ACS in the News

The New York Times (New York NY: 19 million unique monthly visits)
"Bend It, Charge It, Dunk It: Graphene, the Material of Tomorrow"
April 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

I just want to say one word to you. Just one word. No, fans of “The Graduate,” the word isn’t “plastics.” It’s “graphene.” Graphene is the strongest, thinnest material known to exist. A form of carbon, it can conduct electricity and heat better than anything else. And get ready for this: It is not only the hardest material in the world, but also one of the most pliable. Only a single atom thick, it has been called the wonder material. Graphene could change the electronics industry, ushering in flexible devices, supercharged quantum computers, electronic clothing and computers that can interface with the cells in your body. … The American Chemical Society said … that graphene was discovered to be 200 times stronger than steel and so thin that a single ounce of it could cover 28 football fields.

More than 20 media outlets, including Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN: 6 million unique monthly visits), The Seattle Times (Seattle, WA: 5.6 million unique monthly visits), India Times (India: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), Laptop Magazine (977,600 unique monthly visits), and NDTV (India: 236,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
"Chlorine: From toxic chemical to household cleaner"
April 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Few chemicals are as familiar as table salt. The white crystals are the most common food seasoning in the world and an essential part of the human diet. Sodium chloride is chemically very stable - but split it into its constituent elements and you release the chemical equivalent of demons. … But here's something you probably didn't know, and if you are a regular swimmer, may not wish to know. That smell isn't chlorine, at least not the element. It is actually a chlorine compound called chloramine, which is created when chlorine combines with organic substances in the water. So what are those organic substances? We are talking about sweat and urine. So if you've ever noticed that the "chlorine" smell is stronger when the pool is full of kids, well now you know why.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Ways Graphene Will Change Gadgets Forever"
April 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

The future of technology could hinge on a single material. The industry is currently buzzing over the potential of graphene, which is the strongest, slimmest and most malleable material in known existence. Graphene, which is a form of carbon, could change the way our devices look, feel, perform—and even interact with our bodies. Here’s how this sensational substance will influence the world of tech. … The material is purportedly 100 times stronger than steel. According to the American Chemical Society, graphene achieves this strength because its carbon atoms are arranged in two-dimensional sheets.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Altering estrogen levels and recent research on food colors"
April 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A clinical study published April 11, 2011 suggests estrogen levels and breast health can be altered. The published journal article involving pre-menopausal and post-menopausal women shows how a specific combination of nutritional ingredients may help maintain healthy breast tissue. … Extracts from algae, rosemary and monk fruit could soon replace synthetic ingredients and food additives such as Blue No. 1, BHT and aspartame that label-conscious grocery shoppers are increasingly shunning. Research is enabling this shift from artificial colors, sweeteners and preservatives to naturally derived ones, and could soon yield many more natural options, reports Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

NBC News (New York, NY: 61.9 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Ways Graphene Will Change Gadgets Forever"
April 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

The future of technology could hinge on a single material. The industry is buzzing over the potential of graphene, which is the strongest, slimmest and most malleable material in known existence. Graphene, which is a form of carbon, could change the way our devices look, feel, perform and even interact with our bodies. Here’s how this sensational substance will influence the world of tech. … According to a study from the American Chemical Society, graphene is thin enough to stretch over 28 football fields. The material holds a ton of tech potential, as we could someday see paper-thin smartphones and tablets that you can fold up when not in use.

Opposing Views (Los Angeles CA: 7.0 million unique monthly visits)
"The Science Behind The World's Caffeine Love Affair"
April 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Are you one of the over 100 million Americans who depends on (and likely enjoys) the little boost caffeine gives you throughout your day? If so, check out this new video from the American Chemical Society. Caffeine is America’s most widely used drug -- over 100 million Americans are daily coffee drinkers. But out love affair with caffeine doesn’t stop there. Energy drinks, caffeine pills, caffeine gum, and even caffeine jerky have become widely purchased caffeine-infused commodities in recent years.

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Caffeine Actually Impacts Your Body In Four Different Ways"
April 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Caffeine is the most widely used drug — most of us can’t make it through the day without it. But what exactly is caffeine and how does it work? The latest Reactions video from the American Chemical Society breaks it down. When caffeine enters your body, it is broken down into three “daughter” molecules, with similar chemical structures but different actions in the body. Though they are all different, all four molecules are able to cross into the brain, where they bombard receptors on our neurons. Caffeine specifically attaches to a receptor made for the compound adenosine, which normally causes us to relax. Caffeine blocks this “relaxation” signal, keeping us awake.

Nature (London, U.K.: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"How to make graphene in a kitchen blender"
April 20, 2014

Don’t try this at home. No really, don’t: it almost certainly won’t work and you won’t be able to use your kitchen blender for food afterwards. But buried in the supplementary information of a research paper published today is a domestic recipe for producing large quantities of clean flakes of graphene. … Kitchen blenders aren’t the only way to produce reasonably high-quality flakes of graphene. Ferrari still thinks that using ultrasound to rip graphite apart could give better materials in some cases. And Xinliang Feng, from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, says that his recent publication, in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, reports a way to produce higher-quality, fewer-layer graphene at higher rates by electrochemical means.

The Telegraph (Macon, GA: 571,400 unique monthly visits)
"Tip: Peeing in pool isn't just rude and unnecessary"
April 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

You knew that peeing in the pool is gross. It's rude and unnecessary. Now we also know something else it may be harmful. This critical news comes to us from the American Chemical Society's journal Environmental Science and Technology. According to its report, helpfully translated into the study into a news release. Here is the essential finding: "Jing Li, Ernest Blatchley, III, and colleagues note that adding chlorine to pool water is the most common way to kill disease-causing microbes and prevent swimmers from getting sick. But as people swim, splash, play - and pee - in the pool, chlorine mixes with sweat and urine and makes other substances. Two of these compounds, including trichloramine (NCl3) and cyanogen chloride (CNCl), are ubiquitous in swimming pools. The first one is associated with lung problems, and the second one can also affect the lungs, as well as the heart and central nervous system.

Open Culture (1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The Science of Caffeine: The World’s Most Popular Drug"
April 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Here’s a quick shot of science to start your day. The American Chemical Society, an organization representing chemists across the US, has released the latest in a series of Reactions videos. Attempting to explain the science of everyday things, previous Reactions videos have demystified the chemistry of Sriracha, Love, Pepper and more. This latest video breaks down the world’s most widely used stimulant, caffeine. If you haven’t had your morning cup of coffee, you may need to watch this video twice.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"A greener source of polyester — cork trees"
April 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

On the scale of earth-friendly materials, you'd be hard pressed to find two that are farther apart than polyester (not at all) and cork (very). In an unexpected twist, however, scientists are figuring out how to extract a natural, waterproof, antibacterial version of the first material from the latter. Their new technique, which could have applications in medical devices, appears in the ACS journal Biomacromolecules. Cristina Silva Pereira and colleagues explain that polyesters are ubiquitous in modern life, and not just as a practical fabric for clothing. Their durability and other traits make them ideal for use in cushioning and insulating materials, in liquid crystal displays, holograms, filters, and as a high-gloss finish on guitars and pianos. But making polyester for these products involves a toxic process that starts with the melting of petroleum-based products. To replace these synthetic fibers, scientists have turned to nature.

More than 15 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), AllVoices (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 35,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Modesto Bee (Modesto, CA: 539,500 unique monthly visits)
"Study finds chlorinated pools and pee are a match made in harmful gas heaven"
April 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

While it ranks high on the gross scale, peeing in a pool has never been considered hazardous. A new study, however, uncovers serious health effects tied to in-pool tinkles. … Everyone pees. And a fair number of people - one in five Americans, apparently - have no qualms about doing so in a swimming pool. For rampant pool-peers, the general assumption/excuse tends to fall along the lines of this pool's chock-full of chemicals, anyway - no harm done, right? And isn't urine sterile? Yes, but not quite. In addition to being gross (and unhygienic), a new study published in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology has found that, in addition to the fact that pretty much every swimming pool has a bit of pee in it, the combination of urine and chlorine can be detrimental to human health.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"EPA Recommends Too Much Bleach for Water Purification"
April 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) recommendations for treating water after a natural disaster or other emergencies call for more chlorine bleach than is necessary to kill disease-causing pathogens and are often impractical to carry out, a new study has found. The authors of the report, which appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, suggest that the agency review and revise its guidelines. Daniele Lantagne, who was at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at the time of the study and is now at Tufts Univ., and colleagues note that after natural disasters such as floods, clean water can be scarce. To prevent the spread of water-borne illnesses, the EPA currently recommends “bottle, boil, bleach” in case of a water emergency.

More than 8 media outlets, including AllVoices (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Relieving Electric Vehicle Range Anxiety With Improved Batteries"
April 16, 2014

Electric vehicles could travel farther and more renewable energy could be stored with lithium-sulfur batteries that use a unique powdery nanomaterial. Researchers added the powder, a kind of nanomaterial called a metal organic framework, to the battery’s cathode to capture problematic polysulfides that usually cause lithium-sulfur batteries to fail after a few charges. A paper describing the material and its performance was published online April 4 in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters. “Lithium-sulfur batteries have the potential to power tomorrow’s electric vehicles, but they need to last longer after each charge and be able to be repeatedly recharged,” said materials chemist Jie Xiao of the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. “Our metal organic framework may offer a new way to make that happen.”

More than 9 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop new dichloroacetate formulation for cancer treatment"
April 16, 2014

Health forums were abuzz in 2007 with news that a simple, inexpensive chemical may serve as a viable treatment to many forms of cancer. The drug dichloroacetate, or DCA, was touted as a cure-all, but after years of work, scientists are still searching for ways to make the unique treatment as effective as possible. Now, researchers at the University of Georgia have discovered a new way to deliver this drug that may one day make it a viable treatment for numerous forms of cancer. They published their findings in the American Chemical Society's journal ACS Chemical Biology.

More than 10 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits), and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits)
"Making radiation-proof materials for electronics, power plants"
April 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster made the dangers of radiation all too real. To avoid similar tragedies in the future, scientists are working to develop new radiation-proof materials for nuclear power plants, as well as for less obvious applications such as medical devices and airplanes. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the American Chemical Society's weekly news magazine, explores the latest developments. Jyllian Kemsley, a senior editor at C&EN, points out that radiation can cause a range of problems from temperature misreadings in electronic devices to nuclear power plant explosions. But scientists might be able to solve these problems by finding the right materials to deal with high-radiation environments.

More than 7 media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Lasers Enable Observation of Frantic Electrons"
April 15, 2014

A research team at the University of Kansas has used high-powered lasers to track the speed and movement of electrons inside an innovative material that is just one atom thick. Their findings are published in the current issue of ACS Nano, a peer-reviewed journal focused on nanoscience. … The work at KU's Ultrafast Laser Lab could help point the way to next-generation transistors and solar panels made of solid, atomically thin materials. "When the solid is a thin layer, electrons are confined in this thin layer," said Hui Zhao, associate professor of physics and astronomy, who leads the team. "An electron that is free to move in two dimensions behaves very differently from those moving in all the three dimensions. It totally changes how electrons interact with environment.

More than 4 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Financial Express (India: 85,700 unique monthly visits)
"New type of barcode to thwart counterfeiting"
April 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have developed a new type of inexpensive barcode that, when added to documents or currency, could foil attempts at making forgeries. Although the tags are easy to make, they still require ingredients you can't exactly find at the local hardware store, researchers said. Xiaogang Liu from National University of Singapore and colleagues explained that scientists have used fluorescent and DNA-based barcodes, or tags of known composition and sequence, in attempts to develop tests for cancer and other diseases. … The study was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 13 media outlets, including LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"Making new materials an atomic layer at a time"
April 17, 2014

Researchers at Penn State's Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials and the Univ. of Texas at Dallas have shown the ability to grow high quality, single-layer materials one on top of the other using chemical vapor deposition. … "People have been trying to stack these layered materials using the scotch tape method (an exfoliation method developed by Nobel laureates Novoselov and Geim to produce graphene), but that leaves residue on the layers and is not scalable," explains Joshua Robinson of Penn State, corresponding author on a recent article published online in ACS Nano ("Direct Synthesis of van der Waals Solids"). Other groups have utilized the chemical vapor deposition method to grow layered materials on a copper substrate, but this method requires some sophisticated techniques to transfer the layered material to a more functional substrate without causing tears or contamination.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), and LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WLOX (ABC) (Biloxi, MS)
"The precise reason for the health benefits of dark chocolate: mystery solved"
April 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

[Transcript] ...bacteria break down that material... producing anti- inflammatory compounds in the process... which can be absorbed by the body and aid in heart health. The team presented their results to the American Chemical Society... where it got national attention. … the reason dark chocolate benefits the human heart resides deep within another part of the body researchers at a meeting of the American Chemical Society say that the beneficial chemicals contained in dark chocolate generally stay unprocessed until they reached the : once there the microbes are broken down any anti-inflammatory molecules can be used by the body doctors say about two tablespoons of dark chocolate cocoa powder per day were able to produce the beneficial effect. WOR-AM (New York, NY) also covered the story.

WGN (Chicago, IL: Local Viewership 14,227)
"Black Rice"
April 20, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] today we’re going to use the black rice. What is the difference? I’ve never even seen black rice more fiber, more everything. Better always ask for nutrients. Black rice! Black rice has two times as much fiber as brown rice and according to the American Chemical Society; one spoonful has more antioxidants than a spoonful a blueberries.

… From the Blogs

Science 2.0
"Polyester - Now Made From Cork"
April 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

On the scale of earth-friendly materials, most people don't think of polyester but scientists are figuring out how to extract a natural, waterproof, antibacterial version of it from...cork.

Writing in Biomacromolecules, Cristina Silva Pereira and colleagues explain that polyesters are ubiquitous in modern life, and for good reason. Their durability and other traits make them ideal for use in cushioning and insulating materials, in liquid crystal displays, holograms, filters, and as a high-gloss finish on guitars and pianos.

Science World Report
"Recyclable Waste: Could Astronaut Urine Fuel a Trip to Mars?"
April 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Pee and other human waste certainly aren't the most glamorous aspects of space, but all the same, they're a practical problem for those in orbit. For instance, there comes the critical question: What to do with astronaut waste? Fortunately, scientists have come up with a new process that can recycle urine into both water and energy, and it's not just limited to space. Could we all be generating pee-fuel? Though urine is typically considered something to dispose of, Eduardo Nicolau and Carlos R. Cabrera, chemists at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Pierdas, believe in its converting potential. … More information regarding the findings can be seen via the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

Science Codex
"Chemists celebrate Earth Day by showcasing the scientists who keep our water safe"
April 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Water is arguably the most important resource on the planet. In celebration of Earth Day, the American Chemical Society (ACS) is showcasing three scientists whose research keeps water safe, clean and available for future generations. Geared toward elementary and middle school students, the "Chemists Celebrate Earth Day" series highlights the important work that chemists and chemical engineers do every day.

eWallStreeter
"New Type of Barcode Could Make Counterfeiters Lives More Difficult"
April 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Counterfeiters, beware! Scientists are reporting the development of a new type of inexpensive barcode that, when added to documents or currency, could foil attempts at making forgeries. Although the tags are easy for researchers to make, they still require ingredients you can't exactly find at the local hardware store. Their report appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

PBS NewsHour (Washington, DC: 5.6 million unique monthly visits)
"In space, recycled urine has many uses"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Recycled urine is something astronauts are already psychologically prepared to consume when they go to outer space. But a new report published in the ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering journal suggests that rather than releasing wasted urine into space, scientist are working on a new technique that can convert the urine into drinking water and fuel. The reasoning behind this? Cost. Due to the high cost of delivering supplies to space, the recovery of potable water from spacecraft wastewater is critical for life support of crewmembers, the report said. The report’s authors Eduardo Nicolau, Carlos R. Cabrera and colleagues used their new Urea Bioreactors Electrochemical System, or UBE, to collect urine and shower wastewater and filtered out urea and water using forward osmosis.

More than 30 media outlets, including Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Outside Online (Santa Fe, NM: 2.0 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), and BioSpace (San Francisco, CA: 33,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Google Doodle Honors Chemist Dr. Percy Julian"

April 11, 2014

April 11, 2014 would have been Dr. Julian Percy’s 115th Birthday and it was a beautiful sight to behold – seeing today’s Google Doodle honoring the man and his science. “Dr. Julian’s story is a fascinating one and I encourage you to read over the ACS and Wikipedia entries. As you might imagine, he faced discrimination but also managed to find the opportunity for education, including his doctoral studies at the University of Vienna. Dr. Julian turned to private industry for employment after becoming frustrated with the academic pathway. Along the way he founded his own company and nonprofit research institute.”

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is Why You Get Spring Allergies"

April 7, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Spring has sprung, which means the arrival of chirping birds, sunny days, blooming trees and flowers and … spring allergies. But why do some people get allergies -- and all the miserable symptoms that accompany them -- while others don't? And what causes allergies, anyway? "Allergy is actually a mistake that the immune system is making," says Dr. Calman Prussin, M.D., of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, in the video above. "Normally we make antibodies to fight germs and to recognize germs, and in this case, the immune system has made a mistake and instead is making an antibody that recognizes harmless things, such as pollens or animal dander." For more on why we get spring allergies, watch the video above from the American Chemical Society.

More than 13 media outlets, including Canada Free Press Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Recycling Astronaut Urine: Technology Converts Pee to Energy"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It is the constant battle on a road trip: when to stop for a bathroom break? Men and women tend to have very different opinions on what works for traveling rest stops and what doesn’t. But in space travel, the question becomes much more serious than a battle of the stronger bladder. On long space trips, astronaut waste accounts for nearly half of the mission’s total waste. So two researchers at the University of Puerto Rico decided to tackle the task of recycling the human wastewater. … When supplies run low, the treated urine can become a source of drinking water, which would otherwise have to be delivered from Earth at a tremendous cost, according to the American Chemical Society.

Forbes (New York, NY: 9.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Google Doodle Honors Dr. Percy Julian, Pioneering Medicinal Chemist"

April 11, 2014

It’s not every day that you wake up, turn on the laptop, and see chemical structures in the doodle on the Google search landing page. Especially those of drugs isolated or made from plants, the subject of my own academic research for more than 20 years. … Not only did Julian and Pikl synthesize physostigmine in a process that could be scaled up for industry, but they also proved a famous British scientist’s synthesis incorrect: Sir Robert Robinson, 1947 Nobel laureate in chemistry. So significant was this work that the American Chemical Society dedicated the site of their DePauw laboratory as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in 1999 and named the work one of the top 25 accomplishments in chemistry.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Could Cooking With Beer Reduce The Risk Of Cancer?"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Beer lovers, tune in. We've just found one more good excuse to consume as much beer as possible. The American Chemical Society’s 'Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry' has concluded that cooking meat in beer is a good idea. The researchers found that beer reduces polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are a group of chemicals that form on meat after it's been cooked at a high temperature, like when you barbecue. In experiments with laboratory animals, PAHs have been associated with a risk of cancer.

More than 10 media outlets, including The Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 2.7 million unique monthly visits) and FoodBeast (Orange County, CA: 1.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Guardian (London, U.K.: 57.5 million unique monthly visits)
"What on earth is this thing and how exactly can it help me? Disappearing devices"

March 28, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

From Parkinson's to hip replacements, we get to grips with some examples of the ways in which nanomedicine could help study, diagnose and treat a range of diseases and medical issues. … A tiny chip is injected in a wound at risk of infection; it releases heat to kill harmful bacteria, and then disappears. Physical chemist John Rogers of the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign has successfully tested a device inspired by this idea in rodents. "It is an example of what we call electroceuticals – small electronic implants that perform a medical function in the body under the remote control of radio signals," he explains. Rogers' devices have the advantage that they dissolve after performing their function.

Fox News (New York, NY: 12.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Marinating meat in beer reduces cancer risk"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Who doesn’t love a cold beer at a BBQ on a hot summer day? Well your BBQ just got even better, because according to a new study, using it to marinate your meats before grilling can actually help reduce your risk of cancer. Studies have found that grilled meats can sometimes contain cancer-causing substances after cooking. Some may argue that grilling meat gives it great flavor. This taste, though, comes at a price, since the process creates molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which damage DNA, and thus increase your chances of developing colon cancer. But now, in a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers said they found a way around the problem. When barbecuing meat, they suggested, you should add beer.

Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
" 3 Reasons to Eat Some Chocolate Right Now"

April 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Do you like chocolate? If so, I have some good news for you! Get yourself a little piece of good, dark chocolate, and check out these fun chocolate facts below. If you’re trying to watch your sugar intake, you might have given chocolate the boot along with the rest of the sweets in your life. While plowing through a pint of chocolate ice cream is still not a healthy choice, a few squares of dark chocolate once in a while is actually good for you! … A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry looked at how the flavonols in cocoa impacted weight gain. The result? Mice who ate a diet rich in the compounds found in cocoa gained less weight and processed insulin better. The latter result suggests that chocolate may also help prevent type 2 diabetes.

GeekoSystem (New York, NY: 8.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New Method Could Turn Astronaut Pee Into Drinking Water and Fuel"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Pee and other human waste (poop) are a problem in space. Processing astronaut urine for useable drinking water is nothing new on board the International Space Station, but a new process can recycle that urine into both water and energy—and it’s not just limited to space. We could all soon be generating pee-fuel. A NASA-funded report in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering by Eduardo Nicolau, Carlos R. Cabrera, and their colleagues explains their new Urea Bioreactor Electrochemical System (UBE) that converts the urea in pee to ammonia, and then converts the ammonia to energy using a fuel cell using a process called forward osmosis.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists discover promising agents to fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In the fight against "superbugs," scientists have discovered a class of agents that can make some of the most notorious strains vulnerable to the same antibiotics that they once handily shrugged off. The report on the promising agents called metallopolymers appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Chuanbing Tang and colleagues note that the antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is responsible for a significant fraction of the infections that patients acquire in hospitals. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, MRSA usually spreads in hospitals when a health care provider with contaminated hands unknowingly passes it along to a patient.

More than 18 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New agents may revitalize antibiotics to fight superbugs"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The Journal of the American Chemical Society has published a new study that suggests it may be possible to fight superbugs with conventional antibiotics. By pairing the drugs with a new class of metal-based agents called metallopolymers, which revitalize their potency, researchers believe they may be able to overcome drug resistance. The drug-resistant bacterium MRSA (short for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) is one of the biggest causes of hospital-acquired infections in the US. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) say the superbug commonly spreads in hospitals when contaminated health workers unwittingly pass it to patients via their hands. Once vulnerable patients acquire MRSA, they can become seriously ill with pneumonia and other potentially fatal conditions.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Pharma firms turn attention to hearing loss"

April 9, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hearing loss affects 36 million Americans to some degree, often leaving them feeling isolated, but it has received little attention from the pharmaceutical industry — until now. Small firms have brought a handful of potential therapies to the development pipeline, and pharmaceutical heavyweights are taking notice, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly magazine of the American Chemical Society. The story states that the most common cause of hearing loss is loud noise, either from a single event like the bang of a firecracker or from chronic exposure, say daily listening to a cranked-up iPod. Although severe hearing loss can be treated with a hearing aid or cochlear implants, options are scarce for those suffering from milder damage. But there is growing interest to fill the void and to even develop preventative treatments.

LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Google Glass Maps Future of Medical Testing"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

A team of researchers at UCLA has transformed Google Glass into a powerful, wearable medical testing laboratory. Aydogan Ozcan and his team developed an application that reads dozens of different types of diagnostic tests for malaria, prostate cancer and HIV, to name a few. Glass uploads the results to secure servers and provides anonymous data to epidemiologists. In the American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) newest Breakthrough Science video, Ozcan demonstrates how the app works, and explains the broad impact it could have on medicine.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RiverHead News-Review (New York, NY: 67,300 unique monthly visits)
"Dark chocolate does the body good"

April 13, 2014
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

Everyone knows a taste of chocolate is good for the soul. But not everyone knows that it’s also good for the heart. … Maryann Birmingham, nutrition educator with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, said health experts had long believed in chocolate’s positive effects on the heart, but the reason behind its benefits had remained a mystery — until now. The benefits of dark chocolate, according to the study, begin when the cocoa reaches the colon, according to the study. Louisiana researchers discovered that certain bacteria in the gut chow down on the chocolate, fermenting it into anti-inflammatory compounds that are good for the heart, according to the American Chemical Society, which promotes chemistry-related research.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Develop Short, Flexible, Reusable AFM Probe"

April 10, 2014

JILA researchers have engineered a short, flexible, reusable probe for the atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables state-of-the-art precision and stability in picoscale force measurements. Shorter, softer and more agile than standard and recently enhanced AFM probes, the JILA tips will benefit nanotechnology and studies of folding and stretching in biomolecules such as proteins and DNA. … The new probe design, described in ACS Nano, is the JILA research group’s third recent advance in AFM technology. JILA is jointly operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and University of Colorado Boulder.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Synthetic collagen promotes natural clotting"

April 9, 2014

Synthetic collagen invented at Rice University may help wounds heal by directing the natural clotting of blood. The material, KOD, mimics natural collagen, a fibrous protein that binds cells together into organs and tissues. It could improve upon commercial sponges or therapies based on naturally derived porcine or bovine-derived collagen now used to aid healing during or after surgery. The lab of Jeffrey Hartgerink, a chemist and bioengineer based at Rice's BioScience Research Collaborative, developed synthetic collagen several years ago. The lab's analysis of KOD for use as a hemostat, or clotting agent, appears this month in the American Chemical Society journal Biomacromolecules.

More than 12 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"More insights from tissue samples: Researchers demonstrates advantages of the HOPE fixation strategy"

April 8, 2014

A new way of preparing patient tissue for analyses might soon become the new standard. This is what researchers of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research and the Research Center Borstel recommend in their current publication in the Journal of Proteome Research. They discovered that the so-called HOPE method allows tissue samples to be treated such that they do not only meet the requirements of clinical histology, but can still be characterised later on by modern methods of proteomics, a technique analyzing all proteins at once. This is successful, since the structure of the tissue is "fixed" in a way that the protein molecules remain accessible for systematic analysis. This technique therefore meets current requirements in terms of a more personalized medicine and thus opens up new opportunities for researching diseases and their therapies.

More than 5 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

MIT Technology Review (Cambridge, MA: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Tiny Particles May Pose Big Risk"

April 8, 2014

Thousands of consumer products — including cosmetics, sunscreens, and clothing — contain nanoparticles added by manufacturers to improve texture, kill microbes, or enhance shelf life, among other purposes. However, several studies have shown that some of these engineered nanoparticles can be toxic to cells. … The findings, published in a recent issue of the journal ACS Nano, relied on a high-speed screening technology to analyze DNA damage. This approach makes it possible to study nanoparticles’ potential hazards at a much faster rate and larger scale than previously possible.

More than 10 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), and Health Canal (NC: 23,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Clean Technica (1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Moth Eyeballs Inspire Glare-Dimming Gold-Coating For Solar Panels"

April 8, 2014

The glare from commonly used objects such as solar panels or electronics displays can be greatly reduced with the use of a newly developed transparent film black inspired by moth eyeballs. The new film — created by researchers at UC Irvine — can also aid in the main tangency of a clean surface, as it can also keep grime in raindrops and other moisture from sticking. … The findings are detailed in two new papers, one published in Nano Letters, and one in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 6 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits), and Daily Fusion (21,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits)
"Scalable CVD process for making 2-D molybdenum diselenide"

April 8, 2014

Nanoengineering researchers at Rice University and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have unveiled a potentially scalable method for making one-atom-thick layers of molybdenum diselenide -- a highly sought semiconductor that is similar to graphene but has better properties for making certain electronic devices like switchable transistors and light-emitting diodes. The method for making two-dimensional molybdenum diselenide uses a technique known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and is described online in a new paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano. The finding is significant because CVD is widely used by the semiconductor and materials industries to make thin films of silicon, carbon fibers and other materials.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Photonics.com (Pittsfield, MA: 53,400 unique monthly visits)
"Solar Power, Biofuel Production Could Complement Each Other"

April 11, 2014

Photovoltaic installations may be able to give a boost to biofuels production — and vice versa — particularly in sunny and dry regions of the US. Computer simulations developed by scientists at Stanford University show that growing certain plants around photovoltaic equipment in southern California could help conserve water used to keep windblown dirt off the solar panels to ensure they operate as efficiently as possible. The crops would capture water runoff and help anchor the soil. … The work was supported by the TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy at Stanford. The research was published in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), and Daily Fusion (21,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WLOX (ABC) (Biloxi, MS: Local Viewership 21,430)
"The precise reason for the health benefits of dark chocolate: mystery solved"
April 13, 2014

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting Press Release

[Transcript] ...bacteria break down that material... producing anti- inflammatory compounds in the process... which can be absorbed by the body and aid in heart health. the team presented their results to the American Chemical Society... where it got national attention.

… From the Blogs

BioScholar
"Astronauts’ Pee To Get Recycled Into Clean Water"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In between the news about water on Mars, clues of life on Jupiter or new stars being formed at our galaxy’s edge, there is a less glamorous side of space exploration: what to do with astronauts’ urine! Human waste on long-term journeys into space makes up about half of the mission’s total waste. Recycling it is critical to keeping a clean environment for astronauts. … “The system was designed with space missions in mind, but the results showed that the UBE system could be used in any wastewater treatment systems containing urea and/or ammonia,” Nicolau said in a report that appeared in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

Infection Control Today
"Promising Agents Burst Through Superbug Defenses to Fight Antibiotic Resistance"

April 10, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In the fight against superbugs, scientists have discovered a class of agents that can make some of the most notorious strains vulnerable to the same antibiotics that they once handily shrugged off. The report on the promising agents called metallopolymers appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Chuanbing Tang and colleagues note that the antibiotic-resistant bacteria methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is responsible for a significant fraction of the infections that patients acquire in hospitals. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), MRSA usually spreads in hospitals when a health care provider with contaminated hands unknowingly passes it along to a patient. It can cause serious problems such as pneumonia, and can lead to death.

MedGadget
"Google Glass App Reads, Interprets Chromatographic Medical Tests"

April 8, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Back in February we profiled a Google Glass application developed at UCLA for automatic interpretation of chromatographic tests such as lateral flow assays that are commonly used to detect a variety of analytes. The American Chemical Society just released a video with the researchers showing off and discussing the new technology.