FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | June 06, 2011

American Chemical Society hosts Capitol Hill briefing on innovation, jobs and patents on June 8

WASHINGTON, June 6, 2011 — The American Chemical Society (ACS) Science & the Congress Project invites news media to attend a luncheon briefing on “Innovation, Jobs, and Patents: Understanding the Connection.” It will be held Wednesday, June 8, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in Room 2261, Rayburn House Office Building. Please RSVP to http://tinyurl.com/patent-jobs.

This briefing is hosted by the ACS Science and the Congress Project, with honorary co-hosts Rep. Judy Biggert (R-IL) and Rep. Rush Holt (D-NJ), Co-Chairs of the Congressional R&D Caucus and Rep. Ben Quayle (R-AZ), Chairman of the Subcommittee on Technology and Innovation, House Committee on Science, Space and Technology.

This briefing will explore how U.S. intellectual property policy impacts the ability of U.S. science and technology innovators and entrepreneurs to compete and provide high-paying jobs. Our educational system and industrial companies have a long history of placing the United States as a world leader in intellectual property. The connection between this and American jobs has been seriously impacted by global competition and the economic downturn. To learn how intellectual property policy can help create and preserve jobs, particularly in light of pending patent reform legislation, join this event. The briefing will feature the following panelists and an open discussion:

Panelists:

  • Teresa Stanek Rea, Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Intellectual Property and Deputy Director, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office
  • W. Bernard Carlson, Ph.D., Professor, University of Virginia
  • Matthew Gevaert, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer, KIYATEC
  • Paul Sharer, Esq., Partner, Jones Day

The Science & the Congress Project was established in 1995 to provide a neutral and credible source of scientific information targeted to policymakers on Capitol Hill. Expert speakers are chosen to provide a balanced presentation about the topic under discussion, and their comments are independent of any position that may be held by the ACS, the sponsors of Science & the Congress, or its co-hosts. More information.

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