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ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

Coverage from ACS Spring 2021

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“COVID SCIENCE-Blood type not a COVID-19 risk factor in U.S.; inhaled asthma drug may keep mild illness from worsening”
April 16, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

A wearable "sweat sensor" might someday help monitor patients with COVID-19 and other illnesses for the onset of a cytokine storm, a surge of inflammatory proteins heralding a potentially fatal over-reaction of the immune system... "Especially now in the context of COVID-19, if you could monitor pro-inflammatory cytokines and see them trending upwards, you could treat patients early, even before they develop symptoms," said Prasad… at a virtual meeting of the American Chemical Society.

More than 60 media outlets, including Yahoo News (New York, NY: 36.13 million unique monthly visits), Reuters (New York, NY: 13.15 million unique monthly visits) and Fanpage (Naples, Italy: 2.44 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 47.68 million unique monthly visits)
“MIT scientists translated spider webs into music. It could help us talk to them”
April 14, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

"Even though the web looks really random, there actually are a lot of internal structures and you can visualize them and you can look at them, but it's really hard to grasp for the human imagination or human brain to understand all these structural details," said MIT engineering professor Markus Buehler, who presented the work on Monday at a virtual meeting of the American Chemical Society.

More than 130 media outlets, including MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), CNET (San Francisco, CA: 33.62 million unique monthly visits), The Hill (Washington, D.C.: 8.05 million unique monthly visits), Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits), Smithsonian (Washington, D.C.: 2.79 million unique monthly visits) and IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Could Amber Hold Key to Antibiotic Resistance?”
April 13, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Scientists have revealed they have successfully isolated compounds in the mineral amber that they believe could help to solve the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Speaking at the annual spring conference of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the University of Minnesota’s Elizabeth Ambrose and her graduate student Connor McDermott explained that this is the first research to systematically explore the therapeutic potential held by fossilized tree resin.

Seeking Alpha (New York, NY: 3.68 million unique monthly visits)
“The Rise of Oral COVID-19 Antivirals: Todos Medical’s Diagnostic-Therapy Combo Front-Runner”
April 18, 2021

In vitro results showed “potent” antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 and other coronaviruses. More should be known about the potential efficacy and side effects once they release the preclinical data in early April at the Spring American Chemical Society meeting. Pfizer also has an intravenous protease inhibitor called PF-07304814 which is currently in a Phase 1b trial of hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Novel hydrogels can safely remove graffiti from vandalized street art”
April 17, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Street art, in turn, is vulnerable to vandalism, posing unique challenges to those seeking to preserve these rather ephemeral creations. This week, a team of Italian scientists described its novel, environmentally friendly new method to safely remove defacing over-paintings on street art at a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits)
“Snake species from different terrains surrender surface secrets behind slithering success”
April 15, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Some snake species slither across the ground, while others climb trees, dive through sand or glide across water. Today, scientists report that the surface chemistry of snake scales varies among species that negotiate these different terrains. The findings could have implications for designing durable materials, as well as robots that mimic snake locomotion to cross surfaces that would otherwise be impassable. The researchers will present their results today at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society

More than five media outlets covered the story.

In Other News…

Yahoo Lifestyle (New York, NY: 149.32 million unique monthly visits)
“The One Sweet Food To Eat for a Longer Life”
April 13, 2021

So does this mean any of these antioxidant-rich foods can lead to a longer life? They certainly do help! However, in a study published by the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, berries and pomegranates were specifically chosen over 25 antioxidant-rich foods as one of the best sources of antioxidant intake for your body. Berries are an easy source of antioxidants to get into your meal plan…

More than five media outlets, including MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Watermelon”
April 14, 2021

Feeling extra sore after hitting the gym? Watermelon to the rescue! A small study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that athletes who drank watermelon juice as an exercise beverage reported less soreness and slower heart rate 24 hours after working out. Researchers believe the L-citrulline in the melons is the ticket to their impact on exercise recovery.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“6 Ways To Cook With Beer You Never Knew Before”
April 14, 2021

Beer is a wonderful tenderizer, which makes it perfect for finally using that tough cut of meat lurking in your freezer. Next time you plan to cook up a steak or piece of chicken, add a splash of stout to the marinade…. Bonus: Soaking steak in a pilsner for six hours before throwing it on the grill can reduce the number of carcinogens in the meat by nearly 88%, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Yahoo News (New York, NY: 36.13 million unique monthly visits)
“The Whitest Paint Ever Could Block the Sun and Cool Earth”
April 16, 2021

But more importantly, the right paint on a well-designed building could eliminate the need for air conditioning in some locations. “Radiative cooling is a passive cooling technology that offers great promises to reduce space cooling cost, combat the urban island effect, and alleviate global warming,” the researchers write in their new study, which appears in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 80 media outlets, including CNET (San Francisco, CA: 33.62 million unique monthly visits), The Guardian (London, England: 31.72 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.: 26.53 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (New York, NY: 3.48 million unique monthly visits), Popular Mechanics (Center Valley, PA: 3.43 million unique monthly visits) and IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 33.73 million unique monthly visits)
“New Tanzanian Variant Detected In Angola From An Entirely New Branch of SARS-CoV-2”
April 15, 2021

The Tanzanian variant (which is how I will denote it as it lacks official designation) teaches us that variants of interest and concern may lack all three defining mutations of the B.1 strain…. Mutations in red are those found in “B” lineage variants; mutations in black are those that are unique to the Tanzanian variant. (American Chemical Society)

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News Break (Mountain View, CA: 7.61 million unique monthly visits)
“WT student groups to host Earth Day event for regional schools”
April 18, 2021

West Texas A&M University students will help regional elementary students celebrate Earth Day with hands-on activities. The Environmental Science Society at WT and the American Chemical Society will lead several activities April 21 to help third- and fourth-grade students from Thomas R. Helton Elementary School in Wheeler and Wildorado Elementary School learn more about the importance of protecting the environment.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Deseret News (Salt Lake City, UT: 1.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Why some detractors say Earth is not in crisis, and why that drives climate scientists crazy”
April 15, 2021

In addition, it provides a litany of leading scientific organizations that over the years have issued statements endorsing this position, including the American Meteorological Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Chemical Society, the latter of which expressly points to increasing concentration of greenhouse gases and particulate matter as the leading driver behind a warmer climate.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“New fluorescent probe can differentiate between B and T lymphocytes”
April 13, 2021

Distinguishing and separating different types of these cells is highly important in carrying out studies in the field of immunology…. The researchers furthermore concluded that this new lipid oriented live cell distinction (LOLD) mechanism can supplement the existing cell distinction mechanism to improve our ability to distinguish specific cell types from complicated mixtures of different cells. This research was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Novel ultrasensitive assay to measure cathepsin B in the blood”
April 13, 2021

In this study, published in ACS Omega, researchers demonstrated an ultrasensitive assay to measure cathepsin B in blood. While high levels of cathepsin B are readily detectable in aspirates, biopsies and cerebrospinal fluid, a blood test is particularly desirable due to its ease of use with little risk to the patient.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“New nanothin coating could be used to treat deadly bacterial and fungal infections”
April 15, 2021

The new research, published in the American Chemical Society’s journal [ACS] Applied Materials & Interfaces, reveals that BP [Black Phosphorus] is effective at killing microbes when spread in nanothin layers on surfaces like titanium and cotton, used to make implants and wound dressings. Co-lead researcher Dr Aaron Elbourne said finding one material that could prevent both bacterial and fungal infections was a significant advance.

More than 35 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Eat This, Not That! (Irvine, CA: 1.56 million unique monthly visits)
“The #1 Reason Why You Shouldn’t Eat Salmon, According to Science”
April 14, 2021

While it was once believed that microplastics—tiny fragments of plastic measuring less than 5 mm in length, which are a major source of contamination in waterways—remained only in the gut of marine creatures, a 2017 study… found that microplastics are easily discovered in the fleshy portions of fish frequently consumed by humans. According to a 2019 study published in Environmental Science & Technology… fish are now the third most common source of microplastic consumption for Americans.

Daily Kos (Washington, D.C.: 1.23 million unique monthly visits)
“Top Comments: Getting Fluorine out of the Environment”
April 18, 2021

One strategy that is emerging is bioremediation: let microbes digest these substances, transforming them into simpler, safer compounds. I found an article about this in the trade publication for my professional organization, Chemical and Engineering News.  This is what happened to the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) that contaminated the sediments of the Hudson River for decades.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers synthesize and test the anti-HIV activity of CD4-mimicking molecules”
April 15, 2021

A team of scientists… have created novel molecules that prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles from attacking immune cells…. The work is published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry as "Hybrids of Small-Molecule CD4 Mimics with Polyethylene Glycol Units as HIV Entry Inhibitors."

One additional media outlet covered the story.

IFL Science (London England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“You Can Taste Garlic By Rubbing It Into Your Feet, American Chemical Society Demonstrates”
April 14, 2021
Publicized in: ACS video release

While "you can taste garlic with your feet" might sound like something that would make you sound unhinged if you were to shout it in the street, it is nevertheless true thanks to a cool food chemistry trick. It's difficult to test, given how pungent garlic is, but not impossible, as you can see in this video from the American Chemical Society (ACS) below.

MSN UK (London, England: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists produce biodegradable plastic made from fish waste”
April 5, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Scientists working on an alternative to polluting plastic have discovered a biodegradable material derived from fish waste that would otherwise be thrown away, which could be used in a variety of products including packaging and clothing…. The research, which was carried out with support from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, was due be presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on Monday.

Five additional media outlets, including independent.co.uk (London, England: 13.69 million unique monthly visits) and Popular Science (New York, NY: 1.20 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 33.73 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists Turn Spider Webs Into Spider Harps To Hear Spider ‘Voices’”
April 12, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Spiders don’t have great eyesight. They use the vibrations from their web to detect what’s happening in their environment. Spiders can’t speak, either. So to communicate, they use their web, like a complex set of external vocal cords. Now, scientists have turned a spider web into a virtual reality simulation so humans can experience those same vibrations as sound…. The team presented their spider harp today at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS Spring 2021).

More than 85 media outlets, including Techno Holik (New Delhi, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits), VICE (Brooklyn, NY: 9.24 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (New York, NY: 3.48 million unique monthly visits) and Inverse (New York, NY: 3.08 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Toward a transformative therapy for sickle cell patients”
April 9, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

For the millions of people worldwide who have sickle cell disease, there are only a few treatment options, which include risky bone marrow transplants, gene therapy or other treatments that address a subset of symptoms. Today, researchers will describe the discovery of a small molecule with the potential to address the root cause of sickle cell disease by boosting levels of fetal hemoglobin… The researchers will present their results today at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visit), covered the story.

New Scientist (London, England: 1.31 million unique monthly visits)
“Graffiti can now be removed in minutes without damaging underlying art”
April 13, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

If murals or street art are defaced with graffiti, restoring them can be a challenge. But now there is a hydrogel that can remove a layer of graffiti within minutes, without altering the work underneath – even when the art and overlying graffiti use the same type of paint…. The research was presented today at a virtual meeting of the American Chemical Society.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

Interesting Engineering (San Francisco, CA: 1.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Beer Waste Can Now Be Turned Into Biofuel”
April 10, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

“Spent grain has a very high percentage of protein compared to other agricultural waste, so our goal was to find a novel way to extract and use it,” Yanhong He, a graduate student who is presenting the novel work at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society, said.

More than 10 media outlets covered the story.

MSN (NZ) (Auckland, New Zealand: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“The Easiest Ways to Lose Belly Fat, Says Science”
April 7, 2021

A Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry study showed acidic foods help increase the rate at which the body burns off carbs by up to 40%—and the faster you burn off carbs, the sooner your body starts incinerating fat, which can help you get that lean look you crave.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Eye health foods: what to eat to optimize your eyesight”
April 10, 2021

Another study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that blood levels of lutein increased in volunteers who consumed 50g spinach servings five days per week for 12 weeks. As lutein and zeaxanthin are fat soluble, try drizzling on some health boosting olive oil for maximum absorption.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“What grocery shopping was like the year you were born”
April 1, 2021

Kraft brought Maxwell House instant coffee to supermarkets in 1963. The product sparked a new trend in the coffee industry, and all major manufacturers created their own version just a few years later, according to Kenneth Moore of Chemical & Engineering News.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Healthy eating: Research says THIS is the healthiest way to cook rice”
April 11, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Researchers presenting at the American Chemical Society in Denver (ACS) have developed a way to cook rice which reportedly could reduce the calories absorbed by the body by up to 60%. To understand how it works, we need to look at what rice is made up of…. The ACS [presented] cooking method is said to change the rice's composition, turning a large amount of digestible starch into resistant starch.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Lithium: The Next Trend in Microdosing?”
April 5, 2021

In the brain, it can nestle into the ion channels of nerve cells normally used by larger sodium and potassium ions. Just how this tiny, metal atom manages to produce such profound psychiatric effects is currently unknown to science, but a 2014 review of evidence from animal and cell cultures, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, indicates that lithium is actually “neuroprotective.”

FOX News (New York, NY: 21.55 million unique monthly visits)
“CDC: There’s 1-in-10,000 chance of getting COVID from surfaces”
April 6, 2021

The CDC website now cites several studies that "suggest that the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection via the fomite transmission route is low, and generally less than 1 in 10,000, which means that each contact with a contaminated surface has less than a 1 in 10,000 chance of causing an infection." The agency cites 2020 studies from the American Journal of Infection Control and Environmental Science & Technology Letters. The studies note that transmission through surfaces is less likely outdoors than indoors.

More than 15 media outlets, including Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 1.98 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

independent.co.uk (London, England: 13.69 million unique monthly visits)
“New smartphone batteries could last for five years without breaking down”
April 8, 2021

However, even if one assumes that a phone user depletes the entire battery every day of use, the scientists’ findings, which have been published in ACS Applied Energy Materials, suggest that a battery could last for five years before it starts to deteriorate. "The realisation of durable batteries will help in the development of more reliable products for long-term use….”

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

The Sun (London, England: 10.02 million unique monthly visits)
“Experts warn against dangerous TikTok trend which sees people deep fry WATER”
April 10, 2021
Featuring an ACS Expert

Say the ball splits and the water leaks out into the oil, then you're in trouble and likely to suffer injury, as one scientist has made sure to point out. The American Chemical Society's [expert] Dr. Christoper Cramer slammed the stupid trend as 'somewhere between insane and suicidal' as he urged people not to attempt it.

More than 15 media outlets, including LADbible (Manchester, England: 1.78 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Break (Mountain View, CA: 7.61 million unique monthly visits)
“Fairmont State University’s Chemistry Program receives ACS Approval”
April 7, 2021

The American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training recently extended continuation of its approval to Fairmont State University’s chemistry program. The approval is the result of the committee’s periodic review, a process which is conducted every six years to assess the ability of colleges and universities to prepare their students for successful employment as professional scientists.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 5.20 million unique monthly visits)
“Experts see rashes, allergies in Covid surge”
April 9, 2021

A March 2021 study… said that the SARS-CoV-2 virus was mutating at a faster rate in Bengaluru than in the rest of the country. The study found 27 mutations in three isolates of SARS-CoV-2 with over 11 mutations per sample, while the national average is 8.4 and the global average is 7.3. A study by Hyderabad’s CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, has found around 7,684 mutations of SARS-CoV-2 in India. The study has been published in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Axios (Arlington, VA: 3.31 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists hunt for antiviral drugs to fight COVID-19”
April 8, 2021

Merck is expecting interim results from two later-stage clinical trials looking at whether the drug prevents hospitalization and death from the virus. Those studies will help determine whether the drug has a clinical benefit. On Tuesday, Pfizer presented details about an oral antiviral it developed from scratch during the pandemic, Chemical & Engineering News reports.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“New time-lapse system helps measure membrane tension”
April 9, 2021

The KcsA ion channel is the prototypical ion channel used to understand ion channel structure-function relationships. The channel functions in the bilayer, and this is an important advantage given the rapid variability in membrane tension that occurs during actual cellular activity while recording the dynamic responsiveness of the KcsA ion channel. These experiments revealed a novel mode of action for tension sensitivity without precedent in the existing literature. Their results appear in a paper recently published in the peer-reviewed journal JACS Au.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Carbon dioxide levels reflect COVID-19 risk”
April 7, 2021

Tracking carbon dioxide levels indoors is an inexpensive and powerful way to monitor the risk of people getting COVID-19, according to new research from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the University of Colorado Boulder. In any given indoor environment, when excess CO2 levels double, the risk of transmission also roughly doubles, two scientists reported this week in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“New inhibitors may offer novel approach to treating deadly tuberculosis”
April 8, 2021

Purdue University innovators have developed highly potent and selective compounds for use in the treatment of tuberculosis, which is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide. The Purdue researchers developed a series of small molecule inhibitors to target one of the proteins critical for the survival of TB in infected macrophages. Protein tyrosine phosphates B (mPTPB) is a virulence factor of TB to subvert the host immune responses. The Purdue research is published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Patheos (Virginia Beach, VA: 1.04 million unique monthly visits)
“Water Stress: The Unspoken & Under Discussed Global Crisis – Part 2 by Gospel for Asia”
April 9, 2021

Last June, Columbia University announced engineering researchers have been refining desalination through a process known as temperature swing solvent extraction (TSSE). The school says TSSE is radically different from conventional methods because it does not use membranes to refine water. In a paper for Environmental Science & Technology, the team reported their method enabled them to attain energy-efficient, zero-liquid discharge (ZLD) of these brines.

FOCUS (Munich, Germany: 7.56 million unique monthly visits)
“Unknown amber components could help against resistant hospital germs”
April 6, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

For their study, the researchers therefore specifically examined the possible antibacterial effects of Baltic amber…. The result: The bioactive ingredients actually killed at least some of the bacteria…. "Abietic acid and its derivatives are a still untapped potential source of new active ingredients - especially for combating gram-positive resistant bacteria." (ACS Spring Meeting 2021)

More than 20 media outlets covered the story.

Breitbart (Los Angeles, CA: 3.19 million unique monthly visits)
“New Doping Test Distinguishes Natural Hormones from Synthetic Drugs”
April 5, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

A new technique to test for doping is being unveiled Monday at the spring session of the American Chemical Society that aims to detect performance-enhancing drugs that are difficult to distinguish from natural molecules. “If we can develop methods to identify any theoretical steroids in the future, we could dramatically reduce doping because we would be able to detect these new species immediately, without the lag time that’s been associated with anti-doping testing over the last 40 years,”…

More than 10 media outlets, including United Press International (Washington, D.C.: 782,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits)
“Separating beer waste into proteins for foods, and fiber for biofuels”
April 6, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Once all the flavor has been extracted from barley and other grains, what's left is a protein- and fiber-rich powder that is typically used in cattle feed or put in landfills. Today, scientists report a new way to extract the protein and fiber from brewer's spent grain and use it to create new types of protein sources, biofuels and more. The researchers will present their results today at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 25 media outlets, including United Press International (Washington, D.C.: 782,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits)
“Making cleaner, greener plastics from waste fish parts”
April 5, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Polyurethanes, a type of plastic, are nearly everywhere… But these highly versatile materials can have a major downside. Derived from crude oil, toxic to synthesize, and slow to break down, conventional polyurethanes are not environmentally friendly. Today, researchers discuss devising what they say should be a safer, biodegradable alternative derived from fish waste -- heads, bones, skin and guts -- that would otherwise likely be discarded. The researchers will present their results today at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 25 media outlets, including United Press International (Washington, D.C.: 782,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Study indicates an amyloid link between melanoma and Parkinson’s disease”
April 7, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

On the surface, Parkinson's disease… and melanoma… do not appear to have much in common. However, for nearly 50 years, doctors have recognized that Parkinson's disease patients are more likely to develop melanoma than the general population. Now, scientists report a molecular link between the two diseases in the form of protein aggregates known as amyloids. The researchers will present their results today at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 15 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

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