ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Smartphones to monitor real-time air pollution"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have now turned smartphones into personal, real-time air pollution monitors. Led by Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen from the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL) in Barcelona, Spain, the team has used smartphone and sensing technology to better pinpoint where and when pollution is at its worst. … The paper appeared in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 40 media outlets, including The Hindu (Chennai, India: daily circulation 1.46 million), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

NPR (Washington, DC: 32.7 million weekly listeners)
"Dissolving Contact Lenses Could Make Eye Drops Disappear"

February 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you've ever had an eye infection, you know how annoying it can be to get drops of medicine on the eyeball a few times a day. It's an even harder task with children or for older adults who don't always have the dexterity to squeeze they used to. That's why researchers have developed an ultra-thin contact that can be placed on the eye to deliver drugs slowly — in a matter of hours or they hope even days — before dissolving away. … The wafer is not only less tedious than eye drops, it's more efficient, says Dr. Steven Pflugfelder, a professor of ophthalmology at Baylor College of Medicine in Dallas and an author of a study, published in the journal ACS Nano.

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New technique could ID hair dye at crime scenes"

February 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Criminals with a penchant for dyeing their hair could soon pay for their vanity. Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. Their report appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), POLICE magazine (Torrance, CA: 156,800 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Crushing Your Soda Habit With Water"

February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Soda hasn't looked good in a while, and we know now diet soda doesn't fare any better, as studies show among its many problems, it can wreck weight loss and gut health. … And a study presented at the American Chemical Society's annual conference showed two glasses of water before every meal helped people lose an average of 15.5 pounds (five pounds more than the non-water drinkers) over three months.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Get to know the science behind Michael Bay's movie explosions"

February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

"Transformers" director Michael Bay is famously big on big explosions in films, and the American Chemical Society's "Reactions" series released a video Tuesday exploring the pyrotechnics behind the kind of big-budget booms he's so fond of. Reactions show how dynamite, for example, packs a powerful high-pressure explosion into a relatively small package that increases the explosion's shattering power, or brisance.

More than 35 media outlets, including Motherboard (6.2 million unique monthly visits), Science magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000), Cosmos magazine (Australia: 227,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Now, Your Smartphone Will Help You Keep A Check On Air Pollution"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The health effects of air pollution imperil human life. But now you can find out where and when the level of pollution is at its high by simply using your smartphones. The credit for this easy technique goes to none other than the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), a PTI report revealed. … The research was published in the ACS journal Environmental Science and Technology.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Michael Bay Explosions And The Science Of Blowing Things Up In Hollywood"
February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Michael Bay makes blowing things up look easy. Whether it's in the "Transformers" franchise, "Armageddon" or "Pearl Harbor," the director is an expert at Hollywood explosions. Not all explosions are created equally, or have the same chemical composition, so the American Chemical Society created a handy video to show what makes things go boom.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), POLICE magazine (Torrance, CA: 156,800 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Research findings could someday lead to new treatments for patients with autism and cancer"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In recent years, scientists have found a surprising a connection between some people with autism and certain cancer patients: They have mutations in the same gene, one that codes for a protein critical for normal cellular health. Now scientists have reported in the ACS journal Biochemistry that the defects reduce the activity and stability of the protein. Their findings could someday help lead to new treatments for both sets of patients.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Refinery29 (New York, NY: 10.6 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Foolproof Workout Tips For Extreme NYC Winters"

February 16, 2015

While you might be daydreaming about your beachy spring-break plans (or you recently booked your Hamptons summer share), all the ice and snow that's been dumped on New York City recently is here to remind us that we're not quite there just yet. … Saying, "It's too cold outside" is no excuse! Breathing in fresh air (regardless of how chilly it is!) is good for your body and is an overall health booster. A study published in Environmental Science & Technology reports that outdoor exercise can actually increase your energy while decreasing tension, frustration, and depression — something we could all use when the New York City sky seems to be permanently grey.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Climate change in real time: Incredible animations reveal changing ocean acidity"

February 16, 2015

Satellite images are being used to monitor how ocean acidification is changing the world's seas.

For the first time, scientists have been able to obtain a global picture of how rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are affecting the oceans. … In a paper for the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters, the researchers explained they could combine data from a number of satellites to watch how rising carbon dioxide levels affect the oceans.

More than 9 media outlets, including HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Independent (London, U.K.: 16.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The science behind big budget movie explosions"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Pyrotechnics are Hollywood’s go-to special effect to distract audiences from a “half-baked” plot - or so says the American Chemical Society. This video from their YouTube channel Reactions explains the science behind big budget explosions that directors such as Michael Bay are so very fond of. In this video we learn what pyrotechnics actually are, what an explosion is, and how Hollywood makes them.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Light-Based Technique Helps Surgeons Excise Brain Cancer"

February 16, 2015

Neurosurgeons need all the help they can get to remove brain cancer tumors. If they leave cancer cells behind, the tumors can regrow. Finding cancer cells can be particularly difficult with infiltrative cancers such as glioma, which invades surrounding brain tissue. … This article is reproduced with permission from Chemical & Engineering News.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"3 chemistry-based hacks to help a dinner party go off without a hitch"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Trying to impress a special someone, a group of friends, or a team of colleagues by inviting them over for a delicious dinner can be a great way to show off your cooking skills but can also be incredibly stressful — even if you know what you're doing. … Here are four techniques, provided by the American Chemical Society's Reactions YouTube series that can help you on your descent into kitchen-cooking hell.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Hair dye 'CSI' could help police solve crimes"

February 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Criminals with a penchant for dyeing their hair could soon pay for their vanity. Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. Their report appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

Science magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000)
"The best—and worst—places to drive your electric car"

February 20, 2015

For those tired of winter, you’re not alone. Electric cars hate the cold, too. Researchers have conducted the first investigation into how electric vehicles fare in different U.S. climates. … The average range of a Nissan Leaf on the coldest day drops from 112 km in San Francisco to less than 72 km in Minneapolis, according to the study, published online this month in Environmental Science & Technology.

Clean Technica (1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Methane Emissions From Natural Gas Industry Higher Than Previously Thought"

February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you think natural gas is a clean fossil fuel, you’re correct — when it comes to the combustion side of the formula. The production and distribution side and their role in emissions is another matter though — a bad matter. … Findings about the research were published in two American Chemical Society (ACS) papers in its journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Morris Bullock, Ph.D., Daniel DuBois, Ph.D., PNNL Hydrogen Catalysis Team win 2015 ACS Catalysis Lectureship"

February 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

ACS Catalysis and the American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Catalysis Science & Technology are pleased to announce Morris Bullock, Ph.D., Daniel DuBois, Ph.D., and the Hydrogen Catalysis Team at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have won the 2015 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science. This is the first team win for the Lectureship.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Measure Current in Beating Cardiac Cells"

February 18, 2015

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in recording the current in membrane channels of contracting cardiac cells. To do this, the scientists combined an atomic force microscope with a widely used method for measuring electrical signals in cells. … The researchers have now published the successful results of this venture in the journal Nano Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

IEEE Spectrum (New York, NY: 102,000 unique monthly visits)
"Crumpling Graphene Could Expand Its Applications"

February 20, 2015

Last October, researchers at MIT showed that graphene could be crumpled and then flattened again and still remain effective for use in the electrodes of supercapacitors that could be used to power flexible electronics. … The researchers report in the journal Nano Letters that their method allows them to selectively pattern the crumples, which was not possible with other techniques.

More than 8 media outlets, including ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story. 

… From the Blogs

Lab Manager
"Hair Dye 'CSI' Could Help Police Solve Crimes"

February 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. Their report appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

BGR
"Now, smartphones that monitor pollution around you"

February 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers have developed a new sensing technology through which smartphone users will get to know about the pollution levels around them. The scientists of American Chemical Society examined 50 school children equipped with smartphones measured the ambient levels of black carbon and analysed that children contribute 13 percent of their total potential in black carbon exposure.

Science Blog
"New antibiotic holds promise against antibiotic-resistant infections"

February 16, 2015

Estimates of deaths from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the United States range upwards of 19,000 annually. Around 1960, when Staphylococcus aureus developed resistance to first-generation penicillin, methicillin and other second-generation beta-lactam antibiotics were adopted to fight the illness. … The breakthrough was published this week in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Elite Daily (70.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Cheers! Scientists Say Beer Could Actually Keep Your Brain Healthy"

January 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

New research has discovered that a compound found in beer might be able to protect the brain from numerous degenerative disorders. Hops (the ingredient that gives beer its bitter flavor) contains the compound Xanthohumol, an antioxidant previously proven to strengthen the heart and fight cancer...This study was originally published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 20 media outlets, including Telegraph (London, U.K.: 20.1 million unique monthly views), Institute for Natural Healing (Frederick, MD: 1.4 million unique monthly views), Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: 290,400 unique monthly views), Stuff (Wellington, New Zealand: 130,600 unique monthly views) and Vice (U.S.: 37,800 unique monthly views) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly views)
"'Soft micro-robots' could do biopsies, deliver drugs"

February 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

At The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD, a team working in a new area called soft robotics is developing tiny, self-folding devices that could one day be used to perform biopsies or precisely deliver drugs inside living tissue...The researchers report their work in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,000 unique monthly views), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly views), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly views) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

CBC News (Toronto, Canada: 2.3 million unique monthly views)
"Sewage sludge contains millions of dollars worth of gold, other metals"

February 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Have you been adding Goldschlager liqueur to your hot chocolate again? People have been flushing millions of dollars worth of gold down the toilet, a new study suggests. Researchers at Arizona State University measured levels of metals in sewage sludge, also known as biosolids, collected across the United States using a mass spectrometer and an electron microscope. ...The researchers published the results of their study in the Journal of Environmental Science & Technology.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly views)
"Eyedrops may be replaced by stick-on nanowafers"

February 5, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As anyone who has ever used medicinal eyedrops will know, it's hard to get the things into your own eye. Soon, however, they could be replaced by tiny drug-containing polymer "nanowafers" that are applied to the eye like a contact lens. Those wafers would proceed to gradually dissolve, releasing medication throughout the day...The research was led by Dr. Ghanashyam Acharya, and is outlined in a paper recently published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly views), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly views)
"Meet the New ACS CEO: Tom Connelly"

February 5, 2015
Publicized in: OPA News Release

Come February 17, Thomas M. Connelly, Jr. will be the new CEO of the American Chemical Society (ACS), taking over for Madeleine Jacobs, who is retiring after 11 years as CEO and a total of 24 years with ACS. Connelly comes to ACS after a 36-year career with DuPont, retiring from his latest position as executive vice president and chief innovation officer at the end of 2014.

More than 5 media outlets, including Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly views) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Understanding air pollution from biomass burners used for heating"

February 4, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As many places in the U.S. and Europe increasingly turn to biomass rather than fossil fuels for power and heat, scientists are focusing on what this trend might mean for air quality -- and people's health. One such study on wood-chip burners' particulate emissions, which can cause heart and lung problems, appears in the ACS journal Energy & Fuels. The scientists say the findings could help manufacturers reduce the negative impact of this fuel in the future.

More than 10 media outlets, including  LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly views) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Find Missing Oil From the Deepwater Horizon Disaster—Will It End Up on Your Plate?"

February 3, 2015

The “missing” oil from the Deepwater Horizon disaster has been found: It’s on the ocean floor dozens of miles off the Louisiana coast, according to a new study. That’s pretty well out of the way of fisheries—and the food supply. For now. But scientists will be working for years to figure out how that contamination affects the Gulf of Mexico's marine life and food webs...The findings were published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 25 media outlets, including Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly views), Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly views), Take Part (7.9 million unique monthly views), CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly views), Mother Nature Network (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly views), LiveScience (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly views), Treehugger (New York, NY: 2.3 million unique monthly views), Grist (Seattle, Washington: 1.6 million unique monthly views), and Oil Price (151,400 unique monthly views) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly views)
"New nanoparticle gene therapy strategy effectively treats deadly brain cancer in rats"

February 4, 2015

Despite improvements in the past few decades with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, a predictably curative treatment for glioma does not yet exist. New insights into specific gene mutations that arise in this often deadly form of brain cancer have pointed to the potential of gene therapy, but it's very difficult to effectively deliver toxic or missing genes to cancer cells in the brain. Now, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have used nanoparticles to successfully deliver a new therapy to glioma cells in the brains of rats, prolonging their lives. A draft of the study appeared this week on the website of the journal ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly views),  Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,993 unique monthly views), Controlled Environments Magazine (U.S.: 25,900 unique monthly views) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly views) covered the story.

NDTV Auto (New Delhi, India: 412,700 unique monthly views)
"Supercapacitors Could Boost Mileage of Cars"

February 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Advances in supercapacitors could help boost fuel efficiency in cars and trucks, an article published by the American Chemical Society suggests. Unlike slow and steady batteries, supercapacitors gulp up energy rapidly and deliver it in fast, powerful jolts...Researchers have since been pursuing new ways to improve them, but they still can't store as much energy as batteries, noted the article in Chemical and Engineering News, weekly news-magazine of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly views), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly views), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly views) covered the story.

Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits)
"Eyeglasses Turn into Sunglasses at Your Command"

February 9, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Imagine eyeglasses that can go quickly from clear to shaded and back again when you want them to, rather than passively in response to changes in light. Scientists report a major step toward that goal, which could benefit pilots, security guards and others who need such control, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 5 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly views) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly views)
"New microscopy technique allows mapping protein synthesis in living tissues and animals"

February 4, 2015

Researchers at Columbia University have made a significant step toward visualizing complex protein metabolism in living systems with high resolution and minimum disturbance, a longstanding goal in the scientific community. In a recent study published in ACS Chemical Biology ("Imaging Complex Protein Metabolism in Live Organisms by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy with Isotope Labeling"), Assistant Professor of Chemistry Wei Min's research team has reported a light microscopy method to image where the new proteins are produced and where the old proteins are degraded inside living tissues and animals.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly views), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly views), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 80,000 unique monthly views) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,500 unique monthly views) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Lab Manager
"Tiny Robotic 'Hands' could Improve Cancer Diagnostics, Drug Delivery"

February 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Many people imagine robots today as clunky, metal versions of humans, but scientists are forging new territory in the field of 'soft robotics.' One of the latest advances is a flexible, microscopic hand-like gripper. The development could help doctors perform remotely guided surgical procedures or perform biopsies. The materials also could someday deliver therapeutic drugs to hard-to-reach places. The report appears in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Science 2.0
"Mary Morgan, Alice Ball And Rachel Lloyd - 3 Amazing Scientists You've Never Heard Of"

February 2, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

One saved the U.S. space program, another invented a better treatment for leprosy and a third spawned an industry in the American Midwest - but you have probably never heard of these female "legends of chemistry". Their names are Mary Sherman Morgan, Alice Ball and Rachel Lloyd and they all had amazing accomplishments in chemistry, but their work was nearly lost to history. This week ACS Reactions shines the spotlight on them so they can get some proper acclaim.

Biomass Magazine
"Understanding air pollution from biomass burners used for heating"

February 6, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As many places in the U.S. and Europe increasingly turn to biomass rather than fossil fuels for power and heat, scientists are focusing on what this trend might mean for air quality and people's health. One such study on wood-chip burners' particulate emissions, which can cause heart and lung problems, appears in the ACS journal Energy & Fuels. The scientists say the findings could help manufacturers reduce the negative impact of this fuel in the future.

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ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.