ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 20.1 million unique monthly visits)
"How much water can kill you?"

December 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

We all need water to live - but how much water is too much? In this video from the American Chemical Society, poison expert Deborah Blum talks about how some substances which are harmless in small quantities, can prove dangerous in larger amounts.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 18.8 million unique monthly visits)
"$1,000 Reward for Best Scientific Answer: What is Zzzz…z.z.zzz.z.. Sleep?"

December 5, 2014

This simple question is the fourth in a series explored through a contest run by Stony Brook University’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. (The previous questions were what is a flame, what is time, what is color.) Alda has long interlaced a love of science in his theatrical, film and television work. He’s also long been an evangelist for clear and effective communication of basic science. … This is the first year with a cash award. (The contest is now sponsored by the American Chemical Society and American Association for the Advancement of Science.)

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New tool to detoxify drinking water: ash from cigarette butts"

December 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Arsenic can be removed from drinking water through sophisticated treatment methods. Now scientists have found a low-cost, simple, one-step method to remove the poison in areas where technology lags: cigarette ashes. … The researchers reported their method in the American Chemical Society journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanotube film could replace defective retinas"

December 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A promising new study suggests that a wireless, light-sensitive, and flexible film could potentially form part of a prosthetic device to replace damaged or defective retinas. The film both absorbs light and stimulates neurons without being connected to any wires or external power sources, standing it apart from silicon-based devices used for the same purpose. …  A paper describing the work has been published in the journal Nano Letters.

More than 25 media outlets, including News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

io9 (Sydney, Australia: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Can You Drink Too Much Water?"

December 1, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Ah, water! Drink enough, many insist, and be rewarded with beauty and health. Avoid it and your fate is to dry slowly onto the sidewalk, a dehydrated husk, doomed to watch sadly as wiser, better hydrated friends leave you behind. But how much water is too much water? You can indeed drink too much water, explains the American Chemical Society in the video below, though that amount is exceptionally hard to come by and certainly not one that you would drink by accident.

More than 15 media outlets, including Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

WebMD (Orlando, FL: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Dairy & Diabetes Risk: New Thinking?"

December 5, 2014

Some intriguing new research shows that dairy foods, perhaps even high-fat ones, may play a role in type 2 diabetes prevention. … He reviewed recent research on dairy goods and health in a report published in November in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Besides preventing diabetes, lowering blood pressure, and reducing heart disease risk, he found research showing dairy products can even prevent tooth decay, obesity, and cancer.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Gut bacteria from a worm can degrade plastic"

December 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Plastic is well-known for sticking around in the environment for years without breaking down, contributing significantly to litter and landfills. But scientists have now discovered that bacteria from the guts of a worm known to munch on food packaging can degrade polyethylene, the most common plastic. Reported in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, the finding could lead to new ways to help get rid of the otherwise persistent waste, the scientists sas.

More than 20 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Touch Sensors Can Now Mimic Our Skin's Detection of Stretching and Twisting"

December 4, 2014

A stretchy touch sensor, designed to mimic structures in human skin, can detect not only the strength of a mechanical force but also its direction (ACS Nano 2014, DOI: 10.1021/nn505953t). This sensor, which can distinguish between shearing, stretching, bending, and twisting forces, could improve the functionality of prosthetic devices and robotics.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists undertake multiple strategies to tame Ebola virus"

December 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa has pushed the decades-long search for a treatment to a frenetic pace. Somewhere in the virus' deceptively simple structure is a key to taming it. To find that key, scientists are undertaking multiple strategies, some of which are being fast-tracked for human testing, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

More than 8 media outlets, including Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Gut bacteria from a worm can degrade plastic"

December 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Plastic is well-known for sticking around in the environment for years without breaking down, contributing significantly to litter and landfills. But scientists have now discovered that bacteria from the guts of a worm known to munch on food packaging can degrade polyethylene, the most common plastic. Reported in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, the finding could lead to new ways to help get rid of the otherwise persistent waste, the scientists say.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New Material Could Help Build Artificial Retinas for Victims of AMD"

December 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A new material could enable light to stimulate blind retinas, bringing eyesight to those who are currently unable to see. Formed into a sheet, the new film could be placed over the human retinas that have degenerated or been damaged, bringing sight back to the patient. … Development of the new film that could, one day, be used to create artificial retinas was detailed in the journal Nano Letters.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"3-D printers bring microscopic structures to life"

December 2, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

3-D printers are driving a new wave of engineering and design. Now chemists are discovering ways to bring molecules out from under the microscope using this burgeoning technology. In the American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) newest Breakthrough Science video, Vincent Scalfani, Ph.D., talks about how 3-D printers are a valuable teaching tool for chemistry students and chemists alike.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Neutralizing Trigger Can Fight Asthma"

December 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Current asthma treatments can alleviate wheezing, coughing and other symptoms felt by millions of Americans every year, but they don’t get to the root cause of the condition. Now, for the first time, scientists are reporting a new approach to defeating asthma by targeting the trigger — the allergen — before it can spark an attack. They describe their new compound, which they tested on rats, in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than 10 media outlets, including News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,900 unique monthly visits)
"Low-cost technology to produce clean hydrogen fuel"

December 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In a thrust to "artificial leaf" technology, a team of scientists have reported a significant progress toward a stand-alone system that lends itself to large-scale, low-cost production. The "artificial leaf" technology is a green approach to make hydrogen fuel that copies plants' ability to convert sunlight into a form of energy they can use. … The paper appeared in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including Hindustan Times (India: 239,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits)
"Extending the life of rechargeable lithium batteries"

December 2, 2014

A new study will help researchers create longer-lasting, higher-capacity lithium rechargeable batteries, which are commonly used in consumer electronics. In a study published in the journal ACS Nano, researchers showed how a coating that makes high capacity silicon electrodes more durable could lead to a replacement for lower-capacity graphite electrodes.

More than 8 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Electronic 'tongue' to ensure food quality"

December 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An electronic "tongue" could one day sample food and drinks as a quality check before they hit store shelves. Or it could someday monitor water for pollutants or test blood for signs of disease. With an eye toward these applications, scientists are reporting the development of a new, inexpensive and highly sensitive version of such a device in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces ("Might Silicon Surface Be Used for Electronic Tongue Application?").

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"First pictures of baby nanotubes"

December 2, 2014

Single-walled carbon nanotubes are loaded with desirable properties. In particular, the ability to conduct electricity at high rates of speed makes them attractive for use as nanoscale transistors. But this and other properties are largely dependent on their structure, and their structure is determined when the nanotube is just beginning to form. … The results were published online in Nano Letters.

More than 8 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Fidest
"Sharon Hammes-Schiffer joins Chemical Reviews as new editor-in-chief"

December 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

The American Chemical Society (ACS) announces that Sharon Hammes-Schiffer, Ph.D., has been appointed editor-in-chief of Chemical Reviews, effective January 1, 2015. Hammes-Schiffer is Swanlund Professor of Chemistry at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Chem Week
"American Chemical Society names DuPont's Connelly CEO"

December 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

The American Chemical Society (Washington) today announced that its board of directors has named Thomas Connelly, executive v.p. and chief innovation officer at DuPont, its next executive director and CEO, effective 17 February 2015. Connelly is retiring from DuPont at the end of this year after a 36-year career. He will succeed Madeleine Jacobs, who is retiring after 11 years as CEO of ACS and a total of 24 years with ACS.

Science World Report
"Scientists Discover that Worm Gut Bacteria Degrades Plastic"

December 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Everyone knows that plastic is difficult to degrade, persisting in the environment for years after it's discarded. Now, though, scientists have discovered that some bacteria from the guts of waxworms could potentially help us eliminate plastic trash. … The findings are published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Earth Times
"Solar Fuel from Artificial Leaves at last."

December 4, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Solar power is often associated with solar cells on your roof, but here are many ways in which to exploit that never-ending energy of our little star. Artificial leaves have quite a lengthy history, here described with platinum catalysts, as used in labs in Colorado and California. … The paper can be found in the journal, ACS Nano, with the title - All Inorganic Semiconductor Nanowire Mesh for Direct Solar Water Splitting.

Infection Control Today
"Deconstructing Ebola to Find Its Weakness and Defeat It"

December 3, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The Ebola epidemic in West Africa has pushed the decades-long search for a treatment to a frenetic pace. Somewhere in the virus' deceptively simple structure is a key to taming it. To find that key, scientists are undertaking multiple strategies, some of which are being fast-tracked for human testing, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is What Happens to Your Body When You Overeat"

November 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

In the days leading up to Thanksgiving, the American Chemical Society’s YouTube channel “Reactions” has boiled down the science of stuffing your face in a two-and-a-half-minute video. It explains how signals in the brain tell us when we are feeling full or when it is time to stop eating, as well as how antacids reduce the physical discomfort. Might be fodder for conversation after dinner when everyone is sitting around, running out of things to talk about and on the verge of slipping into a food coma.

More than 75 media outlets, including The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits), Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.:6.6 million unique monthly visits), Boston Globe (Boston, MA: 3.3 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"'Tis the Season for ... Hangovers? 6 Foods to Try the Next Day"

November 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

It’s the holiday season and, chances are, you’re knee deep in parties, eating and stress. We all know there's an increase in the frequency of these three components during the holiday season. … More recently, the American Chemical Society referred to a hangover as a “metabolic storm,” which results from “high blood levels of ethanol and the accompanying dehydration, direct toxic effects of the body’s breakdown of alcohol into acetaldehyde and toxic effects of substances called congeners that are present in darkly colored liquor like scotch and bourbon.” Yuck!

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"What Really Happens In Your Body When You Eat Too Much Turkey"

November 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

You know the feeling—you’ve eaten so much that even breathing hurts, and beyond unbuttoning your pants, there’s not much you can do to alleviate the pain. Turns out, there’s a scientific reason for that post-Thanksgiving discomfort. This video from American Chemical Society’s Reactions YouTube channel highlights all the fixings of a Thanksgiving dinner—and shows exactly what they do to your body.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly visits)
"How fruit flies could improve beer flavors"

November 28, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

A recent study found that yeast cells are producing odor compounds, which lure fruit flies. The flies then transport the yeast, which can lead to new yeast colonies and could result in new flavors of beer. (Chemical & Engineering News).

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"What Happens To Your Body When You Stuff Yourself Like A Turkey On Thanksgiving"

November 27, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

It's Thanksgiving, and you know what that means -- it's time to unbuckle your belt and go to town on a plate piled high with holiday fare. And if you're like us, you'll wind up more stuffed than your holiday turkey (or tofurkey, for you vegetarians)--and coping with stomach pain or bloating. Why does overeating cause those symptoms? And what's the chemistry behind dyspepsia? For answers, check out the video above. It's the latest installment of the American Chemical Society's Reactions series.

Shape (New York, NY: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Ask the Diet Doctor: Cooking with Olive Oil"

November 25, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

I’ve heard you shouldn’t cook in olive oil because it has a low smoke point. But a new study found that olive oil withstands the heat of a fryer or pan better than several seed oils. … However, in the study you mention, published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers compared refined olive oil—not the peppery-tasting, antioxidant-loaded, first-pressed extra virgin olive oil we drizzle on salads—to corn, soybean and sunflower oil.

The Christian Science Monitor (Boston, MA: 7.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists take step toward revolutionary coolant ... using outer space?"

November 24, 2014

A team of scientists say they have demonstrated for the first time a way to harness the most ubiquitous coolant available, outer space, to chill structures on Earth's surface throughout the day, including hours of peak sunlight. … The team first set out its ideas in a paper last year in the journal Nano Letters. They modeled the kind of structure a coating would need to simultaneously reflect visible light back into space and allow infrared radiation to pass through the coating within the proper range of wavelengths to take advantage of the atmosphere's infrared "window" to space.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)
"Now, synthetic platelets to help control bleeding"

November 24, 2014

Scientists, including two of Indian-origin, have developed new synthetic platelets that mimic and outperform natural platelets at controlling bleeding. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara turned to the human body's own mechanisms for inspiration in dealing with the necessary and complicated process of coagulation. … The findings appear in the journal ACS Nano.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Science-Based Hacks For Making Your Thanksgiving Meal Perfect"

November 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Thanksgiving dinner comes with a lot to orchestrate — turkey, stuffing, family, and everything else. There are high stakes, and while science can't necessarily solve awkward family conversation about politics at the dinner table, there are scientific ways to help ensure you don't have to deal with a dry turkey. Now that would be a true disaster. … A Bytesize Science video from the American Chemical Society tipped us off about some of these hints, which we've supplemented with additional information.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Cell's skeleton is never still: Scientists model dynamic instability of microtubules"

November 24, 2014

New computer models that show how microtubules age are the first to match experimental results and help explain the dynamic processes behind an essential component of every living cell, according to Rice University scientists. The results could help scientists fine-tune medications that manipulate microtubules to treat cancer and other diseases. Rice theoretical biophysicist Anatoly Kolomeisky and postdoctoral researcher Xin Li reported their results in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

Nanowerk  (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Foldable capacitive touch pad printed with silver nanowire ink"

November 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Paper has become a popular substrate for fabricating electronics – it is a cheap, abundant material and easy to print on. Electronics printed on paper are inexpensive, flexible, and recyclable, and could lead to applications such as smart labels on foods and pharmaceuticals or as wearable medical sensors. Paper has been used for printed memory, as gas sensors ("Cheap nanotechnology paper-based gas sensors") or bioactive sensor to detect neurotoxins. … The international research team has published their findings in the November 3, 2014 online edition of ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits)
"ASU, IBM move ultrafast, low-cost DNA sequencing technology a step closer to reality"

November 24, 2014

"Our goal is to put cheap, simple and powerful DNA and protein diagnostic devices into every single doctor's office," said Stuart Lindsay, an ASU physics professor and director of Biodesign's Center for Single Molecule Biophysics. … The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Human Genome Research Institute, Roche, and published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 3 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Vice News
"Here's What Happens When You Eat Too Much on Thanksgiving"

November 25, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

On Thursday, Americans will indulge in an annual ritual of gluttonous food and drink consumption (Thanksgiving), which for many is simply the preface to an overindulgence of another kind: lining up in the wee hours of Friday morning to overfill shopping carts with mountains of discounted retail goods (Black Friday). The American Chemical Society (ACS), however, sees a possible teaching moment where others might find nothing but inevitable collapse into a food coma.

Food World News
"Blueberries And Night Vision: Fact Or Myth? New Study Reveals The Truth!"

November 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

For years, it has been said that blueberries and night vision are the closest companions, as many have stated in the past that eating the delicious berry will give you the power of seeing better in the dark - but how much truth is there in this statement? Researchers of the American Chemical Society set out to find out if an ongoing saying was fact or fiction: whether blueberries and night vision really do go hand in hand. The study with the new findings was published last week at the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, according to Science Daily.

Maine News
"Astronauts at ISS Enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner"

November 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

It has been reported that six people at the International Space Station had an out-of-this-world Thanksgiving dinner in orbit. … Thanksgiving in America is a day for sitting down and getting stuffed, come what may. According to American Chemical Society our stomach is quite resilient and it can easily stretch to a bit over a liter in volume.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.