ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Does Pizza Taste So Delicious? Allow Science to Explain"

October 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

A few months back, an intrepid team of scientists declared that mozzarella is the best cheese for pizza because it melts, bubbles and browns better than any other varieties. Now, some other scientists from the American Chemical Society have taken an even closer look at the chemistry of everybody’s favorite cheesy food with this new video, part of the organization’s Reactions series.

More than 15 media outlets, including UPROXX (25.3 million unique monthly visits) and Tulsa World (Tulsa, OK: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Scientists Develop Simple and Inexpensive Way to Remove Arsenic from Drinking Water"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A team of Chinese scientists took the byproduct of one health issue and turned it into a solution to another. Writing the American Chemical Society’s journal ‘Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research’, the researchers outlined their unique, simple and inexpensive way to remove the poison arsenic from drinking water. … The key behind the newly developed arsenic removal system is the end result of the unhealthy habit of cigarette smoking: ashes.

More than 30 media outlets, including The Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Caller (Washington, DC: 5.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Hindustan Times (India: 287,300 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"LED breakthrough can mean warmer hues, cheaper cost"

October 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The phaseout of traditional incandescent bulbs in the United States, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given LED lighting a sales boost. But the light from white LED bulbs is generally colder than the warm glow of traditional bulbs. Plus, most of these lights are made with rare earth elements that are increasingly in demand for use in almost all other high-tech devices, adding to the cost of the technology. .. Their findings are reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's Why Pizza Tastes So Frickin' Fantastic"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

For pizza lovers, a good pie is a gift from the gods. But the explanation for why pizza tastes so good is rooted not in theology but in science--in this case, the complex chemistry of cheese, dough, and toppings. If you're hungry for the details, just watch this new episode of "Reactions," the series of YouTube video explainers produced by the American Chemical Society.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Breathalyser used to diagnose dolphin health"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Dolphins are getting breathalysed, but not to stop them driving under the influence: a team of researchers has developed a special breathalyser that allows them to check the health of the animals in a non-invasive way. Professor Cristina Davis and colleagues at the UC Davis Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering have teamed up with researchers at the National Marine Mammal Foundation in San Diego and the Chicago Zoological Society's Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Florida to develop the device, which is placed over the dolphin's blowhole and can be used on both wild dolphins and those in human care. Source: American Chemical Society.

More than 25 media outlets, including Take Part (5.9 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and The Maritime Executive (Fort Lauderdale, FL: 131,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"There’s Finally Something Useful That Disgusting Cigarette Ash Can Be Used For"

October 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Cigarette ash: it’s flicked onto the sidewalk, tapped into trays or simply allowed to hang off the end of a butt until the smoker is done and ready to discard the whole thing. On the whole, cigarette ash has been useless — until now. According to the American Chemical Society, recent research showed that the leftovers of cigarette smoking can actually filter arsenic, a poisonous substance, from drinking water.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"The Science of Why Toothpaste Makes Food Taste Funny"

October 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

All food is made of chemicals—even food that grows on trees or in the ground. (Bananas, eggs and blueberries still have component parts like glucose, aspartic acid, butraldehyde and phenylalanine.) Some of these chemicals nourish us; others are connected to taste or color. And like any chemicals, the chemicals in food interact in sometimes curious ways. … In the video above, the American Chemical Society explains that one toothpaste chemical in particular—sodium lauryl sulfate—seems to alter your mouth's ability to detect tastes.

Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 4.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Science explains why pizza tastes so darn good"

October 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Turns out, there's a scientific reason behind the universal obsession with pizza. And we mean everything from thin crust to deep dish to stuffed crust. In a new video seen above, the American Chemical Society explains the wonders of pizza. Regardless of your toppings, if you've got bread, an acidic sauce and cheese, the group claims you're in for a magical experience.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Compound Semiconductor (London, U.K.) and Photonics (Pittsfield, MA: 53,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Device assesses dolphins' health via their blowholes"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you want to get a picture of wild dolphin populations' health, it's typically necessary to capture some of the animals and then obtain blood samples or skin biopsies. Needless to say, it's hard work, and the dolphins tend not to like it. Soon, however, it may be possible to gather the same information using a device that samples their breath. … A paper on the research was recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

News & Observer (Raleigh, NC: 2.0 million unique monthly visits)
"LED breakthrough can mean warmer hues, cheaper cost"

October 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The phase-out of traditional incandescent bulbs in the United States, as well as a growing interest in energy efficiency, has given LED lighting a sales boost. But the light from white LED bulbs is generally “colder” than the warm glow of traditional bulbs. Plus, most of these lights are made with rare earth elements that are increasingly in-demand for use in almost all other high-tech devices, thus adding to the cost of the technology. … Their findings are reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"French growers up in arms over EU's pending label requirements for lavender"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Next year, the European Commission is set to release guidelines for warning labels on products made with lavender oil, which reportedly can cause allergic reactions for some people. But lavender growers in France are putting up a fight, and some are even threatening to quit the business altogether if the rules go into effect, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Tonsil stem cells could someday help repair liver damage without surgery"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The liver provides critical functions, such as ridding the body of toxins. Its failure can be deadly, and there are few options for fixing it. But scientists now report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a way to potentially inject stem cells from tonsils, a body part we don’t need, to repair damaged livers — all without surgery.

American Laboratory (San Francisco, CA)
"ACS Addresses Fracking and Sustainability"

October 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

In just half a decade, hydraulic fracturing of oil and gas wells has greatly improved the economic competitiveness of America. This is leading to new employment opportunities for hard hats and also lab coats. What does the future look like? Many lecturers addressed the impact of hydraulic fracturing at a 2.5-day Symposium at the 248th ACS National Meeting, held August 10–14, 2014, in San Francisco, CA.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists combine new type of nanoparticle with photodynamic therapy to kill cancer cells"

October 16, 2014

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage to surrounding tissue and fewer side effects than chemotherapy. … In research published online by the journal ACS Nano of the American Chemical Society, Han and colleagues describe a novel strategy that makes use of a new class of upconverting nanoparticles (UCNPs), a billionth of a meter in size, which can act as a kind of relay station.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Guardian Liberty Voice (Las Vegas, NV: 3.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Bio-Inspired 'Nano-Cocoons' Offer Targeted Drug Delivery Against Cancer Cells"

October 15, 2014

Bio-inspired nano-cocoons may offer the newest method for delivering drugs used to treat the spread of cancer cells. Each bio-engineered cocoon consists of a single DNA strand that manipulates itself into the shape of a ball of yarn measuring 150 nanometers wide. They can carry large amounts of anti-cancer drugs and release them rapidly into the cancer cells once inside. … The details behind this new way to treat cancer were released Oct. 13 in a paper published online in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.  

More than 10 media outlets, including StreetInsider.com (Birmingham, MI: 695,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New catalyst could improve biofuels production"

October 16, 2014

Washington State University researchers have developed a new catalyst that could lead to making biofuels cheaply and more efficiently. Led by Voiland Distinguished Professor Yong Wang, the researchers mixed inexpensive iron with a tiny amount of rare palladium to make the catalyst. Their work was featured on the cover of the October issue of the journal ACS Catalysis.

More than 10 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Dispelling a misconception about Mg-ion batteries"

October 16, 2014

Lithium (Li)-ion batteries serve us well, powering our laptops, tablets, cell phones and a host of other gadgets and devices. However, for future automotive applications, we will need rechargeable batteries with significant increases in energy density, reductions in cost and improvements in safety. … Prendergast and Wan have published the results of their work in JACS, the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Clean Technica (1.3 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WTOP-DC (Washington, D.C.)
"Keeping filler ingredients out of your cup of coffee"

October 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] ...counterfeit money but what about counterfeit coffee. The  American Chemical Society says that growing coffee shortages may increase the chance that fillers could be contributing significantly to a morning cup of coffee. A new test however is being developed in Brazil that could detect unwanted coffee fillers, such as wheat corn and soybean, as well as warn when are these fillers could be in your coffee.

… From the Blogs

Counsel & Heal
"Ash to Rescue: Can Filter Arsenic from Water"

October 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chinese scientists have found a potential use for cigarette ash with profound health benefits. They discovered ash's ability to rid water of arsenic, which is known to cause a host of disorders in adults and children. … The findings of the study have been published in ACS' journal Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research.

Zee News
"Lavender to be classified as 'skin sensitiser'"

October 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In view of reports that products made with lavender oil can cause allergic reactions for some people, the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) said it will classify the oil as a 'skin sensitiser'. … At least one lavender producer has notified the ECHA that the essential oils from the plant can cause allergic reactions, said Alex Scott, a senior editor at Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

BGR
"The science of why pizza is so delicious"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Pizza is a national pastime in America. When sports are on and beer is flowing, pizza is cooking up its cheesy goodness in ovens all across the country. But why is pizza something so good that even the most prolific poets would fail to truly capture the true essence of its splendor? We’ll give the job of scientifically explaining why pizza is so amazing to the good folks over at Reactions.

UC Davis
"Engineers develop breath-test device for dolphin health"

October 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

More than just "fish breath": Engineers at the University of California, Davis, have developed a new device for collecting dolphin breath for analysis, which could make it easier to check the marine animals' health and be used in studying dolphin biology and medicine as well as in wildlife conservation. The work was published recently in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
Microscope work wins Nobel Prize in Chemistry"

October 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to a trio of researchers for improving the resolution of optical microscopes. … Commenting on the announcement, Prof Thomas Barton, president of the American Chemical Society, told BBC News: "On my level, the most impressive thing is to look at small molecules, to look at viruses in an atomic-resolved fashion.

More than 75 media outlets, including Associated Press (3.5 billion unique monthly visits; its story is used by media outlets around the world—this link goes to just one example), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: daily circulation 2.1 million), ABC 7 News (San Francisco, CA: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits), OregonLive (Portland, OR: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), CBC News (Toronto, Canada: 2.3 million unique monthly visits), Miami Herald (Miami, FL: circulation 1.7 million), The State (Columbia, SC: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: monthly circulation 1.27 million), Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, CA: circulation 1.2 million), Los Angeles Daily News (Los Angeles, CA: 964,700 unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Madison, WI: 165,000 unique monthly visits), China Daily (Beijing, China: 97,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 57,400 unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 19,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is Why Toothpaste Makes Orange Juice Taste Bad"

October 6, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

It can be the bane of your morning. You brush your teeth and chug down a glass of orange juice on the way out the door. And then ... UGH. The taste hits you like a sack of lemons. … The video above from the American Chemical Society's Reactions series explains that the detergent often found in toothpaste, sodium lauryl sulfate, suppresses sweetness receptors. That leads to a chain of events in your mouth which turn your glass of sugary sunshine into an acid cocktail.

More than 50 media outlets, including World News (20.9 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: daily circulation 2.1 million), New York Magazine (New York, NY: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), BroBible (U.S.: 8.3 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million), Phys.org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.6 million unique monthly visits), Devour.com (810,200 unique monthly visits), SBS News (Australia: 179,000 unique monthly visits), Firstpost (India: 79,100 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 19,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded for Microscope Advancement"

October 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

One German and two American researchers won the Nobel Prize in chemistry Wednesday for discovering how to see into living cells and molecules with unprecedented clarity, overcoming a barrier that had limited the use of microscopes for centuries. … “The spatial resolution possible with this type of microscopy is a huge jump, a quantum jump, from the traditional microscope,” said Iowa State University chemist Thomas Barton, president of the American Chemical Society.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Fat-Burning Foods to Add to Your Shopping List"

October 9, 2014

Want to lose weight but don’t have the time or the energy to do more at the gym? Then the solution could be to fill your shopping basket with the right fat-burning foods. … When you are asked if you want black pepper sprinkled onto your food, you should always answer ‘yes’. Why? Because Korean scientists reporting in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry showed that piperine - the flavoursome substance that gives black pepper its characteristic taste - can block the formation of new fat cells in the body.

People (CA: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"3 Unexpected Health Benefits of Wine"

October 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Drinking too much alcohol is never good for your health, but if there’s one drink you should choose, it may be wine. … A glass of red wine may protect your teeth and gums. A study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that red wine has antimicrobial powers against bacteria that cause decay, gum disease, and tooth loss.

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 4 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemistry Nobel to 3 who made it possible to see the life of molecules"

October 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Science advances tool by tool, and on Wednesday it paused to recognize three practitioners who handed it the means to see the smallest secrets of a living cell. … “It's really new science for a Nobel Prize,” said Tom Barton, president of the American Chemical Society.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Dysfunction at Wikipedia on Homeopathic Medicine"

October 10, 2014

Evidence of the strong bias against homeopathy and against an objective encyclopedic tone is evident throughout the article…. The journal, Langmuir, is one of the journals of the American Chemical Society, and in 2012, they published an important article that provided a plausible explanation for the actions of homeopathic medicines. First, they verified using three different types of spectroscopy that clearly showed that nanoparticles of six original medicinal agents persisted in solutions even after they were diluted 1:100 six times, thirty times, and even two-hundred times.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Explained: Why toothpaste makes orange juice taste like battery acid"

October 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Some things go together really well in the morning. The snooze button and a warm comforter. Coffee and doughnuts. Bacon and eggs. Snow outside and a really warm comforter. … You might think it's a simple case of your toothpaste tasting sweet and the orange juice tasting more citrusy. But, as our friends over at the American Chemical Society point out in their ongoing "Reactions" YouTube series, things aren't that simple.

CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded for microscope breakthrough"

October 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Americans Eric Betzig and William Moerner and German scientist Stefan Hell won the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing new methods that let microscopes see finer details than they could before. … Tom Barton, president of the American Chemical Society, said the laureates' work allowed progress in many fields because it let scientists see molecules and other features with unprecedented resolution. And for biology, he noted, it allows researchers to study very fine details of living things.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)
"11 simple solutions for bad breath"

October 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Everyone worries about bad breath from time to time especially after a spicy meal or a cup of coffee. In fact, about 9 percent of people reported having bad breath within the past 6 months, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). … A recent study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry finds that drinking red wine in moderation can inhibit the growth of bacteria.

io9 (U.S.: 15.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Does Orange Juice Taste Terrible After Brushing Your Teeth?"

October 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Orange juice is many things: A fine source of Vitamin C, easy to get ahold of, and a pretty decent accompaniment to most items in the pantheon of great breakfast foods. What it is not at all, however, is a good thing to drink right after brushing your teeth. The American Chemical Society's Reactions series took on the question of just what's going on with your tastebuds when orange juice and a freshly-brushed smile meet.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
The Dos And Don’ts Of Dieting: How To Shed Those Extra Pounds Effectively"

October 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Studies show that increasing your water intake can aid in weight loss. The results of a clinical trial presented at the 240th Meeting of the American Chemical Society in 2010 showed that participants who drank two cups of water before each meal lost an average of 5 pounds more than those who did not increase their water intake. Think you ought to take out fat and carbohydrates from your diet? Does eating several small meals a day really help you lose weight? Isn't sleep counter intuitive to shedding those extra pounds?

Shape (U.S.: 7.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Ask the Diet Doctor: Farm-Raised vs. Wild Salmon"

October 8, 2014

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are another chemical toxin found in both wild and farmed salmon. Farmed salmon generally contains higher levels of PCBs but wild salmon is not free of these toxins. (Unfortunately PCBs and similar toxins are so ubiquitous in our environment they can be found in the dust in your house.) A 2011 study published in Environmental Science & Technology reported that different factors such as lifespan of the fish (chinook salmon live longer than other types) or living and feeding close to the coastline can lead to PCB levels in wild salmon near to that found in farmed salmon. The good news is that cooking fish leads to the removal of some of the PCBs.

Food News International
"Americas: Researchers test method to process cashews to eliminate allergic reaction"

August 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

For the millions of adults and children in the US who have to shun nuts to avoid an allergic reaction, help could be on the way. Scientists are now developing a method to process cashews — and potentially other nuts — that could make them safer to eat for people who are allergic to them. The researchers are presenting their work at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

… From the Blogs

The Detroit News
"1 winner of Nobel Prize in chemistry from Michigan"

October 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

One of three winners of the Nobel Prize in chemistry is originally from Michigan. … Tom Barton, president of the American Chemical Society, said the laureates’ work allowed progress in many fields because it let scientists see molecules and other features with unprecedented resolution. And for biology, he noted, it allows researchers to study very fine details of living things.

Science Codex
"Making the world's most dreaded undergrad course fun"

October 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Organic chemistry: It's among the most feared courses undergraduate science students take. Whether you call it "orgo" or "o-chem," it has reduced many hopeful scholars to tears. One professor thinks he has a solution. William Dichtel, Ph.D., of Cornell University shares his thoughts on making organic chemistry classes more interesting and relevant to students in the newest episode of Prized Science from the American Chemical Society.

Jewish Business News
"Why Does Toothpaste Make Orange Juice Taste Awful?"

October 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

It’s happened to many of us: Half asleep in the morning, you finish brushing your teeth and reach for your daily glass of orange juice. After taking a big swig, you spit it back out, making a face like you’ve just chewed on a lemon. Turns out, a specific chemical in your toothpaste is responsible for that nasty taste. This week, Reactions explains why toothpaste and orange juice don’t mix.

Science Blog
"Platinum meets its match in quantum dots from coal"

October 6, 2014

Graphene quantum dots created at Rice University grab onto graphene platelets like barnacles attach themselves to the hull of a boat. But these dots enhance the properties of the mothership, making them better than platinum catalysts for certain reactions within fuel cells. … The research is the subject of a new paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

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ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.