ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Wonder Material May Make Cavities and Gum Disease a Thing of the Past"

March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chinese researchers believe graphene oxide could become an important tool in fighting dental diseases in the future. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), oral health is essential to general health and quality of life. … The researcher’s findings have been published in the American Chemical Society’s journal, Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 30 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Science World Report (New York, NY: 101,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 24,700 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 91.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Spicy food could help you achieve your weight loss goals"

March 11, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The next time your mouth is on fire after eating a spicy dish, just remember all the good it’s doing your body. … Adding a little spice to your meal can even protect the ole ticker. Another study presented at the 243rd National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) found that chili peppers could protect against the No. 1 cause of death in the U.S.

More than 4 media outlets, including Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Newsweek (U.S.: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"New Energy-Generating Cloth to Charge Your Phone as You Walk"
 
March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have successfully tested energy-generating cloth that could be used to charge wearable technologies such as smart watches and personal electronics - meaning you could soon be charging your mobile phone as you walk. … The findings were made by a team based at the Sungkyunkwan University in South Korea, and were published by the American Chemical Society.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Silk-derived material could boost battery performance"

March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Next-generation lithium-ion batteries may hold more charge for a greater number of cycles thanks to a new material derived from natural silk. Scientists at the Beijing Institute of Technology found that not only does their regenerated silk fibroin material work for over 10,000 cycles but it also stores five times more lithium than graphite, which is the most common choice for the anode (negative electrode) in lithium-ion batteries. … A paper describing the research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 50 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), The Hindu (Chennai, India: 586,000 unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), India Gazette (India: 275,900 unique monthly visits), The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,000 unique monthly visits), Tech 2 (India: 196,500 unique monthly visits), Mumbai Mirror (Mumbai, India: daily circulation 150,000), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits), Jagran Post (India: 23,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Motherboard (U.S.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How Motion-Powered Fabric Could Charge Gadgets"

March 11, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Wrapped around a person’s wrist, a new foldable fabric patch can scavenge enough energy from arm movement to power small electronic devices (ACS Nano 2015, DOI:10.1021/nn507221f). The fabric patch paves the way to clothing that can charge smart watches and cell phones while the wearer moves or walks around, the researchers say.

Newsweek (U.S.: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"‘Smart’ Keyboard Can ID You by How You Type"

March 10, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As data breaches and identity theft become more and more common, the market is growing for biometric technologies—like fingerprint or iris scans—to keep others out of private e-spaces. They’re still expensive, though, and some balk at the prospect of having deeply personal identifiers taken and maintained by a third party. … In a study describing the technology published in the journal ACS Nano, the researchers had 100 volunteers type the word touch four times using the keyboard.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Uncovering the effects of cooking, digestion on gluten and wheat allergens in pasta"

March 11, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers trying to understand wheat-related health problems have found new clues to how the grain's proteins, including gluten, change when cooked and digested. They report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that boiling pasta releases some of its potential allergens, while other proteins persist throughout cooking and digestion. Their findings lend new insights that could ultimately help celiac patients and people allergic to wheat.

More than 17 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Food Navigator (Crawley, U.K.: 55,200 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story

Smithsonian (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"With Wearable Devices That Monitor Air Quality, Scientists Can Crowdsource Pollution Maps"

March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Air pollution exposure is an invisible hazard responsible for seven million premature deaths every year, according to World Health Organization estimates. But a new generation of wearable high-tech devices, paired with the mobile phones we carry, reveals this hazard so that users can see it in real time. … The study, published in Environmental Science & Technology in late January, examined the degree to which people’s exposure to pollution varies during the day, and tested how well pollution estimate models match our actual experience.

More than 5 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

More than 10 media outlets, including Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Danish chemists discover the first positive atom bonding"

March 15, 2015

Positive atoms can bond to positive atoms despite the prevailing molecular orbital theory that at present indicates that the bonding of positive atoms to positive atoms is not possible. Professor Henrik Kjærgaard and his Quantum, Spectra and Dynamics group at the University of Copenhagen’s Department of Chemistry have found bonding between positively charged hydrogen atoms and positively charged phosphorous atoms. The discovery was presented in the March 13, 2015, edition of the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

Fox News (New York, NY: 25.4 million unique monthly visits)
"11 superfoods that work better together"

March 14, 2015

Peanut butter and jelly. Soup and salad. Spaghetti and meatballs. There are a few classic pairings that will never go out of style. But some food duos do more than just excite your taste buds—they could even boost your health. … A 2010 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that the addition of garlic and onion to cooked or raw food grains enhanced the accessibility of iron and zinc in both cases.

Forbes  (New York, NY: 9.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Solving The Super Weird Chemical Mystery Of Powdered Alcohol Drinks"

March 13, 2015

Lots of ink is spilling and hands are wringing over the government approval of “powdered alcohol” drinks – Palcohol – and if you paid attention in chemistry class, you might feel something sounds wrong. I don’t mean wrong in some societal way involving drunken minors. I mean that something sounds scientifically and chemically amiss. …. An answer that makes sense comes courtesy of the esteemed publication Chemical and Engineering News.

Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (Milwaukee, WI:1.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Need an organ? Decades from now, a 3-D printer may be the answer"

March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The idea seems like science fiction, but decades from now we may be able to address the shortage of human organs available for transplantation by using three-dimensional bioprinters. An article published in Chemical & Engineering News discusses this possibility. Matt Davenport, an associate editor at the journal, says that in 2012, there were about eight people on the waiting list for organs for every organ donor.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Medical Design Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 39,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story. .

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Does urban greenery improve our health?"

March 12, 2015

Can the fact that you live on a tree-lined street or that you are within a few minutes’ walk from a park impact your physical and mental health? This question has drawn a lot of interest in recent years, especially with the concerns of climate change, pollution and overpopulation, and it is undeniable that more and more research points to strong connections between urban greenery and public health. One study of note by the University of Exeter Medical School, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, found that parks and greenery do have a big impact on the mental health of nearby residents.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Silk to power next-generation batteries"

March 13, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Again frustrated at dead smartphone battery again? Wait till "green" silk comes to your rescue. Chinese researchers have developed a new "green" way to boost the performance of lithium-ion batteries with a material derived from silk. … The paper appeared in the journal ACS Nano.

Science (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits)
"Food supply was protected after Fukushima, study finds"

March 14, 2015

On the 4th anniversary of the earthquake and tsunami that triggered meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, there is one bit of reassuring news: A new study concludes that contaminated food was likely kept out of the market. … "It seems very unlikely that more than very few members of the public in Japan exceeded the maximum permissible internal exposure of 1 mSv [millisievert]/year," the team writes in the 3 March issue of Environmental Science & Technology.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The chemistry of poison ivy"

March 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Leaves of three, let them be, right? But what happens when you get covered in poison ivy and can't stop scratching? Jennifer Novotney, winner of the 2014 Chemistry Champions science communications competition, breaks down what it is about that dreaded vine that makes us so itchy. Reactions also offers up a remedy for the poison ivy's itch using the power of chemistry.

NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits)
"Deliciously Dangerous: Why Microwave Popcorn Can Be Terribly Harmful"

March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

You know that hypnotizingly lovely smell that fills up the room when you make a fresh batch of popcorn in the microwave? Yeah, that may not be as good as you might think. … A study in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology from researchers from the University of Minnesota reveal a possible link between diacetyl, via its impact on a brain protein and Alzheimer’s disease.

Modern Healthcare (Chicago, IL: 229,500 unique monthly visits)
"Tapping into beer's therapeutic potential"

March 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Beer lovers may finally have a case for their preferred beverage—it's good for the brain. The good brew news revolves around a compound found in hops, a central ingredient in beer that gives it its bitter taste. … The study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, produced sobering results. Xanthohumol prevented the brain cells from dying and also increased cell production of several antioxidants that counteracted oxidative damage.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"'Chemistry of natural resources' focus of plenaries at American Chemical Society meeting"

March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Problems producing biofuels, the role of gas hydrates in energy production and how to supply clean, safe water are the topics of three plenary talks at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, taking place March 22-26 in Denver.

… From the Blogs

Geek Snack
"Graphene – Cancer cure, cavity treatment, battery life prolonger"

March 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Graphene, the carbon-based nanomaterial that seems to be on everybody’s lips these days has a lot more potential uses than initially suspected. Not a week goes by that we don’t hear something about new inventions based on this intriguing material. … The findings were recently published in the ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces and the research itself is being conducted by professor Zisheng Tang with funding from the Shanghai Natural Science Foundation and the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.

Science 2.0
"Celiac Disease And Allergies: Cooking Pasta May Change Proteins In Wheat"

March 11, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers trying to understand why some people have more severe wheat-related health problems than others, and with different products, have found new clues in how the grain's proteins, including gluten, change when cooked and digested. … Published in  the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Health News Digest

"How 3-D Bioprinting Could Address the Shortage of Organ Donations"
March 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Three-dimensional bioprinting has come a long way since its early days when a bioengineer replaced the ink in his desktop printer with living cells. Scientists have since successfully printed small patches of tissue. Could it someday allow us to custom-print human organs for patients in need of transplants? An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores the possibility.

Crazy Engineers
"Silk Based Material To Make Rechargeable Li-Ion batteries Last Longer"

March 13, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

With millions of gadgets today being powered by the Lithium-Ion batteries, be it your smartphone or tablet or even laptops, the research in the field of extending battery life has been on its peak. … One such research came to light in the journal ACS Nano, where a team claims to have developed a new green material derived from silk that can be used to create Li-ion batteries in a way that boosts their performance.

NBC News (New York, NY: 35.2 million unique monthly visits)
"170-Year-Old Shipwreck Beer Tastes Gross, Less Thrilling"

March 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

When you're picking out a beer, what flavors do you look for? If hints of soured milk and burnt rubber sound delightful to you, then brews that were aged for 170 years at the bottom of the Baltic Sea just might be your thing. … One of the bottles broke in the divers' boat and started to foam. Some gastronomically adventurous divers attested that the liquid indeed tasted like beer, according to the study authors, who published their findings in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry last month.

More than 125 media outlets, including CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 1.3 million unique monthly visits), The Oregonian (Portland, OR: 7.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.9 million unique monthly visits), Newser (U.S.: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), The Weather Network (Ontario, Canada: 679,000 unique monthly visits), News.com.au (Sydney, Australia: 600,800 unique monthly visits), China Topix (New York, NY: 554,000 unique monthly visits), Headline & Global News (U.S.: 549,900 unique monthly visits), National Monitor (Washington, DC: 482,600 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 199,800 unique monthly visits), Vice (U.S.: 37,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Newsweek (U.S.: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Gas Industry’s Solution to Toxic Wastewater: Spray It on Roads"

March 2, 2015

In parts of Pennsylvania and New York, the answer to ice-slick wintry roads is simple: Put some gas production waste on it. Municipalities in the northern parts of both states use the salty wastewater from oil and gas production to melt ice in winter and suppress road dust in summer. … What’s more, a study Vengosh and his colleagues published last month in the journal Environmental Science & Technology found that brine being discharged, untreated, into Pennsylvania’s waterways—the same liquid that is spread on roads—also contained significant concentrations of ammonium, iodide and bromide.

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits)
"Energy-generating cloth could replace batteries in wearable devices"

March 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It’s fashionable and functional. Korean researchers have developed a cloth that captures energy from users’ motion and pumps out its own energy in response – potentially making batteries a thing of the past. Sang-Woo Kim and his colleagues at Sungkyunkwan University based their creation on a new technology, triboelectric nanogenerators, that creates energy out of everyday motion, according to a paper published by the American Chemical Society.

More than 50 media outlets, including IGN (U.S.: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 199,800 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Medical Design Technology (U.S.: 39,400 unique monthly visits), Wireless Design & Development (U.S.: 30,800 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (U.S.: 26,800 unique monthly visits) and The Stack (London, U.K.: 22,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 20.1 million unique monthly visits)
"What does 19th century shipwreck beer taste of? Goat and sour milk"

March 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

When shipwrecks are discovered, most people are excited about discovering why they sank – and if there was any treasure within. A team of scientists from Germany and Finland, however, devoted themselves to analyzing the beer that went down with a schooner in the 1840s. … In their research paper, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the researchers described the detoriated beer having an unpleasant smell of "of autolyzed yeast, dimethyl sulfide, Bakelite, burnt rubber, over-ripe cheese” and “vinegary, goaty, and soured milk flavors”.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Space Stinks"

March 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

In space, perhaps no one can hear you scream–but they can still smell some awfully funny things. The neighborhoods of comets and our moon, it turns out, are surprisingly odorous. Matt Davenport, associate editor at one of our partner publications, Chemical & Engineering News, explains why in this short video.

More than 15 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"5 of the Most Complicated Cocktails on the Internet"

March 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Bloody Mary: Okay, okay. This is actually pretty easy if you have a good pre-made Bloody Mary mix on hand. But a few years ago, the brunch staple Bloody Mary was named the most complicated drink by the American Chemical Society. "It's a very complicated drink," said Neil C. Da Costa, Ph.D., an expert on the chemical analysis of flavors at International Flavors & Fragrances, Inc. "It covers almost the entire range of human taste sensations--sweet, salty, sour and umami or savory--but not bitter."

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 11.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New Recipe For 19th Century Shipwrecked Beer"

March 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have scrutinized the contents of four bottles of beer found in a Baltic Sea shipwreck from the 1840s, an amber ale that perhaps was brewed in Belgium and was on its way to ports in Russia or Scandinavia. … Gibson and colleagues at the University of Munich published their chemical and microbiological analysis recently in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

CNET News (San Francisco, 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Space smells awful or awesome, depending where you're floating"

March 5, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

We've yet to make contact with E.T., but human space exploration has given us at least a few surprising revelations, like the fact that the smells of space range from delicious to downright nasty. … But as the video below from Chemical & Engineering News sums up with an unabashedly geeky flair, not every aroma in space will destroy your appetite.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Are E-Cigarettes Safe? ‘Vaping' Facts, Chemistry Compared To Cigarettes"

March 2, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

The electronic cigarette, which aims to deliver nicotine without the harmful effects associated with tobacco, has become incredibly popular for smokers looking for a possibly healthy alternative to tobacco or who are trying to quit smoking. But the marketing around e-cigarettes provides few details regarding the safety of the product. The American Chemical Society has looked at recent studies regarding the healthfulness of "vaping."

More than 10 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Test Country (U.S.: 23,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)
"School bus filtration system cuts pollution by 88%"

March 2, 2015

Los Angeles freeways are a benefit to Angelenos, but they are also often congested and smoggy. Children riding school buses on LA roads and freeways are exposed to high levels of pollution, resulting in respiratory problems such as asthma and bronchitis. A new study by researchers at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health found that an on-board air filtration system developed specifically for school buses can reduce exposure to vehicular pollutants by up to 88%. The findings were published online on March 2 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 18.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Attention, All Scientists: Do Improv, With Alan Alda’s Help"

March 2, 2015

Martha Furie stormed into the room and huffily sat down in a chair. … The two were participating in an improvisational acting exercise a couple of Fridays ago.  … “This is a big cultural shift,” Mr. Schneider said. In addition, four organizations — Dartmouth College, the University of Vermont, the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in New Jersey and the American Chemical Society — have become affiliates of the center. Other universities, inspired by Stony Brook, are considering setting up similar programs.

More than 4 media outlets, including The Minneapolis Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN: 6.7 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Vegetables’ nutritional value often rises when they are cooked properly"

March 2, 2015

When it comes to vegetables, cooked is sometimes better than raw. That’s because cooking can free up more nutrients for your body to absorb. … Carrots. Cooking ignites this veggie’s cancer-fighting carotenoids. A 2008 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that boiling carrots until tender boosted their concentration of carotenoids by 14 percent.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"How a Moth's Eye Could Help Improve the Efficiency of Solar Cells"

March 4, 2015

Inspiration lies in the strangest of places—and for researchers at the Agency for Science, Technology & Research in Singapore, that includes the eye of moth. A new antireflective coating inspired by the creature's ocular faculties could help bump up the efficiency of solar cells. … The results are published in ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.9 million unique monthly visits), Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits) and Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 405,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Bloomberg Businessweek (New York, NY: 4.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Inside the Powerful Lobby Fighting for Your Right to Eat Pizza"
March 3, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

There are 11,781 registered lobbyists in Washington, more than enough to represent even the most arcane special interests. … But there is nothing quite like the pizza lobby, a rare coalition of competitors who have banded together to advocate for a specific dish. … “Pizza is, without a doubt, the food of the gods,” says a 2014 video produced by the American Chemical Society that explains the chemistry behind pizza’s appeal. “All pizzas deliver divine, rich, cheesy, mouthwatering experiences that hustle your brain’s pleasure centers into overdrive.”

More than 10 media outlets, including Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: daily circulation 207,013) and Chicago Business (Chicago, IL: 112,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Reducing greenhouse gas emissions with a more effective carbon capture method"

March 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Trapping carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants and various industries could play a significant role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the future. But current materials that can collect CO2 -- from smokestacks, for example -- have low capacities or require very high temperatures to work. Scientists are making progress toward a more efficient alternative, described in the ACS journal Chemistry of Materials, that could help make carbon capture less energy-intensive.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (U.S.: 110,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Cancer-fighting nanoparticles carry medicine to tumors in the lungs"

March 5, 2015

Scientists have developed drug-carrying nanoparticles capable of targeting cancer tissue in the lungs. By engineering the devices to release their payloads only once they reach the site of the tumor, the researchers hope to reduce the size of dosages required and also limit the side effects of conventional treatments. … The research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"How to make palm oil without destroying forests"

March 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The versatility of palm oil has led to its use in not just food products but also in everyday goods from lipstick to laundry detergent. But its utility has resulted in the destruction of Southeast Asian rain forests that are the primary source of the oil. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores what avenues companies and scientists are taking to produce the oil sustainably.

The Express Tribune (Karachi, Pakistan: 209,000 unique monthly visits)
"6 foods in Pakistani kitchens that cut fat"

March 6, 2015

If you’re a chocoholic, welcome a new excuse to add more chocolate to your life. Cocoa contains more phenolic antioxidants than most foods. … Research published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has identified that dark chocolate possesses weight loss and anti-diabetes benefits so stick to dark chocolate more often than milk and white varieties.

The Scientist (New York, NY: 157,300 unique monthly visits)
"Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes"

March 5, 2015

Peppering charged water nanoparticles onto fruits and vegetables can eliminate potentially harmful foodborne microbes, researchers from Harvard and their colleagues reported last month (February 19) in Environmental Science & Technology. The new method offers an alternative to chlorine-based sprays, which can tarnish foods and are banned for organic produce.

Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits)
"American Chemical Society Presidential Symposia: nanoscience, international chemistry"

March 5, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

The symposia will be held at the Colorado Convention Center in Denver, March 22-24, and will be sponsored by Diane Grob Schmidt, Ph.D., president of ACS, the world's largest scientific society. "Nanotechnology: Delivering on the Promise" will highlight the fascinating research, development and commercialization of nanochemistry and nanotechnology, and will include 16 senior-level speakers from industry, academe and government.

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0
"What does space smell like?"

March 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

You can see it through a telescope, or watch a documentary about it, but you can't stick your nose out and take a whiff. Speaking of Chemistry returns this week to answer the very important question, "What does space smell like?" Matt Davenport, Ph.D., reveals the stinky secrets of the cosmos from the people who have been there.

Lab Manager
"Energy-Generating Cloth Could Replace Batteries in Wearable Devices"

March 5, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano, scientists report the first durable, flexible cloth that harnesses human motion to generate energy. It can also self-charge batteries or supercapacitors without an external power source and make new commercial and medical applications possible.

Sci-News
"Chemists Analyze Beer from 1840s’ Shipwreck"

March 5, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Some breweries have taken to resurrecting the flavors of ages past. Adventurous beer makers are extrapolating recipes from clues that scientists have uncovered from ancient brews found at archaeological sites. … “Compared to modern beers, the shipwreck beers contained similar levels of potassium but 15- to 60-fold more sodium, presumably derived from sea water. This may have diluted the beers up to 30%,” the scientists wrote in the paper published in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.