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ACS News Service Weekly PressPac: Wed Jun 29 16:42:03 EDT 2011

Recycling A new source of indispensible 'rare earth' materials mined mainly in China

Global In-Use Stocks of the Rare Earth Elements: A First Estimate
ACS Environmental Science & Technology

That axiom of sustainability — “recycle and reuse” — could help ease concerns about a reliable supply of substances, indispensible for a modern technological society, that are produced almost exclusively in the Peoples’ Republic of China. That’s the conclusion of a study on these so-called “rare earth” elements in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Xiaoyue Du and Thomas E. Graedel note that the dozen-plus rare earth elements (REEs) have unique physical and chemical properties making them essential for defense applications, computers, cell phones, electric vehicles, batteries, appliances, fertilizers, liquid crystal displays, and other products. But there is growing concern about the supply, since only one country, China, is the major source. “Since 1990, China has played a dominant role in REE mining production; other countries are almost completely dependent on imports from China with respect to rare earth resources,” the researchers state.

To determine how much recycling potential of the REEs from in-use products could add to the supply, they did the first analysis of the amount of REEs available in products in the United States, Japan, and China. Those countries are the major uses of REEs. The analysis concluded that nearly 99,000 tons REEs were included in products in 2007. This invisible stock, equivalent to more than 10 years of production, “suggests that REE recycling may have the potential to offset a significant part of REE virgin extraction in the future...and minimize the environmental challenges present in REE mining and processing,” the report notes.

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Computers, cell phones, and other electronics that
rely on “rare earth” elements imported from China
could get a new source of these indispensible
materials through recycling.

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