ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"H2O Just Got Interesting: 5 New Waters You HAVE To Try"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Coconut water has revolutionized the healthy drinks market since its introduction in the mid-2000s, but its time in the sun could be over with the introduction of a range of super-healthy competitors. … This high potassium level is great news if you love working out – in a recent study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Watermelon Water was found to relieve post-workout muscle soreness and decrease recovery time.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Hemp Is on its Way to Your Car Battery and Many Things You Haven't Yet Imagined"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The first digital-age domestic hemp crop is being harvested as I write. … Seems the ridged shape of hemp, when reduced to nano-sized carbon atom sheets (called graphene), causes it to outperform previously leading modes of experimental (and, by the way, environmentally unfriendly) energy storage at, according to a paper delivered at the 2014 meeting of the American Chemical Society, 1/1000th of the cost. Just that.

The Daily Mail  (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Now that's drink driving! Distillery turns WHISKY by-products into biofuel for cars"

October 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Whisky-making can be a wasteful business. More than 1.6 billion litres of pot ale, and half a million metric tonnes of ‘draff’ are produced as by-products each year - and the majority is thrown away. Now a firm in Scotland wants to put this waste to good use to power our cars, feed our animals and even make plastics. Edinburgh-based Celtic Renewables was formed in 2011. It has spent the past three years refining its recycling process based on a century-old fermentation technique, and is now taking the next step toward a commercial plant, according to the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Think Progress (8.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Just Discovered How To Determine If Water Contamination Comes From Fracking"

October 21, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A team of U.S. and French scientists say they have developed a new tool that can specifically tell when environmental contamination comes from waste produced by hydraulic fracturing, better known as fracking. In peer-reviewed research published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology on Monday, the researchers say their new forensic tool can distinguish fracking wastewater pollution from other contamination that results from other industrial processes — such as conventional oil and gas drilling.

USA Today (Washington, DC: 5.2 million unique monthly visits)
"National Chemistry Week celebrates the sweet side of candy"

October 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

I bet you never thought your sweet tooth could be so scientific. Candy enthusiasts across the country will celebrate the American Chemistry Society's week devoted to the making, baking and creation of your favorite confections. Starting Sunday, you can attend events throughout the USA to learn what ACS calls the "sweeter side of chemistry." There'll be treasure hunts and even some edible experiments.

The Irish Examiner (Dublin, Ireland: 240,700 unique monthly visits)
"Frying your food with olive oil is better for you than seed oils"

October 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Everybody loves fried food and despite knowing it’s not the healthiest, it’s just too tasty to resist. But if you want to get healthier you needn’t go as far as to stop eating it – simply make sure you’re frying your food with olive oil. Scientists have found that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils, with the result that we get healthier food at the end of it. … The research was reported in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 40 media outlets, including Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), The Daily Meal (586,400 unique monthly visits), NDTV Cooks (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Indian Express (India: 202,400 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), FoodNavigator.com (Crawley, U.K.: 55,200 unique monthly visits) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Why are some sugars sweeter than others? Chew on this"

October 21, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

While most of us know we like ice cream, cookies and all sorts of other dessert-y goodness, we probably don't give much thought to why other than a vague "because, sugar." And while you might not realize it when you're chomping on that cake, our taste buds perceive some sugars as sweeter than others, and it all comes down to chemistry. The American Chemical Society (ACS), by way of its "Reactions" YouTube series, looks to broaden our understanding of what makes things taste sweet in its latest video explainer.

io9 (Sydney, Australia: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"How Do Artificial Sweeteners Trick Us Into Tasting Sugar?"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

We know they're not sugar, but artificial sweeteners still have a way of making us taste sugar (or at least something close to it). But just how do they do that? In this video put together by the American Chemical Society's Reactions, they take on the question of how we taste sweetness. They start with the simpler question of how sugar itself is processed by our taste buds, but quickly transition into how artificial sweeteners are able to find a similar, though not quite, effect.

More than 15 media outlets, including Refinery 29 (New York, NY: 10.6 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Refinery 29 (New York, NY: 10.6 million unique monthly visits)
"An Entirely Different Kind Of Apple Operating System"

October 21, 2014

Whether you like them in a pie, with some peanut butter, or covered in caramel, it's hard to deny the classic, humble appeal of an apple. … Recent studies also suggest that all apples might not be created equally. For instance, a study from Washington State University suggested that Granny Smiths are the most beneficial for our gut bacteria. And, a recent paper published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry indicates that Red Delicious apples have the most antioxidants. But, for the most part, Komstadius says apple types are equally healthy: You'll find filling fiber and helpful vitamin C in all varieties.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
'Coconut Water Is Great, Shut Up"

October 24, 2104
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Coconut water is a delicious and healthy beverage, and it is good for you. If you drink it after going to yoga class or before a jog, you will be hydrated and receive nutritional benefits. … "It has five times more potassium than Gatorade or Powerade. Whenever you get cramps in your muscles, potassium will help you to get rid of the cramps," Dr. Chhandashri Bhattacharya said, presenting a paper on coconut water's benefits to the American Chemical Society. "It's a healthy drink that replenishes the nutrients that your body has lost during a moderate workout."

The Christian Science Monitor (Boston, MA: 7.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New biofuels recipe: iron with a pinch of palladium"

October 21, 2014

Scientists have combined iron and palladium to form a new catalyst for converting biomass into fuels fit for today's gas tanks. It's part of an effort to make biofuels more energy dense, and therefore more competitive with fossil fuels. … The paper on their work was chosen as the cover story in the October issue of the scientific journal ACS Catalysis.

Pacific Standard (Santa Barbara, CA: 953,400 unique monthly visits)
"That Cigarette Would Make a Great Water Filter"

October 21, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In further evidence that one person’s trash is another’s treasure—and perhaps life saver—researchers in China and Saudi Arabia have devised a way to use cigarette ash to filter arsenic from water. … Thus, a certain amount of activated carbon”—that’s the porous, absorbent stuff in your water filter—“is formed and incorporated into the cigarette soot,” write He Chen and colleagues in Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 2.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Fracking tracking breakthrough to hold frackers responsible for pollution"

October 21, 2014

In work supported by the National Science Foundation, researchers have identified new tracers that can identify fracking fluids in the environment, and even differentiate fracking flow-back water contamination from pollution caused by other types of oil and gas wells. … The paper, New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations, is published in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"ACS Ebola resources available to journalists"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Have questions about the science underlying the ongoing Ebola crisis? The virus has so far infected more than 8,000 people, making it the largest outbreak of the virus in history. Despite the incredible efforts of local and global public health teams, Tom Frieden, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, called the situation “unprecedented” while on a visit to the affected region. … The American Chemical Society has set up a resource page containing a list of scientific papers*, as well as Chemical & Engineering News articles, on Ebola that journalists can access for free.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Software Finds Tiny Leaks in Natural Gas Pipelines"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Major leaks from oil and gas pipelines have led to home evacuations, explosions, millions of dollars in lawsuit payouts and valuable natural resources escaping into the air, ground and water. But in a report in ACS’ journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, scientists say they have developed a new software-based method that finds leaks even when they’re small, which could help prevent serious incidents — and save money for customers and industry.

More than 7 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Chem.Info (Rockaway, NJ: 40,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Frying with olive oil better than seed oil for health"

October 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

All around the world people enjoy fried food. But how many know that cooking oils differ in their ability to withstand heat and repeated use? Now, a new study finds that compared to several seed oils, olive oil remains the most stable at high temperature and thus likely to be better for health. The researchers, led by Sfax University in Tunisia, report what they found when they compared olive oil with sunflower, corn and soybean oil, in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits)
"Skin patches may replace blood diagnostic test"

October 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have, for the first time, designed and successfully tested a small skin patch that detected malaria proteins in live mice and could replace the traditional blood diagnostic test. Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe. In the American Chemical Society (ACS)'s journal Analytical Chemistry, a team of researchers report they have designed and successfully tested, for the first time, a small skin patch that detected malaria proteins in live mice.

More than 15 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits), University Herald (New York, NY: 53,700 unique monthly visits) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Interesting facts about our favorite candy to mark National Chemistry Week"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Chemists around the world this week are helping children explore the chemical tricks that confectioners use to transform their ingredients into irresistible treats. These efforts to explain the science behind jelly beans, licorice, chocolate and other gooey delights are part of National Chemistry Week, Oct. 19-25, an annual event sponsored by the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

… TV and Radio News

WFMY (CBS) (Greensboro, NC: Local Viewership 35,748)
"National Chemistry Week"

October 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] Channel your inner Bill Nye and come with us on a chemical adventure! The American Chemical Society is promoting national chemistry week with a program this weekend called "the sweet side of chemistry: candy." Dr. Jerry Walsh is a chemistry professor at UNC and Dennis Ergle is a chemist and the chair of chemistry day.... and they join us this morning with more.

More than 20 media outlets, including WTKR-NFK (CBS) (Norfolk, VA: Local Viewership 42,065), WRCB (NBC) (Chattanooga, TN: Local Viewership 27,790), KSTU-SLC (FOX) (Salt Lake City, UT: Local Viewership 26,351), WTNZ (FOX) (Knoxville, TN: Local Viewership 24,464), KOSA (CBS) (Odessa, TX: Local Viewership 6,419) and WMBD (CBS) (Peoria, IL: Local Viewership 1,154) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0
"Olive, Corn, Soybean Or Sunflower Oil - The Science Answer As To What Is Best For Frying"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Frying in oil is one of the world's most popular ways to prepare food — chicken and French-fried potatoes are staples but even candy bars and whole turkeys have joined the list of deep-friend goodness. Lots of oil make health claims but there is a whole range of physical, chemical and nutritional properties that can degrade oil quality when heated so a paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry tested four different refined oils — olive, corn, soybean and sunflower — and reused the oil 10 times to determine which is truly the best.

Lab Manager
"Turning Waste from Whisky-Making into Fuel"

October 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A start-up company in Scotland is working to capitalize on the tons of waste produced by one of the country's most valued industries and turn the dregs of whisky-making into fuel. Celtic Renewables, formed in 2011, has refined its process based on a century-old fermentation technique and is now taking the next step toward a commercial plant, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Infection Control Today
"Skin Patch Could Replace the Syringe for Disease Diagnosis"

October 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Drawing blood and testing it is standard practice for many medical diagnostics. As a less painful alternative, scientists are developing skin patches that could one day replace the syringe. In the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, one team reports they have designed and successfully tested, for the first time, a small skin patch that detected malaria proteins in live mice. It could someday be adapted for use in humans to diagnose other diseases, too.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Does Pizza Taste So Delicious? Allow Science to Explain"

October 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

A few months back, an intrepid team of scientists declared that mozzarella is the best cheese for pizza because it melts, bubbles and browns better than any other varieties. Now, some other scientists from the American Chemical Society have taken an even closer look at the chemistry of everybody’s favorite cheesy food with this new video, part of the organization’s Reactions series.

More than 15 media outlets, including UPROXX (25.3 million unique monthly visits) and Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Scientists Develop Simple and Inexpensive Way to Remove Arsenic from Drinking Water"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A team of Chinese scientists took the byproduct of one health issue and turned it into a solution to another. Writing the American Chemical Society’s journal ‘Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research’, the researchers outlined their unique, simple and inexpensive way to remove the poison arsenic from drinking water. … The key behind the newly developed arsenic removal system is the end result of the unhealthy habit of cigarette smoking: ashes.

More than 30 media outlets, including The Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Caller (Washington, DC: 5.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Hindustan Times (India: 287,300 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"LED breakthrough can mean warmer hues, cheaper cost"

October 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The phaseout of traditional incandescent bulbs in the United States, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given LED lighting a sales boost. But the light from white LED bulbs is generally colder than the warm glow of traditional bulbs. Plus, most of these lights are made with rare earth elements that are increasingly in demand for use in almost all other high-tech devices, adding to the cost of the technology. .. Their findings are reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's Why Pizza Tastes So Frickin' Fantastic"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

For pizza lovers, a good pie is a gift from the gods. But the explanation for why pizza tastes so good is rooted not in theology but in science--in this case, the complex chemistry of cheese, dough, and toppings. If you're hungry for the details, just watch this new episode of "Reactions," the series of YouTube video explainers produced by the American Chemical Society.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Breathalyser used to diagnose dolphin health"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Dolphins are getting breathalysed, but not to stop them driving under the influence: a team of researchers has developed a special breathalyser that allows them to check the health of the animals in a non-invasive way. Professor Cristina Davis and colleagues at the UC Davis Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have teamed up with researchers at the National Marine Mammal Foundation in San Diego and the Chicago Zoological Society's Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Florida to develop the device, which is placed over the dolphin's blowhole and can be used on both wild dolphins and those in human care. Source: American Chemical Society.

More than 25 media outlets, including Take Part (5.9 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and The Maritime Executive (Fort Lauderdale, FL: 131,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"There’s Finally Something Useful That Disgusting Cigarette Ash Can Be Used For"

October 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Cigarette ash: it’s flicked onto the sidewalk, tapped into trays or simply allowed to hang off the end of a butt until the smoker is done and ready to discard the whole thing. On the whole, cigarette ash has been useless — until now. According to the American Chemical Society, recent research showed that the leftovers of cigarette smoking can actually filter arsenic, a poisonous substance, from drinking water.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"The Science of Why Toothpaste Makes Food Taste Funny"

October 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

All food is made of chemicals—even food that grows on trees or in the ground. (Bananas, eggs and blueberries still have component parts like glucose, aspartic acid, butraldehyde and phenylalanine.) Some of these chemicals nourish us; others are connected to taste or color. And like any chemicals, the chemicals in food interact in sometimes curious ways. … In the video above, the American Chemical Society explains that one toothpaste chemical in particular—sodium lauryl sulfate—seems to alter your mouth's ability to detect tastes.

Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 4.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Science explains why pizza tastes so darn good"

October 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Turns out, there's a scientific reason behind the universal obsession with pizza. And we mean everything from thin crust to deep dish to stuffed crust. In a new video seen above, the American Chemical Society explains the wonders of pizza. Regardless of your toppings, if you've got bread, an acidic sauce and cheese, the group claims you're in for a magical experience.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Compound Semiconductor (London, U.K.) and Photonics (Pittsfield, MA: 53,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Device assesses dolphins' health via their blowholes"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you want to get a picture of wild dolphin populations' health, it's typically necessary to capture some of the animals and then obtain blood samples or skin biopsies. Needless to say, it's hard work, and the dolphins tend not to like it. Soon, however, it may be possible to gather the same information using a device that samples their breath. … A paper on the research was recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

News & Observer (Raleigh, NC: 2.0 million unique monthly visits)
"LED breakthrough can mean warmer hues, cheaper cost"

October 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The phase-out of traditional incandescent bulbs in the United States, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given LED lighting a sales boost. But the light from white LED bulbs is generally “colder” than the warm glow of traditional bulbs. Plus, most of these lights are made with rare earth elements that are increasingly in-demand for use in almost all other high-tech devices, thus adding to the cost of the technology. … Their findings are reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"French growers up in arms over EU's pending label requirements for lavender"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Next year, the European Commission is set to release guidelines for warning labels on products made with lavender oil, which reportedly can cause allergic reactions for some people. But lavender growers in France are putting up a fight, and some are even threatening to quit the business altogether if the rules go into effect, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Tonsil stem cells could someday help repair liver damage without surgery"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The liver provides critical functions, such as ridding the body of toxins. Its failure can be deadly, and there are few options for fixing it. But scientists now report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a way to potentially inject stem cells from tonsils, a body part we don’t need, to repair damaged livers — all without surgery.

American Laboratory (San Francisco, CA)
"ACS Addresses Fracking and Sustainability"

October 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

In just half a decade, hydraulic fracturing of oil and gas wells has greatly improved the economic competitiveness of America. This is leading to new employment opportunities for hard hats and also lab coats. What does the future look like? Many lecturers addressed the impact of hydraulic fracturing at a 2.5-day Symposium at the 248th ACS National Meeting, held August 10–14, 2014, in San Francisco, CA.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells"

October 16, 2014

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. … In research published online by the journal ACS Nano of the American Chemical Society, Han and colleagues describe a novel strategy that makes use of a new class of upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs), a billionth of a meter in size, which can act as a kind of relay station.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Guardian Liberty Voice (Las Vegas, NV: 3.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Bio-Inspired 'Nano-Cocoons' Offer Targeted Drug Delivery Against Cancer Cells"

October 15, 2014

Bio-inspired nano-cocoons may offer the newest method for delivering drugs used to treat the spread of cancer cells. Each bio-engineered cocoon consists of a single DNA strand that manipulates itself into the shape of a ball of yarn measuring 150 nanometers wide. They can carry large amounts of anti-cancer drugs and release them rapidly into the cancer cells once inside. … The details behind this new way to treat cancer were released Oct. 13 in a paper published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.  

More than 10 media outlets, including StreetInsider.com (Birmingham, MI: 695,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New catalyst could improve biofuels production"

October 16, 2014

Washington State University researchers have developed a new catalyst that could lead to making biofuels cheaply and more efficiently. Led by Voiland Distinguished Professor Yong Wang, the researchers mixed inexpensive iron with a tiny amount of rare palladium to make the catalyst. Their work was featured on the cover of the October issue of the journal ACS Catalysis.

More than 10 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Dispelling a misconception about Mg-ion batteries"

October 16, 2014

Lithium (Li)-ion batteries serve us well, powering our laptops, tablets, cell phones and a host of other gadgets and devices. However, for future automotive applications, we will need rechargeable batteries with significant increases in energy density, reductions in cost and improvements in safety. … Prendergast and Wan have published the results of their work in JACS, the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Clean Technica (1.3 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WTOP-DC (Washington, D.C.)
"Keeping filler ingredients out of your cup of coffee"

October 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] ...counterfeit money but what about counterfeit coffee. The  American Chemical Society says that growing coffee shortages may increase the chance that fillers could be contributing significantly to a morning cup of coffee. A new test however is being developed in Brazil that could detect unwanted coffee fillers, such as wheat corn and soybean, as well as warn when are these fillers could be in your coffee.

… From the Blogs

Counsel & Heal
"Ash to Rescue: Can Filter Arsenic from Water"

October 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chinese scientists have found a potential use for cigarette ash with profound health benefits. They discovered ash's ability to rid water of arsenic, which is known to cause a host of disorders in adults and children. … The findings of the study have been published in ACS' journal Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research.

Zee News
"Lavender to be classified as 'skin sensitiser'"

October 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In view of reports that products made with lavender oil can cause allergic reactions for some people, the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) said it will classify the oil as a 'skin sensitiser'. … At least one lavender producer has notified the ECHA that the essential oils from the plant can cause allergic reactions, said Alex Scott, a senior editor at Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

BGR
"The science of why pizza is so delicious"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Pizza is a national pastime in America. When sports are on and beer is flowing, pizza is cooking up its cheesy goodness in ovens all across the country. But why is pizza something so good that even the most prolific poets would fail to truly capture the true essence of its splendor? We’ll give the job of scientifically explaining why pizza is so amazing to the good folks over at Reactions.

UC Davis
"Engineers develop breath-test device for dolphin health"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

More than just "fish breath": Engineers at the University of California, Davis, have developed a new device for collecting dolphin breath for analysis, which could make it easier to check the marine animals' health and be used in studying dolphin biology and medicine as well as in wildlife conservation. The work was published recently in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

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