Kenneth G. Hancock Memorial Award

Sponsors

The ACS Division of Environmental Chemistry and the National Institute of Standards & Technology. The award is administered by the ACS Green Chemistry Institute®.

Purpose

The award provides national recognition and honor for outstanding student contributions to furthering the goals of green chemistry through research and/or studies. This includes but is not limited to the research, development, and implementation of fundamental and innovative chemical technologies that incorporate the principles of green chemistry into chemical design, manufacture, and use, and that have the potential to be utilized in achieving national pollution prevention goals.

Nature

The recipient of the award receives $1000. The award is presented in conjunction with the annual Green Chemistry & Engineering Conference which will be held June 13-15, 2017, in Reston, VA.

Eligibility

The award is open to undergraduate and graduate students, regardless of citizenship or country of study. Students who completed their degree prior to May 1 of the year before the application year are not eligible for the award.

Establishment & Support

To honor his contributions in the field of green chemistry, Dr. Hancock’s colleagues from academia, government, and industry established the Kenneth G. Hancock Memorial Student Award in Green Chemistry, offered under the auspices of the ACS Division of Environmental Chemistry. ACS President Dr. Paul Anderson announced the Hancock Memorial Award in June 1997 as an opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to compete for a prestigious award in recognition of their studies and/or research in green chemistry. In 2006, the ACS Division of Environmental Chemistry and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) expanded the award.

Read more about Kenneth Hancock, former Director of the Division of Chemistry at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and one of the earliest proponents of green chemistry, in the application document above.

2016 Hancock Award Winner
2016 Hancock Award Winner Austin Evans, an undergraduate student at The University of Tulsa, was selected for his research on “A Sulfur-Limonene Polysulfide Synthesized Entirely from Industrial Byproducts and Its Use in Removing Toxic Metals from Water and Soil.” His work investigates the use of low-cost, sustainable starting materials for polymer synthesis and provides an environmentally useful alternative for removing toxic metals from water that benefits communities. Presented by Tom Connelly, ACS Executive Director/Chief Executive Officer.
ACS GCI
2016 Hancock Award Winner
2016 Hancock Award Winner Jesse Vanderveen, a graduate student at Queen’s University, was selected for his research on “Switchable hydrophilicity solvents: benign alternatives to volatile organic solvents for syntheses, extractions, and separations.” The study explores safer alternatives to solvents and distillation that decrease harmful impacts from the production process to the environment and to human health, as well as financial risk to industry investors. Presented by Tom Connelly, ACS Executive Director/Chief Executive Officer.
ACS GCI