ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131 million unique monthly visits)
"The Science Of Why Onions Make Us Cry"
June 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Why do onions make us cry? Many a poet has pondered. Is it because their beautiful, multilayered complexity moves us to weep? Are we mourning the majestic bulb as we cut it up and consume it? Or are these tears induced by the tragic tedium of chopping, chopping, chopping? Yes, yes. All of the above. … For a visual of what the complete process looks like, check out this video by the American Chemical Society.

More than 100 media outlets, including Eater (Washington, D.C.: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Newser (Miami, FL: 3.9 million unique monthly visits), KQED Food (San Francisco, CA: 632,000 unique monthly visits), Southern California Public Radio (Pasadena, CA: 333,500 unique monthly visits), OPB (Portland, OR: 277,800 unique monthly visits), MPR News (Saint Paul, MN: 255,000 unique monthly visits), KPBS (San Diego, CA: 184,700 unique monthly visits), KUOW.org (Seattle, WA: 83,300 unique monthly visits), KCUR (Kansas City, MO: 69,900 unique monthly visits), KUER (Salt Lake City, UT: 60,900 unique monthly visits), WAMC Northeast Public Radio (Albany, NY: 43,300 unique monthly visits), WUNC (Chapel Hill, NC: 42,300 unique monthly visits), KERA News (Dallas, TX: 41,700 unique monthly visits), North Country Public Radio (Canton, NY: 36,600 unique monthly visits), Idea Stream (Cleveland, Ohio: 36,100 unique monthly visits) and KALW (San Francisco, CA: 30,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Shape (New York, NY: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Could Beer Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer?"
June 24, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hops—a flowering plant that gives beer flavor—have all sorts of benefits. They serve as sleep aids, aid in postmenopausal relief, and, of course, help you secure that happy hour buzz. Now, word on the street is there could be a link between hops and breast cancer prevention, according to a new study published in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

More than 20 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), AJC.com (Atlanta, GA : 1.6 million unique monthly visits), DOTmed (New York, NY: 183,900 unique monthly visits), Science Blogs (113,800 unique monthly visits), GEN News (New Rochelle, NY: 112,200 unique monthly visits), Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Decoding the glass ‘genome’ contributes to new functional materials"
June 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

From protecting our most valuable works of art to enabling smartphone displays, glass has become one of our most important materials. Making it even more versatile is the next challenge. Developing new glass compositions is largely a time-consuming, trial-and-error exercise. But now scientists have developed a way to decode the glass "genome" and design different compositions of the material without making and melting every possibility. Their report appears in ACS' journal Chemistry of Materials.

Nine media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Changing the federal legal status of marijuana could boost research, ease confusion"
June 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Marijuana has never been highly regarded by the federal government, which considers it a dangerous and addictive drug. But many states have legalized marijuana for medical purposes and four states allow its recreational use. Now, activists are calling for the drug to be reclassified to make it easier to study its health benefits and untangle regulations, according to the cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Six media outlets, including YubaNet.com (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits)
"Protecting grapes from pests by boosting their natural immunity"
June 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Wine enthusiasts concerned with potential environmental and health effects of synthetic pesticides prefer to buy "organic" pinots, chardonnays and other varietals. Now scientists are onto a new practice that could help meet that demand. They report that shining short-wavelength ultraviolet light (UV-C) on grapes right before harvest boosts levels of the fruits' own disease-fighting compounds, which could reduce the need for pesticides. The study appears in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.


Forbes
(New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Water Vapor Vs Carbon Dioxide: Which 'Wins' In Climate Warming?"
June 20, 2016

The fact that water vapor is the dominant absorber in the Earth’s greenhouse effect can lead to a flawed narrative that anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is not important nor a significant driver of climate warming. … The American Chemical Society’s ACS Climate Science Toolkit cuts right to the chase in an excellent analysis on its website.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Five foods that help your heart"
June 23, 2016

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. … Additionally, a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry indicates dates may help cut levels of triglycerides, fats in the blood associated with heart attacks and strokes.

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Albemarle (ALB) Set to be Added to the S&P 500 Index"
June 24, 2016

Albemarle Corporation ALB is slated to join the S&P 500 index after the market closes on Jun 30, 2016. … This month, Albemarle along with its partner Chicago Bridge & Iron Company N.V. CBI was presented the 2016 Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with the American Chemical Society.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers discover new chemical sensing technique"
June 23, 2016

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new technique to determine the chemical composition of materials using near-infrared light. The work could have a number of potential applications, including improving downhole drilling analysis in the oil and gas industry and broadening the spectrum of solar light that can be harvested and converted to electricity, said Wei-Chuan Shih, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at UH and lead author of a paper describing the discovery published June 22 in Nano Letters.

Nine media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Wireless Design Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 65,400 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Proteins put up with the roar of the crowd"
June 23, 2016

It gets mighty crowded around your DNA, but don't worry: According to Rice University researchers, your proteins are nimble enough to find what they need. … Kolomeisky and lead author Alexey Shvets, a postdoctoral researcher in his lab, published the latest in their quest to learn how proteins search DNA in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters this month.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and TMC News (Houston, TX: 23,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Breitbart (8.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Antarctic sponge yields MRSA-killing compound"
June 22, 2016

Sea sponges are mostly stationary, and without speed or a protective shell, their defense system is largely reliant on chemical compounds. And because bacteria poses one of sponges’ greatest threats, many of their compounds boast antibacterial qualities. … McClintock and his researcher partners recently detailed their discovery in the journal Organic Letters.

Eight media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and UAB The Mix (Birmingham, AL: 306,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers reveal DNA unwrapping can happen asymmetrically to expose specific genes"
June 22, 2016

The protein complex that holds strands of DNA in compact spools partially disassembles itself to help genes reveal themselves to specialized proteins and enzymes for activation, according to Rice University researchers and their colleagues. … The study of nucleosome disassembly by Rice theoretical biological physicist Peter Wolynes, former Rice postdoctoral researcher Bin Zhang, postdoctoral researcher Weihua Zheng and University of Maryland theoretical chemist Garegin Papoian appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and TMC News (Houston, TX: 23,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Research team synthesizes new cancer fighter"
June 20, 2016

Rice University scientists have synthesized a novel anti-cancer agent, Thailanstatin A, which was originally isolated from a bacterial species collected in Thailand. … Rice synthetic chemist K.C. Nicolaou and his group reported their success in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Five media outlets, including Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and TMC News (Houston, TX: 23,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Mirror (London, U.K.: 5.1 million unique monthly visits)
"This is why hot toast tastes so much better than bread"
June 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

A nice slice of hot toast tastes infinitely better than a boring old piece of bread to most people. But the reason why is down to a complex chemical process. The answer lies with something called the Maillard reaction, also known as the “browning reaction", which increases the deliciousness of food no end. … A group called Reactions have studied the Maillard process and can reveal it works best when food is cooked between 110C and 170C.

More than 15 media outlets, including The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Metro (London, U.K.: 2.2 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 213,400 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Hybrid nanogenerator harvests hard-to-reach ocean energy"
June 23, 2016

Energy from the ocean, or "blue energy," is arguably the most underexploited power source, according to researchers in a new study. Although the oceans contain enough energy to meet all of the world's energy needs, currently there is no effective way to harvest it economically and with reasonable efficiency. … In a new study published in ACS Nano, a team of researchers led by Zhong Lin Wang at the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a device that can harvest ocean waves in a very broad frequency range that encompasses almost all of the ocean wave energy spectrum, including the hard-to-reach low frequencies that are inaccessible to most harvesters.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"DuPont Cutbacks Send a Chill through Delaware's Science Community"
June 23, 2016

In 1802 Éleuthère Irénée du Pont de Nemours, a 31-year-old French aristocrat just two years in America, started a powder mill on the banks of Brandywine Creek outside Wilmington, Del. Since then the company he founded has become virtually synonymous with the state. … The renowned DuPont Central Research and Development organization (CRD), called “one of the most prestigious and accomplished research organizations in the chemistry world” by Chemical & Engineering News, is another victim of the reorganization—a development causing widespread dismay among chemists, the magazine reports.

The Baltimore Sun (Baltimore, MD: 2.4 million unique monthly visits)
"New pain drug being developed at University of Maryland could offer relief without addiction"
June 24, 2016

Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore have developed a new drug that promises a possible breakthrough by offering strong pain relief while lowering the risk of addiction. … They published their research on in its ability to act on the two receptors in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience in 2013.

Five media outlets, including Bloomberg (New York, NY: 8.5 million unique monthly visits) and Carroll County Times (Westminster, MD: 104,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

AskMen (Montreal, Canada: 2.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Study Finds Blueberries Are Even Healthier Than Previously Thought"
June 21, 2016

While many are aware of the health benefits blueberries provide, a new University of Florida study shows that the little berry that could is even better for you than you probably think. … Similarly, a 2010 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry illustrated that blueberry supplementation improves memory in older adults.

Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (Cambridge, MA: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Ultrathin, flat lens resolves chirality and color"
June 23, 2016

Many things in the natural world are geometrically chiral, meaning they cannot be superimposed onto their mirror image. Think hands — right and left hands are mirror images but if you transplanted a right hand onto a left, you’d be in trouble. … Now, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an ultra-compact, flat lens that can simultaneously capture both spectral information and the chirality of an object. The research was recently published in Nano Letters.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits)
"GraphExeter illuminates bright new future for flexible lighting devices"
June 23, 2016

Researchers from the University of Exeter have pioneered an innovative new technique to make flexible screens more effective and efficient. A team of Engineers and Physicists from Exeter have discovered that GraphExeter -- a material adapted from the 'wonder material' graphene -- can substantially improve the effectiveness of large, flat, flexible lighting. … The study is published in scientific journal, ACS Materials and Interfaces.

Four media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Pharmaceutical-Technology.com
"Scientists reveal hops extract could help reduce breast cancer"
June 24, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have revealed that new lab investigations on breast cells using extracts from hops, the flower cones used to make beer, could help fight breast cancer. According to a report published in the ACS journal 'Chemical Research in Toxicology', an extract from hops boosted a detoxification pathway in breast cells in the lab.

Science magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Common espresso machine can perform complex chemical analysis"
June 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Chemical analyses often take lots of time and require expensive equipment, not to mention substantial volumes of harsh solvents. But not if you use an espresso machine. … Concentrations of soil PAHs measured using the espresso machine typically fell within 20% of those measured by standard methods, the researchers report in Analytical Chemistry.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 22.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Job-Seeking Ph.D. Holders Look to Life Outside School"
June 14, 2016

New doctorate holders are grappling with dwindling employment prospects within the academy. … Salaries for chemists with Ph.D.s fell 12% between 2004 and 2014, according to the American Chemical Society.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Loofah-based material could give lithium batteries a boost"
June 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Today's mobile lifestyle depends on rechargeable lithium batteries. But to take these storage devices to the next level -- to shore up the electric grid or for widespread use in vehicles, for example -- they need a big boost in capacity. To get lithium batteries up to snuff for more ambitious applications, researchers report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a new solution that involves low-cost, renewable loofah sponges.

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Making vinyl records even groovier"
June 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Audiophiles have reason to celebrate. Vinyl records are experiencing a comeback, and scientists are working to make their sound quality even better. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at how past inventions led to the classic vinyl record, or LP, and what the future might hold.

Eight media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Breitbart (8.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Blood test for endometriosis may be possible, researchers say"
June 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Surgery is required for a doctor to confirm a woman has endometriosis, though scientists think a blood test may prove to be effective at diagnosing patients without cutting them open. … For the new study, published in the Journal of Proteome Research, the scientists performed a metabolomics analysis on blood samples from two groups of mice, one with the condition and one without it.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Health Central (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"IBD and the Benefits of Vinegar"
June 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

With seemingly countless uses (see Reader’s Digest’s list of 95+ Household Uses for Vinegar), vinegar is something of a wonder product. But what about its dietary health benefits? In January 2016 the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry published an animal study that showed promising results for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"How Kevlar Saved an Orlando Police Officer's Life"
June 14, 2016

A helmet made of Kevlar saved the life of an Orlando, Florida, police officer on Sunday (June 12) after police engaged in a gun battle with a man who killed 49 people and injured 53 others at a gay nightclub, according to news sources. … Discovered by DuPont scientist Stephanie Louise Kwolek in 1965, Kevlar is essentially "a high-performance plastic," said Richard Sachleben, a member of the American Chemical Society's panel of experts, who has worked in the pharmaceutical industry in the Boston area for 40 years as a chemist.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits) and Live Science (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits) also covered the story.  

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Scientists Discover Novel Way to Recycle Plastic"
June 19, 2016

Here's a riddle for science-savvy readers: What is one thing you will almost always see, no matter where you look? … Give up? Polyethylene (or PE), the most common form of plastic, is everywhere in the modern world: the containers we store things in, the bottles we drink water out of, the plastic bags that we choose over paper ... it's all polyethylene. … And that's the problem, David Constable from the American Chemical Society, told VOA.

Science magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"‘Elephant’s toothpaste’ reaction explained in slow motion"
June 14, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

It would require a lot of toothpaste for an elephant to brush its teeth, and children across the country are making it by the bottle—sort of. The American Chemical Society’s latest Reactions video breaks down that classic lesson in catalysis, the process of speeding up the rate of a reaction.

Six media outlets, including Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Salt: How much is too much?"
June 15, 2016

Salt intake has become a major health concern in the United States. … A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry earlier this year also suggested a high-salt diet may cause liver damage, while another study linked high salt intake to increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS).

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanoprobe enables measurement of protein dynamics in living cells"
June 14, 2016

A team of researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Rowland Institute at Harvard University have used a specialized nanoprobe developed by the Harvard/Rowland investigators to directly measure levels of key proteins within living, cultured cells. As described in the journal Nano Letters, the investigators used the device to track levels of the Alzheimer's-disease-associated proteins amyloid-beta (A-beta) and tau in neurons and other cells exposed to an anesthetic known to produce Alzheimer's-like changes in the brains of mice.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), GEN News (New Rochelle, NY: 112,200 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 73,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanosubs gain better fluorescent properties for tracking"
June 13, 2016

The next generation of nanosubmarines being developed at Rice University has been upgraded with tags that fluoresce longer, which enables the submersibles to be tracked for greater periods while being driven through a solution. … The new version built and tested with collaborators at Tel Aviv University in Israel is the subject of a recent paper in the American Chemical Society journal Organic Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CBC News (Toronto, Canada: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Sudbury scientist using web tools to teach about science"
June 13, 2016

Sudbury scientist Steve Maguire is using platforms like YouTube and Reddit to teach people about science because he says it helps make it accessible to the everyday person. … The AMA session was organized through the American Chemical Society, which Maguire is a member of.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Magnets could pull oil from water to protect wildlife"
June 16, 2016

Scientists are examining a novel way to address oil spills, and to protect marine wildlife, through the use of magnets. The idea is to use magnets to draw the oil away from key zones. … The research is published in the journal ACS Nano, under the title "Fast Responsive and Controllable Liquid Transport on a Magnetic Fluid/Nanoarray Composite Interface."

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Modular construction - on a molecular scale"
June 13, 2016

Modular constructions from cages (proteins), hubs (metal ions), and struts (organic linkers) allows the rational design of porous scaffolds. The inherent chemical and structural diversity of these building blocks leads to a new class of versatile, self-assembled materials (Journal of the American Chemical Society, "A metal organic framework with spherical protein nodes: Rational chemical design of 3D protein crystals").

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

STAT News (Boston, MA: 129,600 unique monthly visits)
"Widely used diabetes drug found in many Southeastern US streams"
June 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A new study has found traces of the widely used metformin diabetes drug and other medicines in dozens of streams throughout the Southeastern United States. … Moreover, the analysis, which was published in Environmental Science & Technology, detected pharmaceuticals at more than 10 percent of the sample sites at concentrations that would be expected to affect aquatic life.

E&T Magazine (U.K.: 80,100 unique monthly visits)
"New bandwidth record set for laser-based data transmission"
June 15, 2016

A new visible light communication system developed by a team from Saudi Arabia has achieved record bandwidth, providing a data transmission rate of 2Gbit per second…. The research was published in the journal ACS Photonics.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Multicolor super resolution imaging"
June 17, 2016

Researchers from the Mechanobiology Institute (MBI) at the National University of Singapore have developed a new method, using super-resolution microscopy, to determine the length of stretched proteins in living cells, and monitor the dynamic binding of proteins, at sub-second timescales. This study was published in Nano Letters ("Cooperative Vinculin Binding to Talin Mapped by Time-Resolved Super Resolution Microscopy").

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WDIV-DET (NBC) (Detroit, MI: Local Viewership 4,065)
"Watermelon Juice"
June 14, 2016

[Transcript] Sipping watermelon juice before exercise can help us recover from a workout faster, so we're less sore the next day. That's according to a new study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Researchers say it is because watermelon is the only food that contains large amounts of L-citrulline, an amino acid that helps blood deliver oxygen and other nutrients to our muscles, and in turn that helps our muscles heal faster.

Eight media outlets, including WRAZ-RAL (FOX) (Raleigh, NC: Local Viewership 2,417), KSVT (FOX) (Twin Falls, ID), WBKPDT (CW) (Marquette, MI) and KYUR-DT2 (Anchorage, AK) covered the story.

WYPR-FM (Baltimore, MD)
WYPR-FM
June 14, 2016

[Transcript] President Obama is expected to sign the measure into law and when he does the Environmental Protection Agency will gain more powerful and broader authority to review and regulate new and existing chemicals for safety. The show hosts assistant managing editor of Chemical & Engineering News joins us now to help us understand the details.

Eight media outlets, including WBUR (Boston, MA), WESA-FM (Pittsburgh, PA), KQED-FM (San Francisco, CA) and WBFO-FM (Buffalo, NY) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Wind Power Engineering & Development
"Loofah-based material could give lithium batteries a boost"
June 17, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Today’s mobile lifestyle depends on rechargeable lithium batteries. But to take these storage devices to the next level — to shore up the electric grid or for widespread use in vehicles, for example — they need a big boost in capacity. To get lithium batteries up to snuff for more ambitious applications, researchers report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a new solution that involves low-cost, renewable loofah sponges.

Steam Register
"Brewing Up Chemistry With Espresso Machines"
June 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Espresso is great for a quick boost of energy, but chemists are now turning to the espresso machine itself for a quick boost of knowledge. Chemist Francesc A. Esteve-Turrillas and colleagues report in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry that our beloved espresso machines can be used to quickly and inexpensively perform complex chemistry experiments, such as testing for harmful compounds in the environment.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.