FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | Thu Nov 17 15:42:03 EST 2011

Four new American Chemical Society podcasts shine a light on solar energy

WASHINGTON, Nov. 17, 2011 — The American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, today released a series of audio podcasts highlighting the science and cutting-edge technology behind solar power. The podcasts, available without charge at www.acs.org/chemmatters, tell the story of how scientists and students are making progress in harnessing the abundant energy of the sun.

Well-suited for classroom use, the first two episodes explain the chemistry behind solar power — a promising alternative to fossil fuels that could have a larger role in the years ahead as a sustainable energy source for the world. The third and fourth podcasts describe a competition supported by the U.S. Department of Energy called the Solar Decathlon, in which students compete to build the world’s best solar homes.

The podcasts are based on articles published in the latest issue of ChemMatters, ACS’ magazine for high school students. Published quarterly by the ACS Office of High School Chemistry, each issue contains articles about the chemistry of everyday life and is of interest to high school students and their teachers. To request a free copy of ChemMatters, go to http://fs7.formsite.com/ACSEducation/ChemMatters/index.html.

For more entertaining, informative videos and podcasts from the ACS Office of Public Affairs, view Prized Science, Spellbound, Science Elements, Bytesize Science and Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions.

The American Chemical Society is a non-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 163,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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New American Chemical Society videos explain the
science and technology behind solar power.