Division of Chemical Information: Abstract Submission

Submission Deadline: March 28, 2016

Program Chair(s): Elsa Alvaro

This table presents information regarding abstract submissions for the Division of Chemical Information.

Note: Submission deadlines (all deadlines are 11:59 EST on the day posted) and symposia are subject to change. Last updated April 01, 2016.

Title Type Organizer Cosponsor Symposium Description
CINF Scholarships for Scientific Excellence-Poster

Poster

The international scholarship program of the Division of Chemical Information (CINF) of the American Chemical Society (ACS) sponsored by ACS Publications (http://pubs.acs.org) is designed to reward students in chemical information and related sciences for scientific excellence and to foster their involvement in CINF. Up to three scholarships valued at $1,000 each will be awarded at the 252th ACS National Meeting in Philadelphia, PA, August 21 - 25, 2016. Student applicants must be enrolled at a certified college or university; postdoctoral fellows are also invited to apply. They will present a poster during the Welcoming Reception of the Division on Sunday evening at the National Meeting. Additionally, they will have the option to also show their poster at the Sci-Mix session on Monday night. To apply, please inform the Chair of the selection committee, Stuart Chalk at schalk@unf.edu that you are applying for a scholarship. Abstracts for the poster must be submitted electronically through MAPS (http://maps.acs.org). Additionally, please send to me by May 30, 2016, a 2,000-word abstract in electronic form describing the work to be presented. Any questions related to applying for one of the scholarships should be directed to the same e-mail address. Winners will be chosen based on contents, presentation and relevance of the poster and they will be announced during the Sunday reception. The contents shall reflect upon the student's work and describe research in the field of cheminformatics and related sciences.
Beyond Citations: Challenges & Opportunities in Altmetrics-Oral

Oral

Assessing the impact of research outputs is becoming increasingly important for scholars, evaluators, and other stakeholders in academia. In addition to the more traditional peer-review and citation-based metrics, the use of alternative metrics seems to be gaining momentum. Altmetrics and usage metrics are a set of new metrics that seek to expand what it means for research outputs to be impactful by measuring a wide range of metrics. Generated from social and other online tools, these metrics aim at demonstrating the attention and engagement materials are receiving that go beyond traditional citation counts. This symposium will provide an overview of the range of these traditional and emerging metrics, and its role in chemistry. Some of the questions that may be addressed: - What are the most important metrics indicators? What are their values and limitations? - What are the current challenges of altmetrics? - How are metrics being used by different stakeholders, including researchers, publishers, grant funders and libraries? - How can libraries use altmetrics in the decision making process, including integration in institutional repositories, and collection management? - How do metrics, specifically altmetrics, relate to impact?
Bringing Cheminformatics into the College Chemistry Classroom-Oral

Oral

CHED: Division of Chemical Education

This symposium seeks papers on various topics related to the teaching of Cheminformatics to Chemistry majors. We seek papers related to the use of Cheminformatics technologies and resources in both Cheminformatics and other classes across the curriculum. The objective of this symposium is to provide educators and cheminformaticians the opportunity to share resources and experiences.
Chemistry Data for the People: From Policy to Practice-Oral

Oral

Chemistry data are of particular value to quality of life in describing the human-constructed environment and post-publication data processing has been the prominent model for serving consumable data for many decades across the chemistry enterprise. In the current environment, there are many drivers pushing more direct delivery of usable data upstream, in repositories, in conjunction with article publication, or even prior. What opportunities does this present to chemistry and chemists for improving the conduct of science? What lessons can be derived from existing community based data publication practices to lower activation barriers? What technical and economic resources would be constructive in shifting data publication practices? This symposium will focus on the gamut of stakeholders and associated roles and services, from data generators and consumers, to data and information management system developers, to research funders and publishers, to local service providers and educators.
Using New Media to Communicate Chemistry to the Public-Invited, Oral

Oral

Although individual molecules aren’t visible to the naked eye, chemistry is a visual science. The scaffolds of the molecules themselves tell a story. Reactions in the lab change color and fizz. But the printed word doesn’t always do justice to chemistry’s dynamic nature. In this session, science communicators using nonprint media to share chemistry with the public will discuss their strategies to capture the public’s imagination—something other science fields have been more readily able to do. Presenters who use videos, podcasts, blogs, infographics, television, and social media will explain how they use these forms of media to showcase chemistry’s impact on everyday life and increase how often chemistry is shared in the popular news cycle.
Citizen Science & Applications in Chemistry-Oral

Oral

Citizen Science is a phenomenon that has grown in popularity in recent years. Although it could be argued that citizen scientists have been around long before professional scientists appeared on the scene, a movement, perhaps starting with the SETI@Home, allowed individuals to share in distributed computing projects by making their computers available during otherwise idle time periods. More active participation has come about through efforts like GalaxyZoo and FoldIt. This symposium will examine projects to engage the general public in research efforts in science, and more specifically in chemistry, and to understand the potential impact of such projects.
Effectively Harnessing the Worlds Literature to Inform Rational Compound Design-Oral

Oral

MEDI: Division of Medicinal Chemistry

How often has it happened that a chemist is busy pursuing a compound series identified by an internal high-throughput screen against a protein target, only to find out mid-project that related compounds have been published, patented, or presented, sometimes against a completely unrelated target? Or in the course of HTS triage, that a heavily mined series was selected for follow-up when another equally promising, under-explored series was available to pursue? One could argue that a competent researcher should be aware of all developments in their field of interest. However, with the explosion of medchem and patent literature, publicly available databases, and vendors willing to sell data-mining software, it has become increasingly difficult to wrap one’s head around all available sources of data. This symposium will focus on practical applications where researchers have developed platforms to simultaneously mine internally generated data and the world’s literature, presenting the results in a meaningful way to permit informed compound design. Case histories will be shown where the use of such tools has had a direct impact on novel compound selection and design, with take-home messages on approaches that have proven useful in this process.
General Papers-Oral

Oral

Herman Skolnik Award Symposium-Invited, Oral

Oral

Hunting for Hidden Treasures: Text Mining in Scientific Documents-Oral

Oral

A huge chemical and biological space exists in scientific documents (including patents, journal articles, other publications, internal communications, etc). Due to regulatory and technical limitations, much of this space is not indexed or digitized. Unlocking and making use of this space has long been a challenging task. Also, scientific literature in non-English languages has increased rapidly in recent years, which creates additional complexity in information extraction. This symposium will focus on current developments in chemistry and biology text mining. These discussions can hopefully benefit not only scientists in cheminformatics, but also in publishing, patent laws and governmental agencies. Related research topics include, but are not limited to: 1) chemical and biological information extraction, such as images and names of chemical and biological entities in documents; 2) search and visualization of extracted information, such as structure-activity relationship analysis; 3) patent mining, including Markush structure representation and analysis, white space identification, etc.; 4) different interpretations of chemical information by chemists, information scientists, patent attorneys and patent examiners; and, 5) harmonization of different patent offices and changes in global patent law practices. Traditional medicine described in non-English documents.
Shedding Light on the Dark Genome: Methods, Tools & Case Studies-Oral

Oral

In 2014 the NIH initiated a program titled, “Illuminating the Druggable Genome (IDG)” with the goal of improving our understanding of the properties and functions of proteins that are currently unannotated within the four most commonly drug-targeted protein families (GPCRs, ion channels, nuclear receptors and kinases). As part of this program, a Knowledge Management Center (KMC) was formed as a collaboration between six academic centers, with the goal of developing an integrative informatics platform to collect data, develop data-driven prioritization schemes and analytical methods, and disseminate standardized/annotated information related to the unannotated proteins in the four gene families of interest. In this symposium, members of the various components of the IDG program will present the results of ongoing work related to experimental methods, target prioritization, data aggregation and platform development. In addition, we welcome contributions related to the identification of druggable targets, approaches to quantify druggability, and novel approaches to integrating disparate data sources with the goal of shedding light on the dark genome.
Topics In Spectral Data Informatics-Oral

Oral

ANYL: Division of Analytical Chemistry
POLY: Division of Polymer Chemistry

This symposium will cover IR/Raman, MS and/or NMR spectral data informatics issues and innovations. Topics acceptable for abstract submission include: database organization issues, data search, storage, retrieval, and data visualization and display, as well as automated spectral assignment and comparison issues from an informatics perspective. This symposium will focus on software and informatics issues regarding spectral data, and will not deal with methods or hardware innovations.
Using Public Information to Support a Chemical Safety Culture-Oral

Oral

CHAS: Division of Chemical Health and Safety

Many open information databases, such as PubChem, Wikipedia and Orgsyn, include chemical safety information. This symposium will address important questions about this information. What are the criteria that should be used to assess the quality of this information and turning it into specific hazard management practices in the lab? What information tools are available to address this need? What are the strengths and limitations of these tools?