ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Rosemary and Oregano Might Help Fight Diabetes"

July 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Good news if you love Italian food: a new study says that the herbs rosemary and oregano both might be able to help fight diabetes. Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, PhD, of the Division of Nutritional Sciences and Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found herself facing an ongoing problem with some of her diabetic research subjects. Even though about 8 percent of Americans suffer from Type 2 diabetes, not everyone was able to afford medicine to regulate the disease and other sufferers struggled with how to make healthier lifestyle choices. … The result? Both rosemary and oregano showed signs of being able to do exactly that. These preliminary findings were published in a paper in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry in June.

More than 50 media outlets, including Toronto Sun (Toronto, Canada: daily circulation 143,475), HNGN (1.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 1.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,993 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and The Health Site (32,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NPR (Washington, DC: 32.7 million weekly listeners)
"Don't Pop That Bubble Wrap! Scientists Turn Trash Into Test Tubes"

July 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hate to burst your bubble, glass lab gear. But plastic bubble wrap also works pretty well at running science experiments. Scientists at Harvard University have figured out a way to use these petite pouches as an inexpensive alternative to glass test tubes and culture dishes. They even ran glucose tests on artificial urine and anemia tests on blood, all with the samples sitting inside bubble wrap. "Most lab experiments require equipment, like test tubes or 96-well assay plates," says chemist George Whitesides, who led the study. "But if you go out to smaller villages [in developing countries], these things are just not available." One glass test tube can cost between $1 and $5. Bubble wrap, by contrast, is dirt cheap. One square foot of it, with about 100 to 500 bubbles depending on bubble dimensions, costs only 6 cents, Whitesides and his team reported Thursday in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

The Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Apparently, We Don't Actually Know How This Common Pain Reliever Works"

July 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Acetaminophen -- perhaps known best by the brand name Tylenol, and overseas as paracetamol -- is so widely used, that surely we must know how exactly it works, right? Believe it or not, experts are actually not 100 percent sure how the drug works to relieve pain, just that it does. The best working theories are explained in the video above, produced by the American Chemical Society.

Voice of America (VOA) News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Herbs Help Curb Diabetes"

July 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The herbs - rosemary and oregano - not only enhance the taste of food, lab tests find they are loaded with healthful compounds that work to reduce blood sugar as effectively as anti-diabetic drugs. Researchers at the University of Illinois found the herbs contain polyphenols and flavonoids, compounds that interfere with a diabetes-related enzyme, which is also the target of prescription drugs to control blood sugar. The incidence of type-2 or adult-onset diabetes has exploded worldwide with the easy availability of cheap fast food. The findings are reported in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a publication of the American Chemical Society.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The geography of the global electronic waste (‘e-waste’) burden"

July 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As local and national governments struggle to deal with ever-growing piles of electronic waste (or "e-waste"), scientists are now refining the picture of just how much there is and where it really ends up. Published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, their study found that nearly a quarter of e-waste that developed countries discard floods into just seven developing countries -- with major potential health risks for the people who live there. Knut Breivik and colleagues note that the export from developed to developing regions of e-waste -- everything from used TVs and refrigerators to computers and cell phones -- has caused concern. On one hand, this practice can help people in resource-poor countries acquire technology or earn income from selling re-usable parts and raw materials from the waste.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Terra Daily (Sydney, Australia: 52,300 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Tiny Gold Nanomotors Spin 10x Faster Than a Race Car Engine"

July 23, 2014

Nanomotors are an amazing feat of engineering: tiny gold rods less than a micrometer long, powered by ultrasonic waves to spin at crazy-fast speeds. How fast? Scientists just figured out a way to measure, and it's astonishing: 150,000 RPM, ten times faster than the fastest race car engine. … Well, a new research paper published in the journal ACS Nano explains how scientists were finally able to track the screaming micro-machines. They mixed the tiny gold rods (five stacked end-to-end would measure the width of a human hair) with 400-nanometer styrofoam beads, and placed the solution between glass and silicon plates. By measuring how fast the beads move as they swirl around the rods, the scientists were able to estimate the speed of the little spinners.

More than 10 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 15,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Repurpose Bubble Wrap for Low Cost Medical Tests"

July 21, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Nearly everyone loves to pop bubble wrap, but now one group scientists think those tiny pockets of air actually provide a cheap and durable way of preserving and testing biological samples. Normally, scientists working on samples in the lab would use what are known as well assay plates, which is a fancy name for what is essentially a simple flat plate that is pitted with lots of “wells” that are employed as small test tubes. The plates are used for a variety of things, and are considered a necessity in most laboratories today. … Now, writing in the journal Analytical Chemistry, the team believes that the gas-filled compartments in that common packing material known as bubble wrap can act as a container for storing samples, like blood or urine. It could even be used to store certain chemicals so long as the sheets are handled carefully, and should even be suitable for bioanalyses.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists work to detect chronic traumatic encephalopathy in earliest stages"

July 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Autopsies have shown that some high-profile athletes who suffered repeated blows to the head during their careers have unusual protein clumps in their brains. Those clumps suggest the athletes had a disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Now, scientists are working on tests that might be able to detect CTE in its earliest stages, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. In the article, Lauren Wolf, a senior editor at C&EN, explains that many of these athletes struggled with symptoms such as memory loss, depression and violent mood swings while they were alive. One professional wrestler, Chris Benoit - who was known for slamming his head into competitors - murdered his wife and son and then took his own life in 2007.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists use simple, low cost laser technique to improve properties and functions of nanomaterials"

July 22, 2014

By 'drawing' micropatterns on nanomaterials using a focused laser beam, scientists could modify properties of nanomaterials for effective applications in photonic and optoelectric applications. The challenges faced by researchers in modifying properties of nanomaterials for application in devices may be addressed by a simple technique, thanks to recent innovative studies conducted by scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS). … This innovation was first published online in the journal ACS Nano on 24 May 2014.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Wireless Design Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 32,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Toward an oral therapy for treating Alzheimer’s disease — using a cancer drug"

July 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Currently, no cure exists for Alzheimer’s disease, the devastating neurological disease affecting more than 5 million Americans. But scientists are now reporting new progress on a set of compounds, initially developed for cancer treatment, that shows promise as a potential oral therapy for Alzheimer’s. Their study appears in ACS’ Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. Carlo Ballatore, Kurt R. Brunden and colleagues explain that in a healthy brain, the protein known as tau binds to and stabilizes microtubules, which are cellular components made of protein inside cells. Microtubules are critical for performing many processes in the cell, such as growth and division. In the brain, they are particularly important for transporting molecules or other “cargo,” such as nutrients. But in people with Alzheimer’s disease, tau doesn’t bind well to microtubules and clumps up in the brain. That leaves microtubules in disarray.

More than 12 media outlets, including Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits), Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits), ALN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 26,300 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

University at Buffalo Reporter (Buffalo, NY: 158,800 unique monthly visits)
"Richard named fellow of American Chemical Society"

July 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

John Richard, UB Distinguished Professor in the Department of Chemistry, has been named a 2014 fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The ACS will recognize Richard and 98 other scientists named fellows on Aug. 11 during at the society’s national meeting in San Francisco. Fellow status in the ACS, one of the world’s largest scientific societies, is among the highest honors a chemist can achieve, as less than 1 percent of members are awarded the distinction. Recipients are selected for their outstanding contributions to chemistry and the society. “The American Chemical Society plays an important role in explaining the importance of chemistry to the public and in advancing the careers of professional chemists,” says Richard. “I am happy that the society has recognized my contribution to their mission.”

Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits)
"Organometallics welcomes new editor-in-chief: Paul Chirik, Ph.D."

July 22, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Chirik will succeed Editor-in-Chief John Gladysz, Ph.D., who has served in this position since 2010 and will retire from the journal at the end of 2014. Organometallics records progress in one of the most active fields for organometallic, inorganic, organic and materials chemists. "My vision for the journal is to continue its position of excellence as the flagship publication in the field and also to capture the growth and new multidisciplinary chemistry moving forward," Chirik says. Chirik got his start at Virginia Tech, where he earned his B.S. in chemistry in 1995. For his Ph.D., he went on to the California Institute of Technology. He then became a postdoctoral fellow at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2001, he joined the faculty at Cornell University, where he stayed for 10 years. And in 2011, he moved to his current institution, Princeton University.

… TV and Radio News

CLTV (Chicago, IL: Local Viewership 16,404)
"Rosemary and oregano contain diabetes-fighting compounds"

July 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] Adding herbs to the diet may help diabetics manage their disease. Rosemary and oregano contain diabetes fighting compounds according to the journal of agricultural and food chemistry. Lab tests show the herbs work in the same way as prescription anti-diabetic action. Rosemary and oregano, which contain polyphenols and flavanoids interfere with a diabetes related enzyme and provide a natural way.

… From the Blogs

NDTV Cooks
"Rosemary and Oregano Can Help Fight Diabetes"

July 26, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Herbs are widely used in the kitchen to enhance the flavor of food, adding freshness and a pleasant aroma to your meals. Previously, health experts have claimed that fresh herbs pack a number of health benefits and can ward off heart disease, diabetes, obesity and a lot of other health problems. A new study supports their theory and shows that herbs like oregano and rosemary contain diabetes-fighting compounds. The study was published in American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. According to it, herbs are rich in anti-oxidants and essential enzymes like polyphenols and their regular consumption can be a natural way to lower glucose levels in the blood. Therefore, they can help in regulating high blood sugar levels in diabetics.

Lab Manager
"The Geography of the Global E-waste Burden"

July 23, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As local and national governments struggle to deal with ever-growing piles of electronic waste (or “e-waste”), scientists are now refining the picture of just how much there is and where it really ends up. Published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology, their study found that nearly a quarter of e-waste that developed countries discard floods into just seven developing countries — with major potential health risks for the people who live there.

Science Codex
"Detecting concussion-related brain disease in its earliest stages"

July 24, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Autopsies have shown that some high-profile athletes who suffered repeated blows to the head during their careers have unusual protein clumps in their brains. Those clumps suggest the athletes had a disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). Now, scientists are working on tests that might be able to detect CTE in its earliest stages, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Bubble Wrap Can Make Great DIY Test Tubes"

July 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers from Harvard have devised a new use for "the gas-filled compartments in the packing material commonly called 'bubble wrap.'" As they report in the journal Analytical Chemistry, bubble wrap is not just something to wrap breakables in and to pop when you're feeling angsty or playful, but a potential boon to science in places that lack electricity. Bubble wrap, it turns out, can be used as a sheet of test tubes. The researchers realized that bubble wrap possess several characteristics that, in certain situations, make it superior to conventional glass test tubes, Laboratory Equipment explains. For one, it does not shatter. The air pockets inside the bubbles are also sterile, so scientists don't have to heat them up to kill any lingering germs (an impossible or very difficult task in places that don't have electricity). Bubble wrap is also available all over the place, including in many developing countries.  

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 81,500 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 44,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"A natural way to monitor, and possibly control populations of, stink bugs"

July 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Anyone who has squashed a stink bug knows why they got their name. Although just a nuisance to homeowners, the insects feed on and damage fruits and vegetables, causing significant economic losses for farmers. Now scientists report in ACS' Journal of Natural Products that they've discovered certain stink bug pheromone components and made them artificially in the lab for the first time, and these substances can be used to monitor and manage their populations. Ashot Khrimian and colleagues explain that the brown marmorated stink bug, also known as Halyomorpha halys, is an invasive pest from Asia that now is found in most of the U.S., as well as parts of Canada and Europe. These flat, "shield-shaped" insects flap around noisily in homes, especially in the fall, as they seek places to hibernate during the winter. But the real problem lies in their summer activities, when they eat fruits, vegetables and other important crops. It's these summer activities that have prompted efforts to reduce their populations.

More than 14 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nature World News (96,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million)
"Scientists develop inbuilt anti-glare screen for smartphones, tablets"

July 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Soon, you will not have to tilt your smartphone or tablet to avoid glare while watching your favorite movie or video. Scientists have developed a novel glass surface that reduces both glare and reflection on mobile devices. "Mobile or tablet users still have to dish out extra cash for a filter or film to lay on top of their glass screens so they can use the devices in bright light," said Valerio Pruneri at the Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO) in Barcelona, Spain. He developed this glass surface in collaboration with Prantik Mazumder's team at New York-based Corning Incorporated. Pruneri and Mazumder roughened a glass surface so it could scatter light and ward off glare but without hurting the glass's transparency. … The method is inexpensive and can easily be scaled up for industry use, concluded the study, published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 203,000 unique monthly visits), Sify News (Chennai, India: 165,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 97,900 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits), Wireless Design Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 32,700 unique monthly visits) and DailyMe.com (24,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Bubble Wrap Serves As Sheet Of Tiny Test Tubes In Resource-Limited Regions"

July 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Popping the blisters on the bubble wrap might be the most enjoyable thing about moving. But now, scientists propose a more productive way to reuse the popular packing material — as a sheet of small, test tube-like containers for medical and environmental samples. Their report, which shows that analyses can take place right in the bubbles, appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry. George Whitesides and colleagues explain that although bubble wrap filled with biological samples, like blood or urine, or chemicals would have to be handled carefully, the material offers numerous advantages for those living in resource-limited areas. The material is available almost everywhere around the world, is inexpensive, doesn’t generate sharp edges when broken (like glass containers), is easily disposed of by burning and is flexible. The interiors of the bubbles also are sterile, so there’s no need for costly autoclaves that have to be plugged in — a huge plus for the nearly 2 billion people around the world who do not have regular access to electricity.

NJ.com (Piscataway, NJ: 12.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Rutgers Chemistry Professor Kathryn Uhrich Named ACS Fellow"

July 18, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Rutgers University Chemistry & Chemical Biology (CCB) Professor Kathryn Uhrich, a renowned polymer scientist, has been named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. Uhrich, a Plainfield resident, will be honored during the ACS 248th National Meeting & Exposition in San Francisco on August 11. A CCB faculty member since 1995, Uhrich leads a Rutgers laboratory that designs biocompatible and biodegradable polymers for medical, dental and personal care applications. She has trained over 160 junior and senior scientists in polymer chemistry and generated nearly $30 million in federal and corporate funding. Uhrich is the former Dean of Mathematical and Physical Sciences in the Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The race is on to power the next generation of electric cars"

July 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A major shift from gasoline-powered to affordable electric vehicles feels tantalizingly close, but the battery technology that could make it happen still needs to catch up to its own hype. Although luxury-car maker Tesla is banking on lithium-ion to power future generations of electric vehicles, others are taking a chance on promising new approaches, according an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. Alex Scott, a senior editor at C&EN, notes that the all-new Tesla Model S, which can go an impressive 300 miles on one charge, already shows what a lithium-ion battery can do. The catch is that at $80,000, the high-end model is out of reach for most customers. And its battery, which is stored under the floor of the car, is the size of a double mattress and weighs 1,500 pounds.

More than 10 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits), AllVoices (San Francisco, CA: 471,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits)
"Cocaine, cash and chemistry: 4 scientifically rich facts about money"

July 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Chances are those dollars in your pocket have a trace of cocaine on them. Don’t worry — most bank notes in the U.S. do. Your cash also contains invisible ink and has likely been through a washing machine before it came out of the ATM. For more, watch this week’s Reactions episode, which features a stack of chemistry facts about the almighty dollar.

Science Recorder (734,000 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop new anti-glare, anti-reflective display for mobile devices"

July 16, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

According to a report from the American Chemical Society (ACS), scientists announced in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a new glass surface that reduces both glare and reflection – both of which continue to plague even the top mobile displays. Researcher Valerio Pruneri and colleagues reported that considerable effort has been poured into anti-reflective and anti-glare technology.  So, in this highly competitive digital age, any extra feature on a device gives it an edge.  However, bonus features have not included an integrated anti-glare, anti-reflective display.  This often leads users to have to buy a filter or film for their device to set atop their glass screens so they can use the devices in bright light.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage"

July 15, 2014

A three-dimensional porous nanostructure would have a balance of strength, toughness and ability to transfer heat that could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage and composite materials that perform multiple functions, according to engineers at Rice University. The researchers made this prediction by using computer simulations to create a series of 3-D prototypes with boron nitride, a chemical compound made of boron and nitrogen atoms. Their findings were published online July 14 in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C. The 3-D prototypes fuse one-dimensional boron nitride nanotubes and two-dimensional sheets of boron nitride.

Michigan State University
"MSU professor named American Chemical Society Fellow"

July 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Michigan State University’s Robert Maleczka has been named a fellow of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. The title will be given to 99 distinguished scientists who have demonstrated outstanding accomplishments in chemistry and have made important contributions to the ACS. The 2014 fellows will be recognized at an induction ceremony during the society’s 248th national meeting next month in San Francisco. Maleczka began his MSU career in 1995. He is currently a professor of chemistry as well as chairperson of the Department of Chemistry, a post he has held since 2010.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Innovative technique may transform the hunt for new antibiotics and cancer therapies"

July 14, 2014

Antibiotic resistance is depleting our arsenal against deadly diseases and infections, such as tuberculosis and Staph infections, but recent research shows promise to speed up the drug discovery process. In a study reported in ACS Chemical Biology ("Nucleophilic 1,4-Additions for Natural Product Discovery"), University of Illinois researchers developed a new technique to quickly uncover novel, medically relevant products produced by bacteria. Past techniques involved screening more than 10,000 samples to find a novel product, said principal investigator Doug Mitchell, assistant professor of chemistry and Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) member. But by using this new technique, Mitchell’s lab discovered a novel product after screening just a few dozen soil bacteria.

University of Southern California News
"Prakash to be honored as American Chemical Society fellow"

July 15, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Surya Prakash PhD ’78, holder of the George A. and Judith A. Olah Nobel Laureate Chair in Hydrocarbon Chemistry, professor of chemistry and director of the USC Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, has been named a fellow of the American Chemical Society. Prakash, who has significantly advanced methanol chemistry and has helped the world develop viable alternatives to fossil fuels, among other groundbreaking research, is among 99 newly elected ACS fellows. The 2014 class will be honored at a special ceremony during the ACS national meeting on Aug. 11.

Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 81,700 unique monthly visits)
"Nanocamera takes pictures at distances smaller than light’s wavelength"

July 18, 2014

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have demonstrated that an array of novel gold, pillar-bowtie nanoantennas (pBNAs) can be used like traditional photographic film to record light for distances that are much smaller than the wavelength of light (for example, distances less than ~600 nm for red light). A standard optical microscope acts as a “nanocamera” whereas the pBNAs are the analogous film. … “Particle manipulation is the proof-of-principle application,” stated Brian Roxworthy, first author of the group’s paper, "Multifunctional Plasmonic Film for Recording Near-Field Optical Intensity," published in the journal, Nano Letters. “Specifically, the trajectory of trapped particles in solution is controlled by the pattern written into the pBNAs. This is equivalent to creating channels on the surface for particle guiding except that these channels do not have physical walls (in contrast to those optofluidics systems where physical channels are fabricated in materials such as PDMS).”

More than 8 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"Dispersant from Deepwater Horizon spill found to persist in the environment"

July 16, 2014

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) spill in the Gulf of Mexico was the largest accidental release of oil into the ocean, with approximately 210 million gallons gushing from the blown out well. In an attempt to prevent vast quantities of oil from fouling beaches and marshes, BP applied 1.84 million gallons of chemical dispersant to oil released in the subsurface and to oil slicks at the sea surface. The dispersant was thought to rapidly degrade in the environment. A new study by scientists at Haverford College and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) has found that the dispersant compound DOSS, which decreases the size of oil droplets and hampers the formation of large oil slicks, remains associated with oil and can persist in the environment for up to four years. The study was recently published in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than 8 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Bio-medicine.org (U.S.: 40,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

CompleteHerbalGuide.com
"Don’t get fooled by sunscreen claims"

July 17, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

The summer sun is beating down and people are slapping on the sunscreen to keep the burn away. Meanwhile the Food and Drug Administration is cracking down on manufacturers’ claims that SPFs over 50 provide significantly more sun protection. Speaking of Chemistry, a new video series from Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), is here to help sort out the broad spectrum of sunscreen science.

Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits)
"Cocaine, cash and chemistry: 4 scientifically rich facts about money"

July 14, 2014
Publicized in: OPA Press Release

Chances are those dollars in your pocket have a trace of cocaine on them. Don't worry — most bank notes in the U.S. do. Your cash also contains invisible ink and has likely been through a washing machine before it came out of the ATM. For more, watch this week's Reactions episode, which features a stack of chemistry facts about the almighty dollar. The video is available at http://youtu.be/bAIwFaPycaU. Subscribe to the series at Reactions YouTube, and follow us on Twitter @ACSreactions to be the first to see our latest videos.

Tech 2
"Novel Glass: Researchers develop affordable anti-glare display for mobiles"

July 19, 2014
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers Valerio Pruneri and Prantik Mazumder have devised an affordable solution to provide anti-reflection displays to smartphones and other mobile devices. One of the usual quibbles with mobile devices, which a lot of brands are a victim of, is the presence of reflective screens that make reading in bright outdoors quite a task. Buying an anti-reflective film is an added expense and is not all that durable. … As published by the ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Novel Glass is a monolithically integrated micro and nano-structured glass surface with antiglare, antireflection and super hydrophobic properties. In simple terms, the roughened glass surface scatters light to resist glare and moisture, without hurting the transparency.

Science Blog
"New technique may transform hunt for antibiotics and cancer therapies"

July 15, 2014

Antibiotic resistance is depleting our arsenal against deadly diseases and infections, such as tuberculosis and Staph infections, but recent research shows promise to speed up the drug discovery process. In a study reported in ACS Chemical Biology, University of Illinois researchers developed a new technique to quickly uncover novel, medically relevant products produced by bacteria. Past techniques involved screening more than 10,000 samples to find a novel product, said principal investigator Doug Mitchell, assistant professor of chemistry and Institute for Genomic Biology (IGB) member. But by using this new technique, Mitchell’s lab discovered a novel product after screening just a few dozen soil bacteria.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.