Coffee: A Chemical and Physical Perspective

Thursday, November 15, 2018

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a beaker of coffee

Whether you call it Joe, Java, or C8H10N4O2 there is no denying the awesome hold that coffee has on our daily routine. The coffee industry accounts for 1.5% of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product and with every caffeinated cup consumed the coffee market is only getting stronger, with $76 billion in revenue last year and a projection of $89 billion by 2021. However, the variability in coffee flavor limits the end consumer experience and is the reason why you may enjoy a “good” cup one day, but not the next.

Join the Atlantic’s “Specialty Coffee’s Resident Scientist” Christopher Hendon of the University of Oregon in this free interactive broadcast as he uses chemistry and physics, to discuss how to isolate the most impactful variables in the reproduction of cup quality, while optimizing the usage of coffee to maximize profitability and flavor.

What You Will Learn

  • How water chemistry impacts the perceivable flavors in a cup of coffee
  • How the temperature of whole coffee beans determine the particle size distribution produced by a grinder
  • How to systematically improve coffee production (focusing on espresso, but applicable to all brew methods), while reducing wasted coffee mass

Additional Resources

The Fine Print

ACS Webinars® does not endorse any products or services. The views expressed in this presentation are those of the presenters and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the American Chemical Society.

Experts  

Christopher Hendon
University of Oregon

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