FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | July 31, 2012

Chemistry on Mars video with Curiosity Rover from the American Chemical Society

WASHINGTON, July 31, 2012 — After an epic 354-million-mile trek through space, the Mars Curiosity Rover is zooming along at 13,000 miles per hour toward a scheduled August 6 landing on the Red Planet to search for evidence of extraterrestrial life. The newest episode of the American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) award-winning Bytesize Science video series highlights Curiosity Rover’s mission, scientific instrumentation and the role that chemistry plays in the search for life on other planets. The video, produced by the ACS Office of Public Affairs, is available at www.BytesizeScience.com.

It features Mars Science Laboratory Deputy Science Manager Ashwin Vasavada, Ph.D., of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Vasavada takes viewers “under the hood” of the rover, explaining the role of the analytical chemistry instruments found onboard the Curiosity. The use of analytical chemistry techniques will aid in Curiosity’s primary mission goal: to determine the habitability of the Gale Crater, which scientists believe was once filled with water.

The video explains several chemical processes that Curiosity is equipped to perform, including laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, mineralogy tests and X-ray spectroscopy. Test results from these instruments will pave the way for future Mars missions and may provide insight in the search for life on other planets.

For more entertaining, informative science videos and podcasts from the ACS Office of Public Affairs, view Prized Science, Spellbound, Science Elements and Global Challenges/Chemistry Solutions.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society contact newsroom@acs.org.

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Description: MacHD:Users:Podcast:Desktop:Chemistry On Mars .png
With the August 6 landing of the Curiosity Rover,
an Amercian Chemical Society Bytesize Science
video explains the Mars Science Laboratory
mission goals and chemistry’s role in the search
for life on other planets.