ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The fantastic chemistry of Valyrian steel, the ‘Game of Thrones’ super material"

April 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Spring may be coming, but so is "Game of Thrones," the wildly popular TV adaptation of George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series. Even though Martin's books are fantasy — featuring dragons and clairvoyant priestesses — the fantasy world seems tantalizingly close to our own, inviting tons of "scientific" explanations for different phenomena in the show and books. In the latest of the American Chemical Society's Reaction videos, cosplayer and science geek Ryan Consell dives into the chemistry behind Valyrian steel, a rare and treasured material in the "Game of Thrones" universe.

More than 55 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), Nerdist (U.S.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 215,000 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), Newsminer (Fairbanks, AK: 180,400 unique monthly visits), Stuff.co.nz (Wellington, New Zealand: 140,700 unique monthly visits), Winnipeg Free Press (Winnipeg, Canada: 107,200 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Quel fromage! French cheese diet 'reduces the risk of a heart attack'"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Sacre bleu! The French diet - rich in cheese - has been hailed a healthy lifesaver.

Experts claim that brie, camembert, roquefort - and any other variety - helps cut the amount of dangerous cholesterol in people's bodies, leading to a reduced risk of suffering a heart attack.

The discovery is being hailed a new piece in the 'French paradox' puzzle which already shows that drinking red wine cuts cardiovascular disease rates. … The findings were published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 60 media outlets, including Treehugger (New York, NY: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 184,600 unique monthly visits), TV3 (Dublin, Ireland: 63,700 unique monthly visits), Food Navigator (Crawley, U.K.: 55,200 unique monthly visits), Jagran Post (New Delhi, India: 42,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Have Figured Out How to Significantly Reduce the Calories in Rice"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

If you add coconut oil to the boiling water before cooking your rice, the starch will break down and you'll have a healthier meal. Who doesn't love a big bowl of sticky white rice? Now you can munch to your heart's content -- without the guilt. … The revelation comes from Dr. Pushparajah Thavarajah, a professor at the University of Sri Lanka, and undergraduate student Sudhair James, who presented their research to the American Chemical Society.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 38 million unique monthly visits)
"Can squid help make soldiers invisible?"

April 11, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

One of the world's oldest organism groups, cephalopods, like squid, octopus and cuttlefish, have survived in Earth's oceans for millions of years. They key to their survival: mastering the art of camouflage. Now, scientists say, these ancient invertebrates may hold the key to developing a combat technology that will allow soldiers to avoid infrared detection. … The researchers' work was recently presented at the 2015 American Chemical Society national meeting.

More than 13 media outlets, including WFMZ 69 News (Allentown, PA: 1.3 million unique monthly visits), FOX 13 (Salt Lake City, UT: 714,700 unique monthly visits) and Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NBC News (New York, NY: 32.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Treatment for Cotton Makes Fabric Waterproof and Fire-Resistant"

April 10, 2015

Researchers in China have devised a treatment for cotton that makes the fabric both flame-resistant and waterproof. The scientists, from Jilin University, were attempting to extend the life of fire-retarding treatments, and hit on the idea of following the flame-proofing with a water-proofing...This super-advanced cotton probably won't be on the store racks for a while, but it may make its way to things like firefighters' coats or military textiles. The research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemistry of Game of Thrones' Valyrian steel sword: Scientists reveal how the super-strong weapon could be made"

April 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

In Game of Thrones, the secret to forging super-light and strong Valyrian steel swords was said to have been lost with the Doom of Valyria. But, despite its fictional basis, a scientist has investigated whether it would be possible to make a similar weapon using bona fide chemistry. … The findings and conclusions were made by materials scientist Ryan Consell in the latest Reactions video for Washington-based American Chemical Society.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Genetically-Engineered Bacteria Can Keep Mice From Getting Fat "

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists now know that gut microbes almost certainly play a role in us getting fat, and poop transplants are sometimes touted as a potential route to weight loss. But if that’s a little too icky for you, Vanderbilt scientists have been experimenting with more refined microbiome tinkering in mice using genetically modified E. coli. … A recent obesity study presented at American Chemical Society meeting and reported on by MIT Technology Review also involves gut microbes, but its guiding principle is quite different.

Popsugar (U.S.: 7.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Coconut Water or Sports Drink: Which Is Better After a Workout?"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Coconut water is touted as nature's sports drink for good reason; just like Gatorade or Powerade, it contains high levels of electrolytes like sodium, magnesium, and potassium. But a recent study suggests that when it comes to the coconut water vs. sports drink debate, you may be better off keeping the coconut water for lighter workouts and reaching for a sports drink for your sweatier exercises. The study, presented at an American Chemical Society meeting, found that coconut water contains less sodium than the manufactured sports drinks: 400 mg/litre vs. 600 mg/litre.

Vice (U.S.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists May Have Figured Out Why Cheese Doesn’t Make French People Fat"

April 10, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The “French Paradox” has long been a source of wonder for us fat-assed Americans. How the hell are the Frenchies eating a high-fat, decidedly un-Paleo diet laden with bread, Brie, and Bourdeaux, and still maintaining an obesity rate that, despite growing in recent years, is dwarfed by those of the US and UK? … A new study published Wednesday in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry sheds new light on why fromage might be the ticket to understanding the French Paradox.

The Motley Fool (Alexandria, VA: 7.4 million unique monthly visits)
"A Possible Glimpse Into the Future: Is a $1 Prostate Cancer Test on the Way?"

April 11, 2015

Behind breast cancer, there is no cancer diagnosis more common than prostate cancer. … According to a recently published report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Dr. Qun "Treen" Huo of the University of Central Florida's NanoScience Technology Center has developed a new, more accurate type of prostate cancer test that could wind up costing a dollar or less!

More than 18 media outlets, including NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 184,600 unique monthly visits), Youth Health (New York, NY: 83,600 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 25,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Cheese could be the reason why the French eat more fat but don’t get heart disease"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The French are a perplexing bunch for scientists who study diet and nutrition — and for cheese lovers who want to stay healthy. On average, the French eat more saturated fat than the World Health Organization says is good for them. They also ate more cheese, which can be high in saturated fat, than any other country in the world in 2014. … But a new paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests another aspect of the French diet that may play a role in the paradox: all that cheese.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Trying to Make Game of Thrones Valyrian Steel Sword With Real Materials"

April 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Nothing reigns consistently in HBO’s Game of Thrones (and George R.R. Martin’s “Song of Ice and Fire” book series that inspired it) except Valyrian steel, a magical sword material. Valyrian steel is, of course, extremely not real. But materials scientist Ryan Consell took a look at its chemistry anyway.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Turning to freshwater sources to fight drug-resistant tuberculosis, other infections"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The discovery of antibiotics produced by soil fungi and bacteria gave the world life-saving medicine. But new antimicrobials from this resource have become scarce as the threat of drug resistance grows. Now, scientists have started mining lakes and rivers for potential pathogen-fighters, and they've found one from Lake Michigan that is effective against drug-resistant tuberculosis. Their report on the new compound appears in the journal ACS Infectious Diseases.

More than 10 media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (U.S.: 37,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Color-changing windows harvest energy from wind, rain"

April 8, 2015

Smart windows that can harvest electricity from wind or precipitation could be a future source of renewable energy, according to new research published recently in the journal ACS Nano. According to Science, the windows were able to produce up to 130 milliwatts per square meter, which would be enough to power a smartphone in sleep mode, and Dr. Zhong Lin Wang, co-developer of the technology and a nanoscientist at the Georgia Institute of Technology, and his colleagues believe that it could ultimately serve as a power source for some electronics.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Tension between politics and science soothed — for now"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Over the past two years, politicians have questioned the value of dozens of projects funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), many of which focus on social sciences and climate change. But a new agreement on transparency has led to an apparent truce between Congress and the agency, according to Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. How stable that truce is, however, remains to be seen.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists identify chemical compounds that block cancer-causing oncoprotein"

April 10, 2015

A team of scientists at the University of Kansas has pinpointed six chemical compounds that thwart HuR, an "oncoprotein" that binds to RNA and promotes tumor growth. The findings, which could lead to a new class of cancer drugs, appear in the current issue of ACS Chemical Biology.

41 KSHB (Kansas City, MO: 878,400 unique monthly visits) and Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment  (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"How unwanted CDs and DVDs could help cut carbon emissions"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Now that most consumers download and stream their movies and music, more and more CDs and DVDs will end up in landfills or be recycled. But soon these discarded discs could take on a different role: curbing the release of greenhouse gases. In the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report a way to turn the discs into a material that can capture carbon dioxide (CO2), a key greenhouse gas, and other compounds.

More than 18 media outlets, including Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), NewKerala.com (India: 29,300 unique monthly visits), Bangalore Mirror (Bengaluru, India: 22,200 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Washington State University News (Pullman, WA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Study points the way toward producing rubber from lettuce"

April 6, 2015

Prickly lettuce, a common weed that has long vexed farmers, has potential as a new cash crop providing raw material for rubber production, according to Washington State University scientists. Writing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they describe regions in the plant’s genetic code linked to rubber production. The findings open the way for breeding for desired traits and developing a new crop source for rubber in the Pacific Northwest.

More than 16 media outlets, including The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA: 545,500 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), Manufacturing.net (U.S.: 119,800 unique monthly visits), Capital Press (Salem, OR: 50,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How can you see an atom?"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Since ancient Greek times, philosophers and scientists have pondered the atom. For a couple thousand years, humans could only speculate on the structure and other properties of the smallest unit of matter. It wasn't until the 1980s that chemists saw individual atoms. Bestselling author Sam Kean takes us through the nearly 2,400-year quest to see the atom in a new episode of the Reactions sub-series, "Legends of Chemistry."

The People’s Pharmacy  (U.S.: 342,000 unique monthly visits)
"Vitamin D May Keep the Lid on Prostate Cancer"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Some men diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer may be able to keep it from progressing by taking extra vitamin D. In a study, 37 men who had chosen prostatectomies were randomly assigned to take either 4,000 IU of vitamin D per day or a placebo. After two months, they underwent the operations. … 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

NASDAQ (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"A Possible Glimpse Into the Future: Is a $1 Prostate Cancer Test on the Way?"

April 11, 2015

Behind breast cancer, there is no cancer diagnosis more common than prostate cancer...According to a recently published report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Dr. Qun "Treen" Huo of the University of Central Florida's NanoScience Technology Center has developed a new, more accurate type of prostate cancer test that could wind up costing a dollar or less!

The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC: 320,800 unique monthly visits)
"Air pollution’s impact on health is being studied, even though you may not hear about it"

April 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Even as an eighth grader running along the frontage roads of Southfield Freeway in Detroit, I wondered about the air I was breathing and if exercising in it would do me harm. … As spring allergies leave many of us sneezing and sniffling, it may not come as a surprise that certain air pollutants may boost the potency of tree pollen. ... The research is still in the early stages and was scheduled to be presented at an annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Santa Fe New Mexican (Santa Fe, NM: 273,200 unique monthly visits)
"The subtle difference between sugar and high-fructose corn syrup"

April 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

For decades, Americans have sipped on fountain sodas, wondering, at least occasionally but likely much more often, what exactly that thing that makes the drink so sweet is. It’s called high-fructose corn syrup, that much we have known. … In response to the ubiquity of these very questions, the American Chemical Society put together a short video that walks anyone watching through a simple, scientific explanation of the difference between high-fructose corn syrup and sugar.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)
"Water makes wires even more nano"

April 6, 2015

Water is the key component in a Rice Univ. process to reliably create patterns of metallic and semiconducting wires less than 10 nm wide...A paper on their technique, called meniscus-mask lithography, has been published online by Nano Letters.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits)
"Erupting electrodes: how recharging leaves behind microscopic debris inside batteries"

April 9, 2015

An eruption of lithium at the tip of a battery's electrode, cracks in the electrode's body, and a coat forming on the electrode's surface reveal how recharging a battery many times leads to its demise. Using a powerful microscope to watch multiple cycles of charging and discharging under real battery conditions, researchers have gained insight into the chemistry that clogs rechargeable lithium batteries. The work, appearing in the March issue of the journal Nano Letters, will help researchers design cheaper and more powerful rechargeable batteries with metals more common and safer than lithium.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Lab Manager  (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits)
"The Science of Stress"

April 10, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

It’s supposed to help keep our bodies healthy in stressful situations. But the constant stress of our everyday lives means we’re getting overexposed to cortisol. Raychelle Burks, Ph.D., explains why too much cortisol is bad for you in the latest episode of the Reactions series Get To Know A Molecule.

… TV and Radio News

WDAF-KC FOX (Kansas City, MO: local viewership 44,624)
"Lettuce Could Be New Rubber Source"

|April 8, 2015

[Transcript] ...shortage, Washington state university researchers say the use of prickly lettuce can manufacture rubber! The pesky weed produces a white sap that is similar to rubber's polymers. The study is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

WTVQ ABC (Lexington, KY: local viewership 19,953) also covered the story.

… From the Blogs

The Free Press Journal
"Have cheese for super heart health"

April 10, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Do you know why the French have low cardiovascular diseases despite having a diet high in saturated fats? It is not because of wine or their lifestyle but another French staple: Cheese and its metabolism, reports IANS...A recent study had also found that cheese reduced “bad” cholesterol when compared to butter with the same fat content. The results were detailed in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

News Today
"Fabric fights off fire and water at the same time"

April 2015

Firefighters are set to save a fortune on laundry bills. Researchers have come up with a coating for cotton fabric that is both flame-retardant and water-repellent, making it self-cleaning. Fabrics with flame-retardant coatings are firefighter chic, but they are also used for curtains and furniture upholstery. The problem is that these coatings are water soluble, so can be worn away by washing...Journal reference: ACS Nano

HealthNewsDigest.com
"A New Piece in the 'French Paradox' Puzzle — Cheese Metabolism"

April 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Figuring out why the French have low cardiovascular disease rates despite a diet high in saturated fats has spurred research and many theories to account for this phenomenon known as the "French paradox." Most explanations focus on wine and lifestyle, but a key role could belong to another French staple: cheese. The evidence, say scientists in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, is in cheese metabolism.

The Hans India
"How CDs, DVDs can help cut carbon footprints"

April 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A new study has revealed that unwanted CDs and DVDs can help cut carbon emissions. Now that most consumers download and stream their movies and music, more and more CDs and DVDs will end up in landfills or be recycled, but soon these discarded discs could take on a different role by curbing the release of greenhouse gases...The study appears in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Explained: The actual difference between sugar and high-fructose corn syrup"

April 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

For decades, Americans have sipped on fountain sodas, wondering, at least occasionally but likely much more often, what exactly that thing that makes the drink so sweet is. It's called high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), that much we have known. And it could be bad for us in a way that sugar is not. But what exactly is it, where does it come from, and how much does it truly differ from the ingredient it so often replaces in processed foods? In response to the ubiquity of these very questions, the American Chemical Society put together a short video (above) that walks anyone watching through a simple, scientific explanation of the difference between HFCS and sugar.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Tense? Video explains exactly what stress does to your body"

April 2, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Are you prone to stress? If so, you know it doesn't feel good, but do you know exactly what's happening to you chemically when you're twisted into a tense state? A new video in the American Chemical Society's "Reactions" series offers a simple breakdown.

Food Network (New York, NY: 7.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Nutrition News: Nuts About Nuts, Calorie-Cutting Rice Hack, Kraft and Diet Group Part Ways"

April 3, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Talk about hard to absorb: New research introduced by a team of Sri Lankan chemists at last week’s 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society suggests that weight-watching rice lovers can cut the number of calories their bodies absorb from rice in half (or more) by cooking it a particular way that converts digestible starch to resistant starch (RS).

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The science of STRESS: Expert reveals why it's so unhealthy to be tense all the time"

April 3, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Most scientists agree that a bit of stress is good for you, stimulating your body to produce an important hormone called cortisol. But too much is bad for your health and now an expert has revealed exactly why in a video...The science of stress was explained in a video by Dr. Raychelle Burks from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for the American Chemical Society.

Forbes (New York, NY: 10.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Antibiotic Resistance From Unexpected Sources--Herbicides, Dust And Metals"

April 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

More disturbing news was revealed this week on new sources of antibiotic resistance in the environment. … Last week, Olya Keen, Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, presented data at the American Chemical Society about the effects of chlorine on wastewater. Not only does the treatment process not remove antibiotics, but in the lab, chlorine can combine with antibiotics, changing its antibacterial activity and making new compounds.  

Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Opossum Peptides are a Promising New Antivenom"

March 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Though some may consider them a nuisance, opossums are amazingly hardy and opportunistic eaters, feeding on everything from the contents of a garbage can to fruits or snails. They also eat snakes and, thanks to an evolutionary chemical arms race, are immune to basically every kind of snake venom. Now, a team of researchers has isolated the peptide from the opossum that makes the animals resistant to snake bites, hoping to use it as a new, inexpensive antivenom in humans. The researchers presented their work on Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Pesky Packing Peanuts Baked and Crushed to Make Battery Electrodes"

March 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Packing peanuts make shipping fragile objects easy. But the puffy particles become a wasteful nuisance once the shipment is complete. Now researchers report a method to turn them into something useful...Vinodkumar Etacheri, a postdoc in the lab of Vilas G. Pol of Purdue University, presented the work Sunday in the Division of Environmental Chemistry at the American Chemical Society national meeting in Denver.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"What's The Difference Between Sugar And High Fructose Corn Syrup?"

April 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

High fructose corn syrup has been a somewhat mysterious ingredient ever since the 1970s. It was introduced to the market at a time just as corn farmers began to receive subsidies (a practice that's still in place today), making it a much cheaper ingredient than sugar. Unlike sugar, which comes from a plant, HFCS is formed from an intricate chemical process, which breaks down corn into a sweetener. Despite the process in which they're made, sugar and HFSC have little nutritional differences. Learn more about these two sweeteners in video above, which was produced by the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including Geeks Are Sexy (U.S.: 264,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 21.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Gas Utilities Reduce Leaks of Methane, Study Finds"

March 31, 2015

Utilities are making progress in reducing leaks from their natural gas distribution networks, a new study has found, but the industry and regulators can do more. Methane, a major component of natural gas, is a powerful greenhouse gas, having some 85 times the effect of carbon dioxide on climate change over a 20-year period. The Obama administration has promoted the use of natural gas as a power source, since it produces far less carbon dioxide than burning coal, but has also pressed for industry to measure and reduce leaks. The study was conducted with the cooperation of and partial funding from industry and published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 13 media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Greentech Media (Boston, MA: 188,400 unique monthly visits) and Natural Gas Intel (U.S.: 29,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Habits of People Who Love to Work Out"

March 29, 2015

You know these people: they bound out of bed in the morning ready to tackle their sunrise bike rides. They leave the office during lunch to sneak in a quick run. Or they head out of work, gym bag in hand—and they’re going to use it (not just bring it back home)....“Nature makes you feel alive—and when you feel great, you are more likely to want to do the workout again,” says Minardi. Besides, in one 2011 study in Environmental Science & Technology, sweating outdoors was associated with a boost of energy, more engagement in the activity, and better mental wellbeing. Go ahead—sweat, and say ahhh.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Start Your April Fools' Day Off Right With These Chemistry Jokes. They're A Gas!"

April 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

It's April Fools' Day! What better way to celebrate than to nerd out with some cringeworthy chemistry jokes? The American Chemical Society has got you covered, with a new round of witticisms in its latest video (above). For instance: "What do you do with a sick chemist? Well, if you can't helium, and you can't curium, then you're going to have to barium.”

The Washington Post  (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Could this new method make rice a healthier option?"

April 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

An undergraduate student at the College of Chemical Sciences in Sri Lanka, Sudhair James, gave an overview of his research on the simple way to cook rice that could cut the number of calories absorbed by the body. James developed this new method along with his mentor Pushparajah Thavarajah. (American Chemical Society via YouTube).

More than 20 media outlets, including Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Latin Post (U.S.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits) and The Straits Times (Singapore: 263,000) covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The Quest to Re-Invent Photosynthesis Just Got More Colorful"

April 4, 2015

Green may be the Plant Kingdom’s color of choice, but it doesn’t have to be that way. In fact, it takes only a little chemical tuning to turn chlorophyll—the light-absorbing pigment that colors plants green—blue, red, orange, or any other hue under the sun. As reported in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B, scientists have recently figured out how to hack chlorophyll to absorb whatever colors of sunlight we like. Armed with new versions of the pigment, we might be able to engineer plants, or artificial solar cells, that can soak up far more of the sun’s energy than before.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science.Mic (New York, NY: 20.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Just Found a Way to Make Chocolate Healthier and More Delicious"

March 31, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

As if people needed to be given reasons to eat chocolate, a team at the University of Ghana's Department of Nutrition and Food Science found out how to make chocolate healthier and even more delicious. … "We decided to add a pod-storage step before the beans were even fermented to see whether that would have an effect on the polyphenol content," Afoakwa said, according to a release from the American Chemical Society.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Opossum Compounds Isolated to Help Make Antivenom"

March 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A simple peptide could save countless future snakebite victims in developing countries, researchers announced at the American Chemical Society national meeting in Denver. The antivenom relies on a sequence of just 11 amino acids, copied from an opossum protein.

The Dallas Morning News (Dallas, TX: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Air pollution might boost pollen allergy"

March 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Certain air pollutants may boost the potency of a birch tree pollen that plays a big role in seasonal allergies, researchers say. In laboratory tests and computer simulations, researchers found that two pollutants — ozone and nitrogen dioxide — have a significant effect on the pollen, called Bet v 1. … The research, presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver, is still in its early stages, however, studies presented at scientific meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Find More Evidence of Breast Milk's Goodness"

March 31, 2015

A high-tech comparison of the breast milk of humans and their close primate relatives is revealing just how nutritious the human variety is...In other words, human breast milk might be even more protein-rich because human babies rely on its nutritional benefits to a larger degree than other primates. Lemay and her colleagues published the findings online this month in the Journal of Proteome Research.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Squid-inspired invisibility camo for soldiers"

March 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Drawing inspiration from a squid’s ability to blend seamlessly into the background to hide from their prey, researchers at the University of California at Irvine have developed a new “invisibility sticker” that could prevent soldiers from being spotted with infrared cameras. … The researchers, who showed off the fruits of their labor last week at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), went on to explain that the material can adhere to a variety of different surface types, including cloth uniforms.

Mother Jones  (San Francisco, CA: 3.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Leftover Pasta Might Be Healthier Than Fresh"

April 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac and National Meeting news release

Last week, lovers of rice rejoiced when the Washington Post reported on a simple trick to improve the nutritional value of the food. According to researchers in Sri Lanka, all you have to do is add a fat (they used coconut oil) to the cooking water, cool your rice overnight, and voilà!—up to 50 percent of the calories (a cup of rice contains about 200 when cooked conventionally) are gone. …. While there are noted benefits from marinades with lemon juice or vinegar, a study published last year in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that when you marinade meat with beer, the carcinogenic potency is greatly reduced.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits)
"A career is like a love affair"

April 3, 2015

I intended to become a researcher. Instead I became a science journalist, then an editor, and finally CEO of the American Chemical Society (ACS) before I retired in February. At a recent event at Columbia University, hosted by the organization Women in Science at Columbia, I told my career story and passed along lessons I've learned about how women can make the most of their lives and careers.

Royal Society of Chemistry (Cambridge, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits)
"Plant molecule could create ‘greener’ roads"

March 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A molecule that comes from plants and trees could lead to cheaper and more environmentally friendly roads and bike paths, according to Ted Sleghek, a senior scientist with the non-profit TNO in the Netherlands. … Sleghek’s reported at the American Chemical Society’s conference in Denver, Colorado on 23 March, that his team has created several different lignin–bitumen mixtures. These can make tarmac harder in warm weather, minimizing rutting and general wear and tear, or tackier in cold weather to prevent rocks and pebbles from coming loose from brittle roads and damaging cars.

Denver 9 News (Denver, CO: 872,000 unique monthly visits)
"Spangler pulls an April Fools' Day prank on 9NEWS"

April 1, 2015

9NEWS knew Science Guy Steve Spangler liked April Fools' Day, but he proved it on Wednesday. Disguised as a discussion about the American Chemical Society, Spangler shocked the anchors with a move they only slightly appreciated, and made them soaking wet and cold. Beyond the prank, he did talk about the annual chemical convention, which featured more than 20,000 chemists in Denver. He was a featured speaker at the event, and shared some of his insights about some exciting changes in science education.

The Epoch Times (China: 17 million unique monthly visits)
"Smog Killing China’s Forests May Spread to Other Countries, Researchers Warn"

March 31, 2015

China’s forests have been mysteriously dying off since 2001. A new report may have not only found the reason why, but warns the problem could soon spread to other countries. … The study was published in the March edition of the Environmental Science and Technology journal, run by the American Chemical Society.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits)
"This yarn conducts electricity"

April 3, 2015

Right now, wearable fitness trackers and bionic devices like electronic skin look cool, but they’re a bit clunky. One reason is that rigid wires tend to lose their conductivity after being bent, limiting the range of flexibility for wearables...These stretchy strings were then dipped in silver nanoparticles to instill conductivity and then liquid silicone to encase everything. This silver nanoyarn could stretch as much as spandex—500% of its original length—and retain a high conductivity (688 siemens per centimeter), the team reports online this month in ACS Nano.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Lettuce color determines antioxidant quality"

March 29, 2015

One of the reasons lettuce is so healthy is because it is rich in antioxidants, which protect our bodies from molecules that cause cell damage and create a variety of diseases. But a new study indicates that not all types of lettuce are created equal. … In a recent edition of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, lead investigator Usue Pérez-López of the Department of Plant Biology and Ecology of the UPV/EHU’s Faculty of Science and Technology and her colleagues report that the antioxidants found in lettuce with green leaves react more slowly that versions of the vegetable with red leaves.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"A novel way to apply drugs to dental plaque"

April 1, 2015

Therapeutic agents intended to reduce dental plaque and prevent tooth decay are often removed by saliva and the act of swallowing before they can take effect. But a team of researchers has developed a way to keep the drugs from being washed away....Their findings have been published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists gain cellular-level insights into drug delivery processes"

March 31, 2015

Chemists, biologists and pharmacologists deal with the question of how complex active substances can be introduced into cells such that they are rapidly and easily available. … Time and time again, scientists are confronted with the particular biochemical properties of cell membranes, which do not allow large molecules to pass and reach the site inside the cell where they are needed. The scientists presented their results in two recently published articles in the journals Journal of the American Chemical Society and Angewandte Chemie.

News Medical  (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists develop new type of carrier that combines photosensitivity and magnetism to fight cancer"

April 2, 2015

By combining, in a liposome, magnetic nanoparticles and photosensitizers that are simultaneously and remotely activated by external physical stimuli (a magnetic field and light), scientists at the Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes (CNRS/Université Paris Diderot) and the Laboratoire Physicochimie des Electrolytes et Nanosystèmes Interfaciaux (CNRS/UPMC), obtained total tumor regression in mice. … These results, which demonstrate the importance of multiple treatments, were published in ACS Nano on 24 March 2015.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"A new tool for understanding Parkinson's disease"

April 2, 2015

EPFL scientists have developed a new method that can accurately simulate the chemical modification of the protein behind Parkinson's disease. The technique, has opened a new way of understanding Parkinson's, and can be expanded to other proteins and diseases as well. … The method, which can be expanded to investigate the effect of nitration in other proteins, is published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and opens new possibilities for understanding the role of this nitration in health and disease. 

… From the Blogs

Chem.info
"Researchers Mine Metals From Sewage"

March 31,2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Researchers from the U.S. Geological Survey are exploring methods to remove potentially valuable metals from treated waste and collect them for possible sale. Metals from personal care products, clothing and other sources can be ingested by people, according to Kathleen Smith of the USGS, and ultimately sent to sewage treatment plants, where they are separated from water into biosolids...The researchers presented their analysis this week in Denver at the 249th national meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Biomass Magazine
"Algae from clogged waterways could serve as biofuels, fertilizer"

April 2, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Water-borne algal blooms from farm fertilizer runoff can destroy aquatic life and clog rivers and lakes, but scientists recently reported that they are working on a way to clean up these environmental scourges and turn them into useful products. … A multi-pronged nutrient bio-remediation system is the goal of a team of scientists who will present their research at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

Lab Manager
"Periodic Puns, Round Two: Chemistry Jokes for April Fools' Day"

April 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Last year, the American Chemical Society's (ACS) Reactions series shook up the comedy world with a video featuring nothing but chemistry jokes. After overwhelming public acclaim, they're back for this April Fools' Day with round two, featuring a number of fan submissions.

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