Newsmaker Awards

Newsmaker awards are given each year at the fall meeting. These individuals are members that are recognized for their efforts to bring chemistry and chemical engineering into the mainstream press. The award recognizes the ACS journal, meeting, division and individual member that generated the most media coverage to the widest audience.

2002 Newsmaker Recipients

For research in an ACS Journal that generated media coverage to the widest audience:
Mohamed M. Rafi, Ph.D.
, Rutgers University and Chi-Tang Ho, Ph.D., Rutgers University, for research on the anti-cancer properties of myrrh published in the Journal of Natural Products that reached a potential audience of 23.8 million.

For research at an ACS meeting that generated media coverage to the widest audience:
Aaron C. Foss
, former Purdue University graduate student and Nicholas A. Peppas, Sc.D. professor of chemical and biomedical engineering at Purdue, for their research on “Insulin Delivery” presented at the Chicago National Meeting that reached a potential audience of 54.4 million.

For outstanding individual contributions to media coverage about ACS and chemistry:
George Preti
, Monell Chemical Senses Center and Pamela Dalton, Monell Chemical Senses Center for participating in numerous press interviews – a C&EN story reached a potential audience of more than 7 million.

For identifying news in an ACS journal:
A. Douglas Kinghorn
, Ph.D., for alerting the Communications Department to findings on myrrh, published in Journal of Natural Products.

For identifying news from an ACS division:
John Finley
, Kraft Foods, for providing guidance on symposia, reading through abstracts for Chicago meeting, shared insight into biotech program at San Francisco, and ability to explain the complexities of food chemistry to a lay audience.

2001 Newsmaker Recipients

For research in an ACS journal that generated media coverage to the widest audience:
Donald R. Buhler
, Oregon State University, Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Corvallis, Oregon, on a Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry paper that found prenylated flavonoids a better source of antioxidants than red wine, green tea or soy products. Media coverage of this paper reached a potential audience of more than 7 million.

For research at an ACS meeting that generated media coverage to the widest audience:
Lisa A. Young
, Division of Space History, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution, a panelist at the “Preserving Museum Treasures from Old Masters to Space Suits.” Her assistance with identifying persons to participate in the symposium and scheduling the press conference, presented via the Internet, contributed to the success of the web cast. The media coverage reached a potential audience of over 18 million.

For outstanding individual contributions to media coverage about ACS and chemistry:
Robin D. Rogers
, Department of Chemistry and Center for Green Manufacturing, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa and editor of Crystal Growth & Design, for his role in the New York Times article about ionic liquids – poised to revolutionize industrial chemistry and dramatically reduce pollution at its source. The article reached a potential audience of 1.7 million.

For identifying news in an ACS journal:
James N. Seiber
, editor, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry and also with the Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Davis. His diligent identification of newsworthy articles led to media coverage that reached a potential audience of over 23 million.

For identifying news from an ACS division:
Max Bernstein
, GEOC division. Media coverage of this division reached a potential audience of nearly 1.6 million.