ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Gizmodo  (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Tiny Robot Grippers Dissolve Away In Your Body Once Their Job Is Done"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: Press Pac

As robots get small enough to easily swim around inside the human body, they will soon be used to perform medical procedures all from within a patient. And researchers at Johns Hopkins University are making such an idea even more plausible with the development of tiny robotic grippers that will actually dissolve away inside a patient after a medical procedure is complete. ... A paper detailing the development was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 6 media outlets, including Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Inquisitr (U.S.: 27.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Oats Found To Contain Toxins From Mold"

March 1, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Oats are promoted as an important part of a well-balanced diet. They are known as a heart-healthy food that’s high in fiber and helps lower cholesterol, as explained by WebMD. This hearty breakfast staple contains both soluble and insoluble fiber, B vitamins, vitamin E, and avenanthramides — a unique antioxidant found only in oats. They have also been found to contain something not quite so appealing — toxins related mold. … In a study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemicals, 500 samples of corn, wheat, rice, and oat-based breakfast cereals were tested over a two-year period.

More than 65 media outlets, including The Daily Beast (U.S.: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), The Christian Science Monitor (Boston, MA: 6.3 million unique monthly visits), Cosmopolitan (U.S.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 978,200 unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), AllVoices (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 405,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 199,800 unique monthly visits), University Herald (New York, NY: 110,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Health News Digest (New York, NY: 13,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Guardian (London, U.K.: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Poo power: fuel, lampshades, paper and other useful things made from waste"

February 27, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Poo. It’s a dirty word, and in some parts of the world, a taboo. …  Researchers from the Mississippi State University concluded that waste plant material, such as corn cobs and stems, would be ideal alternative sources, with a little help from a cute animal: the panda. Ashli Brown, who co-authored a report based on the research, presented at an American Chemical Society meeting, realized that the bear’s poo could help in the process of converting the waste – it contains a number of microbes needed to break down the material, thanks to the bacteria in the bear’s gut, which it uses to break down its diet of bamboo.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Could an HIV drug beat strep throat, flesh-eating bacteria?"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

With antibiotic resistance on the rise, scientists are looking for innovative ways to combat bacterial infections. The pathogen that causes conditions from strep throat to flesh-eating disease is among them, but scientists have now found a tool that could help them fight it: a drug approved to treat HIV. Their work, appearing in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, could someday lead to new treatments.

More than 15 media outlets, including One News Page (1.3 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 405,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Are Mycotoxins The New Gluten?"

February 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hot on the heels of a lawsuit alleging that thousands of dogs may have been poisoned by mycotoxins, a toxic mold byproduct found in grains, a new study places them in an even more sinister location: our breakfast cereal. Published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry by Hyun Jung Lee and Dojin Ryu of the University of Idaho’s School of Food Science, the paper, “Significance of Ochratoxin A in Breakfast Cereals from the United States,” is the latest in a long series of studies.

Headline & Global News (U.S.: 550,000 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Helping Detectives: New Technique Can Track The Dye on a Strand of Hair"

February 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Finding evidence at a scene is crucial to solving a crime, and more frequently the use of DNA analysis plays an important role. But, scientists say, it is not as easy or as quick to analyze DNA samples as it looks on television. For instance, scientists say that in order to track DNA through a hair sample, several conditions must be met, including having a fully intact hair to retrieve data. … Dmitry Kurouski and Richard Van Duyne released their findings in a report that appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

Michigan Radio (Ann Arbor, MI: 130,000 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists turn smartphones into pollution monitors"

February 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A team of researchers in Spain attached sensors to school age kids. Then, they used a smartphone to track how much air pollution (black carbon, a component of soot) they were exposed to at home and school in real time. Mark Nieuwenhuijsen is an author of the study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. He says the real time monitoring fills in gaps in data and gives a better picture of what the children are exposed to during the day.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"New insight into how rubber is made could improve tires, reduce air pollution"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

People have been making rubber products from elastic bands to tires for centuries, but a key step in this process has remained a mystery. In a report in the ACS journal Macromolecules, scientists have described this elusive part of rubber production that could have major implications for improving the material and its uses. Their findings, if used to improve tire performance, for example, could mean higher gas mileage for consumers and less air pollution.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Location Influences Electric Car Range, Emissions"

February 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Many car buyers weighing whether they should go all electric to help the planet have at least one new factor to consider before making the switch: geography. Based on a study of a commercially available electric car, scientists report in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology that emissions and driving range can vary greatly depending on regional energy sources and climate.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and First Post (India: 33,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits)
"Tagging drugs to fight counterfeit medicines"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The U.S. and other countries are enacting rules to clamp down on the sales of fake pharmaceuticals, which pose a public health threat. But figuring out a system to track and authenticate legitimate drugs still faces significant obstacles, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"How To Beat A Bad Mood"

February 28, 2015

… Of course, exercise is the magic bullet for stress reduction. Even moderate workouts help spur the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), reversing the negative effects of stress. Hanging outdoors is another good idea: An analysis of 10 studies published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology found that people's stress levels dropped if they walked in a natural setting, like a park.

More than 10 media outlets, including Health Magazine (New York, NY: monthly circulation 6 million) covered the story.

io9 (U.S.: 17.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Jeans Are Yellow Just After They're Dyed. Here's Why"

February 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

The American Chemical Society has given us a video that looks at the chemistry of the pants you're probably wearing right now. Jeans are indigo when they're on your body, but just after they're dipped in dye, they're yellow. Find out what changes them. The iconic indigo blue that makes jeans so popular only sets in a while after the jeans have been dyed.

More than 10 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Aluminum "superatoms" hint at a new type of superconducting materials"

February 28, 2015

Scientists at the University of Southern California (USC) have made steps toward discovering a new family of superconductor materials that work at relatively high temperatures, with possible applications in physics research, medical imaging and high-performance electronics. … A paper describing the advance appears on the journal Nano Letters.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Electronic Component News (U.S.: 107,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Wireless Design Magazine (U.S.: 30,800 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Popular Science (New York, NY: monthly circulation 1.3 million)
"Chemicals From Beauty Products Have Migrated to Antarctica”

February 26, 2015

You make contact with a lot of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes every day, and you probably don't even know it. The mouthful of a name refers to groups of chemicals found in numerous human-made items including lotions and other personal care products. In a paper published recently in Environmental Science & Technology scientists announced that they found these compounds in an unexpected place: Antarctica.

More than 12 media outlets, including Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The surprising science of blue jeans"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

A new video from the American Chemical Society's "Reactions" series explains a lot about the pants that have clothed everyone from gold miners to hipsters over the past 140-odd years. For example, you'll discover how your jeans need to be treated in an alkaline bath to get the indigo dye to adhere to them and how they are yellow when they come out of this process until they come in contact with the air, which turns them blue.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Pen Draws Actual Circuits Using Carbon Nanotube Ink"

February 23, 2015

Carbon nanotubes can create working circuits through the use of a special pen that easily creates the devices. Flexible circuits are created using nanotubes each nearly 20 inches long. Fiber drawing has been accomplished before, but the nanotubes were extremely short - just a small fraction of an inch - limiting their use in electronic devices. … Development of the new nanotube fibers was published in the journal Nano Letters.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Drugs for Metabolism Could Reverse Lupus"

February 26, 2015

In a patient with the autoimmune disease lupus, immune cells attack the body’s own tissues as if they were an invading pathogen. This can lead to damage to the skin, joints, kidneys, and even the brain. … This article is reproduced with permission from Chemical & Engineering NewsAmerican Chemical Society).

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"What makes carbon monoxide so deadly?"

February 27, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Carbon monoxide is no joke, especially in the winter when people will do just about anything to warm up. Raychelle Burks, Ph.D., explains why carbon monoxide is so dangerous, and how you can stay safe. Provided by American Chemical Society.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop revolutionary approach to treat drug-resistant tumors"

February 25, 2015

In greater than 90 percent of cases in which treatment for metastatic cancer fails, the reason is that the cancer is resistant to the drugs being used. To treat drug-resistant tumors, doctors typically use multiple drugs simultaneously, a practice called combination therapy. And one of their greatest challenges is determining which ratio and combination -- from the large number of medications available -- is best for each individual patient. … Their results are published in the peer-reviewed journal ACS Nano.

More than 6 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Motherboard (U.S.: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"The Ultrafast Promise of 'Warm' Superconductivity"

February 28, 2015

A couple of laptops before the Lenovo that's at this moment producing these very words was a machine that sounded distinctly like a jet engine taking off. It was an HP, at least a few years past its prime and as thick as a lesser encyclopedia volume (for "X" or "Q"). The noise was the fan, a comically loud din capable of waking up my roommates that nonetheless never seemed to sufficiently cool the thing off. … The latest advance in this field came just last week, courtesy of a team of physicists based at the University of Southern California, as described by a new paper in the journal Nano Letters.

… TV and Radio News

KMPH (Fresno, CA: local audience 68,256)
"Oat breakfast cereals may contain a common mold-related toxin"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript]  A study published by the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found the "mycotoxins" mold may be present in over 40 percent of human cereals. So far, there have not yet been any tests to determine if it's in "beneful", or in any other dog food or human food. KPTM (Omaha, NE: local audience 15,893) also covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Infection Control Today
"Could an HIV Drug Beat Strep Throat, Flesh-Eating Bacteria?"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

With antibiotic resistance on the rise, scientists are looking for innovative ways to combat bacterial infections. The pathogen that causes conditions from strep throat to flesh-eating disease is among them, but scientists have now found a tool that could help them fight it: a drug approved to treat HIV. Their work, appearing in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, could someday lead to new treatments.

Science 2.0
"Oats May Be Natural, But So Is Their Toxic Mold"

February 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Oats are often touted for lowering bad cholesterol, improving the immune system, lowering blood pressure and, more recently, being gluten-free, but a new study finds that some oat-based breakfast cereals in the U.S. contain a mold-related toxin called ochratoxin A (OTA) that's been linked to kidney cancer in animal studies. Natural or not, they may need closer monitoring for potential mold contamination, warns a paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Steam Register
"The Chemistry Of Blue Jeans, The Pants That Changed The World"

February 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

You might have a pair of them on right now, or maybe you have to wait until casual Friday. Blue jeans are among the most popular clothing items in the entire world. But how did Levi Strauss get his “workwear,” as he called it, so blue? Through chemistry, of course. This week, Reactions looks at the chemistry of everyone’s favorite pair of pants. Check out Lauren Wolf’s original article on jeans. Source: American Chemical Society.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Smartphones to monitor real-time air pollution"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have now turned smartphones into personal, real-time air pollution monitors. Led by Mark J. Nieuwenhuijsen from the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL) in Barcelona, Spain, the team has used smartphone and sensing technology to better pinpoint where and when pollution is at its worst. … The paper appeared in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 40 media outlets, including The Hindu (Chennai, India: daily circulation 1.46 million), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

NPR (Washington, DC: 32.7 million weekly listeners)
"Dissolving Contact Lenses Could Make Eye Drops Disappear"

February 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you've ever had an eye infection, you know how annoying it can be to get drops of medicine on the eyeball a few times a day. It's an even harder task with children or for older adults who don't always have the dexterity to squeeze they used to. That's why researchers have developed an ultra-thin contact that can be placed on the eye to deliver drugs slowly — in a matter of hours or they hope even days — before dissolving away. … The wafer is not only less tedious than eye drops, it's more efficient, says Dr. Steven Pflugfelder, a professor of ophthalmology at Baylor College of Medicine in Dallas and an author of a study, published in the journal ACS Nano.

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New technique could ID hair dye at crime scenes"

February 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Criminals with a penchant for dyeing their hair could soon pay for their vanity. Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. Their report appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), POLICE magazine (Torrance, CA: 156,800 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Crushing Your Soda Habit With Water"

February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Soda hasn't looked good in a while, and we know now diet soda doesn't fare any better, as studies show among its many problems, it can wreck weight loss and gut health. … And a study presented at the American Chemical Society's annual conference showed two glasses of water before every meal helped people lose an average of 15.5 pounds (five pounds more than the non-water drinkers) over three months.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Get to know the science behind Michael Bay's movie explosions"

February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

"Transformers" director Michael Bay is famously big on big explosions in films, and the American Chemical Society's "Reactions" series released a video Tuesday exploring the pyrotechnics behind the kind of big-budget booms he's so fond of. Reactions show how dynamite, for example, packs a powerful high-pressure explosion into a relatively small package that increases the explosion's shattering power, or brisance.

More than 35 media outlets, including Motherboard (6.2 million unique monthly visits), Science magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000), Cosmos magazine (Australia: 227,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (40,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Now, Your Smartphone Will Help You Keep A Check On Air Pollution"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The health effects of air pollution imperil human life. But now you can find out where and when the level of pollution is at its high by simply using your smartphones. The credit for this easy technique goes to none other than the Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), a PTI report revealed. … The research was published in the ACS journal Environmental Science and Technology.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Michael Bay Explosions And The Science Of Blowing Things Up In Hollywood"
February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Michael Bay makes blowing things up look easy. Whether it's in the "Transformers" franchise, "Armageddon" or "Pearl Harbor," the director is an expert at Hollywood explosions. Not all explosions are created equally, or have the same chemical composition, so the American Chemical Society created a handy video to show what makes things go boom.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), POLICE magazine (Torrance, CA: 156,800 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Research findings could someday lead to new treatments for patients with autism and cancer"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In recent years, scientists have found a surprising a connection between some people with autism and certain cancer patients: They have mutations in the same gene, one that codes for a protein critical for normal cellular health. Now scientists have reported in the ACS journal Biochemistry that the defects reduce the activity and stability of the protein. Their findings could someday help lead to new treatments for both sets of patients.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Refinery29 (New York, NY: 10.6 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Foolproof Workout Tips For Extreme NYC Winters"

February 16, 2015

While you might be daydreaming about your beachy spring-break plans (or you recently booked your Hamptons summer share), all the ice and snow that's been dumped on New York City recently is here to remind us that we're not quite there just yet. … Saying, "It's too cold outside" is no excuse! Breathing in fresh air (regardless of how chilly it is!) is good for your body and is an overall health booster. A study published in Environmental Science & Technology reports that outdoor exercise can actually increase your energy while decreasing tension, frustration, and depression — something we could all use when the New York City sky seems to be permanently grey.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Climate change in real time: Incredible animations reveal changing ocean acidity"

February 16, 2015

Satellite images are being used to monitor how ocean acidification is changing the world's seas.

For the first time, scientists have been able to obtain a global picture of how rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are affecting the oceans. … In a paper for the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters, the researchers explained they could combine data from a number of satellites to watch how rising carbon dioxide levels affect the oceans.

More than 9 media outlets, including HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Independent (London, U.K.: 16.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The science behind big budget movie explosions"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Pyrotechnics are Hollywood’s go-to special effect to distract audiences from a “half-baked” plot - or so says the American Chemical Society. This video from their YouTube channel Reactions explains the science behind big budget explosions that directors such as Michael Bay are so very fond of. In this video we learn what pyrotechnics actually are, what an explosion is, and how Hollywood makes them.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Light-Based Technique Helps Surgeons Excise Brain Cancer"

February 16, 2015

Neurosurgeons need all the help they can get to remove brain cancer tumors. If they leave cancer cells behind, the tumors can regrow. Finding cancer cells can be particularly difficult with infiltrative cancers such as glioma, which invades surrounding brain tissue. … This article is reproduced with permission from Chemical & Engineering News.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"3 chemistry-based hacks to help a dinner party go off without a hitch"

February 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Trying to impress a special someone, a group of friends, or a team of colleagues by inviting them over for a delicious dinner can be a great way to show off your cooking skills but can also be incredibly stressful — even if you know what you're doing. … Here are four techniques, provided by the American Chemical Society's Reactions YouTube series that can help you on your descent into kitchen-cooking hell.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Hair dye 'CSI' could help police solve crimes"

February 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Criminals with a penchant for dyeing their hair could soon pay for their vanity. Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. Their report appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

Science magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000)
"The best—and worst—places to drive your electric car"

February 20, 2015

For those tired of winter, you’re not alone. Electric cars hate the cold, too. Researchers have conducted the first investigation into how electric vehicles fare in different U.S. climates. … The average range of a Nissan Leaf on the coldest day drops from 112 km in San Francisco to less than 72 km in Minneapolis, according to the study, published online this month in Environmental Science & Technology.

Clean Technica (1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Methane Emissions From Natural Gas Industry Higher Than Previously Thought"

February 17, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you think natural gas is a clean fossil fuel, you’re correct — when it comes to the combustion side of the formula. The production and distribution side and their role in emissions is another matter though — a bad matter. … Findings about the research were published in two American Chemical Society (ACS) papers in its journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Morris Bullock, Ph.D., Daniel DuBois, Ph.D., PNNL Hydrogen Catalysis Team win 2015 ACS Catalysis Lectureship"

February 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

ACS Catalysis and the American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Catalysis Science & Technology are pleased to announce Morris Bullock, Ph.D., Daniel DuBois, Ph.D., and the Hydrogen Catalysis Team at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have won the 2015 ACS Catalysis Lectureship for the Advancement of Catalytic Science. This is the first team win for the Lectureship.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Measure Current in Beating Cardiac Cells"

February 18, 2015

For the first time, scientists have succeeded in recording the current in membrane channels of contracting cardiac cells. To do this, the scientists combined an atomic force microscope with a widely used method for measuring electrical signals in cells. … The researchers have now published the successful results of this venture in the journal Nano Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

IEEE Spectrum (New York, NY: 102,000 unique monthly visits)
"Crumpling Graphene Could Expand Its Applications"

February 20, 2015

Last October, researchers at MIT showed that graphene could be crumpled and then flattened again and still remain effective for use in the electrodes of supercapacitors that could be used to power flexible electronics. … The researchers report in the journal Nano Letters that their method allows them to selectively pattern the crumples, which was not possible with other techniques.

More than 8 media outlets, including ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story. 

… From the Blogs

Lab Manager
"Hair Dye 'CSI' Could Help Police Solve Crimes"

February 18, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have found a way to analyze hair samples at crime scenes to rapidly determine whether it was colored and what brand of dye was used. Their report appears in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

BGR
"Now, smartphones that monitor pollution around you"

February 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers have developed a new sensing technology through which smartphone users will get to know about the pollution levels around them. The scientists of American Chemical Society examined 50 school children equipped with smartphones measured the ambient levels of black carbon and analysed that children contribute 13 percent of their total potential in black carbon exposure.

Science Blog
"New antibiotic holds promise against antibiotic-resistant infections"

February 16, 2015

Estimates of deaths from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the United States range upwards of 19,000 annually. Around 1960, when Staphylococcus aureus developed resistance to first-generation penicillin, methicillin and other second-generation beta-lactam antibiotics were adopted to fight the illness. … The breakthrough was published this week in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

ACS Publications logo

ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.