FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE | Tue May 16 12:44:00 EDT 2017

When water levitates (video)

WASHINGTON, May 16, 2017 — Have you ever seen a drop of water navigate a maze? It’s possible thanks to the same phenomenon that lets you know if a griddle is hot enough for pancake batter. Water droplets that dance and skitter across a hot surface instead of boil away on the spot are experiencing the Leidenfrost effect. Understanding Leidenfrost — first described more than 200 years ago — helped engineers make more efficient steam engines. Today, scientists are using high-speed cameras to better characterize how superhot water behaves on metal surfaces. The investigation might lead to improvements in power generation. Watch the superhot dancing droplets here: https://youtu.be/9tlIWlGvkRc.

Youtube ID: 9tlIWlGvkRc

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