ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 149.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Wash apples with this pantry staple instead of tap water to clean off pesticides"
October 25, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

How about them apples. The best way to clean pesticides off Granny Smiths, Honeycrisps, Macouns and the like is by using baking soda, according to a report in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. That means yet another use for the kitchen and baking staple is likely in your pantry — or in your refrigerator to keep it smelling fresh.

More than 130 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), CNN (Atlanta, GA: 67.3 million unique monthly visits), Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits), Reuters (New York, NY: 49.8 million unique monthly visits), Aol.com (New York, NY: 42.7 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 31.2 million unique monthly visits), USA Today (Washington, DC: 29.9 million unique monthly visits), Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million), The Verge (New York, NY: 24.5 million unique monthly visits), Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Triclosan Is Still Allowed In Toothpaste. Here's What You Should Know"
October 25, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The chemicals in your toothpaste can accumulate on your toothbrush — and even after you change to a different brand, the original chemicals can stick around, a new study found. … In the study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, the researchers built a brushing simulator that helped re-create a recommended brushing routine: two minutes, twice a day, over three months.

More than 90 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Health.com (New York, NY: 11.1 million unique monthly visits), Quartz (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Consumer Reports (Yonkers, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Boston Globe (Boston, MA: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), UMassAmherst (Amherst, MA: 2.6 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and Healthday (Norwalk, CT: 508,900 unique monthly visits), KMOV-TV (Columbia, MO: 369,979 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Rice-Based Infant Cereals Contain More Mercury Than Other Types, New Study Finds"
October 25, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Certain types of fish are considered to be risky foods for nursing mothers, infants, and young children because of high levels of mercury, a heavy metal that can damage developing brains and nervous systems. But a new study shows that rice cereal—a food that’s far more likely to be included in childrens' diets than big-eye tuna or swordfish—can also be a potential source of mercury. Writing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a team of researchers led by scientists from Florida International University found that rice-based cereals—which are often the first food given to infants—contained significantly higher levels of mercury than those made with other grains.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Consumer Reports (Yonkers, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Asian Scientist (Singapore: 33,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"2 million Americans are Drinking High Levels of Arsenic in their Well Water"
October 22, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Have you ever thought about the Earth’s layers and the composition of its layers? Well, maybe not. But you have certainly asked yourself at least once in your life whether the source of your drinking water is safe or not. A research issued by Environmental Science & Technology confirms that almost 2 million U.S citizen might be exposed to high levels of arsenic, a brittle steel-grey semimetal chemical that is toxic to humans, while bringing out water from private wells in the U.S on constant basis.

Eight media outlets, including PBS.org (Washington, DC: 12.6 million unique monthly visits) and Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

How Stuff Works (Atlanta, GA: 40 million unique monthly visits)
"Just 10 River Systems Contribute Up to 95 Percent of Plastic in Oceans"
October 25, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

For decades, we've known that the plastics we throw away — empty water bottles and grocery bags, for instance — pollute our oceans. … According to some new findings, the majority of it might be hitching a ride on the world's rivers. A comprehensive study about this topic appears in the latest issue of the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits)
"11 trendy superfoods that could be the next kale"
October 27, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Tired of kale everything? Try one of these insanely healthy veggies to mix up your eating routine (top nutritionists are!). … Tiny, young leaves — less than 14 days old — are popping up all over on restaurant menus. They may be little, but microgreens are concentrated with up to six times the nutrients of mature leaves of the same plant, found a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"'Star Wars'-Inspired Sex Ed Video Unexpectedly Reveals How Sperm Moves"
October 23, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Is there anything that can't be explained by a good Star Wars analogy? Researchers from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University have created The Beginning, a three-minute video that uses the science fiction franchise to explain the ultimate mystery of life, reproduction. … In a study published in ACS Nano, Reilly and Ingber explain that in the process of creating the simulation of the sperm’s movement for the video, they discovered that a specific region of the sperm’s tail will spontaneously move in its characteristic direction when force is applied at the binding spot.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"7 Postmortem Responses Of A Dead Body: Forensic Scientists Reveal What Happens After You Die"
October 23, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

While most of us prefer not to think about what happens to our bodies once we shuffle off this mortal coil, forensic scientists and various other researchers find the topic fascinating. So much so, they have recorded the details of this natural process precisely and to a T (toe nail). Commonly, death is said to begin with the heart; when this vital organ stops beating, your breathing ends, and soon your brain stops functioning due to a lack of blood (and oxygen) flow. … For a quick review of the above, watch this YouTube video, courtesy of the American Chemical Society.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 22.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Add Sugar to the List of Halloween Horrors"
October 27, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

A dark thought flickered through the minds of experts at the American Chemical Society: How much Halloween candy would it take to kill someone? Realistically, it’s unlikely that pint-size ghouls would consume a lethal dose of candy because they would have to gobble up a gluttonous amount in one sitting to put their lives at risk.

More than 10 media outlets, including Miami Herald (Miami, FL: 12.9 million unique monthly visits), Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, CA: 10.3 million unique monthly visits), The Asbury Park Press (Asbury Park, NJ: 735,900 unique monthly visits), Idaho Statesman (Boise, ID: 534,600 unique monthly visits) and Arizona Daily Sun (Flagstaff, AZ: 198,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNBC News (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: 17.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Apple patents a unique way to coat iPhones in 18-karat gold"
October 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

Apple has an idea for making "enclosures for electronic devices" out of hardened gold, according to a patent application published on Oct. 26. … While Apple's designs and finishes are mostly kept under wraps, iPhones already contain a small amount of bullion in the internal components, according to information from the American Chemical Society and Apple's recycling statistics.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Insights from a rare genetic disease may help treat multiple myeloma"
October 25, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A new class of drugs for blood cancers such as leukemia and multiple myeloma is showing promise. But it is hobbled by a problem that also plagues other cancer drugs: targeted cells can develop resistance. Now scientists, reporting in ACS Central Science, have found that insights into a rare genetic disease known as NGLY1 deficiency could help scientists understand how that resistance works -- and potentially how drugs can outsmart it.

Eight media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Stanford News (Stanford, CA: 325,500 unique monthly visits), Futurity (Rochester, NY: 105,100 unique monthly visits), Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Pesky pollutants that persist, courtesy of nature"
October 25, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In the late 1970s, the United States banned the production of an assortment of synthetic pesticides, insulators, coolants and flame retardants due to their toxicity and the fact that they stick around for a long time. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, nature makes compounds similar to these toxic human-made substances - and that could be a concern.

Joe (London, U.K.:1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Cooking rice this way could reduce its calorie count by 60 percent"
October 29, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Simply adding some coconut oil to rice during the cooking stage, then cooling it before serving could result in a calorie reduction of up to 50 percent, according to research. … According to research presented at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), tests on 38 different types of rice showed the following recipe was the most effective.

Four media outlets, including Her (Ireland: 526,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"A Layer of Industrial Chemicals Could Mark the Beginning of a New Geological Age"
October 27, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

… “We humans have made a lot of changes to the Earth,” Aurea C. Chiaia-Hernández, an author of a paper published in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science & Technology, told Seeker. “We are now influencing so much that there’s a big debate about whether a new epoch, the Anthropocene, has begun.”

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Earth.com (Reno, NV: 430,100 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The chemistry of Hollywood bloodbaths"
October 27, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

Fake blood is a staple of the Halloween horror film experience, but there's no one recipe to suit every filmmaker's needs. The chemistry of fake blood has always been tweaked to create the most realistic experience, or at least the most budget-friendly. From Alfred Hitchcock to Sam Raimi, join Reactions on a Halloween tour of the chemistry of gore.

Six media outlets, including YubaNet (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits), Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits)
"American Chemical Society celebrates 30th National Chemistry Week, Oct. 22-28"
October 24, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

The American Chemical Society (ACS) will celebrate 30 years of National Chemistry Week (NCW) from Sunday, Oct. 22, to Saturday, Oct. 28, with the theme "Chemistry Rocks!" As part of the celebration, ACS is releasing a new Reactions video that explains how scientists figured out that the Earth is 4.565 billion years old.

Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits)
"How do we know the age of the Earth?"
October 24, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

The Earth is 4.565 billion years old, give or take a few million years. How do scientists know that? Since there’s no “established in” plaque stuck in a cliff somewhere, geologists deduced the age of the Earth thanks to a handful of radioactive elements. With radiometric dating, scientists can put an age on really old rocks — and even good old Mother Earth. For the 30th anniversary of National Chemistry Week, this edition of Reactions describes how scientists date rocks.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Solar windows use sunlight to retain a building's heat"
October 27, 2017

A domestic property loses as much as 20% of its heat through windows. For big glassy commercial buildings, that figure is a lot higher, resulting in big heating bills and inevitable disputes among employees about the thermostat. But researchers have now found a way to turn ordinary windows into solar-powered heaters, using energy from the sun to boost window temperature by as much as 15 degrees Fahrenheit. … Source: Nano Letters.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Engadget (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Silicon Republic (Dublin, Ireland: 273,100 unique monthly visits) and ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
"End of smashed smartphones as scientists invent super-flexy touchscreen"
October 25, 2017

Costly smartphone screen breakages could soon be a thing of the past after British scientists invented a cheap flexible touchscreen made of silver and graphene. … The new research was published in the American Chemical Society journal Langmuir.

More than 15 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), IFL Science (London, U.K.: 9.5 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"This breakthrough in battery technology could charge your phone in seconds"
October 25, 2017

Smartphones and tablets have evolved in recent years into computing powerhouses, but the traditional old battery has stayed largely the same – remaining one of the worst aspects of modern technology. In some cases, they degrade. For Samsung, they explode. … "If they're marketed in the correct ways for the right applications, we'll start seeing more and more of them in our everyday lives," he said. The paper was published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CBC News (Ottawa, Canada: 21.1 million unique monthly visits)
"New tool tests effects of wildfire smoke on B.C. wine"
October 27, 2017

Researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a new method to assess whether smoke from wildfires could have an impact on grapes and the taste of wine. The method can't yet give a concrete prediction, but shows promise to reduce the time and money wine producers spend on managing the effects of smoke on their harvest, says Matthew Noestheden, one of the researchers of the study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Inverse (5.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Quantum Computers' Secrets Lurk Within This Strange Form of Matter"
October 25, 2017

Quantum computers have a chance to revolutionize the 21st century, unlocking ways to answer incomprehensibly complex questions that would leave even today’s most advanced computers baffled. … The material in question is an example of an exotic phase of matter known as a quantum spin liquid, as the researchers explain in the latest issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits), Futurism (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Cosmos magazine (Australia: 302,000 unique monthly visits) and Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131 million unique monthly visits)
"Nobel Prize In Chemistry Awarded To Researchers Who Improved 'Imaging Of Biomolecules'"
October 4, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

They were honored for developing a new way to generate 3-D images of biological molecules. … ALLISON CAMPBELL: Unlike many other techniques, this allows you to actually see something. And as you probably know, a picture is worth a thousand words in helping you understand what it is that you're trying to study. GREENFIELDBOYCE: Allison Campbell is president of the American Chemical Society. She says what's really important is that this method lets you study molecules as they exist in water.

More than 550 media outlets, including BBC News (London, U.K.: 85.0 million unique monthly visits), The New York Times (New York, NY: 42.4 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million), ABC News (New York, NY: 24.4 million unique monthly visits), The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 22.3 million unique monthly visits), Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 7.9 million unique monthly visits), Salon (New York, NY: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 6.7 million unique monthly visits), New York Daily News (New York, NY: 4.6 million unique monthly visits), Seattle Post-Intelligencer (Seattle, WA: 4.1 million unique monthly visits), Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Tampa Bay Times (Tampa Bay, FL: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA: 1.9 million unique monthly visits) and Mail.com (Los Angeles, CA: 1.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 85.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Asphalt helps batteries charge more quickly"
October 6, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Lithium batteries can be made to charge 10 to 20 times faster by using asphalt, suggests US research. Scientists at Rice University speeded up the charging time by making one component of a battery using carbon derived from the viscous liquid. In tests, batteries made using asphalt charged to full power in minutes, said the researchers. … Details of the research were revealed in the scientific journal ACS Nano.

More than 22 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Boing Boing (San Francisco, CA: 4.6 million unique monthly visits), Blasting News (U.S.: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Ars Technica (San Francisco, CA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), Inside EVs (1.4 million unique monthly visits), OilPrice.com (London, U.K.: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and Electronic Products (San Mateo, CA: 305,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists develop 'ring' which detects explosives or chemical agents - in breakthrough against terrorism"
October 11, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Researchers have designed a sensor that can be worn as a ring and can detect the presence of a wide array of harmful chemical and biological substances, including explosives and highly toxic nerve agents. … The study detailing the detection device is published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Sensors.

More than 17 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), The Register (London, U.K.: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), Fast Company (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Alphr (Dublin, Ireland: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), Biospace (San Francisco, CA: 187,100 unique monthly visits) and ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mother Nature Network (New York, NY: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"10 rivers may deliver bulk of ocean plastic"
October 13, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Earth's oceans have a big plastic problem. … According to a new study, rivers carry up to 4 million metric tons of plastic out to sea per year — but just 10 rivers may deliver as much as 95 percent of it. … For the new study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, researchers analyzed dozens of previous studies on plastic in rivers.

More than 10 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Cosmos magazine (Australia: 302,000 unique monthly visits), Courthouse News (Redwood City, CA: 87,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The making of medieval bling"
October 11, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Gold has long been valued for its luxurious glitter and hue, and threads of the gleaming metal have graced clothing and tapestries for centuries. Determining how artisans accomplished these adornments in the distant past can help scientists restore, preserve and date artifacts, but solutions to these puzzles have been elusive. Now scientists, reporting in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, have revealed that medieval artisans used a gilding technology that has endured for centuries.

Eight media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How to “cook” an egg without heat — and other weird egg science"
October 10, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

You can learn a lot from eggs. The versatile, delicious, humble chicken egg. You can unlock the secrets of the universe with eggs, or at least a couple of them through these fun (if slightly weird) DIY chemistry experiments in our latest episode of Reactions. Find out how you can "cook" an egg without heat, make them bounce like a basketball and whip up a batch of green eggs for the Dr. Seuss fans in your life.

Six media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), YubaNet (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Ask Men (San Francisco, CA: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Video Breaks Down The Truth About Wine"
October 13, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

The American Chemical Society is back at it again, this time teaming up with PBS to sort the facts from fiction when it comes to wine. If you’re a typical AskMen reader, you’re probably only just reaching an age where you’re getting to grips with the good stuff. Acquiring wine knowledge is hard, yet as a grown adult you’re often called upon to make decisions on what to drink: you might be on a date or hosting a dinner party or heading up a business luncheon. It’s tricky.

Atlas Obscura (San Francisco, CA: 3.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Have Figured Out What Makes Wagyu Beef Smell So Delicious"
October 12, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Wagyu beef is considered by many to be the paragon of meat. The beef from four breeds of Japanese cattle is famous for its beautifully marbled fat, soft texture, and sweet aroma, which some say is reminiscent of coconut or fruit. But what makes it smell that way? A recent study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, found that a cocktail of molecules is responsible, including one that recalls the scent of egg whites.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits) and Beef Central (Canada: 13,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Food & Wine (New York, NY: 2.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Find the Source of Durian's Pungent Odor"
October 10, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Most people who have tried durian—a spikey fruit native to Southeast Asia, with a hard outer shell, and soft yellow meat inside—know it to be a contradiction. It smells like trash that’s been left out in the sun too long, but it tastes divine—both creamy and sweet—nothing like its scent suggests it will taste. … Earlier this year, a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry identified the different chemical compounds in durian that give it such a distinct scent.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)
"A new class of drugs aims to exploit cancer cells’ weaknesses"
October 11, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In recent years, new cancer treatments have brought hope to people who once had limited options. But for others, the wait for an effective drug continues. Now on the horizon is a new generation of drugs based on a concept called synthetic lethality. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes stock of what's in the pipeline.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Cryo-electron microscopy explained"
October 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank and Richard Henderson have claimed this year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The trio earned the prize for their work on cryo-electron microscopy, which is an imaging technique that lets researchers see proteins and other large biomolecules with atomic precision. Learn more about this discovery and its impact in this video from Speaking of Chemistry.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and YubaNet (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits)
"Video of the Day: Why Do Cell Phone Batteries Catch Fire?"
October 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

The American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios have taken a look into exploding cell phones. What is it about the chemistry of today’s batteries that contribute to the dramatic battery fires that lead to some models of phones being banned from airplane flights? There are several different problems that can lead to the ultimate issue, “thermal runaway.” The video doesn’t go into much detail at the component level, but does explain the chemistry behind phone explosions.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Wildfires Are Changing the Flavor of California Wines"
October 13, 2017

As devastating wildfires continue to blaze in the heart of Northern California’s wine-growing country, wreaking catastrophic destruction on the industry, vintners can take a bit of comfort knowing that most of their grapes already have been harvested. … But during fermentation, the smell is released “and the resulting wines are spoiled,” said Wilfried Schwab, a scientist at the Technical University of Munich who recently published a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry describing what happens within the grapevines after they are exposed to wildfire smoke.

More than 10 media outlets, including Popular Science (New York, NY: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), National Post (Toronto, Canada: 3.9 million unique monthly visits) and Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Breakthrough Medical Technologies So Crazy They Sound Like Science Fiction"
October 6, 2017

… In addition to regenerative medicine, nanotech is also being researched as treatment for obesity and diabetes — via a "microneedle patch" that can facilitate targeted fat burning through drug loaded nanoparticles. … The research, published in ACS Nano, used obese mice as test subjects. After a week of treatment, they found a 20% fat reduction in the targeted areas — as well as lowered blood glucose levels (implying an application in diabetes treatment).

How Stuff Works (Atlanta, GA: 40 million unique monthly visits)
"Cancer Scientists Sniff Out the Genes Behind Durian's Famous Stink"
October 10, 2017

In Asia, the durian is called the "King of Fruits," but not everybody in the world bows down to these bulbous, spiny, custardy fruits. It's usually because of the odor. … This isn't the first research conducted on the durian's unique scent; in 2012, a team of German researchers identified dozens of chemical compounds that create to combine the smell, publishing their analysis in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

USA Today (Washington, DC: 29.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Want to study the business of marijuana? There's a degree program for that"
October 9, 2017

Alex Roth has gotten into the habit of pulling out his cellphone and showing skeptical friends a screen shot of the classes he’ll have to take to get his bachelor of science degree from Northern Michigan University. … The idea for the program came last year when associate chemistry professor Brandon Canfield attended an American Chemical Society annual meeting in San Diego.

More than 150 media outlets, including Detroit Free Press (Detroit, MI: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), The Record (Hackensack, NJ: 485,571 unique monthly visits), Reno Gazette-Journal (Reno, NV: 172,958 unique monthly visits), Coloradoan (Fort Collins, CO: 142,643 unique monthly visits), Green Bay Press-Gazette (Green Bay, WI: 130,691 unique monthly visits) and Montgomery Advertiser (Montgomery, AL: 103,694 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"The Matcha Movement: An Interview With Dr. Li Gong of Encha"
October 10, 2017

Matcha is going mainstream. … Shading blocks out about 70-90% of the sun. With much less sunlight, the green tea plants grow much slower and much harder. Guess what? That makes the green tea plants grow more chlorophyll (see the analysis in this study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry).

Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Capture Carbon Dioxide and Inject It Into Rocks For Permanent Storage"
October 13, 2017

Scientists have discovered a way to suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere to inject safely into rocks for long-term storage. … This possible solution to global warming is taking shape at a plant in Hellisheidi, Iceland, reports Chemical & Engineering News. The company explains in a press release that the carbon dioxide is then mixed with water, mingles with basaltic bedrock in the ground and turns into minerals for long-lasting storage.

Six media outlets, including Inquisitr (U.S.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"An economy based on hydrogen fuels - which only emit water - could soon be a reality"
October 4, 2017

Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, so it only seems natural that hydrogen fuels have been touted by many as the solution to our future energy needs, especially given that the only thing they emit when burnt is water. … Now though, researchers from Osaka University have developed a new kind of photocatalyst for extracting hydrogen from water that is free of expensive metals and also absorbs a wider range of sunlight than ever before. Their findings are presented in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"How a green tea compound could prevent Alzheimer's"
October 13, 2017

Studies have tied green tea to a reduced risk of Alzheimer's, but the mechanisms underlying this link have been unclear. Now, a new study reveals how a compound in the popular beverage disrupts the formation of toxic plaques that contribute to the disease. … Lead study author Giuseppe Melacini, of the Departments of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at McMaster University in Canada, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Six media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and Futurity (Rochester, NY: 101,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"A new miniature solution for storing renewable energy"
October 12, 2017

Scientists have long searched for the next generation of materials that can catalyze a revolution in renewable energy harvesting and storage. One candidate appears to be metal-organic frameworks. Scientists have used these very small, flexible, ultra-thin, super-porous crystalline structures to do everything from capturing and converting carbon into fuels to storing hydrogen and other gases. … Their findings were published July 13 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), USC News (Los Angeles, CA: 73,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Solid State Technology (U.S.: 57,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Care 2 (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"12 Proven Ways to Drastically Reduce Your Colon Cancer Risk"
October 6, 2017

We all know that food is medicine, but when it comes to drastically reducing your colon cancer risk, it could not be truer. … Research published in the Journal of Proteome Research found that nutmeg (Myristica fragrans), reduces the precursors of colon cancer.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Stinking Rich: Swiss Sewage Contains $1.8 Million in Gold"
October 12, 2017

It turns out it's not just Swiss banks that are full of gold. … Researchers with the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology took samples at 64 wastewater treatment plants across the alpine nation. Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, reveal that roughly $1.8 million worth of the valuable metal ends up in the country's wastewater annually.

More than 10 media outlets, including Bloomberg (New York, NY: 17.6 million unique monthly visits) and Reader’s Digest (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"A zero-index waveguide: Researchers directly observe infinitely long wavelengths for the first time"
October 9, 2017

In 2015, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) developed the first on-chip metamaterial with a refractive index of zero, meaning that the phase of light could be stretched infinitely long. The metamaterial represented a new method to manipulate light and was an important step forward for integrated photonic circuits, which use light rather than electrons to perform a wide variety of functions. … The research is published in ACS Photonics.

Eight media outlets, including Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (Cambridge, MA: 247,200 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Laser Focus World (Tulsa, OK: 64,100 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 6.1 million unique monthly visits)
"In a post-truth world, science films keep messing up science big time"
October 13, 2017

… Colwell was recently invited to explore the role and relevance of science in film at the 2017 Hollyweird Science symposium held by the American Chemical Society. He discussed the power of film to influence and shape public perceptions of science and tackle issues around diversity and scientific literacy.

Men’s Fitness (New York, NY: 5.9 million unique monthly visits)
"CrossFit Games competitor tests positive for P.E.D.s, stripped of bronze medal"
October 4, 2017

Ricky Garard, the third-place finisher at the 2017 CrossFit Games, has been disqualified from CrossFit-sanctioned events through 2021 and stripped of his bronze medal after testing positive for two banned substances, CrossFit Games general manager Justin Bergh announced Tuesday in a press release. … Testolone, also known as RAD140, is an “investigational selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) for the treatment of conditions such as muscle wasting and breast cancer,” according to the American Chemical Society.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Microlasers get a performance boost from a bit of gold"
October 6, 2017

Scientists have boosted the efficiency of microlasers using tiny gold particles, thus expanding the technology's real-world application possibilities. … The experiments -- detailed this week in the journal ACS Photonics -- showcase the potential of a smaller, more mobile frequency comb.

Nine media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Big Think (New York, NY: 2.3 million unique monthly visits)
"One of the Elements Doesn’t Obey the Laws of Quantum Mechanics"
October 5, 2017

Berkelium is one of the rarest elements in the periodic table. … Now it appears that berkelium has a problem with what physicists consider the laws of quantum mechanics: It disregards them. … Chemist Thomas Albrecht-Schmitt from Florida State University (FSU) and his team were given a precious 13 milligrams by the Department of Energy for his three-year-long studies, the results of which were published August 2017 in Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Sci News (240,200 unique monthly visits) and Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits)
"New efficient catalyst for key step in artificial photosynthesis"
October 3, 2017

A team of chemists have designed a unique catalyst that expedites the rate of a crucial step in artificial photosynthesis, laying the groundwork for next-generation solar-to-fuel conversion devices. … Findings from this investigation were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.