ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists propose new theory about how life came on Earth"
February 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Shedding new light on how life began on Earth, scientists, including an Indian-origin researcher, have proposed a new set of cosmic chemical reactions that could have contributed to the formation of life on our planet. … "How more complex hydrocarbons evolved, including those that would eventually lead to life on Earth, remains an open question," the authors noted in an article appeared in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 75,500 unique monthly visits), Dispatch Tribunal (India: 37,000 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Your scientific guide to the ultimate Super Bowl nachos"
February 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Even if you have zero interest in sportsball, Super Bowl Day is a great day. Everyone loves snacks, and the best snacks are the ones that are the worst for you, and there's no day so dedicated to the consumption of abundant unhealthy appetizers as this coming Sunday. … Enter the American Chemical Society, which has given us a scientific guide to the ultimate nacho cheese.

More than 50 media outlets, including Lifehacker.com (U.S.: 20.9 million unique monthly visits), Forbes (New York, NY: 10.1 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Times (Washington, DC: 5.0 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"The Food Americans Are Most Likely To Stress Eat"
February 2, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

What's the one thing that'll always be there for you after a long, stressful day? According to a new poll, there's a clear answer. … The American Chemical Society says pizza is "the food of the gods" because of the highly palatable mix of the acidic tomato sauce, stringy mozzarella and a crust that's browned by cooking.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Purified cashew proteins lend insight into allergic reactions"
February 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It's well known that peanuts can cause severe reactions in people who are allergic, but research suggests that the risk of developing a life-threatening reaction could be higher for those allergic to cashews. Now scientists have come up with a fast and simple method to purify the three main cashew allergens to help better grasp how they work and their effects on people. Their report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Pace of new drug approvals rise — and so do their price tags"
February 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Last year, more new drugs reached the market than in any year since 1996. But many have six-figure price tags for a year's worth of treatment and deliver only incremental health benefits. What does this mean for patients and the pharmaceutical industry? The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, parses the 2015 crop of therapies and who might benefit.

Fast Company (1.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Motorized "Spermbots" Could Help Couples Conceive"
February 2, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Men with otherwise decent sperm counts can sometimes suffer from what's known as "low sperm motility." Their sperm, while numerous and rightly formed, don't move forward with vigor, but rather—in some sort of sad metaphor for life—shift around in a circular or sluggish manner. In short, the sperm are not able to reach their egg-target on their own, resulting in non-fertility and frustration for trying-to-conceive couples. … And, writing up their work in the journal Nano Letters, the researchers caution that it could be some time before human clinical trials begin.

Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 978,200 unique monthly visits)
"BPA replacement isn't much better than the original, study says"
February 2, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In recent years, packaging manufacturers have moved away from Bisphenol A (BPA), the hardening agent that was once found in nearly all plastic bottles and containers. … In 2012 the American Chemical Society (ACS) reported that people were also being exposed to BPS from the thermal paper used in cash register receipts.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Investigating potential fetal exposure to antidepressants"
February 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Depression is a serious issue for expecting mothers. Left untreated, depression could have implications for a fetus's health. But treating the disease during pregnancy may carry health risks for the developing fetus, which makes an expecting mother's decision whether to take medication a very difficult one. To better understand how antidepressants affect fetuses during pregnancy, scientists studied exposure in mice. They report their findings in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

Six media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Purifying Water with Leaf-mimicking Device"
February 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

For years, scientists have been pursuing ways to imitate a leaf's photosynthetic power to make hydrogen fuel from water and sunlight. In a new twist, a team has come up with another kind of device that mimics two of a leaf's processes — photosynthesis and transpiration — to harness solar energy to purify water. Their development, reported in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, could help address issues of water scarcity.

Eight media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,000 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 34,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Independent (London, U.K.: 35.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Super Bowl food: A guide to making scientifically perfect nachos for the big game"
February 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Even if you have zero interest in sportsball, Super Bowl Day is a great day. Everyone loves snacks, and the best snacks are the ones that are the worst for you, and there's no day so dedicated to the consumption of abundant unhealthy appetizers as this coming Sunday. … Enter the American Chemical Society, which has given us a scientific guide to the ultimate nacho cheese.

Fox News (New York, NY: 25.4 million unique monthly visits)
"3D printing can be hazardous to your health"
February 2, 2016

3D printers don't just produce whatever you choose to make — they also let off fumes. According to a new study from researchers in Paris and the United States, those vapors may be more dangerous than you previously thought. The study, printed in the Jan. 7 issue of Environmental Science & Technology, suggests that plastics such as nylon, ABS and polycarbonate used in 3D printing create particles of potentially dangerous materials like styrene, which the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies as a possible human carcinogen.

Seven media outlets, including Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits) and Fast Company (1.5 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"This Robot Changes Color Like a Chameleon"
February 5, 2016

Imagine a world where robots creep up on you: Electric motors just a gentle whir, hard shells changing color to blend in with their surroundings. Well, there’s no need to imagine—it’s happened. …  The research is published in ACS Nano.

More than 12 media outlets, including Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits) and New Scientist (London, U.K.: 3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Verge (New York, NY: 13.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Should NASCAR go electric?"
February 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Last week, Bill Nye started a bit of a storm with this post on Aeon: "If NASCAR embraced electric cars it could change the world." … At the 246th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, he said that "racing in excess of 150 mph on high-speed ovals will take a significant breakthrough in battery technology for EV race cars, or racetracks, to be competitive in the Indianapolis 500 or NASCAR events."

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Lithium battery catalyst found to harm key soil microorganism"
February 4, 2016

The material at the heart of the lithium ion batteries that power electric vehicles, laptop computers and smartphones has been shown to impair a key soil bacterium, according to new research published online in the journal Chemistry of Materials.

More than 12 media outlets, including Grist (920,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists Turn Carbon Dioxide Into Fuel"
February 4, 2016

Scientists at the University of Southern California are making fuel out of thin air. According to the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, a team led by G.K. Surya Prakash and George Olah has developed a method to turn carbon dioxide (CO2) - the primary gas humans create - into methanol, a fuel which is cleaner-burning and safer than fossil fuels. … The research was published Dec. 29, 2015, in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including Zee News (India: 312,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"3 science-backed food hacks for preparing the ideal dinner party"
February 5, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Inviting a special someone, a group of friends, or a team of colleagues by for a delicious dinner can be a great way to show off your cooking skills but can also be incredibly stressful. Here are three techniques, provided by the American Chemical Society's Reactions YouTube series that can help you make the perfect dinner.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Video: Helium beer—prank or possible?"
February 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Brewers usually fill their kegs with carbon dioxide or nitrogen. But every once in a while, some brewers will post a video announcing they have made beer with helium—and have the high voices to prove it. While these videos are eventually exposed as pranks, the scientific possibility of helium beer is real. Speaking of Chemistry's Matt Davenport investigates with some scientist friends who gave it a try.

Five media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Health24.com (Cape Town, South Africa: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
Health24.com
February 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

For students, the start of the school year means new classes, new friends, homework and sports. It also brings the threat of head lice. The itch-inducing pests lead to missed school days and frustrated parents, who could have even more reason to be wary of the bug this year. … The researchers presented their work at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society.

… From the Blogs

Food Ingredients First
"Purified Cashew Proteins Lend Insight into Allergic Reactions"
February 5, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It's well known that peanuts can cause severe reactions in people who are allergic, but research suggests that the risk of developing a life-threatening reaction could be higher for those allergic to cashews. Now scientists have come up with a fast and simple method to purify the three main cashew allergens to help better grasp how they work and their effects on people. Their report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

WebIndia123
"Scientists propose new theory about how life came on Earth"
February 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Shedding new light on how life began on Earth, scientists, including an Indian-origin researcher, have proposed a new set of cosmic chemical reactions that could have contributed to the formation of life on our planet. … How more complex hydrocarbons evolved, including those that would eventually lead to life on Earth, remains an open question, the authors noted in an article appeared in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The Economist (London, U.K.: 8.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The perfect pinot problem"
January 30, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As grape varieties go, pinot noir is famously finicky. Got right, the thin-skinned grapes can produce some of the world’s finest wines….The researchers report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that they detected 49 aromatic compounds in the grapes from the two years during both the early and the late sampling periods.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Red Meat, Processed Meat and the Scary New Science"
January 26, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

When the World Health Organization issued a report this past October citing that processed meats are carcinogenic from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, news outlets and social media sites lit up with conversation....Beer, according to a study in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, helps fend off the formation of damaging free-radical compounds.

The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 20.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Obama is banning your microbead exfoliator"
January 29, 2016

This year has started with a victory for natural beauty fans across the globe: 2016 is set to be the year cosmetic formulators begin removing plastics from personal care items….Meanwhile Environmental Science & Technology reports that more than an estimated eight trillion microbeads were entering the US waterways daily - this volume is enough to coat the surface of 300 tennis courts every day.

HowStuffWorks (Atlanta, GA: 4.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Are Motorized 'Spermbots' the Answer to Male Infertility?"
January 25, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

For couples who are having difficulty conceiving, one of the common hindrances is something called low or poor sperm motility, which is the fancy medical way of saying that a man's sperm cells aren't so great at swimming….The researchers from IFW Dresden and Chemnitz University of Technology describe their invention in a recent article in the journal Nano Letters titled "Cellular Cargo Delivery: Toward Assisted Fertilization by Sperm-Carrying Micromotors."

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Cellulose nanogenerators could one day power implanted biomedical devices"
January 28, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Implantable electronics that can deliver drugs, monitor vital signs and perform other health-related roles are on the horizon. But finding a way to power them remains a challenge. Now scientists have built a flexible nanogenerator out of cellulose, an abundant natural material, that could potentially harvest energy from the body - its heartbeats, blood flow and other almost imperceptible but constant movements. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 25 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Creating 'greener' wrinkle-resistant cotton fabric"
January 27, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Ironing is a tedious chore, but wearing crumpled clothing is unprofessional. That's why "wrinkle-resistant" garments have become so popular. But the current methods for making these textiles often release formaldehyde -- a chemical that in large amounts is hazardous to human health -- into the air and water. Now a team reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering a method for making wrinkle-resistant cotton fabrics that is more environmentally friendly and cost effective.

Eight media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Chinese scientists develop liver tissue for transplants, drug screening"
February 1, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chinese researchers have engineered a liver tissue in the lab which closely mimics the organ's complicated functions more effectively a finding that can lead to the development of functional liver tissue for clinical applications and drug screening. … It successfully simulated how a real liver would react to various drug combinations, the findings, published in the journal Analytical Chemistry, revealed.

More than 25 media outlets, including Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), The Hindu (Chennai, India: 586,000 unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 405,000 unique monthly visits), The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 186,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits)
"Toxins related to ‘red tides’ found in home aquarium"
January 27, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Many shore residents and beach-goers are already familiar with the health risks of “red tide,” algal blooms along coastlines that can trigger respiratory illness and other effects in people who inhale the toxins the algae release. Now in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology, scientists report new evidence that similar effects can occur on a much smaller scale among home aquaria owners.

Pulse Headlines (Miami, FL: 80,700 unique monthly visits)
"‘De-Icing’ concrete could make roads safer during winter"
January 25, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chris Tuan, civil engineering Professor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, has designed a smart electrically conductive concrete able to melt snow….A group of engineers have published a recent study in the journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research where they propose a method for creating self-sufficient winter roads in which roads could essentially salt themselves.

Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits)
"What DuPont's deep R&D cuts mean for science"
January 27, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

During the last century, private companies, as well as illustrious universities, were known for great exploratory research. But those days may soon be a memory if DuPont's recent layoffs are any indication, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Super-spaghetti of enriched pasta could help reduce risk of suffering cardiovascular diseases"
January 25, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) and the Research and Development of Functional Food Centre (CIDAF, for its initials in Spanish) along with two Italian universities, have developed a 'super-spaghetti' of enriched pasta, elaborated with functional flours, which contains more fibre and proteins than normal pasta and that helps reducing the risk of suffering cardiovascular diseases….Not in vain, due to the technological novelty that this product is, the American Chemical Society (ACS) has devoted an article in its website to it, calling the product a 'super-spaghetti'.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Magnetically Guided Gene Therapy Heals Blood Vessels"
January 29, 2016

A technique that combines gene therapy and magnets could someday provide a new tool for treating cardiovascular disease, which puts millions of lives at risk every year. Researchers have produced cells that carry magnetic nanoparticles linked to a therapeutic gene. With an external magnet to direct the cells, the researchers used them to repair damaged arteries in mice (ACS Nano 2015).

Vice (U.S.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Graphene Brain Implants Hold Promise for Treating Parkinson’s, Paralysis"
January 31, 2016

Figuring out a way to allow electrodes to directly interface with neurons without harming them is one of the most pressing tasks facing neuroscientists today….The team’s research, published in ACS Nano, details how it used rat brain cell cultures to discover that untreated graphene electrodes interfaced perfectly with neurons.

More than 35 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 45,000 unique monthly visits), Medical Design Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 39,600 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and HealthCanal (NC: 23,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

LiveScience (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"11 Body Parts Grown in the Lab"
January 26, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Regrowing a missing limb is no big deal — to a starfish or salamander, creatures that are well-known for using regenerative "superpowers" to replace missing arms and tails….In fact, humans shed their entire outer layer of skin every two to four weeks, losing about 18 ounces (510 grams) of skin cells per year, according to the American Chemical Society.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Fun with Lego (molecules)"
January 27, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

A great childhood pleasure is playing with Legos and marveling at the variety of structures you can create from a small number of basic elements….This week in ACS Central Science, researchers report a simple system to make different nano-architectures with precision.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"New CO2 Recycling Process Captures Carbon Dioxide From Air And Converts Greenhouse Gas Into Methanol"
January 29, 2016

A new study found a means to produce an alternative energy source to gasoline that can help the environment rather than further polluting it….In the study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers were interested in coming up with ways to recycle CO2 into things that can be useful and reduce its effects on the environment.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"A pinch of graphene could keep airplane wings ice-free"
January 27, 2016

Both airplane wings and helicopter rotor blades are subject to one problem – they can both ice up….A paper on the research was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 12 media outlets, including Dispatch Tribunal (Ahmedabad, India: 37,100 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Use Leaf, Sodium to Create New Battery"
January 29, 2016

Scientists at the University of Maryland have a new recipe for batteries: Bake a leaf, and add sodium. They used a carbonized oak leaf, pumped full of sodium, as a demonstration battery’s negative terminal, or anode, according to a paper published yesterday in the journal ACS Applied Materials Interfaces.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits)
"New Type Of Nanowires, Built With Natural Gas"
January 30, 2016

A new simple nanowire manufacturing technique uses self-catalytic growth process assisted by thermal decomposition of natural gas….In a study, reported in the January 21, 2016 issue of Nano Letters, the team demonstrated a new redox-responsive assembly method to synthesize hierarchically structured carbon-sheathed germanium nanowires (c-GeNWs) on a large scale by the use of self-catalytic growth process assisted by thermally decomposed natural gas.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits)
"UCR Research Advances Oil Production in Yeast"
January 27, 2016

A team led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside has adapted the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing system for use in a yeast strain that can produce useful lipids and polymers…..Published recently in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology, the research involves the oleaginous (oil-producing) yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, which is known for converting sugars to lipids and hydrocarbons that are difficult to make synthetically.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Too-few proteins prompt nanoparticles to clump"
January 28, 2016

Blood serum proteins have been observed combining one-to-one with gold nanoparticles and prompting them to aggregate, scientists at Rice University reported….The paper, published this month in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano ("Adsorption and Unfolding of a Single Protein Triggers Nanoparticle Aggregation"), has implications for diseases caused by aggregation, like Alzheimer's, and for nanoparticle toxicity issues, the researchers said.

Seven media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

BrightSurf.com
"Cellulose nanogenerators could one day power implanted biomedical devices"
January 28, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Implantable electronics that can deliver drugs, monitor vital signs and perform other health-related roles are on the horizon. But finding a way to power them remains a challenge. Now scientists have built a flexible nanogenerator out of cellulose, an abundant natural material, that could potentially harvest energy from the body -- its heartbeats, blood flow and other almost imperceptible but constant movements. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Cotton Grower
"Making Wrinkle-Resistant Cotton Fabrics “Greener”"
January 28, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A recent article from the American Chemical Society reported that a team of chemists have developed a new, more environmentally-friendly and cost effective method for making wrinkle-resistant cotton fabrics. Current methods for making wrinkle-resistant textiles often release formaldehyde – a chemical that, in large amounts, is hazardous to human health – into the air and water.

Teatro Naturale
"Toward consistently good pinot noir"
January 30, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The grapes used to make pinot noir, the red wine of hit comedy "Sideways" fame, are known to be literally and figuratively thin-skinned. They're highly sensitive to their environment, making it difficult for growers to determine their quality at harvest time. To get a better handle on the finicky fruit, scientists have now figured out how the grapes' aroma profile changes as they ripen. Their report appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Asian Scientist
"Could More Acidic Oceans Mean Less Pearls?"
January 29, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Pearls have adorned the necklines of women throughout history, but some evidence suggests that the gems’ future could be uncertain. Increasingly acidic seawater causes oyster shells to weaken, which doesn’t bode well for the pearls forming within. However, as scientists report in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, the mollusks might be more resilient to changing conditions than previously thought.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.