 2, 2014

The cover story of the September 2014 edition of Chemical and Engineering News, titled “Aiming for HIV’s Weak Spot,” cites work by NYBC’s Asim Debnath, Ph.D., and his Laboratory of Molecular Modeling and Drug Design for their work to identify small molecules that prevent HIV from entering T cells. Dr. Debnath’s lab was the first to discover the two inhibitors, known as NBD-556 and NBD-557. High-throughput screening was used to identify the HIV-blocking molecules, which came to be known as gp 120 targeted entry inhibitors.

Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"What To Eat For Healthy Teeth: 6 Fortifying Foods To Boost Oral Health"

September 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The very first thing we notice about people, and what people notice about us and base their first impression on, is often a smile. … It’s time to raise your glass and cheers to good dental health. Drinking a glass of red wine, specifically a young Pinot Noir, or a non-alcoholic version of the wine, can effectively get rid of dental disease-causing bacteria, according to a recent study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Handheld nanoprobe scanner could make brain tumor removal more complete, reducing recurrence"
September 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Cancerous brain tumors are notorious for growing back despite surgical attempts to remove them — and for leading to a dire prognosis for patients. But scientists are developing a new way to try to root out malignant cells during surgery so fewer or none get left behind to form new tumors. The method, reported in the journal ACS Nano ("Guiding Brain Tumor Resection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles and a Hand-Held Raman Scanner"), could someday vastly improve the outlook for patients.

More than 10 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Business Standard  (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits)
"American Chemical Society awards Indian-American scientists"

September 3, 2014

Four Indian-American scientists are among the recipients of the 2015 National Awards of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Abhijit A Namjoshi along with several of his colleagues from Dow Chemicals have been selected for the ACS Award for Team Innovation, a media release said. Neil K Garg from the University of California in Los Angeles has been selected for Arthur C Cope Scholar Awards along with nine other scientists, while Joseph Reddy, Endocyte Inc has bagged the George & Christine Sosnovsky Award for Cancer Research along with three other scientists.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"Going to extremes for enzymes"

September 2, 2014

In the age-old nature versus nurture debate, Douglas Clark, a faculty scientist with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the Univ. of California (UC) Berkeley, is not taking sides. In the search for enzymes that can break lignocellulose down into biofuel sugars under the extreme conditions of a refinery, he has prospected for extremophilic microbes and engineered his own cellulases. Speaking at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in San Francisco, Clark discussed research for the Energy Biosciences Institute (EBI) in which he and his collaborators are investigating ways to release plant sugars from lignin for the production of liquid transportation fuels.

… From the Blogs

Science World Report
"Lead and Cadmium Leeches into Brazilian Chocolate"

September 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

You may want to be careful what you eat. Scientists have found that commercial samples of chocolate purchased in Brazil contain varying levels of lead and cadmium, which could both cause health problems-particularly for children. … The findings are published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Photonics Online
"Handheld Scanner Could Make Brain Tumor Removal More Complete, Reducing Recurrence"

September 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Cancerous brain tumors are notorious for growing back despite surgical attempts to remove them — and for leading to a dire prognosis for patients. But scientists are developing a new way to try to root out malignant cells during surgery so fewer or none get left behind to form new tumors. The method, reported in the journal ACS Nano, could someday vastly improve the outlook for patients.

Technobahn
"The Disappearing Spoon Author Sam Kean Takes on the Megalodon Myth"

September 2, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Best-selling author Sam Kean stops by Reactions this week to debunk the myth of the Megalodon, the 50-foot super shark that, despite what "Shark Week" may lead you to believe, is long extinct. Learn all about it at http://youtu.be/KhFygIoW_MA. Kean's book, "The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements," is getting the Reactions treatment in a 10-episode video series produced for the newly launched American Association of Chemistry Teachers (AACT).

Science Codex
"Speaking of chemistry: Rethinking football head injuries"

September 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Football season is here, and along with thousands of lost hours of productivity from fantasy teams, there's a renewed discussion on the impact of head injuries on players. This week's Speaking of Chemistry focuses on a brain disorder called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), whose symptoms include memory loss, depression and aggressive or violent behavior. Current detection methods can only identify CTE after a patient has died, leaving many NFL players with a diagnosis that came too late. Now doctors are developing a way to spot CTE in its early stages and hopefully develop a treatment before tragedy strikes. Find out more at http://youtu.be/edTLgVg8nYw .

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ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.