ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists X-ray chocolate to figure out how to get rid of that weird white stuff"

May 7,2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

You know when you need to stress eat but you devastatingly discover your emergency chocolate stash has accumulated weird white stuff all over it and you have to decide, do I eat this? Just me? Okay, well this is a real problem in need of real solution, not just for chocolate aficionados but the entire chocolate industry. Now a group of German scientists say they've used X-rays to figure out the underlying process behind the "fat blooming" on chocolate in an effort to help reduce the whiteness. They published their findings in the latest issue of the journal Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 75 media outlets, including CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), State Column (Arlington, VA: 78,100 unique monthly visits), Food Manufacturing (U.S.: 52,300 unique monthly visits), New Hampshire Voice (Manchester, NH: 30,300 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Thermometer-like device could help diagnose heart attacks"

May 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Diagnosing a heart attack can require multiple tests using expensive equipment. But not everyone has access to such techniques, especially in remote or low-income areas. Now scientists have developed a simple, thermometer-like device that could help doctors diagnose heart attacks with minimal materials and cost. The report on their approach appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 50 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 117,700 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 34,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"The EPA Tries to Regulate a Product in Many American Homes for the First Time and Industry Stakeholders Are Not Happy"

May 4, 2015

It could be in your clothes, your furniture, your floors, heck, you even produce a little of it naturally when you breathe, and it’s something the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has been working toward regulating for years: Formaldehyde….The American Chemical Society has released several documents over the last few years against the proposed rule as well.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"A step toward making everybody a universal blood donor"

May 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Every two seconds someone in the United States needs donated blood, the equivalent of more than 41,000 three-pint donations every day. There’s a perennial need for more donors — particularly donors of type O-negative blood, which doesn’t have the A- or B-type antigens that can provoke an immune reaction in some people. But fewer than 7 percent of Americans have O-negative blood. In a new study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, researchers describe a way to transform A and B blood into a type that, like O, could be universally donated.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists X-Rayed Chocolate To Figure Out How It Gets That White Film"

May 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Fat blooms, the white stuff you sometimes get on chocolate, have long been the bane of chocolate makers and chocolate lovers. It’s harmless but decidedly unappetizing. Now scientists at Nestle have X-rayed chocolate to figure out exactly what’s going on at a microscopic level…. [ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces]

The Independent (London, U.K.: 35 million unique monthly visits)
"You've been eating avocados all wrong"

May 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

They are known for being a healthy snack, but how many people have been eating an avocado the wrong way? While avocado aficionados often eat the fruit using a spoon, experts say they are missing out on the most nutritious part. Instead of digging in with cutlery, the best way to keep the healthy dark green flesh just beneath the skin is to peel the fruit, after halving. This is according to the American Chemical Society, which uploaded a new video detailing how to get the “maximum health benefits” from avocados.

More than 20 media outlets, including Refinery29 (New York, NY: 10.6 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) and The 42 (Dublin, Ireland: 40,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"ACS Reactions/SciPop Presents "The Science of the Avengers""

May 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

The Avengers: Age of Ultron will without a doubt be a major blockbuster. The sequel to the 2012 Marvels The Avengers has already broken box office records abroad and projected for a big opening weekend in the United States….That is the premise of the new video called "The Science of the Avengers." The short video was created in a collaborative effort by ACS Reactions and SciPop. ACS Reactions is a video team started by the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Fox News (New York, NY: 25.4 million unique monthly visits)
"How eating microbes may aid in weight loss"

May 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

If you could lose weight by consuming special bacteria, would you do it? It sounds weird, but some scientists have hope that a new microbial treatment could one day help control the obesity epidemic. At a meeting of the American Chemical Society in March, researchers presented results from a study on mice given a high-fat diet.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Have YOU been peeling avocados all wrong? New video shows how to get the maximum health benefits - and stop guacamole turning brown"

May 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

They are constantly hailed as a 'superfood' and a great source of healthy fats. But a new video reveals you may not be getting all the health benefits you could from avocados. The key, it seems, is in how you remove the fruit from its skin. Created by the American Chemical Society, experts there explain the part of an avocado with the most nutrients is the darker green part just beneath the skin.

Mother Nature Network (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The truth behind the dreaded chocolate 'bloom'"

May 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Have you ever wondered what that white stuff is that forms on the surface of chocolate that has been sitting around? More importantly, have you ever wondered if you should still go ahead and eat it?...The study was published in the recent issue of the journal Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The next step in DNA computing: GPS mapping?"

May 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Conventional silicon-based computing, which has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent decades, is pushing against its practical limits. DNA computing could help take the digital era to the next level. Scientists are now reporting progress toward that goal with the development of a novel DNA-based GPS. They describe their advance in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The science behind the best (and healthiest) guacamole"

May 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Guacamole is great. We're generally pro-guac at this blog (though we have a blanket policy against cilantro). But as the latest Reactions video from the American Chemical Society explains above, chips and guac is practically a superfood. Or avocados are, anyway, and that's close enough for us.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Thermometer-like device could diagnose heart attacks"

May 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A simple, thermometer-like device that could make diagnosing heart attacks easier in remote or low-income locations has been developed….The research appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

Science News (Washington, DC: 429,000 unique monthly visits)
"Sugar-cleaving molecule raises hope for universal blood"

May 4, 1015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

By tweaking an enzyme borrowed from a bacterium, researchers have taken a step closer to creating blood that is safe for transfusing to all people, regardless of their blood type — A, B, AB or O. Compared with the unaltered enzyme, designated Sp3GH98, the engineered version is 170 times faster at chopping apart certain sugar-based markers found on blood cells, researchers report online April 14 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Supreme Court to decide fate of EPA mercury rule with billions at stake"

May 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The justices of the nation's highest court are weighing whether the Environmental Protection Agency should have considered potential compliance costs before proceeding with a rule that requires power plants to reduce their mercury emissions. In March, lawyers from the government and industry presented their sides to the Supreme Court, which could decide the matter in June, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Many plastics labeled 'biodegradable' don't break down as expected"

May 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Plastic products advertised as biodegradable have recently emerged, but they sound almost too good to be true. Scientists have now found out that, at least for now, consumers have good reason to doubt these claims. In a new study appearing in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology ("Evaluation of Biodegradation-Promoting Additives for Plastics"), plastics designed to degrade didn’t break down any faster than their more conventional counterparts.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"3-D Printer Turns Graphene into Electric Ink"

May 6, 2015

Researchers have printed inks containing nanoscopic graphene flakes to build macroscopic, three-dimensional objects that they say could benefit numerous fields, including energy storage and bioengineering. … And researchers at Northwestern University designed tissue scaffolds with ink that contains graphene flakes within a flexible, biocompatible polymer (ACS Nano 2015, DOI:10.1021/acsnano.5b01179).

Chemistry World (London, U.K.:156,000 unique monthly visits)
"Travel policies restrict US government scientists attending conferences"

May 7, 2015

More than 120 organisations – including the American Chemical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) – have expressed ‘deep concerns’ about the Obama administration’s regulations and policies affecting the travel of US government scientists and their attendance at conferences.

Inside Climate News (Brooklyn, NY: 76,300 unique monthly visits)
"Journal Corrects Fracking Study Over Undisclosed Industry Funding"

May 7, 2015

An influential science journal has issued a correction to a paper on fracking and water safety, after revelations that the authors did not disclose their financial ties to energy giant Chesapeake Energy. The correction was prompted by an article in Inside Climate News in April. The paper, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, concluded that drinking water wells near natural gas sites are not at greater risk of methane contamination than that farther way.

Science News (Washington, DC: 429,000 unique monthly visits)
"Bacteria staining method has long been misexplained"

May 6, 2015

With delicate hues of purple and pink, a lab technique called gram staining has reliably characterized bacteria for more than a century. Yet many scientists are mistaken about why the vivid method works, new research finds. Contrary to standard scientific texts, the purple dye called crystal violet, a main ingredient in gram staining, does not actually enter bacterial cells, researchers report April 27 in ACS Chemical Biology.

Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits)
"The Science of Stress (video)"

May 8, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Raychelle Burks, Ph.D., explains why too much cortisol is bad for you in the latest episode of the Reactions series Get To Know A Molecule. By American Chemical Society

… TV and Radio News

WNEM CBS (Flint, MI: local viewership 36,036)
"Special microbes make anti-obesity molecule in the gut"

May 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] ...scientists are hoping that a new microbial treatment could help control the obesity epidemic. According to a meeting of the American Chemical Society, researchers have created appetite-suppressing bacteria by testing mice. While the research is compelling, it is too soon to know if human trials will pan out. For more information on this study check out the hotlinks section.

… From the Blogs

ANI News
"Now thermometer-like device can diagnose heart attack"

May 7, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

American scientists have developed a simple, thermometer-like device that can help doctors diagnose heart attacks with minimal materials and cost. The scientists from American Chemical Society observed that commonly heart attack diagnosis involves measuring the level of a protein i.e. troponin in the patient's blood as protein's concentration rises when blood is cut off from the heart, and the muscle is damaged, but this process gets expensive due to involvement of big heavy machines.

Gazette Review
"Enzyme That Can Change Blood Type Discovered"

May 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have recently discovered a new enzyme, which can cut the antigens in blood types A and B, which make them more like type O blood. Type O blood is the universal blood type, since it’s the only type that can be donated to anyone with type A or type B, and there is no life-threatening immune response to the blood. … This entire study was just published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Cat Health Problem Might Be Linked to Flame Retardants"

May 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Flame retardants might be linked to a common health problem in pet cats, a new study from Sweden says. Researchers found that cats with hyperthyroidism had high levels of certain flame retardants, which suggests a possible link. More than 10 percent of older cats develop hyperthyroidism, which can cause symptoms such as weight loss, hyperactivity, aggression and vomiting, noted Jessica Norrgran, of Stockholm University, and colleagues. The findings were recently published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Come Closer to Making Everyone a Universal Blood Donor"

May 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An Austrian physician, Karl Landsteiner, first discovered the four basic human blood groups — A, B, AB and O — in 1900. ...The researchers published the results in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. However, though the enzyme works better than any created in the past, it still doesn’t catch and clean 100 percent of the donor blood cells. Scientists are still working to make it even more effective so that it can help patients.

More than 50 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), CTV News (Canada: 870,600 unique monthly visits), The Hindu (Chennai, India: 707,000 unique monthly visits), University of British Columbia News (Vancouver, Canada: 657,500 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), News Everyday (203,400 unique monthly visits), Monthly Prescribing Reference (Congers, NY: 152,300 unique monthly visits), Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (New Rochelle, NY: 64,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientist Develop A Human-Like Robots That Read Your Expressions"

May 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have developed ultra-sensitive, wearable sensors that help human-like robots to read people's expressions. Nae-Eung Lee and colleagues note that one way to make interactions between people and robots more intuitive would be to endow machines with the ability to read their users' emotions and respond with a computer version of empathy...The study is published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 40 media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits), The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 117,700 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Scientific Computing (Rockaway, NJ: 39,700 unique monthly visits), Medical Design Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 39,600 unique monthly visits), The Hans India (Hyderabad, India: 31,400 unique monthly visits), Delhi Daily News (New Delhi, India: 21,600 unique monthly visits) and Health News Digest (New York, NY: 10,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 20.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Cheese: the secret to a longer life and faster metabolism?"

April 28, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It's the best news we've had all year: a study suggests that cheese consumption could be the key to a faster metabolism and reduced obesity. Scientists at Aarhus University in Denmark investigated the fact that the French tend to lead long and healthy lives while consuming diets high in saturated fats. Though most explanations of this phenomenon, known as the 'French Paradox', focus on wine consumed and lifestyle, this new Danish research points to a simpler answer. The study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, suggests that fermented dairy products such as cheese could contribute to longevity and health.

Seven media outlets covered the story, including CBS San Francisco (San Francisco, CA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and The New Indian Express (Chennai, India: 214,800 unique monthly visits).

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The science of the AVENGERS: Physics and chemistry behind Iron Man's suit and Captain America's shield revealed"

April 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

The Avengers have battled to save Earth from an alien invasion, the evil Loki and now, in the latest movie, face off against the killing machine Ultron. They do this, of course, with the help of numerous superpowers - including Iron Man’s suit, super-healing abilities and Captain America’s indestructible shield. But just how scientifically sound are some of these powers, and do any of them hold up to the laws of physics and chemistry as we know them? In a video for Reactions, the American Chemical Society took a look at the science of Marvel's Avengers.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 585,200 unique monthly visits), Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 117,700 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"New CEO at American Chemical Society gets first new job in 30 years"

April 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Thomas M. Connelly Jr. developed a love of chemistry at a young age. After spending his undergraduate and graduate school years doing research in chemical engineering, he wanted to see how the chemical industry worked. So he took a job at DuPont and spent the next 36 years with the company... He became the executive director and chief executive of the American Chemical Society after Madeleine Jacobs retired last month.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits)
"What's Iron Man's suit made of? The science behind the Avengers"

April 28, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Ever wondered what Tony Stark's Iron Man suit is made of? Or how Captain America's shield is able to so readily deflect bullets, grenades and death rays? The American Chemical Society's "Reactions" series has released a new video exploring the science of Marvel Comics superhero team the Avengers.

Inquisitr (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Blood Donations Made Easy: Scientists Discover Blood-Altering Enzyme That Could Turn Anyone Into A Universal Donor"

May 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Thousands of people require blood transfusions every day, but the donor’s blood type has to match that of the recipient, or it could be fatal. Though there’s one exception, the “universal” Type O blood, which can be donated to anyone without risk...“We produced a mutant enzyme that is very efficient at cutting off the sugars in A and B blood, and is much more proficient at removing the subtypes of the A-antigen that the parent enzyme struggles with,” said David Kwan, the lead author of the study, which was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Making robots more human: Wearable sensors read human facial expressions"

April 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Most people are naturally adept at reading facial expressions -- from smiling and frowning to brow-furrowing and eye-rolling -- to tell what others are feeling. Now scientists have developed ultra-sensitive, wearable sensors that can do the same thing. Their technology, reported in the journal ACS Nano, could help robot developers make their machines more human.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Making leather that is earth- and fashion-friendly"

April 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Alternatives to leather made from animal hides have been around for decades. Synthetic leather is in our car seats and our stylish jackets. But materials used to make faux-leather are also highly toxic. In this week's Speaking of Chemistry, Lauren Wolf talks about a new, alternative way to make synthetic leather both eco-conscious and fashion-forward.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Artificial Photosynthesis Key to Fuels, Plastics, Medicine"

April 29,2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The global industrial sector accounts for more than half of the total energy used every year. Now, scientists are inventing a new artificial photosynthetic system that could one day reduce industry’s dependence on fossil fuel-derived energy by powering part of the sector with solar energy and bacteria. In the ACS journal Nano Letters, they describe a novel system that converts light and carbon dioxide into building blocks for plastics, pharmaceuticals and fuels — all without electricity.

Five media outlets covered the story, including Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) and Health News Digest (New York, NY: 10,400 unique monthly visits).

Vice (U.S.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)
"We're Getting Closer to Creating a Universal Blood Supply"

April 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Receiving the wrong type of blood during a transfusion can be a fatal mistake. But what do you do when you have type A blood flowing through your veins, but the hospital only has type B on hand? A newly developed enzyme could change that type B blood into type O, what’s known as a “universal” blood type, allowing for a successful emergency transfusion...To transform one type of blood to another, researchers at the University of British Columbia developed an enzyme that, once introduced to donated blood, can quickly strip the cells of their antigens, making them type O. A paper describing their work was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 251,800 unique monthly visits)
"Can China Sustain Annual Pollution Reductions?"

April 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

China’s government and other sources say that the country’s carbon-dioxide emissions flattened out between 2013 and 2014. The leveling-off was a remarkable feat that could set the country on a course to beating its own goals for lowering emissions. But this optimistic outcome hinges on China overcoming some serious energy challenges, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"How unwanted CDs and DVDs could help cut carbon emissions"

April 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Now that most consumers download and stream their movies and music, more and more CDs and DVDs will end up in landfills or be recycled. But soon these discarded discs could take on a different role: curbing the release of greenhouse gases. In the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering ("Adsorption Properties of Activated Carbons Prepared from Waste CDs and DVDs"), scientists report a way to turn the discs into a material that can capture carbon dioxide, a key greenhouse gas, and other compounds.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Facial stickers could let robots read our emotions"

April 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If robots are ever going to interact with us on a daily basis, then it's important that they know what sort of emotions we're expressing. While some already use computer vision systems to do so, Korean scientists have developed what they say is a simpler and more precise technology – users just have to be willing to stick something on their face...A paper on the research was recently published in the journal ACS Nano.

The Scientist (New York, NY: 157,300 unique monthly visits)
"Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins"

April 28, 2015

Scientists have taken advantage of bacteria’s natural ability to transport molecules into other cells to create a custom protein-delivery service that’s nonpathogenic... “On the basis of our ability to generate variants of several mammalian proteins that are recognized as secreted substrates, we anticipate that a wide variety of proteins can be modified by a type 3 secretion sequence and delivered into mammalian cells by these bacterial strains,” the authors wrote in their report, published earlier this month (April 8) in ACS Synthetic Biology. According to Chemical & Engineering News, “Lesser and her colleagues are taking the next step toward therapies.”

News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7 million unique monthly visits)
"The Power of Lettuce"

May 1, 2015

"Lettuce," said Charles Dudley Warner, American author and pal of Mark Twain, "Is like conversation. It must be fresh and crisp, so sparkling you barely notice the bitter in it." And just like good conversation, lettuce can be rapid-fire or low-key when it comes to delivering its nutritional messages. A recent study in the "Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry" examined the polyphenol, flavonoid, vitamin, and antioxidant activity of three types of lettuce: one all-green (Batavia), one semi-red (Marvel of Four Seasons), and one red (Oak Leaf).  

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers probe chemistry, topography and mechanics with one instrument"

May 1, 2015

The probe of an atomic force microscope (AFM) scans a surface to reveal details at a resolution 1,000 times greater than that of an optical microscope. That makes AFM the premier tool for analyzing physical features, but it cannot tell scientists anything about chemistry...This multimodal imaging will allow scientists to explore thin films of phase-separated polymers important for energy conversion and storage. Their results are published in ACS Nano, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

Seven media outlets covered the story, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits).

The Express Tribune (Karachi, Pakistan: 278,500 unique monthly visits)
"6 benefits of chowing down watermelon"

April 27, 2015

No other fruit shouts summer quite like watermelon. It could be its refreshing taste or even the burst of colour that adds vividness to your plate...A Spanish study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that drinking watermelon juice or consuming the fruit can truly be quite soothing after a grueling workout. Athletes who consumed a little more than 16 ounces an hour before exercise had less muscle soreness and a lower heart rate within a day.

… TV and Radio News

WBRC-BIRM FOX (Birmingham, AL: local viewership 73,600)
"A new piece in the ‘French paradox’ puzzle — cheese metabolism"

April 30, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript]  ...They found people who ate cheese had higher levels of butyric acid which is a compound linked to reduced obesity and higher metabolism. Dietitians say more work needs to be done before they suggest everyone start eating more cheese. Findings appear in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. …

More than 18 media outlets covered the story, including WHNS FOX (Greenville, SC: local viewership 58,300), WTVA NBC (Columbus, MS: local viewership 49,200), WAOW ABC (Wausau, WI: local viewership 28,300) and WVUE-NO FOX (New Orleans, LA: local viewership 10,900).

KATU-POR ABC (Portland, OR: local viewership 24,400)
"Oat Cereal"

April 28, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript]  ...If you enjoy cereal for your breakfast or serve it to your kids, a warning. There could be a toxin in there that might make you sick. Debora Knapp has been looking into this. This is coming from a new study? It is. It's in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The study revealed some oat-based cereals in the United States have relatively high levels of Ochratoxin A, a toxin that comes from mold.

… From the Blogs

PC-Tablet

"Researchers come up with a transparent sensor to help robots read human expression"
May 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A team of scientists in Seoul has developed a transparent and stretchable sensor that can enable robots to read human expression...With the help of this sensor, robot developers can try to add life to their machines and make them more humans. The study was published in the reputed technology journal ACS Nano.

Lab Product News
"Transforming all donated blood into a universal type"

April 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Every day, thousands of people need donated blood. But only blood without A- or B-type antigens, such as type O, can be given to all of those in need, and it's usually in short supply. Now scientists at the University of British Columbia are making strides toward fixing the situation. In ACS' Journal of the American Chemical Society, they report an efficient way to transform A and B blood into a neutral type that can be given to any patient.

Click Green
"Can China sustain recent progress on pollution reductions?"

April 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

China, the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases, is claiming it significantly slowed both carbon dioxide releases and coal consumption in 2014. If confirmed and sustained, that trend could galvanize other countries’ climate change mitigation efforts as they prepare for upcoming treaty talks in Paris...Article first published in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Asian Scientist
"Nanoparticle Drug Reverses Parkinson’s-Like Symptoms In Rats"

April 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As baby boomers age, the number of people diagnosed with Parkinson's disease is expected to increase. Patients who develop this disease usually start experiencing symptoms around age 60 or older. Currently, there’s no cure, but scientists are reporting a novel approach that reversed Parkinson's-like symptoms in rats. Their results, published in the journal ACS Nano, could one day lead to a new therapy for human patients.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.