ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Needle-Free Tattoos Can Check Diabetics' Sugar Levels"

January 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A temporary electronic "tattoo" may one day offer diabetics a bloodless way to check blood sugar levels, researchers say. Diabetes affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is among the leading causes of death and disability. People with diabetes must test their glucose levels several times a day, using devices with a tiny needle to draw blood from a fingertip. … The scientists detailed their findings in the Jan. 6 issue of the journal Analytical Chemistry.

NPR (Washington, DC: 32.7 million weekly listeners)
"What's More Nutritious, Orange Juice Or An Orange? It's Complicated"

January 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

We all could probably eat more fruits and vegetables. But if forced to choose between whole fruit or a glass of juice, which one seems more healthful? The general advice is to opt for the fruit, since juices are stripped of the fiber – which most us don't get enough of — in whole fruit. And let's face it: Most juice contains a lot of sugar, which most of us consume too much of. … The findings, which appear in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, are scientifically intriguing.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 22 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists test new anti-cocaine vaccine"

January 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists are taking a new approach in developing a vaccine to end cocaine addiction. Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., have created a vaccine that uses the body's immune system to balance out the high that cocaine causes. … The researchers detail their findings in the American Chemical Society journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

More than 15 media outlets, including The Scientist (New York, NY: 68,100 unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 16.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Hacker-foiling keyboard generates power, recognizes your keystrokes"

January 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

When you think about it, we modern humans, collectively, are burning through a heck of a lot of calories every day by pounding away on our computer keyboards. Researchers have found a way to convert that mechanical energy into actual power through a new smart keyboard. … The journal ACS Nano recently published an article on it.

More than 75 media outlets, including Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Fast Company (Harlan, IA: 482,700 unique monthly visits), News Everyday (237,200 unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Why bleaching wrecks your hair (and how to make it better)"

January 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Hair dye isn't magic. It's actually a precise science. And if you think you can tug the pigment out of your hair without damaging it, my split ends have got news for you, bud. In the latest video from Chemical and Engineering News' "Speaking of Chemistry" series, host Matt Davenport explains just why a rigorous bleaching takes such a toll on your fussy follicles. But first, some basic hair science.

More than 5 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Independent (London, U.K.: 16.6 million unique monthly visits)
"It turns out there's a lot of gold in your excrement"

January 22, 2015

A team of brave researchers has discovered that sewage in major cities can be home to millions of pounds worth of gold and other metals. After studying sludge - the “goo left behind when treating sewage” - in cities across the US, the team from Arizona State University found that a city with a million people can produce about £13 million (£8.65m) in precious metals each year. It turns out our sewage is a treasure trove full of valuable elements like gold, silver, copper and platinum, according to the research published in the Environmental Science & Technology journal.

More than 15 media outlets, including The Smithsonian (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Discover Magazine (New York, NY: monthly circulation 850,000) and The Weather Network (362,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Smart Keyboard That Knows Who's Typing Could Make Passwords Stronger"

January 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If you've ever worked in an office with someone who types like a jackhammer, it's obvious we all type a little differently. Now scientists have created a prototype of a keyboard that can identify users by their unique typing patterns. It could point to a next generation of passwords that don't just take into account what you're typing, but how. The keyboard, described this week in the journal ACS Nano, comes with a whole host of smart features: a hydrophobic coating that repels dirt and grime, the ability to generate electricity from the tapping of keys.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits
"Micro-machines journey inside animal for first time"

January 19, 2015

In a case of science fiction meeting reality, microscopic "machines" have journeyed inside a living animal for the first time. The tiny devices delivered a cargo of nano-particles into the stomach lining of a mouse. The research by scientists at the University of California is published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits) and GOOD (Los Angeles, CA: 1.0 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Bustle (New York, NY: 24.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Winter Survival Life Hacks from the American Chemical Society Make the Snow Way More Bearable"

January 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

All things considered, the winter hasn’t been that bad so far. We did, however, finally get a decent snow where I live last night, so these winter survival chemistry hacks couldn’t have arrived at a better time. Brought to us by the American Chemical Society’s Reactions web series, they’re just what the doctor ordered to make getting through the cold weather a little tiny bit easier. The best part? They’re all based in science. Fun!

More than 5 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 785,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

io9 (Sydney, Australia: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"The First Demonstration Of Self-Propelled Nanobots In A Living Animal"

January 19, 2015

Researchers from the University of California have developed acid-fueled micro-machines capable of traveling and delivering cargo directly inside a living creature. It's a breakthrough that's expected to significantly advance the field of medical nano-robotics. … Read the entire study at ACS Nano.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Improving Your iPhone's Battery Life Through Deep-Fried Chemistry"

January 20, 2015

Graphene has been called a “wonder material” and a new process to develop the super-strong, ultra-thin material could make batteries last a lot longer. The new technology was discovered by South Korean scientists who exposed small amounts of graphene, a material made from pure carbon and 200 times stronger than steel to a process that's a lot like deep-frying chicken. … Sang-Hoon Park, a materials scientist at Yonsei University, told Chemical & Engineering News his team’s goal was to develop three-dimensional clusters of graphene to increase its surface area, and therefore its ability to store power.

More than 10 media outlets, including Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Times (Washington, DC: 8.4 million unique monthly visits)
"True cybersecurity: ‘Intelligent’ computer keyboard identifies users by pattern of their key taps"

January 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Protective computer passwords have some competition. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a novel intelligent computer keyboard that not only cleans itself - but can identify users by the pattern and style of their fingertips and keystrokes. The “human-machine interfacing” device reported in the American Chemical Society’s academic journal ACS Nano, could provide a foolproof way to prevent unauthorized users from gaining direct access to computers.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Designed Molecules Trap Cancer Cells in Deadly Cages"

January 22, 2015

Chemists have designed a carbohydrate-based molecule that can surround and strangle bone cancer cells by self-assembling into a tangled web of nanofibers (Journal of the American Chemical 2014, DOI: 10.1021/ ja5111893). The molecule spares healthy cells because its assembly is triggered by an enzyme that’s overexpressed on cancer cells.

Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"New nicotine vaccine may succeed at treating smoking addiction, where others have failed"

January 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

If you're a smoker who's trying to quit, you may recall hearing about vaccines designed to cause the body's immune system to treat nicotine like a foreign invader, producing antibodies that trap and remove it before it's able to reach receptors in the brain. … A paper on the research was recently published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Headlines & Global News (1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Orange Juice Is Healthier Than Fresh Fruit? Finding Suggest There Is Some Truth Behind It"

January 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Many health advisors urge their patients to choose water over orange juice due to the high concentration of sugar in the beverage, but new research suggests this may not necessarily be the best advice. New findings suggest certain nutrients could be easier for the body to absorb when consumed in juice form as opposed to as whole fruit, the American Chemical Society reported.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"What does a GOP-led Congress mean for science — and the public?"

January 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

With Republicans now at the helm, Congress is gearing up to pursue a legislative agenda with potentially profound implications for science and how it informs policies on the environment, energy, health and agriculture. Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the science-related issues facing the new Congress.

More than 5 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000)
"Nanoparticle drug stops cancer’s spread in mice"

January 22, 2015

When a person dies from cancer, the culprit is usually not the original tumor but rather the cancerous cells that spread throughout the body and replicate in distant organs, a process called metastasis. … In a paper posted online this month in ACS Nano, Adema and his colleagues report packaging P-3Fax-Neu5Ac into nanosized, biodegradable vesicles made from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), or PLGA, a compound already approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

… TV and Radio News

WGN (Chicago, IL: Local Viewership 160,569)
"Oranges versus orange juice: Which one might be better for your health?"

January 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] So which is better? A juicy orange or orange juice? Many fear the sugars in juice sour the benefits, but The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry reports, despite the sugar content, the nutrients in orange juice are easier for the body to absorb compared to the unprocessed fruit itself. Oranges are packed with vitamin C and flavinoids that boost the immune system and may even help ward off cancer. In juice form, those benefits may be even sweeter. Have a drink a day and keep your heart healthy.

More than 5 media outlets, including WTIC-HFD (FOX) (Hartford-New Haven, CT: Local Viewership 32,818) and WGBY 57 (PBS) (Springfield, MA: Local Viewership 4,676) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

The News Reports
"Vaccine kills cocaine’s buzz; could help addicts quit"
January 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In a bid to help addicts overcome the urge of snorting on cocaine permanently, scientists are developing a vaccine that dulls cocaine’s psychotropic effects using a new approach that utilises a bacterial protein to trigger an immune system attack on cocaine if it enters the body. Published in ACS journal Molecular Pharmaceutics, the study claims that this immune response could dull cocaine’s psychotropic effects.

Science 2.0
"Is There A Difference In Nutrient Uptake Between Oranges And Orange Juice?"

January 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It's become a fad for nutritionists to claim that oranges are better than orange juice, and they list numerous reasons - from added sugar in juice to better uptake of carotenoids, flavonoids and Vitamin C in whole oranges. … Writing in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Ralf Schweiggert, Julian Aschoff and colleagues note that oranges have nutrients such as carotenoids and flavonoids that, among other benefits, may potentially help lower a person's risk for certain cancers and cardiovascular disease.

Science Codex
"Heat boosts phthalate emissions from vinyl crib mattress covers"

January 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The U.S. continues to look at the use and regulation of phthalates, which have been associated with health problems. Of particular concern is the safety of these plastic additives to children. A new study aims to improve our understanding of one possible exposure route for babies: vinyl crib mattress covers. Scientists report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that as these covers warm up, they emit more phthalates into the air.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Ecstasy Levels Spike In Rivers Near Major Music Festival"

January 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Levels of the illegal drug ecstasy were found to have spiked in rivers near a major music festival in Taiwan that draws more than a half-million revelers annually. Researchers said they're concerned not only about widespread use of the drug at the festival, but its potential effect on aquatic life. A report published Wednesday in Environmental Science & Technology found that during the outdoor music fest "Spring Scream," held each April in southern Taiwan -- attended by approximately 600,000 "pop music fans and youth" -- local rivers show a significant rise in illicit drugs, including MDMA (also known as "ecstasy" or "Molly") and ketamine, as well as caffeine, acetaminophen and pseudoephedrine.

More than 50 media outlets, including Newsweek (New York, NY: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), Jezebel (U.S.: 18.0 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Music Times (5.8 million unique monthly visits), Live Science (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits) and Ars Technica (San Francisco, CA: 1.0 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Ouchless Glucose Testing Possible for Diabetes Patients"

January 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hundreds of millions of people around the world who suffer with diabetes must prick their fingers with a needle or other sharp object once or several times a day to extract a drop of blood which is then used to measure their blood glucose levels. … Scientists from the University of California, San Diego, writing in the American Chemical Society’s journal “Analytical Chemistry”, say that they’ve come up with a new way to test those blood glucose levels without the pain and inconveniences of those finger pricks.

More than 25 media outlets, including RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 15.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Music festival causes spike in ecstasy and caffeine in nearby river"

January 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It turns out that massive music festivals might not just be a noise disruption for locals -- they might be causing issues for nearby aquatic life, too. According to a study published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, these events could be introducing dangerous drugs like ecstasy and ketamine into the water supply, leaving traces of them in rivers and soil.

CNBC (Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: 10.6 million unique monthly visits)
"'Nanowire' clothing could cut your heating bills"

January 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have developed a nearly invisible coating that supercharges a fabric's ability to hold in heat, and it's hoped that the material could make clothes so warm that households could save hundreds of dollars on heating bills. Metals reflect heat very well, but are obviously uncomfortable to wear. To overcome that, researchers at Stanford University coated cloth with flexible, silver "nanowires" that reflect the heat human bodies naturally emit, according to a study published January 7 in the journal Nano Letters, and since discussed in Popular Science.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanowire-Coated Fabric Keeps You Warm So Your House Won’t Have To”
January 12, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Instead of turning up the thermostat up this winter, why not just throw on some nanowire-coated clothing to stay toasty? According to the International Energy Agency, indoor heating accounts for almost half of total global energy usage, mainly on heating residential buildings. In a recent study published in Nano Letters, researchers from Stanford University describe a better way to conserve thermal energy. The nanomaterial-coated fabric they created traps heat inside a person's clothing, thereby removing the necessity to heat empty space and inanimate objects, and lowering the cost of household heating to (theoretically) almost nothing.

More than 20 media outlets, including Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: daily circulation 3.14 million) and GOOD (Los Angeles, CA: 1.0 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Fracking Brings Ammonium and Iodide to Local Waterways"

January 14, 2015

Two hazardous chemicals never before known as oil and gas industry pollutants—ammonium and iodide—are being released and spilled into Pennsylvania and West Virginia waterways from the booming energy operations of the Marcellus shale, a new study shows. The toxic substances, which can have a devastating impact on fish, ecosystems, and potentially, human health, are extracted from geological formations along with natural gas and oil during both hydraulic fracturing and conventional drilling operations, said Duke University scientists in a study published today in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including Ohio.com (Akron, OH: 222,300 unique monthly visits) and Science News (Washington, DC:  107,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (Sydney, Australia: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"There's Millions of Dollars’ Worth of Gold and Silver in Sewage"

January 16, 2015

There's gold in them thar sewers—and silver and platinum and copper, too. A study by Arizona State University (ASU) researchers estimates there is $13 million worth of precious elements in the sewage produced by a million-person city every year. Never think of sewage as stinky worthless waste again. … [Science, Environmental Science Technology]

More than 20 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo! News India (India: 123,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Grist (Seattle, WA: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Would you rather swim in a river of ammonium or MDMA?"

January 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

We have Grist’s official “hot or not” vacation roundup for you, and our theme this week is “Where to get high, and where to die!” Hot: Taiwan, where the rivers now run with MDMA thanks to some hellscape of an EDM festival in Kenting National Park. From CityLab: “During one week in April 2011, the researchers identified in southern rivers the presence of not just ecstasy but ketamine, codeine, pseudoephedrine, caffeine, and prescription drugs for high cholesterol and urinary tract infections, according to a new paper in Environmental Science & Technology.”  

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: monthly circulation 125,000)
"Sewage sludge could contain millions of dollars’ worth of gold"

January 16, 2015

If the holy grail of medieval alchemists was turning lead into gold, how much more magical would it be to draw gold from, well, poop? It turns out that a ton of sludge, the goo left behind when treating sewage, could contain several hundred dollars’ worth of metals—potentially enough to generate millions of dollars’ worth of gold, silver, and other minerals each year for a city of a million people. The upshot: There's as much as $13 million worth of metals in the sludge produced every year by a million-person city, including $2.6 million in gold and silver, they report online this week in Environmental Science & Technology.

Think Progress (8.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Discover Two New Pollutants In Fracking Waste"

January 14, 2015

The primary waste product created by oil and gas drilling contains two types of potentially hazardous contaminants that have never before been associated with the industry, research published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology on Wednesday revealed.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"DNA 'glue' could someday be used to build tissues, organs"

January 14, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A molecules provide the "source code" for life in humans, plants, animals and some microbes. But now researchers report an initial study showing that the strands can also act as a glue to hold together 3-D-printed materials that could someday be used to grow tissues and organs in the lab. This first-of-its-kind demonstration of the inexpensive process is described in the brand-new journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 208,800 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists design nicotine vaccine that provokes robust immune response"

January 12, 2015

When a promising nicotine vaccine failed in clinical trials a few years ago, scientists from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) were determined to keep trying to help smokers overcome their addiction. Now the team has designed a more effective nicotine vaccine and proven that the structures of molecules used in vaccines is critical. The study was published recently in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 82,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000)
"Wrangling over pesticide ingredients comes to a head in 2015"

January 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Consumer advocates are fighting a new rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency that aims to address concerns over “inert” ingredients, including fragrances and dyes, in pesticides for non-food use. They say the proposal, which could become final this year, doesn’t go far enough to protect human health and the environment from the ingredients’ potential impacts, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New catalyst process uses light, not metal, for rapid polymerization"

January 12, 2015

A team of chemistry and materials science experts from University of California, Santa Barbara and The Dow Chemical Company has created a novel way to overcome one of the major hurdles preventing the widespread use of controlled radical polymerization. … Their study was recently detailed in a paper titled "Metal-Free Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization," published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Water, water, everywhere - Controlling the properties of nanomaterials"

January 12, 2015

Scientists at the US Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are learning how the properties of water molecules on the surface of metal oxides can be used to better control these minerals and use them to make products such as more efficient semiconductors for organic light emitting diodes and solar cells, safer vehicle glass in fog and frost, and more environmentally friendly chemical sensors for industrial applications. … In a set of papers published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society and the Journal of Physical Chemistry C , the team of researchers studied cassiterite (SnO2, a tin oxide), representative of a large class of isostructural oxides, including rutile (TiO2).

More than 5 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: monthly circulation 80,000) covered the story.

 … From the Blogs

Tone Deaf
"Drugs From Music Festivals Are Contaminating Your Drinking Water"

January 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It’s hardly news that people use drugs at music festivals, particularly ecstasy. But until recently, the only ones really affected by that drug use, in most cases, was the user. However, according to a newly released study, festival drug consumption could have an untold impact on the surrounding environment. According to a study published last week in the Environmental Science & Technology journal, these events could be introducing drugs like ecstasy and ketamine into the local water supply, leaving traces of them in rivers and soil, potentially impacting local marine life.

Shiny Shiny
"DNA can ‘glue’ 3D printed organs together"

January 15, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists in the U.S have found that strands of DNA molecules can stick together 3D printed materials that could be used to make lab-grown organs and tissue. Andrew Ellington and colleagues from the University of Texas published their results in the American Chemical Society journal Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

The Crop Site
"Wrangling Over Pesticide Ingredients Comes to a Head in 2015"

January 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Consumer advocates are fighting a new rule proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency that aims to address concerns over "inert" ingredients, including fragrances and dyes, in pesticides for non-food use. They say the proposal, which could become final this year, doesn't go far enough to protect human health and the environment from the ingredients' potential impacts, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.