ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Tonsil stem cells may help repair liver damage without surgery"

September 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have found a new, non-surgical way to repair a damaged liver by using stem cells from tonsils, according to a new study. The research, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, involved tonsil-derived stem cells compressed into a heat-sensitive liquid that turned to biodegradable, 3-D gel at body temperature.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), MedIndia (Chennai, India: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's The Science Behind Why Leaves Change n The Fall"

September 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Yes, people have been drinking pumpkin spice lattes for a month now. But fall doesn't begin officially until tonight, when autumnal equinox arrives. That means shorter days, cozy sweaters, and of course brilliant foliage. But have you ever wondered why leaves change color in the fall, and why they turn so many different hues, from yellow and orange to crimson and finally to brown? As a new American Chemical Society video explains, it's all about the activity of chlorophyll, a pigment that makes leaves green and which plays a critical role in photosynthesis.

More than 10 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits) and LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits).

UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits)
Treating fracking wastewater results in new unsafe compounds
September 25, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A new study suggests fracking wastewater can endanger drinking water even after it has passed through treatment plants and been diluted… Researchers with the American Chemical Society found that even extremely diluted wastewater can still produce these byproducts during the treatment process. Scientists say their findings suggest regulators and energy officials should be more careful about which surface waters treated wastewater is emptied into.

More than 20 media outlets, including Think Progress (Washington, DC: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits, LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) and Chem.Info (Rockaway, NJ: 13,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"When It Comes to Sparkling Wine, Size Matters"

September 25, 2014

You and your friends are sitting at a dining table of your favorite restaurant, popping bottles of sparkling stuff (as you do), and the party next to you asks, “What’s the occasion?” “It’s a Tuesday,” you reply. … “The little bubbles pick up flavor and aroma molecules during their celebrated ascent, pulling them along until the bubbles literally explode onto the surface of the liquid, creating the sensory fireworks that are generally associated with a good tasting, refreshing champagne,” wrote the American Chemical Society in 2003.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 18.8 million unique monthly visits)
"A Rising Tide of Contaminants"

September 25, 2014

Deborah Swackhamer, a professor of environmental health sciences at the University of Minnesota, decided last year to investigate the chemistry of the nearby Zumbro River. She and her colleagues were not surprised to find traces of pesticides in the water. … In an essay last week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, titled “Re-Emergence of Emerging Contaminants,” editor-in-chief Jerald L. Schnoor called attention to both the startling growth of newly registered chemical compounds and our inadequate understanding of older ones.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"'Greener,' low-cost transistor heralds advance in flexible electronics"

September 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As tech company LG demonstrated this summer with the unveiling of its 18-inch flexible screen, the next generation of roll-up displays is tantalizingly close. Researchers are now reporting in the journal ACS Nano a new, inexpensive and simple way to make transparent, flexible transistors -- the building blocks of electronics -- that could help bring roll-up smartphones with see-through displays and other bendable gadgets to consumers in just a few years.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Forbes (New York, NY: 9.4 million unique monthly visits)
"The Dire Need For A Rapid Diagnostic Ebola Test In West Africa"

September 18, 2014

The size and spread of this Ebola epidemic is simply unprecedented. The largest previous Ebola outbreak occurred in 1976 in Zaire: 318 confirmed cases and 280 deaths, but the current outbreak in West Africa has exceeded 4,400 cases with 2,300 deaths and growing. According to WHO estimates more than 20,000 more cases will occur before containment is achieved. … Newer tests include antigen and antibody identification using ELISA, and a nanoparticle microscopy system termed the Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS), which can digitally identify virons based on size. (ACS Nano. 2014 Jun 24;8(6):6047-55.)

The Atlantic (Washington, DC: 5.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Leaves Change Color Each Fall Because of Dieting Trees"

September 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

No offense to Pumpkin Spice Lattes and decorative gourds, but the real signs of fall are the leaves—leaves that transform from green to red. And green to orange. And green to yellow. Autumnal romance aside, it's a change that is, of course, chemical in nature.

It goes like this, as the video above, from the American Chemical Society, explains: Trees eat sunlight, essentially, converting solar rays into energy through photosynthesis.

Guardian Liberty Voice (Las Vegas, NV: 5.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Working on New Antibiotic Created From Older Drug Vancomycin"

September 26, 2014

In the Journal of the American Chemical Society, scientists have written about how they have successfully been working on synthesizing a new antibiotic created from the older drug vancomycin. It appears to be displaying impressive strengths against bacteria resistant to vancomycin and other infection-causing microorganisms. Even though this is not going to solve the long term problems of antibiotic resistance, researchers may have bought people a little more time.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New pediatric heart-defect patches enhance electrical connections between cells"

September 24, 2014

Carbon nanotubes serve as bridges that allow electrical signals to pass unhindered through new pediatric heart-defect patches invented at Rice University and Texas Children's Hospital.

A team led by bioengineer Jeffrey Jacot and chemical engineer and chemist Matteo Pasquali created the patches infused with conductive single-walled carbon nanotubes. The patches are made of a sponge-like bioscaffold that contains microscopic pores and mimics the body's extracellular matrix. … The work appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

More than 3 media outlets, including Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"FDA and industry need to ensure safety of food ingredients"

September 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Confusion over a 1997 Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rule that eases the way for food manufacturers to use ingredients "generally regarded as safe," or GRAS, has inspired a new initiative by food makers. Food safety advocates say the current GRAS process allows substances into the food supply that might pose a health risk, while industry defends its record. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) details what changes are on the table.

More than 5 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"ACS Central Science names Carolyn Bertozzi as its founding editor-in-chief"

September 25, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

The American Chemical Society (ACS) announced today that internationally renowned chemist Carolyn Bertozzi, Ph.D., will take the helm as editor-in-chief of its first fully open access journal, ACS Central Science, which is set to launch in early 2015. Currently a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator at the University of California at Berkeley, Bertozzi is widely recognized as one of the most accomplished and respected chemists of her generation.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Why We Need Antibiotics"

September 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Antibiotics revolutionized health care in the early 20th century, helping kill bacteria that once killed thousands of people. But bacteria are constantly outsmarting science, and new strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are popping up more frequently. ACS’ Speaking of Chemistry focuses on the current shortage of new antibiotics and discusses the prospects for new drugs. The episode also answers the question: why should you finish your pills if you feel better?

More than 5 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NewsMax Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"The Pope Drinks Yerba Mate Every Day — Should You?"

September 25, 2014

While returning from a recent visit to South Korea, Pope Francis sat with reporters during the flight and spoke of his health. The 77-year-old pontiff admitted to being treated for "nerve" problems, and confided he drank mate every day. "Must treat them well, these nerves, give them mate every day," he said. … A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that consuming yerba mate improved cholesterol levels in patients with high cholesterol and provided additional reduction in LDL (bad) cholesterol level in patients taking statins.

Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits)
"How skin pigment protects us from UV rays"

September 27, 2014

To protect the body from the dangerous ultraviolet (UV) rays from the sun, skin pigment converts UV radiation into harmless heat through a rapid chemical reaction, a study says. "In this way, the pigment disarms the energy in the UV light and prevents it causing harmful chemical reactions," said Villy Sundstram, a professor of chemistry at the Lund University in Sweden. The study appeared in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 4 media outlets, including The Health Site (60,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Nanoparticles add zest to search for drug delivery methods"

September 24, 2014

Food scientists at the University of Maryland created tiny packages of the spice turmeric and whey protein that could color the way hard-to-absorb drugs are delivered. Zi Teng, Ying Li, and Qin Wang of the University of Maryland’s College of Agricultural and Natural Resources will publish their results in an upcoming issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry ("Insight into Curcumin-Loaded β-Lactoglobulin Nanoparticles: Incorporation, Particle Disintegration, and Releasing Profiles").

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)
"Nanotubes help healing hearts keep the beat"

September 24, 2014

Carbon nanotubes serve as bridges that allow electrical signals to pass unhindered through new pediatric heart-defect patches invented at Rice University and Texas Children's Hospital. A team led by bioengineer Jeffrey Jacot and chemical engineer and chemist Matteo Pasquali created the patches infused with conductive single-walled carbon nanotubes. The patches are made of a sponge-like bioscaffold that contains microscopic pores and mimics the body's extracellular matrix. The work appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Wireless Design Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 29,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Munchies (U.S.: 51,500 unique monthly visits)
"This German Meat Detective Is Looking for Horse in Your Dinner"

September 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Everyone loves a good mystery, except when it comes to their meat. In 2013, a meat scandal dubbed “Horsegate” rocked Europe when it was discovered that several supermarket chains across the UK and the continent had sold beef products that had been adulterated with cheap filler meat from pigs and horses. … They recently published their findings in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

… TV and Radio News

WJXT-JAX (Jacksonville, FL: Local Viewership 35,517)
"Coffee"

September 23, 2014

[Transcript]  He says coffee increases the number of fatty acids in your bloodstream and makes it easy to burn those fats as fuel. the American Chemical Society found that coffee drinkers limit their risk of type 2 diabetes by over 50 percent! and by boosting antioxidants.. coffee can just make you feel happier overall. ...

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0
"'Greener' Transistors For Upcoming Flexible Displays"

September 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The iPhone 6 is apparently flexible, though that's a not a good thing; people are warping them when they sit down, and people without abnormal strength can simply twist them in their hands. But that won't always be a design and construction defect. … Yang Yang and colleagues note in ACS Nano that transistors are traditionally made in a multi-step photolithography process, which uses light to print a pattern onto a glass or wafer.

Science Blog
"Tonsil stem cells could someday help repair liver damage without surgery"

September 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The liver provides critical functions, such as ridding the body of toxins. Its failure can be deadly, and there are few options for fixing it. But scientists now report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a way to potentially inject stem cells from tonsils, a body part we don’t need, to repair damaged livers — all without surgery.

UC Berkeley
"New ACS journal names Bertozzi its founding editor"

September 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Chemistry professor Carolyn Bertozzi will take the helm as editor-in-chief of the American Chemical Society’s first fully open-access journal, ACS Central Science. The new journal is set to launch in early 2015.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Nature-Inspired Design Collects Water from Fog"

September 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A simple device, inspired by the beaks of shorebirds, can harvest drops of water from fog and dew. Its developers say it could help drought-prone communities around the world meet their need for drinkable water. … Writing in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Luo reports that a single 25-by-10 centimeter prototype harvested about 15 milliliters of water in a half hour.

More than 25 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"iPhone 6: The Chemistry Behind the Smartphone"

September 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus have smashed all previous pre-order records since being unveiled by Apple last week, with widespread excitement about the device's new screen, better battery, A8 processor, and improved camera. But what exactly goes into the creation of the world's most talked about smartphone? The American Chemical Society has decided to answer this question with a new video that reveals the chemical elements found inside Apple's latest iPhone.

More than 50 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)
"4 health benefits of spicy foods"

September 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

Spicy foods do more than add flavor to your favorite meal. … Another benefit from spicy foods is improved heart function. The same capsaicin that produces a heat sensation on the tongue has also been shown to lower bad cholesterol. In a study published by the American Chemical Society, researchers found that capsaicin helps reduce the buildup of cholesterol while increasing blood flow by blocking a gene that causes arteries to narrow.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: daily circulation 550,821)
"Here are the chemicals that make your iPhone work"

September 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

The recently announced iPhone model has broken pre-order records, selling 4 million units in 24 hours. That's a lot of phones -- and it takes a lot of elements to keep all those batteries charged and touch screens touchy. In the above video from the American Chemical Society, you can learn about some of the chemical reactions that keep you happily texting.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Environmentalists and industry duke it out over plastic bags"

September 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Campaigns against disposable plastic shopping bags and their environmental impact recently scored a major win. In August, California lawmakers passed the first statewide ban on the bags, and Governor Jerry Brown is expected to sign it. But the plastic bag industry is not yielding without a fight, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)
"Artificial 'beaks' to produce water from fog"

September 21, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Inspired by a bird's beak, scientists have developed a novel and highly efficient device to collect water from fog. From the most parched areas of Saudi Arabia to water-scarce areas of the western US, the idea of harvesting fog for water is catching on, researchers said. … The research was published in the American Chemical Society (ACS)'s journal Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"New Antibiotic Promises to Act Against Superbugs that Keep Rising"

September 18, 2014

A new vancomycin-based antibiotic developed promises to be effective against many of the antibiotic resistant bacteria. The pill comes with double anti-microbial action, according to scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. "This is the prototype of analogues that once introduced will still be in clinical use a generation or maybe even two generations from now," said Dale L Boger, the Richard and Alice Cramer Professor of Chemistry at TSRI. The report by Boger and members of his laboratory was published online ahead of print by the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 18 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"'Electronic skin' could revolutionize breast cancer detection"

September 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A group of scientists are currently working on the development of an "electronic skin" that has the capacity to detect - or "feel" - and produce images of small lumps in breast tissue that the practiced fingers of a clinician could miss. … The thin-film tactile device is being developed by Chieu Van Nguyen and Ravi F. Saraf from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and they describe both the device and its preliminary testing within the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 5 media outlets, including Health Central (New York, NY: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"New Antibiotic Promises to Act Against Superbugs that Keep Rising"

September 18, 2014

A new vancomycin-based antibiotic developed promises to be effective against many of the antibiotic resistant bacteria. The pill comes with double anti-microbial action, according to scientists at The Scripps Research Institute. "This is the prototype of analogues that once introduced will still be in clinical use a generation or maybe even two generations from now," said Dale L Boger, the Richard and Alice Cramer Professor of Chemistry at TSRI. The report by Boger and members of his laboratory was published online ahead of print by the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Forbes (New York, NY: 9.4 million unique monthly visits)
"What The iPhone 6 Is Really Made Of"

September 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

You’ve heard about the rumored sapphire screens that didn’t show up on the final iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus designs, and by now you know that Apple Pay is a key part of the pitch for the next generation Apple smartphone, but there’s also a decent amount of real gold and silver in each iPhone as well. The American Chemical Society and UK chemistry teacher Andy Brunning broke down the actual elements that go into the production of each iPhone and reveal that rather than use sapphire, Apple turned to potassium to create its “ion-strengthened glass” screen — bathing the glass in the element is what creates the stronger glass.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"This Artificial Tongue Can Taste the Tannins in Wine"

September 18, 2014

Wine tasting notes are famous for their verbal flourishes—for example, "kirsch, dried beef and baker's chocolate,"—but the liquid is ultimately just a collection of molecules, some sour, some bitter, some dry. And we're getting better at quantifying taste. A newly developed artificial tongue uses the very proteins from our mouthes to measure the dryness of wine. … A new study published in ACS Nano describes an artificial tongue that detects the effects of tannins, the molecules that give wine their astringency, in the mouth.

More than 12 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: daily circulation 223,549)
"Pesticide levels in waterways are down, reducing risks to humans"

September 16, 2014

The development of safer pesticides and legal restrictions on their use have sharply reduced the risk to humans from pesticide-tainted rivers and streams, while the potential risk to aquatic life in urban waters has risen, according to a two-decade survey published Thursday. The study, conducted by the United States Geological Survey and published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, monitored scores of pesticides from 1992 to 2011 at more than 200 sampling points on rivers and streams.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's What Science Says Is The Best Way To Cool A Case Of Beers"

September 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA news release

A lot of science is dedicated to big questions, like mapping the universe or figuring out which virus will try to kill us off next. But sometimes, scientists take what they've learned from their research and show us how it can make our lives a lot easier in a cool way — like using chemistry to chill beers super fast or to cook the perfect burger. These are the life hacks that really matter, and the American Chemical Society has put together a list of four great ones in one of the latest videos in their Reactions series.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Rooting out horse-meat fraud in the wake of a recent food scandal"

September 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As the United Kingdom forms a new crime unit designed to fight food fraud -- in response to an uproar last year over horse meat being passed off as beef -- scientists from Germany are reporting a technique for detecting meat adulteration. They describe their approach, which represents a vast improvement over current methods, in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 4 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"New study throws into question long-held belief about depression"

September 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

New evidence puts into doubt the long-standing belief that a deficiency in serotonin — a chemical messenger in the brain — plays a central role in depression. In the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, scientists report that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains (and thus should have been “depressed” by conventional wisdom) did not show depression-like symptoms.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Toward making lithium-sulfur batteries a commercial reality for a bigger energy punch"

September 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A fevered search for the next great high-energy, rechargeable battery technology is on. Scientists are now reporting they have overcome key obstacles toward making lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, which have the potential to leave today’s lithium-ion technology in the dust. Their study appears in the ACS journal Nano Letters ("Polydopamine-Coated, Nitrogen-Doped, Hollow Carbon–Sulfur Double-Layered Core–Shell Structure for Improving Lithium–Sulfur Batteries").

More than 14 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Protein courtship revealed through chemist's lens"

September 15, 2014

Staying clear of diseases requires that the proteins in our cells cooperate with one another. … Professor emeritus Jens Jørgen Led of the University of Copenhagen's Department of Chemistry and his colleagues have just published a method that helps reveal the secret dance of proteins in their article, "Specific and nonspecific interactions in ultra-weak protein-protein associations revealed by solvent paramagnetic relaxation enhancement", in the latest edition of the pre-eminent Journal of the American Chemical Society.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"A nanosized hydrogen generator"

September 19, 2014

Researchers at the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE)’s Argonne National Laboratory have created a small scale “hydrogen generator” that uses light and a 2-D graphene platform to boost production of the hard-to-make element. … This research appeared in ACS Nano.

… From the Blogs

OverClockersClub
"Bringing Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Closer to Reality"

September 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Lithium-ion batteries are something of a standard technology now, with them being used in everything from electric cars to cellphones. While the technology has been serving us well for some time, we are approaching its limits and have to look for a replacement. As reported by the American Chemical Society, one of these replacements got a big boost recently.

Horse Talk
"Researchers use mass spectrometry to find meat contamination"

September 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

German researchers have shown the value of mass spectrometry in identifying meat fraud. … The Germans, whose findings have been published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, say their approach represents a vast improvement over current methods.

TechTimes
"Can 'beak' mimicry help end droughts? Scientists pull water from fog using shorebird technique"

September 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Taking inspiration from the beaks of shorebirds, scientists say they have developed an efficient artificial equivalent that can collect water from fog or dew as a possible partial solution to drought. … When fully open, the plates' large surface would allow fog to condense on them as water beads; when the collector closed, the water drops would slide down into a collecting tube at the hinged edge, engineering professor Cheng Luo and his doctoral student Xin Heng report in the American Chemical Society journal Applied Materials & Interfaces.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.