ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"The Truth About the Food Additive MSG"

August 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

For years, consumers in the United States have shunned the food additive monosodium glutamate (MSG), which is used as a flavor enhancer in a wide variety of foods around the world. Most consumers know that it may turn up in Chinese food, but the additive may also be found in products including canned vegetables and processed meats. This week, the American Chemical Society (ACS) attempted to change minds with a video that claims to debunk the longstanding notion that MSG is unhealthy. “Few ingredients come with as much baggage as monosodium glutamate,” writes the ACS in a press release.
More than 45 media outlets, including The New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits), New York Magazine (New York, NY), Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), The Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 2.7 million unique monthly visits) and Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"New Test Can Tell If Your Food Is Organic: Study"

August 29, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Slapping on the "organic" label to inflate the price of produce might become a thing of the past thanks to researchers from the Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority and the Wuerzburg University in Germany, who have developed a high-tech test to set the standards. Despite tightening laws and increasing proactivity from food watchdog groups in some countries, organic food fraud continues to occur because the label can fetch double the price of conventional produce. Researchers explored a technique called magnetic resonance spectroscopy that is already in use for authenticating honey and olive oil. … The study was published in the American Chemical Society Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 25 media outlets, including Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 978,200 unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Food Navigator (Crawley, U.K.: 55,200 unique monthly visits) and Times Live (44,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
"Why having a sea wee is 'good for marine life'"

August 25, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

If you feel guilty about having a wee whilst swimming in the sea - worry no more. A science writer has insisted that you are actually helping marine life. Chemical & Engineering News writer, Lauren Woolf, said the chemical urea, found in urine, broke down into useful ammonium for sea plants. "It's converted into nutrients they need", she said.

More than 20 media outlets, including The Independent (London, U.K.: 16.6 million unique monthly visits), TODAY (New York, NY: 10.7 million unique monthly visits) and Shape (New York, NY: 7.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits)
"New test could expose organic food frauds"

August 29, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Slapping on the "organic" label to inflate the price of produce might become a thing of the past thanks to researchers from the Bavarian Health and Food Safety Authority and the Wuerzburg University in Germany, who have developed a high-tech test to set the standards. Despite tightening laws and increasing proactivity from food watchdog groups in some countries, organic food fraud continues to occur because the label can fetch double the price of conventional produce. … The study was published in the American Chemical Society Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: daily circulation 550,821)
"Is MSG bad for you?"

August 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Monosodium Glutimate (MSG), has gotten a bad rap for more than 50 years, but should that negative reputation be reconsidered? Reactions, a video series produced by the American Chemical Society, breaks down the science to find out.

Parade (New York, NY)
"Aluminum or Aluminium?"

August 27, 2014

E. Milton Wilson in Pomona, Calif., writes: Element 13 is officially called “aluminium” by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. This goes along with the ending of other metals such as sodium, potassium, thorium, uranium, etc. With the U.S. and Canada being the only two nations using the alternative spelling, don’t you think you could help out with world communications by using the standardized spelling? … Marilyn responds: You need to complain to the American Chemical Society, not me! As I’m an American writing for an American audience, I use only American English, and “aluminum” is the American word

The Weather Channel (28.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Should You Pee In the Sea? Someone Actually Did a Study. Here's What They Found"

August 27, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

You know peeing in a swimming pool is totally unhealthy for you and everyone else in it. But what about relieving yourself in the ocean? In May, Proctor and Gamble revealed results of its “Don’t pee in the sea" survey. Out of 1009 beach going adults, 62 percent said they’ve urinated in the ocean. But is pee bad for the ocean? The American Chemical Society produced a fun video as part of their "Reactions" series. In the video, ACS explains urine is more than 95 percent water. It also contains sodium and chloride ions.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Is MSG really all that bad for you?"

August 25, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Monosodium glutamate, widely known to us as MSG, has a bad rap. The food additive, which has been used for decades in Chinese food, canned vegetables, and processed meat, has been associated with several medical symptoms including headache, sweating, and numbness in some people, according to the US Food and Drug Administration. As a result, many believe that MSG should be avoided at all costs. With a growing number of people trying to avoid the additive, some restaurants have decided to go MSG-free and even use MSG-free labels in their advertising. But is MSG really even all that bad for you? A new video from the American Chemical Society's Reactions YouTube page explains that not only is MSG perfectly safe for the vast majority of people but shows how MSG, or, more accurately glutamate, is found in tons of natural, protein-rich foods.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Five Reasons Why Coffee is Good for Your Health"

September 1, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Aside from keeping you alert first thing in the morning, there are plenty of other health and nutritional benefits that can be derived from drinking coffee. Some of the contents of coffee can actually prevent serious diseases and boost mental function. … Coffee is also effective for fat loss by boosting your metabolic rate by about three to 11 percent. Fat burning then becomes more efficient with caffeine in your system. Other fat-loss effects that coffee provides include suppressing your appetite and preventing hunger pangs. A study presented at the American Chemical Society showed that individuals who took green coffee every day lost about 10% of their total body weight.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Potential therapy for the Sudan strain of Ebola could help contain some future outbreaks"

August 27, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Ebola is a rare, but deadly disease that exists as five strains, none of which have approved therapies. One of the most lethal strains is the Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV). Although not the strain currently devastating West Africa, SUDV has caused widespread illness, even as recently as 2012. In a new study appearing in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, researchers now report a possible therapy that could someday help treat patients infected with SUDV.

More than 15 media outlets, including All Africa (1.3 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits), Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's The Terrible Thing That Happens When You Pour Grease Down The Drain"

August 29, 2014

We've all been warned that pouring that delicious bacon grease down the drain is bad... but why is it bad? The answer lies in the chemistry that happens after your wastewater is flushed from your pipes and delivered to the sewers: The fats in the grease and oil from your kitchen mix with the other chemicals in the sewers and form nasty conglomerations of chemicals that can build up and block the pipes that take our dirty water to the wastewater treatment plant. … When sewer levels rise high, these fat blobs glob onto the ceiling of the pipes, creating stalactite-type structures that are sometimes called "fatbergs." We've actually just recently been discovering how they come to be. A 2011 paper in the journal Environmental Science & Technology was the first to successfully form these deposits in the lab.

Grist (Seattle, WA:1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Now you can feel guilty about wearing sunscreen at the beach"

August 28, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A confession: I’m a little afraid of the sun. The U spectrum and I have had some ugly run-ins in the past: Miss Lisa’s pool, 1996, summer camp soccer fields, 1999, and who could forget the Terrible Sun Rash Incident of 2004? There’s a reason I live in Seattle now, where I only need to apply SPF 15 on especially bright rainy mornings instead of the multiple dunkings of 50+ I’d require in a place like California or — shudder — anywhere in the Southwest. But I also love to swim in the ocean, which is why a new study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology has me in the throes of a serious moral dilemma: To goop or not to goop?

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Taking aim at added sugars to improve Americans’ health"

August 27, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Now that health advocates’ campaigns against trans-fats have largely succeeded in sidelining the use of the additive, they’re taking aim at sugar for its potential contributions to Americans’ health conditions. But scientists and policymakers are still wrangling over the best way to assuage the nation’s insatiable sweet tooth, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New study throws into question long-held belief about depression"

August 27, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

New evidence puts into doubt the long-standing belief that a deficiency in serotonin -- a chemical messenger in the brain -- plays a central role in depression. In the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, scientists report that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains (and thus should have been "depressed" by conventional wisdom) did not show depression-like symptoms. Donald Kuhn and colleagues at the John D. Dingell VA Medical Center and Wayne State University School of Medicine note that depression poses a major public health problem. More than 350 million people suffer from it, according to the World Health Organization, and it is the leading cause of disability across the globe.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Simpler process to grow germanium nanowires could improve lithium ion batteries"

August 29, 2014

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed what they call "a simple, one-step method" to grow nanowires of germanium from an aqueous solution. Their process could make it more feasible to use germanium in lithium ion batteries. The Missouri S&T researchers describe their method in "Electrodeposited Germanium Nanowires," a paper published today (Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014) on the website of the journal ACS Nano. Their one-step approach could lead to a simpler, less expensive way to grow germanium nanowires.

More than 4 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Getting graffiti off a masterpiece"

August 28, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Works of art can take years to create and just seconds to deface. It happened to Mark Rothko’s “Black on Maroon” while on display at the Tate Modern gallery in London in 2012. A vandal tagged the painting, landing him two years in jail. Restoration experts teamed up with Dow Chemical to create a cleanser that would get rid of the graffiti and leave the art intact. Learn all about it in this episode of Speaking of Chemistry.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Synthesis produces new antibiotic"

August 29, 2014

A fortuitous collaboration at Rice Univ. has led to the total synthesis of a recently discovered natural antibiotic. The laboratory recreation of a fungus-derived antibiotic, viridicatumtoxin B, may someday help bolster the fight against bacteria that evolve resistance to treatments in hospitals and clinics around the world. … The work reported this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS) focused on a tetracycline discovered in 2008 by scientists who isolated small amounts from penicillium fungi. The yield wasn’t nearly enough for extensive testing, but it provided a basis for the discoverers to analyze its structure through magnetic resonance imaging, Nicolaou said.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WAGA-ATL (FOX) (Atlanta, GA: Local Viewership 83,952)
"Keeping filler ingredients out of your cup of coffee"

August 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] and there is more than caffeine in your morning cup of joe. New research presented at a national meeting at the American Chemical Society shows that it can have fillers including wheat, soybeans, barley, rye, brown sugar, corn, and even sticks. Experts say that's important to know if you have food allergies. Otherwise, no need to worry about it.

KSDK-STL (NBC) (St. Louis, MO:  Local Viewership 9,559)
"Is it OK to Pee in the Ocean?"

August 27, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] ...if you're planning a trip to the ocean anytime soon - you can apparently go number one in the water and it's okay! All this, from the American Chemical Society - so you know it's legit. They made a video that's trending on YouTube this morning. Finally the entire fancy math - every animal in the ocean pees in the ocean - so if they aren't harming things, you certainly aren’t as well! the video explains that if everyone in the world peed in the Atlantic ocean -- that's 350 quintillion liters --- urea, the waste product in urine, would still just be 60 parts per trillion! Chemically speaking that's nothing!

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0
"New Antibody Shows Promise Against Sudan Strain Of Ebola"

August 30, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. Sudan ebolavirus was first identified in 1976 and has caused numerous Ebola outbreaks (most recently in 2012) that have killed more than 400 people in total. A different strain, the Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), is now devastating West Africa. … Published in ACS Chemical Biology.

Science Codex
"Getting graffiti off of a masterpiece"

August 28, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Works of art can take years to create and just seconds to deface. It happened to Mark Rothko's "Black on Maroon" while on display at the Tate Modern gallery in London in 2012. A vandal tagged the painting, landing him two years in jail. Restoration experts teamed up with Dow Chemical to create a cleanser that would get rid of the graffiti and leave the art intact. Learn all about it in this episode of Speaking of Chemistry.

Green Car Congress
"Rice University team develops new nanocomposite material for Li-sulfur battery cathode with high cycling stability"

August 26, 2014

Researchers at Rice University led by Dr. James Tour have developed a hierarchical nanocomposite material of graphene nanoribbons combined with polyaniline and sulfur (Sulfur-PANI-GNRs, SPG) using an inexpensive, simple method. The composite shows good rate performance and excellent cycling stability for use as a cathode material in Lithium-sulfur batteries. As reported in an open access paper in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, the stable reversible specific discharge capacity was 567 mAh/g at the 26th with only a 9% decay in the following 374 cycles, at the rate of 0.4 C.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Sunblock Could Harm Sea Animals"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

For many people, especially in the northern hemisphere, summer time is also vacation time, and one of the most popular destinations is the beach.  One of the most important rituals for beachgoers is slathering on gobs of sunblock on their bodies. But what people count on to protect them from sunburn and skin damage has been found to be harmful to some marine animals, according to a new study published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Environmental Science and Technology. It turns out that when people take a dip in the ocean, key ingredients in sunblock – such as titanium dioxide and zinc oxide – wash off the skin and can form new compounds such as hydrogen peroxide when they react to ultraviolet light from the sun.

More than 30 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Recorder (664,200 unique monthly visits), Quartz (343,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

io9 (U.S.: 123.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Is It Okay To Pee In The Ocean?"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

According to the folks at the American Chemical Society's Reactions channel: Yes. In a pool, though? That's a different story. … Peeing in the ocean: Many have done it, but few admit to it. Fortunately for beachgoers everywhere, our latest episode of Reactions explains why, from an environmental perspective, it is absolutely OK to pee in the ocean.

More than 30 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), MTV News (U.S.), The Times (London, U.K.: 148,000 unique monthly visits) and FOX 6 (Birmingham, AL: 49,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"New Painkiller Soothes The Nerves That Sense Hot Chile Peppers"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It's a chemical compound so new, it doesn't have a name.* In a paper, its creators call it either V116517 or Compound 37. (Like Chanel's No. 5 perfume! Except a drug.) Compound 37 is an early-stage, experimental painkiller drug... that works by incapacitating the protein that makes chiles taste spicy. The protein, TRPV1, appears in human nerves. In addition to sensing capsaicin, the spicy-pepper molecule, TRPV1 also senses pain from heat, strong acids, and molecules associated with tissue inflammation, like the inflammation that happens in certain types of arthritis and in irritable bowel syndrome. Very interesting, TRPV1, very interesting. … The researchers published their work last month in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than 25 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,300 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 86,200 unique monthly visits), The Health Site (India: 85,200 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Bio-Battery Produces Power from Your Perspiration"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Do you like working up a sweat? Or do you feel like maybe sweat should work for you? Well, hold on to your sudoriferous glands. Because researchers have designed a device that could someday produce power from your perspiration. The schvitzy scheme was presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco. [Wenzhao Jia et al, Epidermal Biofuel Cells: Energy Harvesting from Human Perspiration, in Angewandte Chemie] Strenuous exercise generates lactate—the molecule that makes overworked muscles burn. Athletes sometimes evaluate their fitness by checking the lactate levels in their blood. To reduce blood draws, researchers came up with a monitor that could measure the lactate in sweat. The device they designed strips electrons from lactate, which creates a small electric current. The strength of the current reveals the amount of lactate.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Why it's OK to pee beside the seaside: Urinating in the ocean is harmless and is actually GOOD for marine life, say scientists"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Ever 'had to go' while swimming in the ocean but felt guilty about polluting the water? Well, feel guilty no more - according to the American Chemical Society (ACS) peeing in the ocean is not only harmless, it is actually good for marine life. In a video, it says the components of urine pose no threat to life in the ocean, and if anything they can be beneficial - but they add peeing in enclosed areas like pools is a big no. A lot of people will no doubt have encountered the problem of going for a swim in the sea before realising they need to go to the toilet.

Live Science (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Dirt and Corn? Test Reveals Hidden Coffee Ingredients"

August 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Cream and sugar may not be the only additives in your morning cup of coffee. Tough growing conditions and rising demand are leading some coffee producers to mix in wheat, soybean, brown sugar, rye, barley, acai seeds, corn, twigs and even dirt. The filler ingredients are natural and don't pose any immediate health risks for most people. But these additives could be a serious problem for people with soy or wheat allergies, said Suzana Lucy Nixdorf, a researcher at Universidade Estadual de Londrina in Brazil. That's why Nixdorf developed a chemical test that can spot the difference between a batch of pure coffee grounds and a batch with unwanted ingredients. … Nixdorf's research was presented at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco last week.  

More than 10 media outlets, including The Modern Farmer (424,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Turning Waste From Rice, Parsley And Other Foods Into Biodegradable Plastic"

August 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Your chairs, synthetic rugs and plastic bags could one day be made out of cocoa, rice and vegetable waste rather than petroleum, scientists are now reporting. The novel process they developed and their results, which could help the world deal with its agricultural and plastic waste problems, appear in the ACS journal Macromolecules … Synthetic plastics persist for hundreds or thousands of years while releasing toxic components with the potential to harm the environment and human health. Also, plastics are made out of petroleum, which is a nonrenewable source. The shift to more environmentally friendly bioplastics has been challenging and expensive. Athanassiou’s team wanted to find a simple, less costly way to make the transition.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), OpEdNews.com (Newtown, PA: 239,700 unique monthly visits), Nature World News (91,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Weather Channel (28.8 million unique monthly visits)
"With This Tattoo Developed by UC-San Diego, Sweat Could One Day Power Your Electronics"

August 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Harvesting electricity from your body as you sweat? A group of researchers from the University of California-San Diego say they've discovered a way to do so, detailing their work in a study they presented at this week's meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco. Taking their cue from the peel-and-stick tattoos popular with children, the scientists developed a sensor that the wearer applies to her arm, using a design that comes in the shape of the university's "UC" logo. Once applied on the skin, the device detects and measures lactate, a naturally-occurring chemical in sweat. As Newsweek magazine explains, "The sensor contains an enzyme that strips electrons from the lactate to generate electrical current across an anode and cathode, which, in the case of this design, are printed on tattoo transfer paper. The electrical current generated is stored in a battery built into the sensor."

More than 10 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Fox News (New York, NY: 21.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Is this the end of your nut allergies?"

August 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Question: If you put Harry Potter’s invisibility cloak on a cashew, what would you get? Answer: A crunchy snack that people with nut allergies might safely be able to eat. Wait, what? OK, so that bit about the invisibility cloak might be a tiny bit dramatic, but check this out: Experts really are working to develop less allergenic versions of nuts, and it actually does have to do with making a part of the nut, in a way, invisible ..."They’re the same proteins, but the chemical alteration leads to a change in how the proteins look to the immune system. It changes their shape and makes them harder to see," said Chris Mattison, a molecular biologist who presented his research at last week’s annual American Chemical Society meeting. And if it’s harder for the immune system to see a threat, it’s harder for it to find a reason to freak out.  

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop gel that wards off superbugs"

August 19, 2014

A team of researchers from the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University in Canada has made a breakthrough in the war on hospital superbugs, have used natural proteins to develop an innovative antibacterial gel that kills the dreaded Pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococci and E.coli. The potion is capable of breaking down bacteria coating called biofilm which has roughly the same consistency of pudding and which is the culprit of antibacterial resistance. … The Queen's study was published in Bio Macromolecules, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 25 media outlets, including HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), CTV News (Canada: 257,900 unique monthly visits), The Irish Times (Ireland: 231,400 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,600 unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Hope for the Future: How American Chemical Society Student Representatives Increase Climate Science Literacy"

August 20, 2014

Far too often in the United States it feels as if the issues surrounding Climate Change are being completely ignored. However, stepping into a symposium on "Global Stewardship through Increasing Climate Science Literacy" at the 248th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in San Francisco this past Tuesday provided a completely different feeling. In order to understand this symposium, it is helpful to describe the primary focus of the project that led to this symposium. ACS kicked off the recent 2011 International Year of Chemistry (IYC 2011) by sending two undergraduate students from York College of Pennsylvania along with two faculty mentors to the November 2010 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) 16th Conference of Parties (COP16) in Cancun, Mexico. The primary goal of these students was to learn and report.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
"Queen's University Belfast scientists create 'superbug gel'"

August 19, 2014

Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have developed a gel that acts to kill hospital superbugs. It targets Pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococci and E.coli. Lead researcher Dr Garry Laverty said: "Our gels are unique as they target and kill the most resistant forms of hospital superbugs.”It involves the use of gels composed of the building blocks of natural proteins, called peptides - the same ingredients that form human tissue." He added: "These molecules are modified slightly in the laboratory to allow them to form gels that will rapidly kill bacteria." The School of Pharmacy at Queen's and the School of Chemistry at Brandeis University, Waltham, US, collaborated on the research. Their results will be published in the journal, Biomacromolecules, next month.

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits)
"Gel that wards off superbugs may be coming soon"

August 20, 2014

A team of researchers from the School of Pharmacy at Queen's University in Canada has made a breakthrough in the war on hospital superbugs, have used natural proteins to develop an innovative antibacterial gel that kills the dreaded Pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococci and E.coli. The potion is capable of breaking down bacteria coating called biofilm which has roughly the same consistency of pudding and which is the culprit of antibacterial resistance. According to researchers, it leaves healthy cells unaffected. … The Queen's study was published in Bio Macromolecules, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Water leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels production"

August 20, 2014

Trying to understand the chemistry that turns plant material into the same energy-rich gasoline and diesel we put in our vehicles, researchers have discovered that water in the conversion process helps form an impurity which, in turn, slows down key chemical reactions. The study, which was reported online at the Journal of the American Chemical Society, can help improve processes that produce biofuels from plants. The study examines the conversion of bio-oil, produced from biomass such as wood chips or grasses, into transportation fuels. Researchers used computer simulations to explore what happens to a common bio-oil byproduct. Water, everywhere during biofuels production, turns the byproduct into an impurity that disrupts and blocks the reactions that lead to biofuels. The results apply not only to water but to related liquids in bio-oil such as alcohols and certain acids.

More than 10 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Celebrating 100 years of crystallography"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of a revolutionary technique that underpins much of modern science, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) magazine last week released a special edition on X-ray crystallography—its past, present and a tantalizing glimpse of its future. C&EN is the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The technique got its start when German physicist Max von Laue published the first paper on X-ray diffraction from a crystal in 1912. In the century following von Laue's discovery, which was recognized with a Nobel Prize in 1914, scientists went on to use crystallography to describe hundreds of thousands of molecular structures, influencing every corner of science from chemistry to biology, from the Earth to outer space.

More than 3 media outlets, including ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Exploring 3-D printing to make organs for transplants"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. In the ACS journal Langmuir ("Study of Droplet Formation Process during Drop-on-Demand Inkjetting of Living Cell-Laden Bioink"), scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.

More than 5 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

The Star Phoenix
"CLS tunes graphene, a futuristic supermaterial"

August 19, 2014

In 2024, you might fold your iPad like a piece of paper before you slip it into your wallet. That’s thanks to graphene, a supermaterial that’s stronger than steel, conducts electricity better than copper, yet is flexible like fabric. Researchers at Saskatoon’s Canadian Light Source (CLS) synchrotron are some of many across the globe studying the material that may one day replace silicon in the tech industry. If clever minds can find a way to mass-produce graphene affordably, the potential uses include wearable electronic devices, packaging that tells you when food has spoiled, armour, and sensors sensitive enough to detect a single molecule. … Iyer and her colleagues’ results were published in the American Chemical Society journal, ACS Nano.

More than 3 media outlets, including SciTech Daily covered the story.

Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits)
"Good news for diabetics who are sick of the finger prick"

August 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Diabetes affects nearly 10 percent of the U.S. population. Among the biggest complaints of diabetics: constant finger pricking to test blood glucose levels. Fortunately, research published in ACS Chemical Biology reports the development of a protein that could lead to less pain and more accurate results for diabetes patients. In the American Chemical Society's (ACS') newest Breakthrough Science video, Sylvia Daunert, Ph.D., shows off her "designer protein" that could eventually allow diabetics to check their blood sugar from their iPhones. The video is available at http://youtu.be/x51o8p8j8Z0.

More than 7 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WBRC-BIRM (FOX) (Birmingham, AL: Local Viewership 91,378)
"Is it OK to pee in the ocean? Science says yes."

August 21, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

[Transcript] ...it's ok to go to the bathroom in the ocean. >> Number one? >> Yes. Let’s be clear. Their study shows that urine is harmless to the ocean and actually is good for marine life. >> The American Chemical Society says that urine is mostly the water. In fact the average human urine is composed of 95 percent water. >> The other 5 percent if you are wondering is urea which is the main product is in the year-end. Apparently even if everyone went into the ocean there would still be ... bottom-line go to town. >> When you have to cut you have to go. >> Not in a pool but in the ocean.

More than 25 media outlets, including WPIX-TV (WB) (New York, NY: Local Viewership 76,017), KENS-SAT (CBS) (San Antonio, TX: Local Viewership 75,162), WTXF-PHI (FOX) (Philadelphia, PA: Local Viewership 54,629), KNSD-SD (NBC) (San Diego, CA: Local Viewership 50,725) and WBIR (NBC) (Knoxville, TN: Local Viewership 37,306) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Counsel & Heal
"Pain Cured by Blocking Spicy Sensation, Study"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Blocking the "chili-pepper receptor" that causes burning sensations could help treat pain, according to a new study. After analyzing the chili pepper's effects, researchers believe that they could develop new treatments for various kinds of pain triggered by inflammation or other problems. Lead researcher Laykea Tafesse and her team at the American Chemical Society wanted to better understand a compound called capsaicin, an active ingredient in chili peppers that causes burning pain.

Environmental Leader
"How to Turn Food Waste into Bioplastic"

August 20, 2014\
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chairs, synthetic rugs and plastic bags could one day be made out of cocoa, rice and vegetable waste rather than petroleum, according to scientists. The process they developed and their results, which could help the world deal with its agricultural and plastic waste problems, appear in the ACS journal Macromolecules. Athanassia Athanassiou, Ilker S. Bayer and colleagues at the Italian Institute of Technology point out that plastic’s popularity is growing.

Republica
"Sweat to power small electronic devices soon"

August 21, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Sweat can not only help you burn calories while exercising but also power small electronic devices in near future. Researchers have designed a sensor in the form of a temporary tattoo that can both monitor a person´s progress during exercise and produce power from their perspiration. The device works by detecting and responding to lactate, which is naturally present in sweat. “Lactate is a very important indicator of how you are doing during exercise,” said Wenzhao Jia, a postdoctoral student at University of California San Diego. … The team described the approach at the 248th national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) this week.

Science 2.0
"Water Gunks Up Biofuels Production"

August 21, 2014

Biofuels production has never lived up to the hype. It does something, so it is less hype than quantum computers have been for 15 years, but biofuels suffer from inefficiencies that have kept it from improving due to time and experience, some of which is that subsidies and mandates lead to less innovation rather than more, and then there is a chemistry problem. There may be hope for the chemistry problem. A new paper the Journal of the American Chemical Society finds that water in the conversion process helps form an impurity which slows down key chemical reactions. Researchers used computer simulations to explore what happens to bio-oil, produced from biomass such as wood chips or grasses,  and common bio-oil byproduct .

Science Codex
"Salt, pink diamonds and DNA: 5 surprising facts about crystals"

August 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Many people think of crystals as little more than sparkly things behind glass cases in museums. But crystals are everywhere, from the dinner table to the human body. Because 2014 is the International Year of Crystallography, Reactions is celebrating with a video highlighting five surprising facts about crystals.

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