ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 46.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Pool party? Check the health inspection before diving in"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Nothing feels quite like jumping into cool water on a hot summer day -- but before you do your best belly flop, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you check the last time that public swimming pool was inspected. …  A study published in April in the journal Environmental Science & Technology found that when those chemicals mix with "human inputs" -- the stuff people add to the water when they get in, such as sweat, urine and cosmetics -- they form compounds called disinfection byproducts.

More than 50 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 26.2 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), Lifezette (Washington, DC: 742,000 unique monthly visits), KITV 4 (Honolulu, HI: 85,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is What Actually Happens To You When You Swallow Chewing Gum"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Most British schoolchildren grow up with the scare story that if you swallow chewing gum it will stay inside your stomach for seven years - or forever. But what actually happens if you swallow a little grey lump of chewing gum? Well, says the American Chemical Society, it’s not quite as bad as generations of children have portrayed it - in fact, the tale is largely a myth.

More than 55 media outlets, including MSN Lifestyle (New York, NY: 127.0 million unique monthly visits), AOL.com (New York, NY: 42.7 million unique monthly visits), Today.com (New York, NY: 19.4 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits), Tech Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.6 million unique monthly visits), The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Seattle Pi (Seattle, WA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Elite Daily (New York, NY: 8.1 million unique monthly visits), Stamford Advocate (Stamford, CT: 155,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 14.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Unmasking a Cheese Impostor"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scandal stank up the cheese industry earlier this year when news emerged that products labeled as Parmesan cheese were not all they claimed to be. Now, a technique for unmasking impostors explained in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry could put an end to these Parmesan pretenders.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Cosmos magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Chem.Info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 31.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Wood turned into a clear material stronger than glass"
May 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It may not be as easy to make as glass, but it's less, dense, stronger, better at insulating, and more biodegradable than plastic. … To make the wood clear, a process detailed in the journal Biomacromolecules, it is treated in a chemical bath to strip away the lignin, the molecule that gives wood its colour.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"First 3D bio printed placenta model for study of preeclampsia created"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists at the Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation at Children's National Health System, in partnership with the University of Maryland, are the first to create a 3D bio printed placenta model and use it to study preeclampsia, a life-threatening pregnancy complication. … The study of the 3D bio printed model is published in American Chemical Society (ACS) Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

More than 16 media outlets, including Vocativ (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Extract from Antarctic Sponge Could Open New Front against MRSA"
May 18, 2016

A sponge that thrives in frigid Antarctic waters could provide a powerful new weapon against MRSA, a sometimes fatal infection that has become highly resistant to antibiotics. … Writing in the journal Organic Letters, they [report that only 1.6 percent of the bacteria survived and grew.

More than 25 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), ABC Action News (Tampa Bay, FL: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Breitbart (8.0 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Nature World News (129,100 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

GrindTV (Carlsbad, CA: 6.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Is your camping tent exposing you to carcinogens?"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

While most people think of camping as a healthy, fun way to get out and get some fresh air, a new study by researchers from Duke University suggests that the air you are breathing in might not be that fresh — in fact, it might be filled with harmful carcinogens from your tent. … The new study, published in the latest edition of the Environmental Science & Technology journal, details the levels of exposure to flame retardant chemicals that 20 volunteer study subjects experienced prior to and after assembling their camping tents.

Five media outlets, including Gear Junkie (Minneapolis, MN: 504,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Easy, immediate access to effective antidotes could help reduce deaths from opioid overdose"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Over the past 15 years, deaths caused by heroin and prescription opioid overdoses have quadrupled despite the existence of a highly effective antidote. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores what it might take to turn the tide.

More than 11 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 96,600 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Making biodiesel with used cooking oil and a microwave"
May 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Weaning cars and trucks off of gasoline and diesel made from fossil fuels is a difficult task. One promising solution involves biodiesel, which comes from natural oils and fats, but it is costly. … They report how they did it in ACS’ journal Energy & Fuels.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Horseradish can help you fight cancer"
May 19, 2016

It is not a myth that good food may help you beat cancer. Horseradish has surfaced as a food which can help in the war against cancer. … This study has been published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 12 media outlets, including Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Hardy frog can survive being frozen for weeks: Amphibian's secret may lead to better ways to freeze food and aid fertility treatment"
May 19, 2016

A small species of frog which can survive freezing temperatures could lead to improvements in everything from medicine to frozen foods. … The findings are published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

More than 12 media outlets, including Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Inquisitr (U.S.: 30.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The Strange Ways Stress Can Effect You"
May 22, 2016

Stress is modern man’s thorn in the flesh. Pretty much every person in the entirety of Western culture deals with stress in some form or another. …Happily, you may be able to combat this issue with dark chocolate. A study in the Journal of Proteome Research revealed that “people who ate an ounce and a half of the stuff every day for two weeks showed lowered levels of stress hormones in their bodies.”

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanosized Materials Help Electronics Compute Like Real Brains"
May 20, 2016

Although processors have gotten smaller and faster over time, few computers can compete with the speed and computing power of the human brain. And none comes close to the organ’s energy efficiency. … This article is reproduced with permission from Chemical & Engineering NewsAmerican Chemical Society).

Irish Examiner (Dublin, Ireland: 328,400 unique monthly visits)
"Are men ready to take the contraceptive pill responsibly?"
May 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The idea of a contraceptive pill for men has been kicking around for years, but will we see it in our lifetime? … The latest breakthrough comes from a group of scientists, including lead researcher Gunda I. Georg, PhD at the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy, who presented their findings at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society in March.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Watching whisky dry for science"
May 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Have you ever watched paint dry? How about whisky? It turns out whisky could hold some chemical clues to making better paints. Princeton researcher Howard Stone and photographer Ernie Button wanted to figure out whisky's unique drying properties. The Speaking of Chemistry team then compared dried whisky rings to another popular beverage, coffee.

Four media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"How to Make Cut Flowers Last Longer"
May 17, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

While supporting the behemoth known as the factory farmed flower industry is no way to celebrate a special occasion, there is nonetheless an undeniable beauty in having cut flowers around. … These come from the folks at the non-profit scientific group, American Chemical Society, who approached the task through the eyes of science.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists Add Color to Chemical Reactions"
May 18, 2016

Chemists at Syracuse University have come up with an innovative new way to visualize and monitor chemical reactions in real time. … The subject of an article in ACS Nano (American Chemical Society, 2016), their discovery enables researchers to monitor reactions qualitatively with the naked eye and quantitatively with simple instrumentation.

Nine media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits)
"Thinning out the carbon capture viscosity problem"
May 18, 2016

To make "clean" fossil fuel burning a reality, researchers have to pull carbon dioxide out of the exhaust gases that rise from coal or natural gas power plants and store or reuse it. … Although the chemists still have to test the predicted liquid in the lab, being able to predict viscosity will help researchers find and design cheaper, more efficient carbon capture materials, they report in Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters March 28.

More than 13 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Theorists smooth the way to modeling quantum friction"
May 16, 2016

Theoretical chemists at Princeton University have pioneered a strategy for modeling quantum friction, or how a particle's environment drags on it, a vexing problem in quantum mechanics since the birth of the field. The study was published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

Ten media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemical emitted by trees can impact St. Louis' ozone levels"
May 17, 2016

It is well known that the dog days of summer in St. Louis are hot, humid and hazy. On the warmest of these days, the air arrives from the south, bringing with it high temperatures, moisture and natural forest emissions of chemicals, known as hydrocarbons, from the Ozark Plateau. … Results of the study were recently published online in Environmental Science & Technology and are the first to show this phenomenon.

Seven media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"IBM Macromolecule Kills Ebola, Herpes, Dengue, Influenza in Tests"
May 16, 2016

Viruses have always been the most difficult puzzle for medicine. Since they can mutate quickly and evolve, they easily defeat molecular countermeasures. … The company’s research was published in the journal Macromolecules.

Seven media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits) and Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 96,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

Today (New York, NY: 19.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Does your swallowed gum stay in your stomach for 7 years? Science has the answer"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] How about don't swallow gum. If you do it stays lodged in your stomach for seven years. Is it true? >> Please say it's not true. Because I swallow every single piece. I swallow my gum all the time. >> Oh, okay. Well the American Chemical Society is now weighing in on this. >> Oh, no. >> It says, no, that's false. >> Oh, good. >> Gum does not stay with you for seven years. … The scientists do admit gum is harder for your body to digest but your body gets rid of it like any other food.

More than 20 media outlets, including KYTV (NBC) (Springfield, MO: Local Viewership 37,706), KARE-MIN (NBC) (Minneapolis, MN: Local Viewership 35,118), WMBF (NBC) (Myrtle Beach, SC: Local Viewership 23,042), WPTZ-BUR (NBC) (Burlington, VT: Local Viewership 18,817), KHNL-HON (NBC) (Honolulu, HI: Local Viewership 12,158) and KTEN-DT3 (Sherman, TX) covered the story.

WBFF-BAL (FOX) (Baltimore, MD: Local Viewership 21,260)
"What happens when you swallow gum?"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] You probably heard this from your mom. Don't swallow your gum or it will stay in your stomach for seven years. >> The American Chemical Society is weighing in saying our stomach acid can't break down the gum entirely. It does take care of some parts like the carbohydrates from the sugar, but it can't break down the rubber polymers. >> But it works its way through your digestive system in a way or two. So sorry, mom.

WJLA-7 (ABC) (Washington, DC: 751,000 unique monthly visits)
"Memorial Day Chemistry Hacks"
May 20, 2016

Memorial Day is a week away and you never know what you are in need of fast! Showing us how to apply chemistry to get through the holiday with these Memorial Day hacks was Kim Duncan, from the American Chemical Society.

KOVR-SAC (CBS) (Sacramento, CA: Local Viewership 26,711)
"What happens when you swallow gum?"
May 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] scientist says the myth that chewing gum stays in your system for seven years if you swallow it is not true. According to the American Chemical Society, it passes through your body like anything else. Chewing gum made of the same rubber used to make basketball.

WSAZ (NBC) (Charleston, WV: Local Viewership 79,238)
"The American Chemical Society awards banquet"
May 17, 2016

[Transcript] Science students from high schools and middle schools across our region, who are at the top of their class, were honored tonight at the American Chemical Society awards banquet at West Virginia State university. Students from 14 schools received awards for competing in the "You Be The Chemist" competition and in the Chemistry Olympiad. The state, the American Chemical Society and the university of Charleston offered 14 college scholarships valued at more than 200-thousand dollars to the students.

… From the Blogs

3Ders.com
"3D bio printed placenta model could be the key to treating preeclampsia"
May 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Preeclampsia, a pregnancy disorder usually occurring in the late stages of pregnancy, is one of the leading causes of both maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality today. … The study about the 3D bio printed placenta model, which was recently published in American Chemical Society (ACS) Biomaterials Science & Engineering, could be the key to discovering the cause of preeclampsia as its cellular composition and functions mimic the real organ.

Spectroscopy NOW
"GC-MS can tell a good parmesan cheese"
May 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A parmesan scandal reported earlier this year highlighted how easy it can be to doctor this cheese. … Now, in a paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report a novel method for identifying adulterated parmesan based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"How to keep fresh cut flowers from dying (with science)"
May 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

It's finally spring, allegedly. … The American Chemical Society's Reactions series is here to help. Here's everything you need to know to science your flowers into submission.

More than 25 media outlets, including Bustle (New York, NY: 119.3 million unique monthly visits), Lifehacker.com (U.S.: 47.9 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 5.1 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Treehugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), YubaNet.com (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Using Your Spit to Diagnose Disease"
May 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

To see how healthy you are or to properly diagnose a disease, doctors often run a few tests that can include uncomfortable measures such as getting jabbed with a needle for a blood test. … Now, researchers writing in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Proteome Research, suggests that our saliva may contain biomarkers that could be used as a way of detecting disease.

More than 12 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 96,600 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 14.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Urban Cyclists: Don't Breathe on Busy Roads"
May 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Next time you pedal to work instead of driving or hopping on the subway, you might want to pick a longer route. Cycling on congested city streets or suburban thoroughfares -- even if faster -- boosts the amount of toxic chemicals absorbed by your body, according to a new study. … The study was published recently in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 18 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), Vancouver Sun (Vancouver, Canada: 510,000 unique monthly visits), Red Eye (Chicago, IL: 298,000 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 213,400 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The art — and science — behind treasured Japanese porcelain"
May 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Porcelain connoisseurs have prized the traditional Japanese-style ceramics called akae, typically known for Kakiemon-style ware, for centuries. Its paintings feature a vivid red color against a milky white background. Artisans have passed on their techniques to produce this type of porcelain for generations, but these methods are poorly documented. Now scientists report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a practical method for preparing red paints for high-quality akae.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Photonics.com (Philadelphia, PA: 2.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Bringing low-cost solar panels to the market"
May 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In just one hour, the Earth receives more than enough energy from the sun to meet the world population’s electricity needs in an entire year. Tapping that vast power output efficiently and at low cost remains a challenge, but new technologies could change that. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores whether emerging solar technologies could soon break into the market.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Products Made from Polyurethanes Get 'Green' Makeover"
May 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Polyurethanes in products from cushy sofas to stretchy spandex have made sitting, sleeping and walking more comfortable. But once they have served their purpose, most of the non-degradable materials pile up in landfills. Now scientists report in the journal ACS Macro Letters a potential way to reduce future waste: a chemically recyclable foam made using a new sugar-derived material.

Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Maple Syrup Is Much Healthier Than You Thought"
May 6, 2016

We thought we knew everything. … Additionally, a recent study by the American Chemical Society showed that there are key ingredients in maple syrup that may help to protect our brains against Alzheimer’s disease (or prolong the lifespan of those who already suffer from the disease).

Popular Science (New York, NY: 7.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Gecko Feet Help Keep Fine Art Clean"
May 3, 2016

Gecko feet are providing art conservators with a new way of keeping fine artwork clean. … In a study published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces researchers developed a polymer that had tiny columns all over it, just like the pads on a gecko's feet.

Shape (New York, NY: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Science-Backed Ways Getting In Touch with Nature Boosts Your Health"
May 6, 2016

Here's some motivation to swap that spin class for a bike ride in the park or take your om outdoors: One multi-study review published in Environmental Science & Technology found that compared with exercising indoors, working out in a natural environment can lead to increases in revitalization and energy and a decrease in tension, confusion, anger, and depression.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Better bone replacement: 3-D printed bone with just the right mix of ingredients"
May 5, 2016

To make a good framework for filling in missing bone, mix at least 30 percent pulverized natural bone with some special man-made plastic and create the needed shape with a 3-D printer. That's the recipe for success reported by researchers at The Johns Hopkins University in a paper published April 18 online in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Cosmos Magazine (Australia: 308,000 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles That Convert Phosphorus In Soil Could Boost Food Production"
May 2, 2016

As the global population continues to rise over the years, so does the need for food. As farmers work hard to satisfy the demand for food production, more and more phosphorus – a vital fertilizer ingredient – is absorbed by the soil. … The findings of the study are featured in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 7.0 million unique monthly visits)
"3D Holograms of Atoms Offer a Glimpse Inside Molecules"
May 3, 2016

A new imaging technique is letting scientists peek inside molecules to get a better read on how their atoms are arrayed. Until now, researchers could only scan the surface of molecules or image a few atoms at a time. But recently, scientists reported in the journal Nano Letters that they have devised a way to spy on thousands of atoms at once.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

TreeHugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Pill-popping comes back to haunt in vegetable form"
May 6, 2016

Prescription drugs are the gift that keeps on giving, getting locked into an endless pee-to-food-to-pee cycle that continues to contaminate our bodies through the food we eat. … The study, which was published in March in Environmental Science & Technology, looked specifically at carbamazepine, an anti-convulsant drug commonly used to treat epilepsy that is “ubiquitously detected in wastewater, highly persistent in soil, and taken up by crops.”

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop molecule that binds to GAA enzymes key to progress of Pompe disease"
May 4, 2016

Researchers at Leiden University have made a breakthrough in the study of the hereditary Pompe disease. Together with colleagues in York, they have developed a molecule that binds to the enzyme that is key to the progress of the disease. The findings have been published in ACS Central Science.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Molybdenum disulfide holds promise for light absorption"
May 5, 2016

Mechanics know molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) as a useful lubricant in aircraft and motorcycle engines and in the CV and universal joints of trucks and automobiles. … Thomann and Rice graduate students Shah Mohammad Bahauddin and Hossein Robatjazi have recounted their findings in a paper titled "Broadband Absorption Engineering To Enhance Light Absorption in Monolayer MoS2," which was recently published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Photonics.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Explore Properties Of Wonder Material Phosphorene"
May 5, 2016

In a collaborative and multidisciplinary study, scientists develop methods to explore phosphorene and its properties. … The study was published online in ACS Nano Letters on March 10.

Eight media outlets, including SpaceDaily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

BBC Radio 2 (London, U.K.: 85 million unique monthly visits)
"How to Keep Cut Flowers Fresh Longer"
May 9, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript]... Scientists at the American Chemical Society, ACS, say the vase, first of all, should be scrubbed with soap. So scrub your vase with soap then rinse it thoroughly. Then half fill the vase with warm tap water. ...

… From the Blogs

Heritage Daily
"The art — and science — behind treasured Japanese porcelain"
May 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Its paintings feature a vivid red color against a milky white background. Artisans have passed on their techniques to produce this type of porcelain for generations, but these methods are poorly documented. Now scientists report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a practical method for preparing red paints for high-quality akae.

Kansas City InfoZine
"Measuring the airborne toxicants urban bicyclists inhale"
May 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

By switching from four wheels to two, bicyclists help reduce traffic and air pollution — all while getting much-needed exercise. But that health benefit could be costly, due to exposure to potentially harmful compounds in motor vehicle exhaust. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers analyzed breath samples to find out how much of these compounds are absorbed by the body. They report their findings in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology.

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ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.