July 31 - August 4, 2022

2022 Biennial Conference on Chemical Education

Purdue University |  West Lafayette, IN

American Chemical Society Division of Chemical Education  |  New Approaches to Modern Challenges

Thomas Bussey and Carly Schnoebelen, Program Chairs

Submission Deadline: February 28, 2022

List of Topics
Program Area Type Invited Organizers Sponsor

Exploring strategies for decreasing DFW rates in General & Organic Chemistry

A simple metric for measuring student success is the course’s DFW rate (D,F, Withdrawal). The purpose of this symposium is to introduce and explore strategies implemented in General & Organi… Read More

A simple metric for measuring student success is the course’s DFW rate (D,F, Withdrawal). The purpose of this symposium is to introduce and explore strategies implemented in General & Organic Chemistry courses that aim to increase overall student success, notably for students who are at risk of not passing. Attendees and presenters can get ideas from others regarding strategies for decreasing DFW rates amongst their students. This can include institutions and classes of various sizes utilizing multiple teaching styles. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses of these strategies is acceptable.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Amanda Leigh Waters

Eric S. Eitrheim

Sponsor:

Why and/or how do the flipped classroom influence student learning and faculty success in chemistry classes and laboratories?

According to the Flipped Learning Network, flipped learning is a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and th… Read More

According to the Flipped Learning Network, flipped learning is a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the teacher guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter.<br /> One of the major challenges that chemistry students face is applying concepts they learn in the classroom to solve problems and connect it to the other concepts that have already been discussed in the earlier sections. Most students are struggled to know where to start and distinguish between information that is relevant and which are not. The flipped class, interactive learning environment, is one of the unique ways to improve these problem-solving skills. In this symposium, I would like to you to share the experiences, practical advice, suggest recommendations, and tips to implement flipped classroom approach into either lecture class or Laboratory settings.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Roshinee Perera

Sponsor:

Non-dominant Culture in Chemistry (#AdvancingEquityinCER)

Chemistry education has historically been taught through the lens of the dominant culture, translating to chemistry curriculum that do not incorporate alternative ways of knowing. As a resul… Read More

Chemistry education has historically been taught through the lens of the dominant culture, translating to chemistry curriculum that do not incorporate alternative ways of knowing. As a result, many non-majority students find classroom material to be separate from what they experience in their daily lives. This separation makes it difficult for non-majority students to relate to what is taught in the classroom. Culturally relevant education aims to integrate students’ unique cultures and community value sets with academic skills and concepts. This symposium will highlight efforts by researchers and practitioners that bring non-dominant cultures into the chemistry classroom. This symposium was submitted on behalf of a community of practice for scholars seeking to advance education research grounded in equity (#AdvancingEquityinCER).
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kathryn Hosbein

Jeffrey Spencer

Sponsor:

Research Beyond Course Undergraduate Research Experiences

Course undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) have been shown to be important in improving student critical thinking skills by requiring them to apply concepts learnt in the laboratory. … Read More

Course undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) have been shown to be important in improving student critical thinking skills by requiring them to apply concepts learnt in the laboratory. However, the time limitations prevent full application of CUREs within a typical semester. This symposium seeks to identify effective strategies and best practices that can used by chemical educators from two and four-year institutions for the continuation of the CURE beyond the classroom. Educators are invited to share examples of projects that started off as CUREs in the classroom, but continued well and beyond the CURE duration. Educators are invited to share examples of projects that resulted into the student continuing with the CURE in a PI’s lab. Submissions of projects that started off as a CURE in the classroom, and transgressed into bigger endeavors such as grant ideas, scientific publications in peer review journals, and so on are highly encouraged.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Allan Ayella

Moriah Beck

Sponsor:

C.O.V.I.D.: Carrying Over Valuable Innovative Developments

Due to covid, educators were required to make many innovative changes to instruction. Covid protocols required “outside the box” thinking. What valuable lessons did you learn that will cha… Read More

Due to covid, educators were required to make many innovative changes to instruction. Covid protocols required “outside the box” thinking. What valuable lessons did you learn that will change your instruction going forward--back into in-person settings? Come share your innovative developments that you used during remote or hybrid instruction that will carry over into more traditional settings to improve student learning.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Eric Malina

Sponsor:

Engaging Students in Organic Chemistry: A Symposium to Honor Barbara Murray

Engaging students in organic chemistry is a critical task for an instructor. The material in the traditional one year sequence is foundational for upper level science courses. When students … Read More

Engaging students in organic chemistry is a critical task for an instructor. The material in the traditional one year sequence is foundational for upper level science courses. When students are engaged in learning the fundamental concepts in organic chemistry, they both appreciate the content and identify its applications to other areas. In this symposium, authors share methods for engaging students in organic chemistry. These methods may range from creative activities for individual class topics to pedagogical models utilized over an academic year. Laboratory experiments, writing assignments, lessons that incorporate inclusive language, and innovative assignments are also included.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Patricia Kreke

Barbara Murray

Sponsor:

Media in Teaching and Learning Chemistry

Everyone is exposed to media whether online, broadcast, film, or print. In this symposium, we will share uses of media in teaching and learning chemistry. Examples include uses of media (bro… Read More

Everyone is exposed to media whether online, broadcast, film, or print. In this symposium, we will share uses of media in teaching and learning chemistry. Examples include uses of media (broadly defined) in class assignments, student activities regarding accuracy of scientific information in news reports, or examples of sharing of science in the community via media.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

William Donovan

Sponsor:

Addressing the needs of the non-chemistry majors in general education courses

For many students, their exposure to science in college may be limited to a single course. This can create frustration for instructors who may feel compelled to cover general scientific lite… Read More

For many students, their exposure to science in college may be limited to a single course. This can create frustration for instructors who may feel compelled to cover general scientific literacy as well as specific chemistry content. However, these courses also provide opportunities for instructors to be creative and to interact with a different population of students. This symposium will explore teaching strategies and courses designed with the non-chemistry major in mind. What teaching techniques work best for this diverse population? How are those techniques different from chemistry-major focused classes? What innovations have been developed to address the needs of students in these classes? What are appropriate expectations for these students and should those expectations be different than for chemistry majors? How do we provide opportunities for exploration and engagement in the classroom and in the laboratory? Speakers are encouraged to address how they answer some of these questions but may also explore additional areas. Submissions are encouraged from courses taught in-person, online, or through a hybrid model.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kathryn Kloepper

Garland Crawford

Sponsor:

Jim Spencer Memorial Symposium

In a career of nearly four decades, Jim Spencer was a leader and innovator in the chemical education community. With his passing in the spring of 2021, we have lost a true giant in the field… Read More

In a career of nearly four decades, Jim Spencer was a leader and innovator in the chemical education community. With his passing in the spring of 2021, we have lost a true giant in the field. This symposium will celebrate the wide-ranging and significant impacts that Jim had - and continues to have - on the teaching and learning of chemistry at the high school and college levels.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Richard Moog

Sponsor:

Grading for Growth

In recent years alternatives to the traditional points-based grading system have gained popularity. Many of these course schemes begin with the philosophy that learning is a process and that… Read More

In recent years alternatives to the traditional points-based grading system have gained popularity. Many of these course schemes begin with the philosophy that learning is a process and that all students can be successful (according to their various individual definitions) if given sufficient resources and support. These grading schemes are developed around a growth mindset and are designed to emphasize learning and encourage student perseverance. This symposium explores the variety of approaches to assessing students that are designed to promote and guide student learning, such as mastery-based (e.g. standards-based or specifications-based) grading or ungrading. Presentations discussing specific implementations of such grading schemes, including applications to classroom environment/structure, or more general themes relating to this topic are welcomed. The focus of the symposium will be on undergraduate chemistry courses at any level.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kristina Closser

Daniel A Barr

Sponsor:

Overarching undergraduate curriculum reform

In the past few years there have been several institutions that have committed to innovative reform across the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. This symposium focuses on those programs se… Read More

In the past few years there have been several institutions that have committed to innovative reform across the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. This symposium focuses on those programs seeking to make changes across multiple courses or labs as opposed to single course reform. Talks focusing on challenges to reform and implementation as well as the results of reform are welcomed. Reform efforts in progress are welcomed in addition to those that have completed rollout. Presenters are encouraged to highlight assessment efforts and plans.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Douglas Mulford

Nichole L Powell

Sponsor:

Blended instruction design and assessment: Leveraging technology to promote adaptive learning for college chemistry

In the rapidly changing landscape of chemistry education, approaches that thoughtfully combine Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) and Active Learning Pedagogy (ALP) hold promise to increase … Read More

In the rapidly changing landscape of chemistry education, approaches that thoughtfully combine Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) and Active Learning Pedagogy (ALP) hold promise to increase student engagement, promote adaptive instruction, and improve learning. This symposium will discuss ways to effectively blend TEL and ALP, and the resulting instructional advantages for faculty and students. For example, technological tools - such as online learning activities and homework - can be used to enhance didactic instruction, free up class time for active learning, and provide detailed student performance data to instructors. Evidence-based (open-educational-resources) activities that combine explanations with scaffolded problem-solving, spaced practice and timely feedback can supplement or replace more passive lecture sessions. Instructors can also use detailed usage data gathered online to tailor their in-person instruction. This includes adaptation at the course level, by selecting in-class learning activities that target student needs; and at the individual level, by reaching out to students that the data suggest are struggling with specific aspects of the material or course or are not engaging sufficiently with the course material. Additionally, data gathered online and in-person can be used to evaluate and refine the instruction to increase engagement, improve learning outcomes and optimize the learning environment. This symposium will include presentations from participants in the CA Learning Lab grant project: <i>Improving Learning Outcomes for all General Chemistry Students through Adaptive Hybrid Courses</i>. Presentations are enthusiastically sought from others using TEL and blended learning to adapt instruction to improve student success.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Mark Blaser

David Yaron

Julia Chamberlain

Jaclyn Jeanette Stewart

Sponsor:

George R. Hague Memorial AP/IB Chemistry Symposium

In this all-day popular symposium, participants will hear from the AP Chemistry Chief Reader about lessons learned from the 2022 administration of the AP Chemistry exam. A representative fro… Read More

In this all-day popular symposium, participants will hear from the AP Chemistry Chief Reader about lessons learned from the 2022 administration of the AP Chemistry exam. A representative from the College Board may also present developments in AP Chemistry. In addition, presenters will present pedagogical tools for successfully teaching AP and IB chemistry. Talks which include methods for increasing diversity, accessibility and inclusivity in these courses will be prioritized.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Linda Cummings

Paul David Price

Sponsor:

Engaging Students in Analytical Chemistry - Classroom Practices and Learning Environments

In this symposium we invite presentations from practitioners who are innovating both the classroom and laboratory experiences in analytical chemistry courses at the college level. This sympo… Read More

In this symposium we invite presentations from practitioners who are innovating both the classroom and laboratory experiences in analytical chemistry courses at the college level. This symposium focuses on classroom experiences that engage a diverse student-body with the content of quantitative analysis, instrumental analysis, and corresponding laboratory courses. We invite talks discussing student-focused classroom activities, laboratories, methodologies, assessments, technologies, and any other innovative teaching tools designed to guide students along the path of mastering content covered within the analytical chemistry sequence.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Lynetta Mier

Matthew Queen

Sponsor:

Moving towards anti-deficit framing in our research and practice (#AdvancingEquityinCER)

In what ways should our research focus on the individual, the system, or both? This symposium will address this question by focusing on anti-deficit practices for research of classroom and l… Read More

In what ways should our research focus on the individual, the system, or both? This symposium will address this question by focusing on anti-deficit practices for research of classroom and learning environments. By examining research emphasizing a variety of approaches to inequity, this symposium aims to provide a space for moving away from deficit framing in CER and how to reorient towards anti-deficit processes. In this symposium, we also aim to define the distinction between an asset-based approach and an anti-deficit mindset and draw attention to the utility of each of these frameworks. Our goal is to highlight resources and create a community to explore reframing and its effects on our research and field. The symposium will conclude with a panel discussion of speakers to reflect on anti-deficit research methods. This symposium was submitted on behalf of a community of practice for scholars seeking to advance education research grounded in equity (#AdvancingEquityinCER).
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Stephanie Werner

Guizella A Rocabado

Vanessa Rosa Ralph

Christiane N Stachl

Morgan E. Howe

Sponsor:

Culturally Relevant and Inclusive Chemistry Curriculum and Pedagogies

It has been suggested that as the nation seeks to strengthen its stance in STEM, it must leverage the talents of all citizens, including those from minoritized groups. This symposium will fo… Read More

It has been suggested that as the nation seeks to strengthen its stance in STEM, it must leverage the talents of all citizens, including those from minoritized groups. This symposium will focus on curricular efforts that contribute to a more diverse STEM pipeline. Talks will address impactful teaching and learning support strategies that lead to measurable academic success among diverse populations throughout the chemistry curriculum. Educators will present their experiences with course design, content delivery methods (traditional, flipped, web-enhanced, blended, etc.), non-traditional assessments, and in-class activities that promote critical thinking, skill development, and concept mastery. Such strategies will emphasize the incorporation of diverse perspectives that are relevant to a range of individuals. To this end, talks will highlight curricular activities that allow students from different backgrounds to connect with science personally and cultivate their science identities. Further, best practices will be shared regarding resources and activities external to the classroom that support student success. Presentations will include models for measuring the impact of these strategies, and assessment data on student learning outcomes, retention, and affective traits will be presented. The symposium will be relevant in the chemistry lecture and laboratory and for a range of STEM-based disciplines and academic institutions that desire to acknowledge and encourage the role underrepresented groups play in sustaining our nation’s STEM capabilities.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Leyte Winfield

Jennifer L Muzyka

Shanina Sanders

Sponsor:

Innovations, challenges, and practices in large-enrollment laboratory courses

Large-enrollment laboratory courses face unique challenges in administration, pedagogy, and assessment. As the number of students approaches or exceeds 100 people, the faculty and staff admi… Read More

Large-enrollment laboratory courses face unique challenges in administration, pedagogy, and assessment. As the number of students approaches or exceeds 100 people, the faculty and staff administrating these labs face similar challenges. This symposium aims to provide a space for the directors of large laboratory courses to share their creative approaches to laboratory curriculum, structure, instruction, and execution of their courses. Discussions of the successful implementation of new ideas, as well as lessons learned from not-so-successful ones,<br /> are welcome.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Katie Gesmundo

Sponsor:

Community-Based Learning in Chemistry: Implementation, Best Practices, and Evaluation

Like the scientists they are training to be, students desire authentic engagement with the world around them. There is evidence that community-based learning (CBL) or service-learning (SL) … Read More

Like the scientists they are training to be, students desire authentic engagement with the world around them. There is evidence that community-based learning (CBL) or service-learning (SL) not only enhances feelings of engagement in the community, but also increases confidence and competence in the sciences. However, the logistics of implementation can be imposing, and there is not a one-size-fits-all set of best practices for the design, scaffolding, and evaluation of CBL activities. This symposium seeks to convene current and aspiring practitioners of CBL in chemistry to share ideas on all aspects of CBL including but not limited to initiating and sustaining partnerships with community organizations, designing activities (including ideation, supporting students, and assessment), to evaluating the impact on students and partners.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Yi Jin Gorske

Emily Lesher

Sponsor:

Fun-tastic Games and How to Make/Use Them

Looking for creative ways to make your chemistry classroom (in person or virtual) or lesson more engaging? Content-based games provide an alternative to traditional forms of learning and pro… Read More

Looking for creative ways to make your chemistry classroom (in person or virtual) or lesson more engaging? Content-based games provide an alternative to traditional forms of learning and promote active learning through student-student and student-content interactions. This session will explore game-related questions, such as the following:<i> How do you make educational games?; When and how should games be used in the classroom?; </i>or<i> How do you adapt games to your own classroom setting?</i> This symposium will provide a space for presenters to share their games and their experiences implementing games in the classroom. All types of games are welcome, and presenters are encouraged to use part of their presentation time to engage the audience in a demo of their game.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Theresa Gaines

Zachary Thammavongsy

Rachel M Doughty

Po Yin Bowie Lee

Sponsor:

Engaging Non-Majors in Introductory Chemistry Courses

Many non-chemistry or non-STEM majors enroll in introductory chemistry courses as a part of general education or university curricular requirements. While some students are truly interested … Read More

Many non-chemistry or non-STEM majors enroll in introductory chemistry courses as a part of general education or university curricular requirements. While some students are truly interested in chemistry, many are not excited by the opportunity due to prior experiences or perceptions of the field. Increasing interest and engagement in introductory chemistry courses for non-majors is essential for student success and positively impacts learning of material, overall course grades, and scientific literacy. This symposium will highlight methods used to spark curiosity, interest, and engagement in introductory courses for non-majors. What are you doing in your in-person or virtual classroom to increase student curiosity, motivation, enthusiasm, and appreciation for chemistry? Topics can include innovative course design, active learning activities, creative assessments, service learning projects, or unique demonstrations.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Melissa Mullen Davis

Sponsor:

#Scicomm: The Role of Science Communication

Many of us use TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter to communicate with our friends, family, and colleagues. Social media can be a powerful tool in communicating with the public and our … Read More

Many of us use TikTok, Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter to communicate with our friends, family, and colleagues. Social media can be a powerful tool in communicating with the public and our students. It can empower parents to try activities at home with their children, students to investigate a topic that is interesting to them, and show that science happens in real-time and is done by real people. Social media can also help advance representation in science efforts. This symposium will highlight some of the many ways scientists can communicate with the public. This includes but is not limited to: podcasts, journalism, STEM-influencers, Youtube Channels, and illustrations. If you are sharing science with the general public in a unique way, we encourage you to submit it to this symposium. Presentations will show the platform used and explain the benefits of using that platform or technology, explain how they converted the science from academic to public-facing, and the outcomes of their efforts. Presentations can include demonstrations that use household materials and that are not messy or videos of such activities. </b>
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Stephanie Ryan

Elissia Franklin

Sponsor:

Student Teamwork Management: Efficiently helping students gain knowledge and incorporateing DEI practices

Many teaching techniques (ie POGIL, Team-based learning, laboratory) incorporate teamwork. Working with peers can not only increase learning, but it is a critical skill that students will ne… Read More

Many teaching techniques (ie POGIL, Team-based learning, laboratory) incorporate teamwork. Working with peers can not only increase learning, but it is a critical skill that students will need for success in graduate education and chemistry-based careers.<br /> <br /> This symposium will explore the logistical aspects of teamwork: 1) organizing diverse and equitable teams; 2) helping teams lay a foundation for success; 3) helping teams work inclusively; 4) helping teams to work through conflicts; 5) evaluating the work submitted by a team; and 6) evaluating (including self-evaluating) individual participation and contributions.<br /> <br /> The goal is to help educators to gain the benefits of teamwork in their courses through an exchange of tools, tips, and best-practices.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Amy Gottfried

Sponsor:

Demystifying Spectroscopy: Methods, Innovations, and Best Practices for Teaching Spectroscopic Interpretation and Structure Elucidation in the Undergraduate Classroom.

Most undergraduate organic chemistry courses cover spectroscopic technique and interpretation. The value of covering these topics in the classroom is well documented. The hands-on skills of … Read More

Most undergraduate organic chemistry courses cover spectroscopic technique and interpretation. The value of covering these topics in the classroom is well documented. The hands-on skills of spectroscopic interpretation are applicable to the field of chemistry. More broadly, the general problem-solving skills developed through interpretation and structure elucidation are also valuable. Students, however, often struggle with utilizing spectroscopic data effectively and they stigmatized the topic as overly difficult. Research into how students look at, evaluate, and interpret spectroscopic data is enlightening. How do we as educators use this knowledge to inform and change how these topics are taught in the classroom?<br /> <br /> Spectroscopy is a common topic in the undergraduate classroom and a significant portion of the ACS organic exams but tends to be an underrepresented topic in pedagogical discussions. The talks included in this symposium will highlight current research into how students learn to interpret spectroscopic data and/or innovative pedagogical methods that help students demystify the process.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Christine Theodore

Sponsor:

Favorite half-hour lab experiments

Multi-week laboratory projects are great but some experiments are short and sweet. Perhaps you teach in a workshop format or do experiments during a class period. What is your favorite short… Read More

Multi-week laboratory projects are great but some experiments are short and sweet. Perhaps you teach in a workshop format or do experiments during a class period. What is your favorite short lab? This could be something new, feature cutting edge research, be your take on a classic, an adaptation for time, a demonstration modified to be a hands-on laboratory experiment, an activity to introduce a topic, or a lab that is just fun. Lets share!
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

George Lisensky

Sponsor:

Active Learning in Organic Chemistry

Multiple studies have shown that the use of active learning pedagogies in the classroom result in positive student learning outcomes in science courses. These improved outcomes include highe… Read More

Multiple studies have shown that the use of active learning pedagogies in the classroom result in positive student learning outcomes in science courses. These improved outcomes include higher test scores and final grades, improved understanding of content, lower withdrawal rates, and more positive attitudes toward science. There are many techniques that can be implemented to introduce more active learning into any environment, including those that can be incorporated into traditional lectures, used to flip the classroom, promote collaborative learning, or scaffold construction of knowledge. This symposium includes presentations of organic chemistry faculty who have implemented active learning, broadly defined, in their organic courses.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Alexey Leontyev

Jennifer L Muzyka

Vincent M Maloney

Cathy Welder

Matthew D Casselman

Sponsor:

Gateways to success: Initiatives and programs to support STEM diversity

Nearly half of all undergraduate students enroll in a two-year college at some point in their educational career and many STEM students begin their degree by completing ‘gateway’ introductor… Read More

Nearly half of all undergraduate students enroll in a two-year college at some point in their educational career and many STEM students begin their degree by completing ‘gateway’ introductory chemistry courses at a two-year college. Equity-based and inclusive programs and experiences, particularly in gateway courses and curricula, are vital to the success of this diverse group of STEM students. Chemical educators and administrators are invited to share initiatives, programs, and partnerships that support and promote successful course, transfer, and degree completion for students starting their educational career in two-year college programs. High-impact strategies and initiatives that provide alternate pathways and opportunities for students may include curriculum-based changes, undergraduate research, internships, honors programs, transfer partnerships, peer-support, and like-me role model programs.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Laura Anna

Sponsor:

Trends in GOB Chemistry

One of the requirements in many health professions programs is one or two semesters of chemistry as a General, Organic, and Biological (GOB) Chemistry course. Teaching the GOB chemistry cour… Read More

One of the requirements in many health professions programs is one or two semesters of chemistry as a General, Organic, and Biological (GOB) Chemistry course. Teaching the GOB chemistry course has a set of unique challenges for students and instructors. These challenges can be turned into opportunities for novel ideas to be implemented and tested. This symposium will explore the development of relevant GOB curriculum and examine successful classroom practices for the GOB classroom that can be demonstrated to be successful. This may include innovative curriculum modifications/development (both lecture and laboratory), identification of important laboratory skills and exercises to develop these skills, creative/innovative approaches to understanding the concepts of chemistry fundamental to the understanding the science relevant to the students future profession. Presenters are encouraged to share their research, experiences, strategies, and successes with the course. We are especially interested in new curriculum and classroom practices that emerged from COVID. This session will conclude with a discussion among the audience and the presenters to identify successful trends in teaching the GOB course.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Laura D Frost

Eaton Lafayette

Corina E Brown

Sponsor:

Preparing students for success in organic chemistry

Organic chemistry can be a challenging subject for college sophomores to master, particularly those who anticipate pursuing a career in medicine--and may not necessarily be excited about che… Read More

Organic chemistry can be a challenging subject for college sophomores to master, particularly those who anticipate pursuing a career in medicine--and may not necessarily be excited about chemistry! Given the diversity of students engaging with the organic chemistry curriculum and the range of learning goals faculty establish for students, this session will highlight effective techniques used to improve student success in organic chemistry. These applications may exist in a variety of settings, including but not limited to, course preparation (i.e. Gen Chem II scaffolding, pre-course assignments, etc.) and course enhancements (active learning, peer instruction, specialized tutoring, etc.).
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Jessica Fautch

Joseph Houck

Sponsor:

Functional Groups: Collaborative learning in organic chemistry and related subjects

Organic Chemistry has a reputation as a gate-keeper course. While General Chemistry is perceived by students to be centered on problem solving, Organic Chemistry often continues to be viewed… Read More

Organic Chemistry has a reputation as a gate-keeper course. While General Chemistry is perceived by students to be centered on problem solving, Organic Chemistry often continues to be viewed as an exercise in memorization rather than critical thinking. With this perception in mind, instructors must foster learning environments that encourage learners to engage with key concepts and develop their ability to propose solutions to organic chemistry questions. In this symposium, presenters will share their experiences with learning environments that encourage students to work together- both in theory and practical courses. By working together, students communicate with each other, developing their ability to express their ideas and take part in peer-to-peer learning. These presented environments might include workshops, projects, practicals, asynchronous discussion among others. There will be a focus on Organic Chemistry, as well as related courses like Biochemistry that are also often perceived as memorization-based and GOB.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

John Kiappes

Sponsor:

Improving implementation of innovative laboratory models

Over the last few decades, several innovative laboratory approaches (such as ADI, CUREs, PBL, POGIL, SWH, among others) have been utilized in a variety of chemistry laboratories. As the need… Read More

Over the last few decades, several innovative laboratory approaches (such as ADI, CUREs, PBL, POGIL, SWH, among others) have been utilized in a variety of chemistry laboratories. As the needs of individual classrooms, institutions, and diverse student populations vary, it is reasonable to expect that specific components of these laboratory models must be adjusted to meet those needs. This symposium invites speakers to share their experiences on the implementation and modification of any of these laboratory models. Both research and practitioner-based talks relevant to all levels of instruction are welcome and should address how the changes met their specific needs and fostered an inclusive laboratory environment for their student population.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Dawn I Del Carlo

Steven Gravelle

Sponsor:

COVID Keepers: Positive lessons learned from the pandemic

Potential exposure to the COVID-19 virus in the Spring of 2020 forced the majority of schools, colleges and universities to send students off-campus, uprooting education as we knew it. While… Read More

Potential exposure to the COVID-19 virus in the Spring of 2020 forced the majority of schools, colleges and universities to send students off-campus, uprooting education as we knew it. While the shift was difficult for many, it also presented the opportunity to reach new audiences and student groups, especially those in underserved and rural communities who may had difficulty moving to be on campus. Adapting to the new learning environment required the developent of novel and varied means of content delivery and student outreach. Many of these stragetigies and techniques were used for multiple terms, evolving as time passed and becoming robust teaching tools that should be celebrated. This symposium seeks to disseminate the best of what was developed in response to the sudden switch to online-focused instruction for both the lecture and the laboratory across secondary and post-secondary education as well as remote student outreach, including an emphasis on inclusion strategies specific to increasing equity and inclusion in the online setting.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Mitzy Erdmann

Sponsor:

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) in the classroom & laboratory

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a student-centered, team learning pedagogy based on research on how students learn. In a POGIL learning environment, students work in self… Read More

Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) is a student-centered, team learning pedagogy based on research on how students learn. In a POGIL learning environment, students work in self-managed teams using specially designed activities that guide them to construct key concepts while developing important process skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, communication, and teamwork. The purpose of this symposium is to bring together practitioners of POGIL pedagogy from secondary school through university level. Presentations focusing on implementation, process skills, curricular development, equitable and inclusive practices, and assessment are welcome.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Martin Perry

Laura E Parmentier

Sponsor:

An Early CURE: Course Based Undergraduate Research Experiences in General Chemistry.

Recently, the development and implementation of Course Based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) has blossomed and these are seen to provide many benefits for students compared to tra… Read More

Recently, the development and implementation of Course Based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) has blossomed and these are seen to provide many benefits for students compared to traditional expository labs including exposing them to real-world applications, allowing them to experience numerous aspects of the research process and enhancing critical thinking. Many of these CUREs are designed for upper level undergraduates yet there are many benefits and additional challenges to developing similar experiences for introductory college level laboratories including resources, student knowledge and often the fact that these are the largest enrolled classes in a department. This symposium should provide a venue for those who have developed or are working on introductory class CUREs to share various aspects of their own CUREs whether it be the topics investigated, novel pedagogy or the means of implementation for larger classes and to provide inspiration for those thinking about developing their own in the future.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Graeme Wyllie

Sponsor:

Novel Uses of Representations and Models in AP and General Chemistry

Representations are fundemantal to the teaching of chemistry. Instructors are always looking for ways to clarify confusing or abstract concepts with the creation of new and creative models o… Read More

Representations are fundemantal to the teaching of chemistry. Instructors are always looking for ways to clarify confusing or abstract concepts with the creation of new and creative models or representations. Join your peers to obtain new ideas on how best to help students develop mental represenations to best learn compliated concepts.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Paul Price

Sponsor:

Course-Based Undergraduate Research Experiences (CUREs) in the chemistry and biochemistry teaching laboratory

Research experience at the undergraduate level is a proven asset in training novice scientists. In the physical and life sciences, this has traditionally taken place in apprenticeship based,… Read More

Research experience at the undergraduate level is a proven asset in training novice scientists. In the physical and life sciences, this has traditionally taken place in apprenticeship based, PI-directed laboratory settings. However, this model incurs time, cost, and space limitations. To make undergraduate research more accessible, recent years have seen an increase in course-based undergradute research experiences, or CUREs. In a CURE, students work on authentic research questions by searching literature, proposing hypotheses, designing and carrying out experiments, and interpreting data, in a directed manner guided by an expert investigator as occurs in a traditional research lab setting. A CURE seeks to do this in a traditional semester/academic year timeframe, with group sizes ranging from dozens to hundreds of students. This approach requires pursuing research questions that (a) can be adressed in meaningful depth in a time of months rather than years, (b) can be carried out in parallel fashion by multiple students at a time, and (c) fulfil requisite learning content within an academic program.<br /> In this symposium, presentations will be welcomed from CURE practitioners teaching chemistry and biochemistry laboratory courses at introductory and upper levels to share effective practices in CURE development, implementation, and assessment.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Michael Pikaart

Anya Goodman

Sponsor:

Promoting subject mastery using technology in hybrid and online general chemistry courses

Since chemistry departments have begun to embrace hybrid and online instruction, with some being forced to due to the pandemic, instructors have been plunged into the evolving world of educa… Read More

Since chemistry departments have begun to embrace hybrid and online instruction, with some being forced to due to the pandemic, instructors have been plunged into the evolving world of educational technology. Teaching with technology, however, is more than using the newest and flashiest applications out there. Instructors need to understand first how the technology supports student learning outcomes and subject mastery. Various online platforms have data-driven learning designs that offer differentiated instruction or personalized learning and can measure student engagement and even metacognition through adaptive learning. Sophisticated systems can even map student current knowledge in a given “knowledge space.” But what really works? What allows students to show that they have truly learned and remember concepts? This symposium will focus on discussing methods and tools that successfully promote student engagement, persistence, and mastery learning in general chemistry courses offered either in a hybrid/blended format or asynchronously online.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Lisa Hibbard

Sponsor:

Evolution of the ACS Guidelines for Approved Programs & the Future of Chemical Education

Since their inception, the ACS Guidelines for Approved Programs have been informed by the needs of the undergraduate education community. This community has been significantly impacted by th… Read More

Since their inception, the ACS Guidelines for Approved Programs have been informed by the needs of the undergraduate education community. This community has been significantly impacted by the COVID-19 global pandemic. The lessons learned from the pivot to remote teaching as well as the development of educational resources as a result of this pivot will have a lasting effect on the way that chemistry is taught and, ultimately, on the guidelines for ACS approval. In this symposium, speakers will focus on the current status of the approval program and how recent changes in chemical education might affect the evolution of the guidelines. There will be an emphasis on requirements focused on the laboratory experience. Attendees will be able to interact with discussion panels following each session.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Michelle Brooks

Barbara A Reisner

Reid Scott

Sponsor:

STEM Persistence Amid a Pandemic

Students' persistence in STEM is of great concern for educators and researchers. Has the COVID-19 pandemic affected STEM persistence, and if so in what ways? In this symposium, we are going … Read More

Students' persistence in STEM is of great concern for educators and researchers. Has the COVID-19 pandemic affected STEM persistence, and if so in what ways? In this symposium, we are going to explore different activities educators and researchers are pursing in classrooms and colleges to support students’ persistence in STEM and the impact of the pandemic. These activities include, but not are limited to research studies of factors that affect students’ persistence, science identity development, sense of belonging, and results from programs implemented at the university or college level to support students. We invite researchers and practitioners to share their findings with the community.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Sachel Villafane-Garcia

Julia Chan

Barbara L Gonzalez

Sponsor:

Active learning implementation

Successful implementation of a pedagogical technique that one hears about at a conference is challenging. As more faculty look to incorporate active-learning approaches into their classroom,… Read More

Successful implementation of a pedagogical technique that one hears about at a conference is challenging. As more faculty look to incorporate active-learning approaches into their classroom, many of these faculty come across questions about how to do it effectively. If they do not have colleagues at their institution who can help, they may decide that making the change is too difficult and give up. Therefore, it is proposed that faculty are more likely to successfully adopt a new approach if they have a mechanism for support during implementation. The goal of this symposium is to create a connection between presenters and attendees to help support adoption of active-learning techniques.<br /> In this symposium, presenters are asked to describe how they implemented a new pedagogical approach and how they overcame any challenges encountered during adoption. Presenters could describe a new technique they developed or how they adopted an existing technique and made it work for their course. As part of their presentation, presenters will also be required to identify a mechanism through which attendees can contact the presenters in the months after the conference, e.g., zoom consult, follow-up mini-seminar, FAQ website.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Daniel King

Sponsor:

Learning for All: Making Chemistry Instruction Accessible to Blind/ Low -Vision Students

Symbolic, spatial, and visual information are key components for comprehending and learning chemistry; however, they are not readily accessible to blind/low vision (BLV) students in the chem… Read More

Symbolic, spatial, and visual information are key components for comprehending and learning chemistry; however, they are not readily accessible to blind/low vision (BLV) students in the chemistry classroom and virtual environment in conventional ways. Furthermore, full participation by BLV students over the 4-year undergraduate laboratory curriculum has not yet been realized due in part to misconceptions about capabilities of the blind. Appropriate instructional methods can be used to include these differently abled students in the learning process while also enhancing the learning outcomes of a diverse student population. By applying learning style attributes, Universal Design for Learning practices, and adapted teaching approaches, collaborative learning methods, non-visual assistive technologies and equipment, chemistry classroom and laboratory work for BLV students can be transform from a passive experience to an active one. Non-visual ways (<i>i.e.,</i> auditory and text to speech applications, speech-enabled equipment, tactile graphics, and physical artifacts) by which BLV students conduct their work will be described, practical ways to enhance instruction will be explored, and actions and development efforts needed to effect change to eliminate disadvantages and inequities will be considered. The aims of this symposium are to help undergraduate and high school chemistry faculty: understand adaptations and assistive technologies, become familiar with how non-visual learners use them, recognize challenges faced by BLV learners, choose universally effective teaching practices that will minimize barriers, propose solutions to the most pressing issues that face BLV chemistry students.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Alfred DAgostino

Sponsor:

Transforming STEM teaching at the institution-level: Learning from successes and misfires

Telling is not teaching, though through our years of schooling, we're habituated to conflate the two. Whether K-12 or university, educators tend to lecture and expect learners to learn from … Read More

Telling is not teaching, though through our years of schooling, we're habituated to conflate the two. Whether K-12 or university, educators tend to lecture and expect learners to learn from being told. Then when learners become educators, they perpetuate the cycle. Current efforts towards active learning strategies and high impact practices push on educators to expand our mindset and repertoire. But, habits are hard to break. Change can be difficult, but, individually, we do it. Change is evermore challenging to sustain if we're the only ones teaching differently. Culture (department/institution) and structure (tenure and promotion parameters, faculty development support) of the systems in which we teach are factors that can't be ignored. The power dynamics among colleagues (and with institutional leaders) can be a distraction, a barrier, or leveraged as an asset. Thus, impediments to change aren't always lack of willingness on the part of educators, though that certainly exists. The urgent need for addressing equity and inclusion in STEM and STEM teaching requires change at the systemic level in how we as educators think about and approach our practice but also understanding, questioning, and challenging the way things are done within our institutions.<br /> This symposium makes space for discourse on institution-level changes to enable and maintain transformative STEM teaching. Models and success stories spark ideas and inspiration. Setbacks and misfires provide invaluable insights and strategies for next time. Collectively taking the time to share these stories and reflect on them can be helpful for generating solutions.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Lynn Tran

Danika Leduc

Sponsor:

Integrating polymer content into the existing undergraduate laboratory curriculum

The American Chemical Society highlighted the need to improve undergraduate education in polymer science with the 2015 revision to the undergraduate guidelines for approved chemistry program… Read More

The American Chemical Society highlighted the need to improve undergraduate education in polymer science with the 2015 revision to the undergraduate guidelines for approved chemistry programs. While there are multiple ways to satisfy the new requirement, all programs are now expected to instruct students on the preparation, characterization, and identification of physical properties for at least two of the four types of systems: synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, supramolecular aggregates, and meso- or nanoscale materials. In this symposium, presenters will share laboratory experiments and active learning activities that allow polymer content to be embedded throughout the undergraduate curriculum. The goal is to provide presenters with contacts so that they can share their materials and find classroom testers. The focus will be on incorporating polymer labs and activities into existing topics in general, organic, analytic, and physical chemistry lab courses.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kristy Mardis

Andrea G Van Duzor

Valerie Goss

Sponsor:

Practices that Promote Inclusive Excellence in the Diverse General Chemistry Classroom

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted educational disparities in the chemistry classroom, especially among students from groups traditionally underrepresented and/or historically underserved gro… Read More

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted educational disparities in the chemistry classroom, especially among students from groups traditionally underrepresented and/or historically underserved groups. These discrepancies are especially underscored in general chemistry, a “gateway” course for most STEM students. During the pandemic, disproportionately higher attrition rates among underrepresented and underserved groups are suspected, with implications potentially lasting long into the future if not addressed soon. This symposium aims to address the urgent need to transform the undergraduate general chemistry curriculum to help close retention gaps between groups of students from diverse backgrounds. We welcome submissions that describe particular teaching activities or efforts that reach out to populations including but not limited to students with disabilities, the LGBTQIA+ community, racial/ethnic minorities, and students from first-generation and/or low-income backgrounds. Presenters may elect to share efforts across any course modality, from remote to in-person instruction. Submissions from all levels of general chemistry courses (including non-majors, high school, and dual-enrollment courses) are encouraged.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Theodore Alivio

Sponsor:

Encoiling Research and Practice to Understand and Improve Inorganic Chemistry Education

The diversity of undergraduate inorganic chemistry courses in the U.S. is a reflection of the breadth of the inorganic field, the relative autonomy of inorganic instructors, and the many way… Read More

The diversity of undergraduate inorganic chemistry courses in the U.S. is a reflection of the breadth of the inorganic field, the relative autonomy of inorganic instructors, and the many ways that courses emerged and were integrated into chemistry curricula at different institutions. This diversity and autonomy can open doors to pedagogical innovation, yet present challenges to studying teaching and learning in these many contexts and disseminating findings outside individual institutions. The goals of this symposium are (1) to provide a forum for inorganic chemistry educators to share their efforts to develop, adapt, and/or adopt evidence-based materials and teaching strategies in undergraduate inorganic chemistry courses, and (2) for education researchers to describe what has been learned from studying inorganic chemistry teaching and learning. Submitted talks should express how educational research has informed classroom practice or how classroom practice has informed education research. This symposium is organized and supported by the Interactive Online Network of Inorganic Chemists (IONiC).
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Justin Pratt

Joanne L Stewart

Sponsor:

General Chemistry Lab: Curriculum and Best Practices

The goal of this symposium is to provide an opportunity for general chemistry laboratory instructors to come together and share information about the structure of their lab course, current c… Read More

The goal of this symposium is to provide an opportunity for general chemistry laboratory instructors to come together and share information about the structure of their lab course, current curriculum, recent redesigns or tried-and-true experiments, best practices, teaching or grading strategies, and/or exams and assessments. As instructors, it is wonderful to get an idea about one new, interesting experiment, but it can also be helpful to see what others are doing as a whole picture. Have you been teaching for a while and found something that works well, or did you recently revamp your general chemistry lab curriculum and have results to share? What projects, units, or experiments work well at your college or university?
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Jenine Maeyer

Sponsor:

Chemistry Education in the Emerging World of the Internet of Things

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the largest and fastest growing segment of the Internet with 46 billion connected devices in 2021. Inexpensive single board microprocessors and microcontrolle… Read More

The Internet of Things (IoT) is the largest and fastest growing segment of the Internet with 46 billion connected devices in 2021. Inexpensive single board microprocessors and microcontrollers like the Raspberry Pi and Arduino have opened-up a wide range of opportunities for chemical educators to bring into the curriculum emerging interdisciplinary skills and knowledge that will be of great value to tomorrow’s chemist, who will work in future labs that will be full of smart devices. Our goal with this symposium is to bring together pioneers, innovators and early adopters in IoT technologies to share in their experiences and learn from each other. We are looking for contributions across the spectrum of applications. These could be laboratory activities like the building of a spectrometer or automated titration devices, or pedagogic activities teaching problem solving skills as students trouble shoot code and sensor circuits. Presentations on high school robotics clubs, IoT enabled citizen science projects and innovative applications like vertical farming are encouraged. How these devices can be used to bring programming and big data analytics like machine learning into the chemistry curriculum are also desired, as well as novel applications like offline access to online content through Internet-in-a-Box devices. This symposium is sponsored by the CHED Committee on Computers in Chemical Education (CCCE) and will include an open panel discussion on how the CCCE can support K12 through university faculty who wish to use these technologies in their classrooms, especially faculty with no programming experience.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Robert Belford

Ehren C. Bucholtz

Sponsor:

Science Communication and Deliberative Pedagogy in Undergraduate Classrooms

The last decade has highlighted the importance of teaching communication skills to scientists to foster greater public engagement on socio-scientific issues (SSIs) facing our society, from c… Read More

The last decade has highlighted the importance of teaching communication skills to scientists to foster greater public engagement on socio-scientific issues (SSIs) facing our society, from climate change to environmental contaminants to COVID-19. This symposium will highlight pedagogical innovations in the undergraduate classroom that use communication instruction to enhance collaborative and translational public engagement of science. Presentations could connect with themes relating to public engagement of science, such as oral lab reports, presenting scientific research to public audiences, and translational strategies of communication. Presentations on deliberative pedagogy should highlight classroom innovations using public dialogue and deliberation, small group communication processes that engage socio-scientific issues (SSIs). Deliberative pedagogy can be implemented as a course-level innovation (Rain-Griffith, Sheghewi, Shusterman, Barbera, & Shortlidge, 2020; Drury, Rush, Wilder, Wysocki, 2019; Komperda, Barbera, Shortlidge, & Shusterman, 2018). Participants in the symposium will gain understanding in a variety of pedagogical innovations to enhance science communication and public engagement.<br /> <br /> The symposium welcomes submissions from individuals representing diverse institutions of higher education. Committed symposium speakers include Laura Wysocki (Wabash College), Sara Drury (Wabash College), Amanda Nienow (Gustavus Adolphus University), Jayalakshmi Sridhar (Xavier University), and Florastina Payton Stewart (Xavier University).
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Laura Wysocki

Sara Drury

Sponsor:

Writing to Promote Learning and Disciplinary Thinking in Chemistry

The National Research Council recently called for increased incorporation of writing in STEM classrooms because of its ability to support conceptual learning and student development of disci… Read More

The National Research Council recently called for increased incorporation of writing in STEM classrooms because of its ability to support conceptual learning and student development of disciplinary practices. Current writing pedagogies utilized in chemistry courses range from tasks focused on conceptual learning and critical thinking to genre assignments that support discipline-specific writing skills and practices. Additionally, there are moves to incorporate instructional scaffolds that support both the efficacy of writing assignments and their instructional use. The purpose of this symposium is to bring together instructors that use writing and researchers that study writing in chemistry classrooms at the college and/or high school level. Both instructors and researchers are encouraged to submit abstracts related to the implementation of or research on writing of any form (long-from, short-form, disciplinary genres, writing-to-learn, etc.) in chemistry classrooms. Abstracts should clearly indicate a research or practice focus.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Solaire Finkenstaedt-Quinn

Field M. Watts

Sponsor:

Extended Reality in Chemistry Education

The usage of technology in instruction promotes different ways for students to interact with the educational material at hand. Virtual tools can be interactive and responsive in real-time, w… Read More

The usage of technology in instruction promotes different ways for students to interact with the educational material at hand. Virtual tools can be interactive and responsive in real-time, which adds a new layer of feedback to the user. Extended reality (XR) tools encompass augmented reality (AR), virtual reality (VR), and mixed reality (MR). They provide an interactive nature and a three-dimensional immersive environment, non-attainable by traditional means. This symposium is for practitioners and researchers at all levels who have used XR to complement instruction, training, or as a means of assessment to address challenges when teaching chemistry. Presenters can discuss topics such as the advantages and limitations of using XR in the classroom or laboratory, the extent to which XR materials have impacted attitude, affect, or learning, and how XR materials can be used to promote inclusion or accessibility.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Lyniesha Wright Ward

Emmanuel Echeverri

Sponsor:

Evidence-based Instructional Practices: Flipped Classrooms and Inquiry-based Teaching Strategies

There are multiple types and communities of chemistry educators. Some of us are excellent teachers. Some of us are excellent educational researchers. Some of us are excellent providers of pu… Read More

There are multiple types and communities of chemistry educators. Some of us are excellent teachers. Some of us are excellent educational researchers. Some of us are excellent providers of public outreach. Some of us teach in high schools, some in community colleges, some at universities (at both the undergraduate and graduate levels), and some in more informal venues like homes and museums. Each of us brings value to our understanding of how chemistry is taught and learned, and we can ALL learn from each other.<br /> <br /> This symposium is jointly sponsored by the Two-Year College Chemistry Consortium (2YC3), the American Association for Chemistry Teachers (AACT), the Chemistry Education Research Committee from the ACS Division of Chemical Education, and the American Chemical Society Committee on Education communities as an attempt to allow chemistry educators at all levels to learn from each other. There are many different instructional practices we can use to help our students learn chemistry. The most effective of these practices are supported by classroom- and/or research-based evidence. This symposium is meant to be a place for sharing those evidence-based practices: both the research that explains why they work and how to implement them in our classrooms. Presenters from high schools, community colleges, and universities will discuss, for example, how they use these techniques in their classrooms, ways to modify the techniques to meet the needs of learners from diverse backgrounds and with diverse abilities, ways to assess the impact of these techniques on student learning, or educational research supporting the use of the techniques. The inaugural sessions of this symposium will focus on two specific evidence-based instructional practices that allow students to engage directly in constructing their understanding of chemistry content: flipped classrooms and inquiry-based teaching strategies.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

MaryKay Orgill

Samuel Pazicni

Joi Phelps Walker

Kathy E Carrigan

Amiee Modic

Sponsor:

Molecular-Level Animations in Secondary Chemistry: VisChem Teacher Showcase

There is a critical need to transform chemistry teaching and learning from an emphasis on description of phenomena to deep understanding consistent with the Next Generation Science Standards… Read More

There is a critical need to transform chemistry teaching and learning from an emphasis on description of phenomena to deep understanding consistent with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). To build a community of practice around molecular level explanation of phenomena, two cohorts of high school chemistry teachers have participated in VisChem Institutes (VCIs). These intensive VCIs immersed teachers in the research foundation and pedagogical moves for the VisChem Approach, a teaching method that uses carefully produced dynamic visualizations (designed by Roy Tasker) with teaching strategies informed by a cognitive learning model. Key to VisChem is communication of internal visualizations using storyboards (drawings with explanation) of chemical and physical changes. In this symposium, teachers will present VisChem learning designs (lesson plans) implemented in their classrooms. Each presentation will include an overview of the learning goals, VisChem animations, key pedagogical moves, and an overview of the student learning outcomes. Presenters are encouraged to illustrate how their findings may be useful to other teachers to encourage broadening of the VisChem Community of Practice.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Ellen Yezierski

Meng-Yang Matthew Wu

KatieMarie Magnone

Roy Tasker

Sponsor:

Inclusive practices for unrepresented groups in STEM

There is a gap in the current literature regarding best practices for inclusivity and equity practices for the STEM classroom. This symposium will provide an opportunity for researchers and … Read More

There is a gap in the current literature regarding best practices for inclusivity and equity practices for the STEM classroom. This symposium will provide an opportunity for researchers and practitioners to discuss research and best practices for the engagement of underrepresented groups. We welcome any research that includes historically underrepresented or underserved groups in STEM, including but not limited to racial and ethnic groups, women, students with disabilities, and the LGBTQ+ community. We are especially interested in studies of specific pedagogies, curriculum materials, community engagement, and activities used to foster an inclusive learning environment. We invite both researchers and practitioners in order to bring both groups together to discuss what research is ongoing, what is happening in and outside the classroom, and how we can make a connection between the two.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Nicole Lapeyrouse

Sponsor:

Innovations and Experiences In the Chemistry Classroom During the First Two Years

This session is for all faculty or graduate students who teach chemistry during the first two years of college, especially those at community colleges. Come and share your teaching methods, … Read More

This session is for all faculty or graduate students who teach chemistry during the first two years of college, especially those at community colleges. Come and share your teaching methods, technology tools, and pedagogical approaches. Approaches that did not work as well as those that did are welcome. We will take an expansive definition of the classroom and welcome innovations both pre-pandemic, during COVID semesters, and things done to transition students back to the in-person campus.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Thomas B Higgins

Sponsor:

Incorporating diversity, equity, inclusion, and respect (DEIR) learning opportuntities in the chemistry classroom

This symposium highlights approaches, experiences, and challenges to integrate diversity, equity, inclusion, and respect (DEIR) in the chemistry course work. The professional landscape for t… Read More

This symposium highlights approaches, experiences, and challenges to integrate diversity, equity, inclusion, and respect (DEIR) in the chemistry course work. The professional landscape for the STEM field is changing rapidly; engaging students in the exploration of cultures and life experiences different from their own is a high impact practice that promotes student success. The aim of this symposium is to provide a platform for participants to share their pedagogical approaches and ideas for incorporating DEIR related activities in chemical education.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Akiko Nakamura

Kate R Ries

Sponsor:

A Contextualized Approach to Teaching Chemistry

This symposium invites educators to share innovative ways to engage students in learning chemistry. Making students realize that chemistry is at work in their everyday lives is paramount to … Read More

This symposium invites educators to share innovative ways to engage students in learning chemistry. Making students realize that chemistry is at work in their everyday lives is paramount to increasing their interest and motivation in the classroom and laboratory. Presenters in the symposium should emphasize resources or ideas of how to incorporate real-life applications in the classroom. Sharing effective technology and methodology to achieve this is also welcome. This symposium is hosted by the ACS textbook <i>Chemistry in Context</i> (CiC) author team. Using a variety of activities and interactives, CiC features a context-first approach, which weaves in relevant chemical principles within the chapter narratives of particular contexts. The author team would like to invite others with ideas in line with a context-first approach to share their resources, ideas, and expertise.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Bradley Fahlman

Sponsor:

Oral communication in the chemistry curriculum

This symposium is a follow up from a previous BCCE, and we hope to further explore approaches for integrating oral communication in chemistry courses as a way to enhance technical expertise … Read More

This symposium is a follow up from a previous BCCE, and we hope to further explore approaches for integrating oral communication in chemistry courses as a way to enhance technical expertise and to teach a professional competency. The goal of this symposium is to discuss best practices for the development of oral communication skills in chemistry. Both formal and informal methods of promoting student oral communication are of interest. What are the best ways to help our students develop this important transferable skill? How does one give constructive feedback? How do oral communication experiences help with student learning, engagement, and metacognition? What role can the chemistry lab, both instructional and research, play in helping students improve as oral communicators? How can these skills be used to promote student-student interactions? What other benefits (and pitfalls) result from getting students talking? Speakers are encouraged to address how they answer some of these questions but may also explore additional areas. Submissions from all levels of chemistry courses, including non-majors and high school courses, are encouraged.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Garland Crawford

Kathryn D Kloepper

Sponsor:

Teaching in the chemistry laboratory: Beyond confirmatory experiences

This symposium looks at innovative and effective experiments conducted at all levels of the college chemistry curriculum. Presentations will describe labs, projects, or curricular structures… Read More

This symposium looks at innovative and effective experiments conducted at all levels of the college chemistry curriculum. Presentations will describe labs, projects, or curricular structures that seek to give students experiences that model the practice of chemical research. Moving past labs that describe chemical behavior (and confirm known results), these projects might engage students in the following: formation of research questions, experimental design, collection and interpretation of data, and dissimination of results.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

David Styers-Barnett

Katherine Weber Stickney

Brad M Neal

Sponsor:

Present and Future Directions in Organic Chemistry Laboratory Courses

This symposium seeks to foster a discussion of innovations in course content and delivery by bringing together chemical educators who instruct undergraduate organic chemistry laboratories. P… Read More

This symposium seeks to foster a discussion of innovations in course content and delivery by bringing together chemical educators who instruct undergraduate organic chemistry laboratories. Presenters are invited to offer their perspectives on the development of new experiments or teaching modules, the utilization of digital resources for visualization, problem solving, or scientific recordkeeping, or strategies to streamline the learning experience. Advancements in the realization of large enrollment laboratory courses are of special interest, as are advancements that may be scalable to that environment.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Noel Paul

Christopher S Callam

Sponsor:

Teaching Large Classes

This symposium will discuss successes, trials, and tribulations in the large chemistry classroom. Topics may include course management strategies, technology, mentoring teaching assistants,… Read More

This symposium will discuss successes, trials, and tribulations in the large chemistry classroom. Topics may include course management strategies, technology, mentoring teaching assistants, and other topics that pertain to teaching large classes. A desired result of this symposium is the formation of a support network of faculty who teach large classes at different colleges and universities.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Alicia Paterno

Sponsor:

Food Chemistry

This symposium will explore the use of food and beverages in making chemistry more entertaining and/or relevant to the students in chemistry courses.

Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Keith Symcox

Sponsor:

Biochemistry Education: Discussions of the Laboratory Learning Environment

This symposium will focus on teaching innovations and educational research related to the biochemistry laboratory learning environment. The biochemistry laboratory is a unique environment wh… Read More

This symposium will focus on teaching innovations and educational research related to the biochemistry laboratory learning environment. The biochemistry laboratory is a unique environment where students must synthesize learning from many courses (e.g., chemistry, biology, physics) and attain a high level of representational competence to be successful. Because of its interdisciplinary nature, the biochemistry laboratory can provide students a context in which to grow and develop their understanding of a variety of scientific concepts and practices. The purpose of this symposium is to provide a forum for educators to present their work in shaping biochemistry laboratory learning environments. We invite all biochemistry laboratory educators to share their work, with an eye toward highlighting pedagogies that emphasize active learning and inclusive teaching strategies. Speakers are encouraged to include some form of assessment results (e.g., surveys, exam questions, interviews) in their presentation.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Sara Johnson

Sponsor:

Biochemistry education: discussions of the lecture learning environment

This symposium will focus on teaching innovations and educational research related to the biochemistry lecture learning environment. The inclusive biochemistry classroom can provide students… Read More

This symposium will focus on teaching innovations and educational research related to the biochemistry lecture learning environment. The inclusive biochemistry classroom can provide students with the opportunity to grow and develop their understanding of molecular life science concepts and practices. However, as many biochemistry educators can attest, this potential for student learning is not often fully realized. We invite those teaching lecture courses in all areas of biochemistry to share their work. We especially welcome those interested in 1. active learning pedagogies and 2. creating diverse and inclusive classrooms. We encourage all symposium speakers to include some form of assessment such as results from surveys, exam questions, student interviews, or formal assessment instruments in their presentations.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Rodney Austin

Tracey Arnold Murray

Sponsor:

Big 10 Gen Chem Labs: Advances, Innovations, and Challenges

This symposium will provide a forum for discussing the current state of the general chemistry labs at universities in the Big 10 Conference. Topics of discussion, while aimed at large, resea… Read More

This symposium will provide a forum for discussing the current state of the general chemistry labs at universities in the Big 10 Conference. Topics of discussion, while aimed at large, research-oriented chemistry departments, will be relevant to most any other size chemistry department. This symposium invites presentations that outline any innovative approach to teaching general chemistry labs (curriculum, new/novel laboratory activities, TA training or mentoring, facility management, etc.), whether successful or not. The organizers believe that a lot can be learned from innovations that work and those that don’t work as expected.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Eric Malina

Sponsor:

Faculty Experience with Course-based Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE)

Undergraduate research (UR) has been recognized as a high impact practice to improve student content mastery, retention, and graduation rates in STEM fields. Compared to an independent, ment… Read More

Undergraduate research (UR) has been recognized as a high impact practice to improve student content mastery, retention, and graduation rates in STEM fields. Compared to an independent, mentored research experience, a course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE) can serve a larger population of students without requiring an extensive additional time commitment from either faculty or students. We invite presentations that discuss important aspects of development, assessment, and/or benefits of CUREs on student learning. Furthermore, we encourage presenters to share the challenges faculty face in developing and teaching these courses through the COVID pandemic. Presentations are not limited to CUREs that provide full or authentic research experiences but may also include CUREs that prepare students for a full research experience (pre-CURE) by only focusing on certain elements of a full research experience, such as writing research questions or making scientific arguments. Discussion of CUREs for lecture courses are encouraged.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kuang-Chiu Ho

Jillian L Stafford

Tracy Terry

Sponsor:

Developing Learner Writing Skills in General Chemistry

Writing across the curriculum has become a mainstay at many higher education institutions. While writing activities are a natural fit for many courses, incorporating writing within General C… Read More

Writing across the curriculum has become a mainstay at many higher education institutions. While writing activities are a natural fit for many courses, incorporating writing within General Chemistry is sometimes seen as incongruent with the central learning objectives. This symposium will address why and how to develop, deliver, and provide constructive feedback on student writing activities. Of particular interest are the ways in which presenters have merged writing development within traditional chemistry content activities (e.g. homework, quizzes, tests), and how instructors, who may not be unshakably certain about their own writing skills, can provide meaningful feedback for learners. Examples of successful and not-quite-so-successful implementations of writing activity inclusion are encouraged.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Brad Neal

Sponsor:

Exploring the implementation of Peer-Led Team Learning and the diverse outcomes that result

Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) is a national initiative to promote active learning in STEM classes through the use of peer leaders, students who have successfully completed a course that retu… Read More

Peer-Led Team Learning (PLTL) is a national initiative to promote active learning in STEM classes through the use of peer leaders, students who have successfully completed a course that return to lead students in small groups. The symposium highlights the diverse set of outcomes that have resulted from enacting PLTL or other forms of peer-supported instruction. Additionally, this symposium invites reports of efforts to initiate or sustain PLTL in the chemistry curriculum, to adapt PLTL to online instruction, and to address diversity and equity issues within peer-supported learning. Given the potential for PLTL to have a substantive impact on the experiences of students, peer leaders and/or faculty members, the symposium welcomes presentations that employ any methodological approach.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kathleen Bowe

Christopher Bauer

Scott E Lewis

Sponsor:

Model Concept Development and System Thinking for Improved Conceptual Learning

This symposium focuses on the use of concept models as a tool to help chemistry teachers create solid lessons and activities for students’ deep conceptual learning in chemistry. Creating con… Read More

This symposium focuses on the use of concept models as a tool to help chemistry teachers create solid lessons and activities for students’ deep conceptual learning in chemistry. Creating conceptual models using a system thinking framework will help teachers streamline and target their lessons to important concepts and prevent the incorporation of activities that take up time but are not necessarily supporting deep learning. Developing conceptual models will push teachers to assess their own understanding of the concepts and supporting lesson planning targeting students’ improved learning. Within the project EQuIPD, we found that ensuring that teachers frame their lessons by creating concept model development generated significant challenges for teachers. Teachers were assisted in creating lessons using system thinking both as a perspective where parts and whole are distinguished and defined, as well as a framework where supports like process mapping are used to support lesson planning. EQuIPD’s one-on-one facilitative coaching sessions with teachers continuously help them improve their using modeling for lesson planning.<br /> In this symposium, we showcase conceptual models created by teachers supported through our project. We also present models created by students showing how targeted lesson planning including process mapping resulted in students' deeper understanding of chemistry concepts. We found that when teachers are supported in identifying the important concepts they are going to teach, anchor their lessons with state, regional or governmental standards and map the important conceptual elements to build the full model, these teachers are assessing and identifying what it is they understand about concepts.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Nancy Jean Ruzycki

Lorelie Imperial

Krista Dulany

Sponsor:

Using chemistry education research to inform teaching strategies and the design of instructional materials

The results of chemistry education research provide a significant resource to inform teaching strategies and the design of instructional materials at both the high school and undergraduate l… Read More

The results of chemistry education research provide a significant resource to inform teaching strategies and the design of instructional materials at both the high school and undergraduate levels. The goal is to provide a forum for instructors wishing to learn about, adapt, and incorporate research-based materials and teaching strategies into their courses, with the goal of “doing better things” to create more effective learning environments to promote students achieving a deeper understanding of chemistry and developing appropriate science process skills. We strongly encourage paired submissions to this symposium that include two linked talks. The first talk will present the design and results of a chemistry education research project, while the second talk will describe the implementation of these results in classroom practice. Please indicate the paired talk in the notes to organizers. This symposium is sponsored by the DivChed Chemistry Education Research Committee.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Joi Walker

Courtney Stanford

Sponsor:

Advances in e-Learning, Digital Learning, and Online Chemical Education

Online learning, blended learning, e-learning, and the development of online courses, content, and communities of scholarship are important topics for contemporary educators and education re… Read More

Online learning, blended learning, e-learning, and the development of online courses, content, and communities of scholarship are important topics for contemporary educators and education researchers. This symposium brings together perspectives from a wide range of instructors, course developers, and researchers who are currently exploring the use of web-based and other digital technology in online or on-campus courses.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Dorian Canelas

Sponsor:

Engaging students in Analytical Chemistry

In this symposium we invite practitioners who are reimagining the teaching and outcomes of analytical chemistry at the college level to enhance career readiness. Here we focus on the importa… Read More

In this symposium we invite practitioners who are reimagining the teaching and outcomes of analytical chemistry at the college level to enhance career readiness. Here we focus on the importance of designing bigger-picture coursework with a focus on skill development and the intersectionality of analytical chemistry. Skills that prepare students for future coursework and careers may include but are not limited to literature evaluation, scientific writing, critical-thinking, problem solving, peer review, and experimental design. We invite talks using classroom techniques including active learning, inclusive pedagogies, project-based curriculum, models and simulations, guided reflections, curriculum assessments, case studies that demonstrate the importance of analytical chemistry in society, and other creative methodology.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Alycia M Palmer

Lynetta Mier

Susan Plummer Oxley

Jill Kirsten Robinson

Sponsor:

Engaging Students in Physical Chemistry

Traditionally, physical chemistry has a reputation for being a very difficult and boring course. From lecture to laboratory, and all across the various topics in undergraduate physical chemi… Read More

Traditionally, physical chemistry has a reputation for being a very difficult and boring course. From lecture to laboratory, and all across the various topics in undergraduate physical chemistry, this symposium focuses on improving the teaching and learning in physical chemistry by engaging students in meaningful ways.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

David Gardner

Craig M. Teague

Sponsor:

Research Investigations in STEM Identity in Chemistry Learning Environments

Recently, there has been an upswing in research that investigates how parts of a student’s STEM identity can influence their performance and persistence in STEM courses, as well as their sen… Read More

Recently, there has been an upswing in research that investigates how parts of a student’s STEM identity can influence their performance and persistence in STEM courses, as well as their sense of belonging in STEM fields. Investigating STEM identity, particularly identity as a “chemistry person,” offers a valuable lens through which one can gain an understanding of how the affective learning domain can influence our students in our classrooms and laboratories. Talks in this symposium may provide further evidence for how STEM identity influences such factors as student achievement in chemistry courses, persistence in chemistry and STEM majors, or how one’s STEM identity may be further developed. The research studies presented may be qualitative or quantitative in nature and should clearly outline the research questions under investigation, provide a thorough description of the methods and instruments used to collect data, and provide a summary of the findings. Research-based suggestions for instructors on how identity may be addressed in their classroom may also be presented.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Michelle Head

Justin H Carmel

Sponsor:

Teaching Chemistry through Art and Archaeology

Chemistry education centered on art and archaeology provides a unique platform to teach core concepts and instrumental methods while integrating cultural literacy within the curriculum. From… Read More

Chemistry education centered on art and archaeology provides a unique platform to teach core concepts and instrumental methods while integrating cultural literacy within the curriculum. From characterizing pigment degradation to authenticating artifacts, chemistry plays a critical role in reconstructing and preserving humanity’s complex material culture. Art and archaeology derived curricula and content provide a means to demonstrate chemistry’s crosscutting applications and infuse courses with authentic applications of key instrumental techniques, synthetic methods, and key concepts. This symposium will feature talks that highlight materials derived from the interdisciplinary intersection of chemistry, art and archaeology and describe how these materials can enhance chemical education within the classroom and laboratory for both majors and nonmajors. Presenters from high school and two and four-year institutions are invited to share curricula, laboratory experiments, and lectures that integrate these topics across the undergraduate curriculum.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kevin L Braun

Kristin Jansen Labby

Sponsor:

Computational Chemistry in the Classroom

Computational chemistry is a long recognized, critical tool for chemical investigation and understanding. However, implementing this new essential in existing high school and undergraduate c… Read More

Computational chemistry is a long recognized, critical tool for chemical investigation and understanding. However, implementing this new essential in existing high school and undergraduate curricula can prove difficult. This symposium focuses on curricular implementation in the classroom and in the laboratory. Talks highlighting computational chemistry integration across the chemistry and/or general science curriculum are particularly encouraged.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Angela N Migues

John B Dudek

Sponsor:

Chemistry as Metaphor

From literature to sports, chemistry serves as a frequent metaphor for describing the ineffable. This symposium encourages participants to investigate how chemistry, as a knowledge domain, i… Read More

From literature to sports, chemistry serves as a frequent metaphor for describing the ineffable. This symposium encourages participants to investigate how chemistry, as a knowledge domain, is used to communicate understanding in non-chemistry domains.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kenneth Hoffman

Sponsor:

Project Orientated Undergraduate Lab Design

Historically laboratory experiments have involved cookbook-like procedures, which yield low student engagement and do not require in-depth problem solving. Project-oriented labs teach studen… Read More

Historically laboratory experiments have involved cookbook-like procedures, which yield low student engagement and do not require in-depth problem solving. Project-oriented labs teach students valuable critical thinking skills and allow them to explore challenging questions. In this symposium, talks will focus on novel project-oriented lab design to improve or supplement traditional undergraduate laboratories.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Rebecca Loy

Alexis Lynn Courtney

Sponsor:

Innovations in instruction in large-enrollment lecture courses

Large-enrollment lecture (200+ enrolled) courses face unique challenges in administration, pedagogy, assessment and equity. How do faculty adapt their curriculum to try and address all stu… Read More

Large-enrollment lecture (200+ enrolled) courses face unique challenges in administration, pedagogy, assessment and equity. How do faculty adapt their curriculum to try and address all student needs in large and often heterogeneous lecture classes? This symposium aims to provide a space for the instructors of large lecture courses to share their creative approaches to a shifting curriculum, structure, instruction, and execution of their courses. We welcome conversations of both the successful and not-so-successful implementation of new ideas.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Kimberly Arnold

Deborah Snaddon

Cathrine Reck

Sponsor:

Using Computational Chemistry to Improve Student Understanding of Chemical Reactions

Modern computational methods and software allow students to explore molecular structures and energy differences, which can support students’ ability to make sense of chemical phenomena. Thi… Read More

Modern computational methods and software allow students to explore molecular structures and energy differences, which can support students’ ability to make sense of chemical phenomena. This symposium will explore student use of computational chemistry and computational results to interpret experimental data and the outcome of chemical reactions. The prediction of observable spectra (IR, Raman, NMR, m-wave, UV-Vis, etc.) has become commonplace in chemistry research and will naturally become part of an authentic student experience. Likewise, experimental and theoretical chemists routinely explore the energetic differences between transition states, reactive intermediates, isomeric products, etc. Computational chemistry provides insight into molecular structure, including the nature of bonding and non-bonding orbitals, which allows students to rationalize observed reactivity. The use of computational chemistry in this manner applies to all branches of chemistry and is appropriate in both laboratory and lecture settings.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Brian John Esselman

Nicholas J Hill

Sponsor:

Undergraduate research as a tool for improving the proficiency of chemistry undergraduate majors

Narrowing the proficiency gap between chemistry graduates and chemistry professionals has received very little attention in chemistry education literature and meetings. The recruiters that c… Read More

Narrowing the proficiency gap between chemistry graduates and chemistry professionals has received very little attention in chemistry education literature and meetings. The recruiters that come to our university recommended that the ability to apply knowledge and skills to real-world settings would improve the quality of students' preparation for careers. Completing a significant (applied) learning project before graduation would be a useful component of the curriculum. Undergraduate research seems to be the right pedagogical tool to materialize the aforementioned suggestion. Preceptors in graduate schools also agree that previous undergraduate research experience is very useful in shortening the startup delays in PhD projects. The purpose of the proposed symposium is to initiate the discussion and find solutions that would increase the efficacy of undergraduate research. The following questions could be used to formulate discussion topics: What does the project’s introduction to a student need to contain (scientific details, expected new knowledge to be produced, end goal such as a conference poster or publication, relevance/benefits to a student’s future career, expectations of students)? How to stimulate the students’ motivation? How do we design the syllabus and grading rubrics; should they be individualized or the same for all the students involved? How do we balance producing data and the student’s learning? How can the design be leveraged to achieve the aforementioned goal of a course embedded undergraduate research experience or the classical version when an undergrad becomes a member of a research group?
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Bratoljub H Milosavljevic

Sponsor:

Lab Practicals

One of the major reasons that labs are an intrinsic part of the chemistry curriculum is to teach practical skills. However, these skills are not always easy to assess. This symposium will … Read More

One of the major reasons that labs are an intrinsic part of the chemistry curriculum is to teach practical skills. However, these skills are not always easy to assess. This symposium will showcase various types of lab practicals, which are designed to assess these practical skills. The presentations will look at how to design, conduct and assess the effectiveness of lab practicals.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Stephanie Ann Myers

Sponsor:

Teaching Programming in the Chemistry Curriculum: Approaches, Challenges, and Best Practices

Programming and computational science is an increasingly important part of chemistry. This symposium, organized by the Molecular Sciences Software Institute (MolSSI), focuses on how programm… Read More

Programming and computational science is an increasingly important part of chemistry. This symposium, organized by the Molecular Sciences Software Institute (MolSSI), focuses on how programming is taught within the chemistry curriculum at all levels of higher education. Different institutions and departments may include computer programming as part of the chemistry curriculum in many different ways. Some curricula may require a stand-alone programming course, taught by a computer science or computer engineering department, while others may not include any computer programming instruction at all. This symposium focuses on a middle ground: when computer programming is taught by chemists within the existing chemistry curriculum. The symposium will bring together chemical educators from all levels of higher education to discuss how and when they incorporate programming into their curriculum, what challenges they faced in implementing their programming curriculum, how the programming learning objectives are integrated with chemistry learning objectives, and the best practices they have discovered for teaching programming to chemists. A speaker from the Molecular Sciences Software Institute will describe programming and resources for faculty offered by MolSSI and introduce MolSSI’s best practices in software engineering for computational molecular science. We welcome submissions that describe a particular activity that is used to teach programming to your students or those that describe larger curricular innovations at the department or institutional level. Submissions should focus on teaching programming rather than using computational tools in the chemistry curriculum.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Ashley Ringer McDonald

Jessica Ann Nash

Sponsor:

Utilizing scientific literature to develop reading comprehension skills, writing efficacy, and content knowledge.

Scientific literature is the primary method of communication among scientists. It can also be an effective educational resource and example to help undergraduates develop writing and reading… Read More

Scientific literature is the primary method of communication among scientists. It can also be an effective educational resource and example to help undergraduates develop writing and reading skills, and content knowledge. As students move on to graduate school and industry, they are expected to be able to effectively read and comprehend published research articles as well as write at the same high-quality level. Therefore, curricula that include opportunities to develop these skills helps undergraduates prepare for future endeavors. This symposium seeks to disseminate and discuss the use and incorporation of scientific literature into the curriculum as a resource and example to improve scientific writing, develop reading comprehension and evaluation skills, and increase chemistry content knowledge. Scientific literature, such as primary research articles, secondary journal articles, Internet based articles, and past student writings, all serve as valuable resources and examples to educate students. Presenters are encouraged to discuss curriculum integration methodologies and the evaluation of impact on learning.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Clinton Johnson

Eugene P Wagner

Michelle Morgan

Sponsor:

Systems Thinking in Chemistry Education: What it is and why we should do it

Systems thinking is an approach for examining and addressing complex behaviors and phenomena from a holistic perspective. This approach can be used to not only increase understanding of vari… Read More

Systems thinking is an approach for examining and addressing complex behaviors and phenomena from a holistic perspective. This approach can be used to not only increase understanding of various natural and artificial systems, but to prepare citizens to address global world challenges—such as sustainability, pollution, climate change, and poverty—and to participate knowledgeably and democratically in science-related policy decisions. While the idea of systems thinking has infiltrated many areas of STEM education, including biology and engineering, it has yet to become an integral part of the chemistry curriculum. Over that past several years, an international coalition of chemists, educators, and chemistry education researchers has been considering how some of the potential advantages of systems thinking might be achieved in the chemistry education context. The IUPAC Systems Thinking in Chemistry Education (STICE) Working Group has worked to define systems thinking for chemistry education and is beginning to develop systems thinking learning objectives and assessment models for general chemistry. In this session, speakers from the STICE project—and others--will describe systems thinking, the skills and competencies of a systems thinker, and how it can serve chemistry teaching, chemistry learning, and earth and societal systems.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Peter G Mahaffy

Jennifer MacKellar

Sponsor:

Communicating chemistry: Improving oral and written communication skills to foster academic and career success

The need for chemistry students to be able to clearly and accurately communicate what they have learned both orally and in writing has been identified as an important pedagogical issue by ed… Read More

The need for chemistry students to be able to clearly and accurately communicate what they have learned both orally and in writing has been identified as an important pedagogical issue by educators and employers alike. Our symposium will address this issue by soliciting submissions that provide examples of best practices, tips for success, and suggestions for averting problems while improving students’ oral and written communication skills. The symposium will encourage presentations from faculty teaching chemistry majors and general education chemistry courses, those incorporating oral and written communication pedagogy into their chemistry courses, and those team teaching across disciplines.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Bozena Widanski

Jo Ann Thompson

Sponsor:

Designing and Implementing Chemistry Learning Environments that Support Students in Connecting Molecular Behavior to Phenomena

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) describe learning science as a process of developing, refining and using knowledge to construct causal accounts for phenomena. Accordingly, chemi… Read More

The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) describe learning science as a process of developing, refining and using knowledge to construct causal accounts for phenomena. Accordingly, chemistry courses should support students in linking molecular behavior to events they can see and touch. This symposium will describe an ongoing NSF-funded collaboration between teachers and researchers aimed at creating sensemaking-focused chemistry learning spaces. Audience members will have the opportunity to hear first-hand accounts from high school chemistry teachers designing and enacting reformed curricular materials, discuss the theory underpinning our curricular design, and ask questions of the researcher-practitioner team.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Adam Schafer

Thomas Michael Kuborn

Cara Schwarz

Ryan L Stowe

Sponsor:

Chemistry Education Research: Graduate Student Research Symposium

This symposium has a long history of providing a great constructive platform for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to present their chemistry education research. The goal of thi… Read More

This symposium has a long history of providing a great constructive platform for graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to present their chemistry education research. The goal of this particular forum is for the presenter to receive audience feedback that is neither intimidating nor overly-challenging, but instead, professionally advises the individual in a way that helps them grow into a better presenter and researcher. As such, submissions should intend to report ongoing or completed chemistry education research projects in connection with the four conference themes: Classroom Practice and Learning Environments, Curriculum and Cognition, Assessment and Research Methods, and Professional Development. Further in line with the conference mission, presenters are encouraged to consider potential implications relating to issues and aspects of equity, diversity, inclusion, and respect whenever appropriate. This symposium is hosted by the Younger Chemistry Education Scholars committee of DivCHED as part of their larger mission to foster growth in the future generation of chemical education researchers.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Olivia Marie Crandell

Megan Connor

Sponsor:

In Memoriam: Celebrating the Life and Works of George M. Bodner

This symposium will commemorate the career of one of the founders of chemical education research, Dr. George M. Bodner, the Arthur E. Kelley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Education, … Read More

This symposium will commemorate the career of one of the founders of chemical education research, Dr. George M. Bodner, the Arthur E. Kelley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry, Education, and Engineering at Purdue University, who passed away in March, 2021. Through his nearly five decades of research, teaching, and service – especially as a mentor, formally or otherwise – Dr. Bodner touched the lives of thousands. To celebrate his distinguished life and career we request submissions in theoretically-framed research and/or evidence-based practice. We welcome talks encompassing all areas of inquiry and sub-disciplines of chemistry; and especially encourage submissions on topics aligned with Dr. Bodner’s main contributions, including problem solving, theoretical frameworks (especially constructivism), and courses beyond general chemistry. Please note that the symposium will include an “open mic” period for those who would like to share personal anecdotes and tributes to Dr. Bodner.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Gautam Bhattacharyya

Alexander C Davis

Sponsor:

Integrating Green Chemistry and Sustainability into Chemistry Education

This symposium will highlight the incorporation of green chemistry and sustainability principles throughout the chemistry curriculum as well as through co-curricular activities such as clubs… Read More

This symposium will highlight the incorporation of green chemistry and sustainability principles throughout the chemistry curriculum as well as through co-curricular activities such as clubs, organizations and service-learning opportunities. The focus will be on green chemistry and sustainability materials and models rooted in the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry that are designed to educate high school, community college, four year college and graduate students. These materials will include classroom teaching modules/courses, learning methods, educational research, laboratory experiments and experiences, the integration of toxicology into the chemistry curriculum, and the use of systems thinking.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Loyd Bastin

Andrew Dicks

Sponsor:

Reimagining Chemistry Education: Integrating Systems Thinking into Green & Sustainable Chemistry Education

To address emerging global challenges such as those outlined via the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Planetary Boundary Framework methods for practicing sustainabilit… Read More

To address emerging global challenges such as those outlined via the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Planetary Boundary Framework methods for practicing sustainability through chemistry are vital for the next generation. While there have been multiple calls to integrate systems thinking into chemistry education, less attention has been paid to the practical implementation of systems thinking into chemistry courses and classrooms across the education continuum. This symposium will outline new approaches for the implementation of teaching and learning curricular materials to facilitate systems thinking within the context of Green Chemistry Principles and Sustainable Chemistry education. Approaches will be presented for implementation at the K-12 level, university level and beyond to include examples from activities, demonstrations and laboratory experiments to whole program level and cross-institutional/international partnerships intended to transform chemistry education to greener practices for a sustainable future.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Glenn Hurst

Natalie J O'Neil

Jane E Wissinger

Sponsor:

Cognitive resources for understanding students: How to and what for?

Over the past few decades, research in chemistry education primarily focused on a misconception view of students’ conceptual understanding. However, recently there has been a shift from this… Read More

Over the past few decades, research in chemistry education primarily focused on a misconception view of students’ conceptual understanding. However, recently there has been a shift from this misconception view that views knowledge as an intact cognitive unit to resources-based frameworks that views learning as the activation of resources generated based on a particular context and task. The resources framework, made popular by the work of Hammer and Redish, has been used frequently in physics education research. Although CER is seeing increased use of this framework, it is still unfamiliar to many in our community. In this symposium, we invite presentations that focus on 1) the details of research methods employed when using a resources-based framework or 2) the outcomes and implications of research studies that use resources-based framework. Abstracts should include specific details about how resources-based framework was used, including how it shaped research questions, data collection, data analysis, and interpretation.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Suazette Reid Mooring

Alena Moon

Sponsor:

Methods for Characterizing Epistemology in Chemistry Education Research

A person’s epistemology, or how they understand the nature of knowledge and learning, shapes how they view and respond to situations that engage them in knowledge work. When performing resea… Read More

A person’s epistemology, or how they understand the nature of knowledge and learning, shapes how they view and respond to situations that engage them in knowledge work. When performing research on teaching and learning in chemistry, it is useful to understand how the participants’ epistemological ideas inform their interactions in the classroom or in a research setting. As epistemological ideas are usually implicit, they must be inferred from observable behaviors (e.g., discourse features). Being able to characterize participants’ in-the-moment epistemology influences interpretation of data and has important implications for how learning environments can be designed to support students in engaging in authentic scientific work. This symposium will be devoted to discussing methods and theoretical perspectives useful in characterizing the epistemologies of students and instructors in chemistry education research.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Kimberly DeGlopper

Ryan Stowe

Sponsor:

Chemistry education research: Undergraduate student research symposium

As the field of Chemistry Education Research (CER) continues to expand, the role of undergraduate researchers in the discipline will undoubtedly follow suit. This symposium is designed to gi… Read More

As the field of Chemistry Education Research (CER) continues to expand, the role of undergraduate researchers in the discipline will undoubtedly follow suit. This symposium is designed to give undergraduate researchers in chemistry education a dedicated platform for presenting their work and receiving feedback from their peers and mentors. Like the long-standing graduate student research symposium, the goal is to give undergraduate students an opportunity to practice presenting and sharing their work in a constructive environment. Undergraduate students participating in research on any topic in chemistry education are encouraged to submit their work and contribute to the growth of the undergraduate CER community during this symposium.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Julie Donnelly

Nicole Lapeyrouse

Sponsor:

Assessment Instruments: Design, Development, and Evaluation

Assessment instruments have become ubiquitous within chemistry education. They are used to gauge the impacts of curricular change and understand the relations among student-specific characte… Read More

Assessment instruments have become ubiquitous within chemistry education. They are used to gauge the impacts of curricular change and understand the relations among student-specific characteristics and course outcomes. As educators and education researchers rely on assessment instrument data to make these and other inferences, the tools must be carefully designed, developed, and evaluated with aspects of validity and reliability of the data being generated in mind. This symposium will bring together presentations about the creation and evaluation of all types of assessment instruments with the goal of informing the chemistry education community about the potential uses of these tools, their limitations, and the evidence that supports the validity and reliability of the data they generate.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Jack Barbera

Molly Atkinson

Sponsor:

Beyond Classroom Observation

Classroom observation allows for qualitative and/or quantitative analysis of how instruction is carried out in terms of behavior, interactions, and/or prescribed teaching practices. What can… Read More

Classroom observation allows for qualitative and/or quantitative analysis of how instruction is carried out in terms of behavior, interactions, and/or prescribed teaching practices. What can investigators do with the data that they have gathered? This symposium explores methods in classroom observation and how they are related to, as well as how they may be applied towards, other aspects of K-12 and college chemistry education such as curricular design and reform, assessment, and general affect.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Jonathan Velasco

Sponsor:

Educational Research in the High School Science Classroom

Educational research in the high school classroom can lead to important outcomes for that teacher and their students. This research can be referred to as action research, but it may not alw… Read More

Educational research in the high school classroom can lead to important outcomes for that teacher and their students. This research can be referred to as action research, but it may not always follow that model. Regardless of the model, this research can provide inquiry conducted by the teacher to assist in the development and improvement of teaching for the teacher. Examples of such research projects may include but are not limited to: 1) exploring the effect of a different teaching approach on student learning or metacognition, 2) determining the academic impact of giving students more choice in their assignments, and 3) implementing a new reading strategy to impact student knowledge. This symposium aims to provide a forum for teachers to share examples of educational research they have done, are currently doing, or plan to do in their science classrooms.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Melody Jewell

Matthew L Miller

Sponsor:

Laboratory skill assessments

Evaluating a student's achievement of Expected Learning Outcomes for the laboratory component of a course is a vital component of an instructor’s experimental design and review process. Dete… Read More

Evaluating a student's achievement of Expected Learning Outcomes for the laboratory component of a course is a vital component of an instructor’s experimental design and review process. Determining which skills are essential and how to fairly evaluate them can be challenging. This symposium will highlight strategies for developing and implementing laboratory practicals and other assessments of student laboratory skill development.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Tyler Weaver

Amy Moore

Sponsor:

Using Eye-tracking technology as a magnifying glass to investigate learners’ cognition

Eye tracking technology has largely advanced the possibilities for chemistry education research. As dealing with multiple external representations can be a complex endeavor for students in c… Read More

Eye tracking technology has largely advanced the possibilities for chemistry education research. As dealing with multiple external representations can be a complex endeavor for students in chemistry, measuring underlying cognitive processes based on students’ eye movements allows researchers to derive more in-depth implications about student learning. This symposium aims at bringing research in chemistry education together that makes use of eye tracking as a tool to elicit students’ perception and underlying cognitive processes. Contributions that make use of eye tracking to evaluate the effectiveness of differently designed instructional materials, characterize the correlation between students’ performance and their eye movements, and couple eye tracking with innovative approaches, such as machine learning, through exploratory studies to predict performance or derive adaptive learning scenarios are welcome. As eye tracking can be used to provide a qualitative and a quantitative perspective, both approaches are considered in the symposium. Currently, eye tracking is mostly used in research projects and less applied in teaching settings; research groups, graduate students involved with eye tracking projects, and interested faculty are encouraged to participate in this symposium.<br /> Eye tracking is a powerful tool in chemistry education research, but it has its pitfalls – choosing the right metrics as well as deriving sound inferences based on eye-movement measures can be tricky. The symposium thus aims to discuss with the contributors and attendees the future avenues of eye tracking, possibly reflecting on establishing a standard when using eye tracking in chemistry education research.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Nicole Graulich

Melissa Weinrich

Molly Atkinson

Katherine Havanki

Sarah J.R. Hansen

Melissa Weinrich

Sponsor:

Well that’s interesting! Emergent results, unexpected findings, and new areas for research

Have you ever set out to study one thing and noticed something else? The nature of DBER and SoTL scholarship requires careful thought to craft research question(s) and intentionally select a… Read More

Have you ever set out to study one thing and noticed something else? The nature of DBER and SoTL scholarship requires careful thought to craft research question(s) and intentionally select appropriate methods. However, despite this planning, sometimes unexpected things emerge or the data gathered answers different or additional questions. These emergent or exploratory findings can generate productive research avenues and highlight areas where more study is desperately needed. The central goal of this symposium is for presenters from both research and practice to share surprising and/or unexpected results, particularly those that highlight new areas for further study (or that you couldn’t fit in that publication). To facilitate this, we encourage presenters to tell the full story of the data: detailed context, specific descriptions of what data was collected or observed, and the resulting questions and/or implications.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Michelle Herridge

Nicole James

Sponsor:

The affective domain in chemistry education: Impact of affective and cognitive factors on student learning and pedagogical practices.

Pedagogical practices, focused on active learning, have evolved to facilitate greater student engagement in classrooms, better performance and retention in chemistry courses. However, as qua… Read More

Pedagogical practices, focused on active learning, have evolved to facilitate greater student engagement in classrooms, better performance and retention in chemistry courses. However, as qualitative and quantitative results have demonstrated, regardless of ability, students’ interests, motivations, and beliefs about themselves have a far-reaching impact on their performance and persistence in chemistry courses and in their intended majors.<br /> This symposium, targeted at the college level, will highlight the influence of affective factors on cognitive outcomes, retention, and enacted pedagogical practices in face-to-face, remote and/or hybrid learning environments. Researchers and practitioners using techniques to assess, evaluate and better understand affective dimensions in the undergraduate chemistry classroom are welcome to contribute to this symposium.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Shalini Srinivasan

Sachel Villafane-Garcia

Sponsor:

Questioning Objectivity (#AdvancingEquityinCER)

The perception of objectivity has a deep and sorted past in scientific research. Objectivity affords a false legitimacy to narratives constructed from majority perspectives. This symposium c… Read More

The perception of objectivity has a deep and sorted past in scientific research. Objectivity affords a false legitimacy to narratives constructed from majority perspectives. This symposium centers on research disentangling collective adherence to the notion of objectivity via the synthesis of the literature, sharing of counterstories, or evaluations of the underpinning assumptions driving research in STEM education. Research lines pertinent to this discussion include reformed approaches to the development of assessment tasks, Critical interpretations of assessment outcomes, methodological advancements (including philosophical underpinnings of epistemology and ontology), and advancements in qual/quant/mixed methods. The discussion will be scaffolded to provide spaces for researchers and practitioners to discuss the biases observed of “objective” data in educational measurement and methodology and share ideas on the general advancement of our field beyond the fallacies of objectivity. This symposium was submitted on behalf of a community of practice for scholars seeking to advance education research grounded in equity (#AdvancingEquityinCER).
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Vanessa Rosa Ralph

Katherine Nicole Hosbein

Paulette Vincent-Ruz

Morgan E. Howe

Sponsor:

Equitable and Student-Centered Assessments

The purpose of this symposium is to explore a diverse array of assessment practices that are designed to uncover misconceptions, inform learning, and guide instruction. Recent events and res… Read More

The purpose of this symposium is to explore a diverse array of assessment practices that are designed to uncover misconceptions, inform learning, and guide instruction. Recent events and research support the idea that grades are not the most effective form of feedback for students. However, most high school and university chemistry instructors work within a system that requires grades at specific points. Knowing this, we aim to answer two questions:<br /> <br /> How can we develop equitable and student-centered assessments that meet the requirements of our schools?<br /> <br /> How can we show evidence of student learning with techniques that are based on both student growth and conceptual understanding?<br /> <br /> The featured assessment strategies demonstrate a reduction in bias, an increase in student self-efficacy, and/or further ability to differentiate for a wide range of learners. Topics may include but are not limited to the following: student cycles of revision, mastery learning, reassessment, feedback, portfolios, ungrading, conferencing, and student reflection/metacognition.<br /> <br /> This symposium will be an opportunity to discuss best practices regarding teaching and learning for those who seek to improve both pedagogy and assessment.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Michael Farabaugh

Johanna Brown

Sponsor:

Disrupting Grading

Traditional grading systems have been shown to be statistically invalid, unreliable, and oppressive, particularly to students who face systemic inequities. As chemistry educators, many of us… Read More

Traditional grading systems have been shown to be statistically invalid, unreliable, and oppressive, particularly to students who face systemic inequities. As chemistry educators, many of us despise grading and see it as one of the most tedious aspects of our jobs. It is time to disrupt grading — to learn different ways to provide evaluation to students. This symposium welcomes anyone who has tried or wants to try a different approach to grading (specifications grading, ungrading, or any alternative to traditional grading) in their classrooms at any level (high school, undergraduate, graduate, or other) and any subdiscipline (general, organic, or other) that may have a significant impact on students, teachers, and the system. In addition, this symposium is interested in the effects of alternative grading approaches on the classroom environment.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Renee D Link

Clarissa Sorensen-Unruh

Kristina D Closser

Daniel A Barr

Jennifer L Muzyka

Joshua Roderick Ring

Sponsor:

Research in Chemistry Education

Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Mary Beth Anzovino

Justin Carmel

Sponsor:

Assessment and Measurement in Research and Practice

In the ever-changing landscape of chemistry education research, one question has continually stood the test of time. How do we know what our students know? This symposium invites contribut… Read More

In the ever-changing landscape of chemistry education research, one question has continually stood the test of time. How do we know what our students know? This symposium invites contributions which emphasize evidence-based assessment and measurement practices at the undergraduate level for both research and practice. Contributions are especially encouraged which feature novel methods of classroom and/or programmatic assessment as well as those with implications for the broader chemistry education community.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Jeffrey Raker

Kristen Murphy

Sponsor:

Professional Development of Teaching Assistants

As STEM jobs in the United States are set to expand by 8% between 2019-2029, it has become ever more pressing to train well qualified and proficient Chemistry graduates who are experienced i… Read More

As STEM jobs in the United States are set to expand by 8% between 2019-2029, it has become ever more pressing to train well qualified and proficient Chemistry graduates who are experienced in the lab, conceptually literate, and socio-culturally aware. In order to achieve this, institutions will require highly trained teaching assistants (TAs) to support education development. This symposium is designed to provide a platform to promote research focused on TA professional development. For the purposes of this symposium, we are defining teaching assistants as graduate teaching assistants, undergraduate teaching assistants, or learning assistants. We consider professional development to be any training or targeted intervention designed and/or implemented to support and understand the needs of teaching assistants. <br /> We will be accepting two categories of abstracts for this symposium <br /> 1) Early research projects: For this category, you will present projects in their early stage of development/implementation where you are looking for support, advise, or potential collaboration for your project. The intent of the project you are developing should have teaching assistants as the focus of your study. Your presentations should close with 1 or 2 key questions that you would like to crowdsource potential solutions from the audience. <br /> 2) Late stage/ completed projects: For this category, you will present the results of late stage or completed projects where the focus of the study participants are teaching assistants. Here we expect the presentation of substantial results, key findings/implications and explicit suggestions for how to implement practices in other settings.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Christopher Randles

Erin Saitta

Sponsor:

Adjunct Faculty Forum

Being an adjunct faculty member is often a good way to get teaching experience during graduate school, or a stepping stone to a full-time position, especially at a community college. If you … Read More

Being an adjunct faculty member is often a good way to get teaching experience during graduate school, or a stepping stone to a full-time position, especially at a community college. If you are an adjunct faculty member, please share what you have learned and what you wish you would have known. The session will conclude with a moderated panel discussion aimed at people who are considering adjuncting or just getting started as an adjunct.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Thomas Higgins

Sponsor:

We want YOU for the US National Chemistry Olympiad!

Calling all high school and college chemistry faculty: this professional development and volunteer opportunity is for you! Have you heard of the Chemistry Olympiad and wondered what it’s al… Read More

Calling all high school and college chemistry faculty: this professional development and volunteer opportunity is for you! Have you heard of the Chemistry Olympiad and wondered what it’s all about, how to get involved, or how to get your high school students involved? This symposium will highlight the various stages of United States National Chemistry Olympiad (USNCO) competition at the local, national, and international levels. High school students take a series of examinations to qualify them for a two-week study camp designed to prepare, train, and ultimately select four students to represent the USA at the International Chemistry Olympiad (IChO). Several aspects of the USNCO program will be showcased including how to host a local competition, the role of mentors, the study camp and IChO experiences, and more. A particular focus will be on engaging diverse high school students in the local competitions; current coordinators are encouraged to share their experiences. More information about the USNCO program can be found on the website at https://www.acs.org/usnco
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Joseph Houck

Melissa Barranger-Mathys

Sponsor:

Effective Graduate Education for Masters and Doctoral Chemistry Students

Graduate education in chemistry has received a great deal of attention from national organizations such as the American Chemical Society, National Academies, Council of Graduate Schools, and… Read More

Graduate education in chemistry has received a great deal of attention from national organizations such as the American Chemical Society, National Academies, Council of Graduate Schools, and others for several decades. While primarily thought of as a model for the world to look up to, the culture and outcomes of U.S. graduate education has faced intense scrutiny and many calls for drastic reform. Additionally, the advent of chemistry education research as an area of chemistry has lead to the formation of many new programs that rely on courses and experiences not traditionally observed in the other areas. This symposium is dedicated to disseminating fundamental research and/or innovations that exist in chemistry graduate education. Two different areas are targeted: (1) Research on the effectiveness of current elements of graduate education (courses, seminars, research groups, mentoring, etc.) and data from implementation of reformed practice in the traditional areas of chemistry (biochemistry, organic, inorganic, physical, and analytical) are welcomed. (2) Innovations and approaches to the effective training of graduate students specifically in chemistry education research are also welcomed. Presentations in these two areas should help shed light on best practices in graduate education in the ongoing effort to produce highly trained chemists.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Jordan Harshman

Ginger Szymczak Shultz

Sponsor:

Department chairs: catalysts among chemical educators

Many faculty will have the opportunity at some point in their teaching career to serve as department chair. Some may embrace that opportunity; others may be hesitant to take on this critical… Read More

Many faculty will have the opportunity at some point in their teaching career to serve as department chair. Some may embrace that opportunity; others may be hesitant to take on this critical role. Regardless of how one becomes chair, new avenues of responsibility and potential will be part of the journey. Talks in this symposium should highlight topics or resources that would help department chairs, or others in coordinator/administrative roles, serve as catalysts for supporting colleagues and students, enhancing curriculum, and advancing programs. This symposium is a place to share experiences and practices and gain insights common to those leading chemistry departments.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Aimee Miller

Laura Anna

Sponsor:

Building Momentum for Systemic Change (#AdvancingEquityinCER)

Over the past several years, institutions, departments, and individuals have been working towards equity reform in higher education. The driving force behind this push for systemic change ha… Read More

Over the past several years, institutions, departments, and individuals have been working towards equity reform in higher education. The driving force behind this push for systemic change has, in part, been the new light shed on systemic racism, injustice, and oppression that resulted in the marginalization of individuals based on race, ethnicity, gender, and other social identities within the Academy. Still, many initiatives that push for systemic change remain grounded in deficit framing, focusing on helping individuals adapt and fit into an unjust system rather than acknowledging and addressing the flaws in that system. This symposium will focus on systemic change within STEM fields—from community-specific initiatives to large-scale institutional reforms—to build momentum for broader reforms across departments, programs, and institutions. Importantly, we aim to highlight projects and practices that focus on equity by addressing systemic issues within institutions in order to shift the focus away from deficit framing. We aim to include discussions about how data can be collected and used to initiate change and the types of initiatives and interventions that are being devised and implemented to reform higher education. This includes but is not limited to: program-focused change at the undergraduate or graduate level, professional development or career counseling initiatives, teacher or graduate student instructor training, development of equitable pedagogies and philosophies in higher education, and more. This symposium was submitted on behalf of a community of practice for scholars seeking to advance education research grounded in equity (#AdvancingEquityinCER).
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Christiane Stachl

Morgan Howe

Vanessa Ralph

Stephanie Werner

Sponsor:

Effective Practices for Peer Tutoring

Peer tutoring is a commonly used out-of-class support system that has potential benefits for both students who are receiving academic support and for students who are providing the academic … Read More

Peer tutoring is a commonly used out-of-class support system that has potential benefits for both students who are receiving academic support and for students who are providing the academic support. Designing peer tutoring support structures that promote engagement of students in the learning process provides an opportunity to improve student course performance and ultimately student retention in chemistry. In this symposium, effective practices for developing, evaluating, and maintaining peer tutoring in chemistry will be explored. Important questions include: What initiatives have been successful in encouraging students to consistently utilize peer tutoring? What types of training for peer tutors have been effective in helping them engage students in the learning process? What are cost-effective and scalable approaches for meaningful tutoring interactions? What is the impact of different peer tutoring structures on student learning gains? What is the impact of peer tutoring practices on student retention in chemistry? How can technology be utilized to support both tutors and students seeking assistance? Do effective peer tutoring approaches vary by institutional type or course level? Attendees will be encouraged to actively participate in the discussion and share their experiences in building and maintaining effective tutoring practices.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Daniel Albert

Sponsor:

Think, Plan, Teach: Enacted Pedagogical Content Knowledge in Higher Education

Studies of instructors’ beliefs, planning, and actions related to teaching in the classroom have largely examined primary and secondary (K-12) teachers, often looking toward student performa… Read More

Studies of instructors’ beliefs, planning, and actions related to teaching in the classroom have largely examined primary and secondary (K-12) teachers, often looking toward student performance as the key indicator of successful teaching. In this symposium, we shift our attention towards instructors in higher education and how they prepare for and enact their teaching practices (i.e. their enacted pedagogical content knowledge, or ePCK). We will also consider the personal and contextual factors that influence their ePCK, such as personal experiences, beliefs, and identity, the departmental or institutional climate, and other external circumstances.<br /> <br /> We welcome studies conducted at institutes of higher education of any size, population, and location, including community colleges and institutes classified as minority-serving (e.g. HBCUs, HSIs, TCUs, etc.). In addition to faculty and teaching staff, we also encourage studies looking at undergraduate and/or graduate teaching assistants.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Emily Atieh

Lu Shi

Sponsor:

Chemical Education Xchange: Engaging with Contributors

The Chemical Education Xchange (ChemEd X, www.chemedx.org) is a virtual home for high school and higher education chemistry instructors. ChemEd X is designed to be a collaborative space to s… Read More

The Chemical Education Xchange (ChemEd X, www.chemedx.org) is a virtual home for high school and higher education chemistry instructors. ChemEd X is designed to be a collaborative space to share resources, ideas, and expertise. ChemEd X contributors will engage with you by highlighting and expanding upon ideas and activities they have shared at ChemEd X. Attendees are encouraged to register for a free account at www.ChemEdX.org and bring their preferred device to access the website during the symposium. Find out more about the resources available at ChemEd X and how you might engage with and contribute to this growing, vital community.
Type: Oral Invited: Y Organizers:

Jon Holmes

Sponsor:

Preparing High School Chemistry Teachers

The need for High School Chemistry Teachers exist in most if not all states. Please share what you are doing to recruit and prepare teachers for the high school classroom. If you are a high … Read More

The need for High School Chemistry Teachers exist in most if not all states. Please share what you are doing to recruit and prepare teachers for the high school classroom. If you are a high school chemistry teacher share how you were prepared or not prepared and what expereinces and knowledge you wish you had been provided during your preparation. The ideal presentation will be the sharing of one to four activities, ideas or projects to help those who teach the methods course improve their course.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Jeffrey Pribyl

Sponsor:

Beyond the Laboratory Teaching Assistantship: How can we prepare our graduate students for teaching outside of the laboratory?

Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are an integral part of instruction in most large university settings. The pedagogical training and utilization of this workforce is managed differently a… Read More

Graduate Teaching Assistants (GTAs) are an integral part of instruction in most large university settings. The pedagogical training and utilization of this workforce is managed differently at different institutions and changes over time. At Northwestern and the University of Southern California, we are striving to leverage graduate students’ experience in the classroom to maximize the benefit to both their careers and our undergraduate instruction. Devoting effort to high-quality training of GTAs and subsequent opportunities for using that training is a benefit to the department as well as to the graduate student population. Others have made great strides toward this effort, and it is our hope to highlight the unique contributions of many individuals across a broad scope of institutional contexts. We have identified several key aspects of the role of GTAs in undergraduate instruction and the contributions that can potentially be shared by several key individuals, highlighted below. TA Training Methods and Programs Perhaps the most universal experience among institutions that utilize GTAs is the challenge of providing sufficient pedagogical instruction. Many institutions have developed training programs that span from a few days to a course that lasts a full semester. The GRAD-TA PREP Workshop has done an excellent job at bringing representation from physics and chemistry departments together to brainstorm about this subject, but the results inspired by the three-day conference are worthy of the larger venue of BCCE.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Veronica Berns

Rebecca Broyer

Stephanie Knezz

Jessica Parr

Sponsor:

Training, mentoring, and managing laboratory teaching assistants

Training and managing laboratory teaching assistants (TAs) present a unique set of challenges for chemistry programs. TAs are expected to provide an engaging laboratory experience and equita… Read More

Training and managing laboratory teaching assistants (TAs) present a unique set of challenges for chemistry programs. TAs are expected to provide an engaging laboratory experience and equitable implementation of instruction, however, TAs are often students themselves. Due to program demands and personal preferences, TAs vary in motivation and teaching experience, yet they serve as frontline instructors, interacting extensively with undergraduate students in entry level courses. Logistical limitations, such as dedicated training time and simultaneous use of multiple rooms or buildings, make ongoing and timely coaching of TAs by lab coordinators or instructors complicated. Presenters are invited to discuss all practices, including those that failed, around pedagogical and professional training of TAs. Examples of appropriate topics include, but are not limited to: mentoring, considerations as student enrollment exceeds 150 students, pre-academic term vs during academic term trainings or meetings, identifying TAs in need of intensive coaching early in an academic term, strategies for promoting consistent course vision and execution, leveraging strengths of TAs from varying backgrounds, graduate vs non-graduate student TAs, and improving TA efficiency.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Christy Bagwill

Renee Link

Jennifer Monahan

Courtney Sobers

Daria Sokic-Lazic

Caitlin Zumalt

Sponsor:

Future in Pharmaceutical and Biochemical Industries post Bachelor's and Associate's Degree

Students interested in biochemical sciences have many career options, including working in a biopharmaceutical company. The life sciences industry in Maryland and the larger BioHealth Capita… Read More

Students interested in biochemical sciences have many career options, including working in a biopharmaceutical company. The life sciences industry in Maryland and the larger BioHealth Capital Region is experiencing significant growth, opening opportunities for local talent to enter the workforce at multiple entry points. Members of the Maryland Life Sciences Advisory Board and the Maryland Tech Council task force are proposing a workshop where speakers will describe the multitude of existing and future opportunities in the life sciences industry for those interested in biomedical research and proactively engage faculties, students and non-students. The speakers will share their personal stories of navigating professional paths to: 1) demonstrate the wide array of impactful careers in the life sciences; 2) dispel common misconceptions about industry careers; 3) address the imposter syndrome and other barriers that may keep many talented students from pursuing job opportunities and 4) provide information on how to increase their employable skills. In addition, the panel will provide practical advice on the importance of networking, balancing technical and professional skills and marketing one’s experiences to successfully compete for industry positions. The speakers will demystify the recruitment process and address the imposter syndrome and other barriers that keep many talented students from applying to industry sector jobs. Key reasons we are choosing this platform: i) to meet our group’s key objective of addressing the skewed representation of minorities in the life sciences sector ii) Inform the faculties so that they can best advise the students for future in industry.
Type: Oral Invited: N Organizers:

Supriyo Ray

Ulyana Desiderio

Sponsor:

General Posters

Type: Poster Invited: N Organizers:

Mary Twist van Opstal

Sponsor:

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