ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"A lightweight sensor can help sniff out survivors in disaster zones"
April 23, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

There are a number of different ways that search and rescue teams look for survivors in the aftermath of disasters, such as earthquakes or bombings. A team of researchers from Austria, Switzerland, and Cyprus may have added a powerful new technology to the toolkit, however, in the form of an inexpensive sensor which can be used to help find people trapped in rubble. … A paper describing the project, “Sniffing Entrapped Humans with Sensor Arrays,” was recently published in the American Chemical Society journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 10 media outlets, including Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), DNAindia.com (India: 12.6 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 8.8 million unique monthly visits), The Hindu (Chennai, India: 804,500 unique monthly visits) and Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Verge (New York, NY: 24.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Why failing to recycle electronics leaves gold mines untapped"
April 23, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

There’s 80 times as much gold in one ton of cellphones as there is in a gold mine, says Federico Magalini, an expert on electronic waste. … And in a recent paper published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, researchers argued that recovering materials from discarded electronics — often called “urban mining” — makes more financial sense than mining for new materials from the earth.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Sunlight works against oil clean-up efforts"
April 25, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Two new studies have shown that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more significantly and quickly than previously thought. The phenomenon considerably limits the effectiveness of chemical dispersants, which are designed to break up floating oil and reduce the amount of oil that reaches coastlines. … The related studies were published on February 20, 2018 in the Journal Environmental Science & Technology and today (April 25, 2018) in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), National Science Foundation (Alexandria, VA: 576,000 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Water Online (Horsham, PA: 105,000 unique monthly visits) and Oil Gas Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Think Progress (Washington, D.C.: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Climate deniers and tobacco flacks headline the EPA’s new science standard announcement"
April 24, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

On Tuesday afternoon, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt signed a proposed rule limiting the kinds of science that the agency can use in its rulemaking, a step that he described as bringing transparency and trust back to the agency’s scientific process. … The proposal was also publicly opposed by 50 science organizations and universities, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, the American Lung Association, and the National Council for Science and the Environment.

MedIndia (Chennai, India: 7.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Trick Used By Rabies Virus Could Help Deliver Drug Deep In The Brain"
April 27, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Rabies virus may have some tricks to bypass the blood brain barrier, this trick can be used to treat disease that require drugs to effectively cross the blood brain barrier, finds a new study. The findings of this study is published in the ACS Nano journal.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), ALN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Generic drug manufacturers see new opportunities ahead"
April 25, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Declining prices and a saturated market could spell doom-and-gloom for the generic pharmaceutical industry, but some in the business are turning lemons into lemonade, seeing opportunities instead. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, these companies are putting their special expertise in chemistry to work.

Five media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 51,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Straits Times (Singapore: 3.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Avoid these 8 cooking mistakes that can make dishes unhealthy"
April 24, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

We cannot be sure of how much pesticide is lurking on the surface of our fruit and vegetables because they are invisible to the naked eye. Before eating fruit or vegetables, make it a rule to wash them thoroughly in a tub of water. An experiment reported in American Chemical Society revealed that using a pinch of baking soda in the tub of water used to wash vegetables is the best way to get rid of almost all traces of pesticide.

Futurism (1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"There May Soon Be A New Vaccine To Combat Addiction To Bath Salts"
April 23, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Hey, here’s a thought: Why don’t we create a vaccine for drug addiction? … “The vaccines seem very promising, and they’re novel, providing a different mechanism to prevent substance abuse,” Kelly E. Dunn, a researcher focused on opioid use disorders at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, told Chemical and Engineering News. “But there is still a lot of work to do.”

Alphr (Dublin, Ireland: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanowires could hold the key to safer, less flammable Lithium-ion batteries"
April 25, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Rechargeable Lithium-ion batteries pretty much power our lives. From our smartphones to our laptops, right up to our electric cars, where would we be without them? Well, in all honesty, somewhere safer and a lot less flammable. … However, according to a new study published in Nano Letters, a journal from the American Chemical Society, there could be a way to remove the fire risk from Lithium-ion batteries altogether, and the answer lies in nanowires.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), PC Authority (Australia: 423,000 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and V3 (London, U.K.: 206,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concerns"
April 25, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

As technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that by studying lake sediments they can construct a history of tellurium as it was deposited in the environment.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits), ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Mushroom toxin fights cancer"
April 29, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Scientists have taken one of the most deadly toxins, extracted from a fungus, and demonstrated that the chemical can be used with the treatment of certain types of cancer. … The research has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

The Grand Island Independent (Grand Island, NE: 191,000 unique monthly visits)
"Husker Researchers Explore Ways To Use Grape Waste"
April 29, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Roughly 20 percent of the grape, including the seed, stalk and skin, are not used in wine production and therefore wind up in landfills. New research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is focused on creating beneficial uses for grape pomace, or the parts of the grape not used to make wine. … Xu and his colleagues recently presented their research at the 255th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

More than 10 media outlets, including KNEB (Scottsbluff, NE: 58,000 unique monthly visits), KRVN (Lexington, NE: 53,000 unique monthly visits) and KTIC Radio (West Point, NE: 51,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CBS New York (New York, NY: 28.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Engineer Creates ‘Everything-Repellent’ Coating To Kid-Proof Items"
April 24, 2018

An engineer in Michigan may have just answered the prayers of many parents who have messy children at home. Researchers at the University of Michigan have reportedly created a new coating that’s being called an “everything-repellent.” … According to the team’s findings, published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, the omniphobic coating can be applied to any surface and would prevent grime from building up on tables, floors, walls, and even phone screens.

More than 25 media outlets, including CBS Philadelphia (Philadelphia, PA: 28.1 million unique monthly visits), CBS Boston (Boston, MA: 27.3 million unique monthly visits), CBS Chicago (Chicago, IL: 27.2 million unique monthly visits), CBS Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA: 27.1 million unique monthly visits), CBS San Francisco (San Francisco, CA: 26.5 million unique monthly visits), CBS Denver (Denver, CO: 26.4 million unique monthly visits), CBS Miami (Miami, FL: 25.8 million unique monthly visits), CBS Baltimore (Baltimore, MD: 24.5 million unique monthly visits) and CBS Sacramento (Sacramento, CA: 24.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Healthline (San Francisco, CA: 16.4 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is Not a Drill... Researchers Using Proteins to Treat Cavities"
April 23, 2018

There’s a new dental product that uses your body’s natural tooth-forming proteins to rebuild tooth enamel to repair cavities. Why should you care? Well, this process could replace the current method of filling dental cavities… without using a drill. The product was the subject of a research study that was published recently in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering.

Vox (San Francisco, CA: 15.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Batteries have a dirty secret"
April 27, 2018

Energy storage (batteries and other ways of storing electricity, like pumped water, compressed air, or molten salt) has generally been hailed as a “green” technology, key to enabling more renewable energy and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. … There is a growing body of scholarly research around energy storage; the key paper on its emission effects is by the Rochester Institute of Technology’s Eric Hittinger and Carnegie Mellon’s Inês Azevedo, in Environmental Science & Technology.

Northwestern Now (Evanston, IL: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Watching nanomaterials form in 4-D"
April 25, 2018

For decades, these high-powered instruments had been limited to taking static snapshots of specimens, which only tell part of the story. Now researchers from Northwestern University and the University of Florida are filling in the blanks to make this story more complete. … The research was published today, April 25, in the journal ACS Central Science. Mollie A. Touve, a graduate student in Gianneschi’s laboratory, is the paper’s first author.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 50,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"6 reasons to remove your shoes inside"
April 24, 2018

From harboring hitchhiking bacteria to tracking in toxins, here’s why you may want to leave your kicks at the door. … An EPA study, reported in Environmental Science & Technology provided the first proof that unhealthy herbicides can be tracked into residences on shoes. The researchers found that the herbicide 2,4-D could be easily imported inside via shoes for up to a week after application. And not only that, but the “track-in” exposures of these chemicals may exceed those from residues on non-organic fresh fruits and vegetables.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New optogenetic tools show promise in treating cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric disorders"
April 27, 2018

… In other words, researchers have created tools that would enable real-time activation of target genes in specific locations in the genome. This technology may help scientists to illuminate the gene function during different biological processes and hopefully be useful in regenerative medicine. Researchers at Texas A&M are creating a system to do this using two common elements: calcium and light. … The researchers described their technique in a recent article published in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Camera (Boulder, CO: 868,000 unique monthly visits)
"Boulder scientists show personal care products' atmospheric impact"
April 29, 2018

People applying deodorant to start their day could be contributing a comparable level of chemicals to the atmosphere as they do when getting in their cars and driving to work. … The new study, published Wednesday in Environmental Science & Technology, leverages the work of CIRES scientist Brian McDonald,…which found that chemical products such as household cleaners, paints, perfumes and pesticides that contain compounds refined from petroleum now rival motor vehicle emissions as the top source of urban air pollution.

Six media outlets, including Times Call (Boulder, CO: 188,000 unique monthly visits) and Buff Zone (Boulder, CO: 61,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 804,500 unique monthly visits)
"Novel technique to detect paraffin oil contamination in coconut oil"
April 28, 2018

Using a novel approach, researchers at Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras have for the first time been able to use mass spectrometry to analyse various saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons directly from solutions. … The results were published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

Global Citizen (New York, NY: 454,000 unique monthly visits)
"Swiss Mountains Are Covered in Microplastics, Scientists Say"
April 27, 2018

Microplastic pollution is legion in Switzerland — even the most remote parts of its world-renowned mountains, according to new research. In a study conducted by Michael Scheurer and Moritz Bigalke at the Geographical Institute of the University of Bern, the scientists found microplastics, fragments under 5mm in size, in 90% of the country’s soils. It is believed that the particles are carried across the nation by the wind, according to a report published in Environmental Science and Technology.

Four media outlets, including My Science (73,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Could Banned Chemicals Be Lurking in Your Kitchen?"
April 18, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

Toxic chemicals that have been banned for nearly four decades may be hiding in kitchens across the United States, new research suggests. Polychlorinated biphenyls, more commonly known as PCBs, might be released when cabinet sealants break down, the scientists warn….The study was published April 18 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 30 media outlets, including Drugs.com (Auckland, New Zealand: 26.5 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), The Times (London, U.K.: 5.8 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 5.1 million unique monthly visits) and UPI (Washington, DC: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"The 'radical' ways sunlight builds bigger molecules in the atmosphere"
April 18, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

With summer approaching, "sea and sun" might conjure up images of a beach trip. But for scientists, the interactions of the two have big implications for the climate and for the formation of tiny droplets, or aerosols, that lead to clouds. In ACS Central Science, researchers demonstrate that sunlight can cause certain molecules at the ocean's surface to activate others, resulting in larger molecules that could affect the atmosphere.

Eight media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), SpaceDaily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Pepper plant metabolizes antibiotic in personal care products"
April 18, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

It sometimes can be hard to find toothpastes, soaps and other toiletries without antibiotics. Their popularity has caused an increase in environmental levels of antimicrobial substances, such as triclocarban (TCC), which end up in the water and soil used to grow crops. Scientists report in the ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that TCC and related molecules can end up in food, with potentially negative health effects.

Five media outlets, including Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Stemming the tide of ocean plastics"
April 28, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

As people in the developing countries become more affluent, they end up buying more plastics. But these areas often don't have good waste management procedures in place, so a lot of that plastic eventually ends up in the ocean, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including Science Newsline (Japan: 51,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Network World (U.S.: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New solar panel creates power from rain, as well as sunlight"
April 18, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

With an upcoming data tsunami expected to absorb up to 20 percent of global electricity by 2025, according to some experts, data center energy sources are a hot talking point — the photovoltaic solar panel being one of the hottest and most viable fossil fuel alternatives….“Solar cells, as promising devices for converting light into electricity, have a dramatically reduced performance on rainy days,” say the scientists from Soochow University in an abstract of their paper published in the American Chemical Society’s ACS Nano.

Five media outlets, including Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Cheap, portable gadget could save disaster victims' lives"
April 18, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In the aftermath of a disaster such as an earthquake, it's of the utmost importance to quickly find live victims buried under the rubble. A new device, created by a team led by ETH Zurich's Prof. Sotiris E. Pratsinis, could make doing so cheaper and easier than ever....A paper on the research was recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Engineering 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), TerraDaily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits), Wireless Design Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 65,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Sensors (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 51,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Video: What is flame jetting?"
April 17, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

We know fuels like gasoline and alcohol can burn. But sometimes, when the conditions are just right, a hand-held container of fuel being poured near an ignition source can shoot out a ten-foot jet of flame. Flame jetting is extremely dangerous and has caused several deaths. In this video from Reactions, the bizarre phenomenon is explained with help from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Four media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Eat This, Not That! (U.S.: 2.4 million unique monthly visits)
"23 Genius Tips to Reduce Food Waste"
April 16, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Last weekend: Your refrigerator was a barren oasis because you were at the end of your grocery cycle; there was no way the hodgepodge of condiments could unite to form a dinner, so you ordered in….It’s time to rethink plastic packaging and manufacturers agree. Researchers at the most recent American Chemical Society national meeting revealed that they’re developing a packaging film (made from milk proteins) that is edible.

Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME: 2.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Yes, you CAN recycle that!"
April 22, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

You've mastered paper, glass and plastic. But on this Earth Day, you're wondering where to best ditch those old Christmas lights, antiquated cellphones, half-used paint cans, alkaline batteries, scorpion brooch and microwave….A recent study in the Environmental Science & Technology journal looked at eight Chinese recycling companies and compared the costs for extracting copper and gold that way versus extracting the metals in their raw form from the ground.

Five media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Deccan Chronicle (India: 227,300 unique monthly visits)
"Here's the secret to making that perfect cup of coffee"
April 20, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Turns out, you can switch up the flavour and awesomeness quotient of your morning cuppa joe every time. A team of scientists from University of Oregon has unlocked the key to creating consistent cups of java….The researchers presented their results at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Six media outlets, including WebIndia123 (India: 58,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits)
"Harvesting Water From Fog With Harps"
April 18, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

As summertime draws near, some people around the U.S. will face annual water usage restrictions as water supplies become strained. But for those who live in arid climates year-round, water shortages are a constant concern. In these areas, residents must capitalize on even the smallest bit of moisture in the air. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a type of "harp" to harvest fresh water from fog.

Five media outlets, including Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 51,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Semiconductor Nanowires Could Revolutionize Solar Technology"
April 19, 2018

Sol Voltaics and a group of scientists from Lund University believe that semiconductor nanowires are the way forward for a world with better solar cells. With their patented Aerotaxy process, they aim to manufacture low-cost gallium arsenide solar cells….Their work was published in the latest issue of Nano Letters.

Reader's Digest (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"15 Cleansing Foods to Detox Your Body Naturally"
April 18, 2018

… Yet another reason to buy them by the bag, avocados were shown to dial back liver damage caused by liver toxins, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural Food Chemistry. A key ingredient is glutathione, a powerful antioxidant that helps the liver detoxify fat before bile is emitted, helping to rid your body of unwanted toxins.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Identify Unique Binding Mechanism of Antifreeze Molecule"
April 19, 2018

Scientists have identified a unique molecular binding mechanism that helps keep non-mammalian creatures in sub-zero temperatures from freezing. Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), produced by polar fishes, inhibit ice growth to prevent their bodies from freezing. This ice binding mechanism, which scientists knew was soft and flexible, remained a mystery until now. Using molecular simulations, scientists identified the details of this binding mechanism. Their results were published in early April in the Journal of the American Chemical Society as a cover article.

Four media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Penn State News (State College, PA: 204,300 unique monthly visits)
"Electrochemical tuning of single layer materials relies on defects"
April 19, 2018

Perfection is not everything, according to an international team of researchers whose 2-D materials study shows that defects can enhance a material's physical, electrochemical, magnetic, energy and catalytic properties….To do this, the researchers are looking at molybdenum sulfide single atomic layers. They report the results of their investigation in a recent issue of ACS Nano.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 6.4 million unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 51,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 105,100 unique monthly visits)
"How volcanic rock traps CO2 and turns it inert"
April 18, 2018

New research shows how effective injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) into the volcanic rock basalt could be for fighting carbon emissions. Burning fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide. As the gas rises and the atmosphere traps it, it retains heat as part of a process called the greenhouse effect….The researchers report their findings in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Cough Syrup Doesn't Work, But Here's What Actually Helps Your Hacking"
February 8, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

Anyone who has had a coughing fit in the middle of the night—or in the middle of a meeting—is familiar with the mad dash to find something that quiets a cough, and fast. … A video from the American Chemical Society points out that although we spend billions of dollars on cough medicine every year, the science behind syrups is seriously lacking. Analyses of cough medicine studies have found either conflicting evidence or no evidence that the meds are any better than a placebo.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"We're Getting A DNA Emoji, But It's Twisted The Wrong Way"
February 14, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

This month the Unicode Consortium, the strange and little-known organization that decides which new emoji appear in our lives, announced some good news for science: Among the 157 new emoji being added to the emoji keyboard in 2018 is a DNA double helix. It’s kind of cute. There’s just one problem. The DNA is twisted the wrong way. … The DNA emoji was proposed along with a whole slate of new science emoji by a group of science enthusiasts, with the support of the American Chemical Society, and General Electric, which has run an emoji-based science outreach campaign.

The New York Post (New York, NY: 23.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Mind-controlling wasp venom could treat Parkinson’s"
February 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Getting stung by an emerald cockroach wasp isn’t a fun time, especially if you’re one of the cockroaches that the wasp is notorious for hunting. A single sting can stop a roach in its tracks, with subsequent stings turning the insect into a zombie that follows orders solely from the wasp. Now, its powerful venom is being studied for its mind-controlling properties with the hopes that unlocking its secrets could lead to new treatments for Parkinson’s disease. … The research was published in the American Chemical Society. (link: Biochemistry)

Four media outlets, including The Orange County Register (Anaheim, CA: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Health.com (New York, NY: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Common Chemicals in Nonstick Pans and Food Wrappers Could Hurt Your Health–and Your Waistline. Here's How to Avoid Them"
February 14, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

PFAS chemicals have water- and oil-repellant properties, which makes them valuable to the fast-food industry and for packaged foods like microwave popcorn. In a 2017 study published in Environmental Science & Technology Letters, researchers found that about half of the 400 food wrappers and containers they analyzed contained fluorine, an indicator of PFAS.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Coffee threatened by climate change, disease, pests"
February 14, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

According to connoisseurs, the tastiest of coffee beans come from the Coffea arabica shrub, a fragile weakling that is susceptible to diseases and pests. And climate change isn't making things any easier for the plant. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reports that although coffee producers and scientists agree that C. arabica is under siege, they don't agree on what to do about it.

Four media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Specialized nanotechnology could reduce pain, recovery time in oral surgery"
February 14, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A trip to the dentist or orthodontist usually instills a sense of dread in most patients, and that's before the exam even begins. Add to that the fear of oral surgery with a painful recovery, and many people will avoid these visits at all costs. Now, one group reports a pre-clinical study in ACS Nano showing that they could potentially reduce pain and recovery time with the aid of specialized nanotechnology.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), The Jerusalem Post (Israel: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Develop Environmentally Friendly Method To Melt Snow Quickly"
February 15, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Businesses and local governments located in areas where it snows a lot must make sure that the white stuff is kept clear from their streets, sidewalks and parking lots. The problem, in some cases, is what to do with all the snow once it’s been cleared. … Now, the authors of a study published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Langmuir say they may have a better and more environmentally friendly solution to the problem of quickly getting rid of excess snow.

More than 16 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Tech Xplore (New York, NY: 165,000 unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits) and Terra Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

i News (U.K.: 1.0 million unique monthly visits)
"From Venus to Casanova: a history of how oysters got sexy"
February 13, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

It’s Valentines week. … In 2005, Professor George Fisher and a group of undergraduate scientists presented their research on molluscs to the American Chemical Society. They found that some mussels contained the amino acid, D-Aspartic acid, which has been found to increase the level of sex hormones in lab rats.

Science News for Students (Washington, DC: 844,000 unique monthly visits)
"Chemists look to mine silver from laundry wastewater"
February 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Believe it or not, laundry wash water can hold a mother lode of silver. … They have developed a way to extract silver from wash water. If the technique proves affordable and reliable, that silver could be recycled for a host of uses. The researchers have just shared their innovation in the January 2 ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"A step toward sensitive and fast gluten detection"
February 14, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

For people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities, the number of food options in the stores is growing. But current tests for gluten are not finding all of the substance in foods, resulting in some products being labeled "gluten free" when they really aren't. Now researchers reporting in ACS Sensors say they have developed a fast gluten detector that has the potential to detect and quantify different sources of gluten than those on the market today.

Eight media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ThirdAge (San Francisco, CA: 657,000 unique monthly visits)
"Getting Ready for the Summer Sun with “Green” Sunscreens"
February 15, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Although it’s been a tough winter for many people in the U.S., summer is coming. And that means backyard barbeques, fun on the beach and, of course, slathering on sunscreen. But one particular environmentally friendly sunscreen ingredient has been difficult to obtain — that ingredient, shinorine, could only be harvested from nature. Now, as of January 2018, Scientists reported in ACS Synthetic Biology the laboratory production of that compound.

Four media outlets, including Public (U.S.: 41,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Does fracking adversely impact on drinking water?"
February 13, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

New research suggests a negative impact of hydraulic fracturing, intended to extract gas and oil, upon streams, plus downstream recreation water and drinking water. The research has been led by the University of Central Arkansas. … The new study has been reported to the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

The Scientist (New York, NY: 250,500 unique monthly visits)
"Federal Science Funding Could Increase Under New Budget Deal"
February 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

… In response to the news about the deal, which ended a very brief government shutdown, the American Chemical Society (ACS) released a statement that reads in part, “ACS is encouraged by the bipartisan budget deal that includes an increase in domestic spending over two years. ACS encourages Congress to invest heavily in scientific research and education, which are key elements of the U.S. innovation pipeline that drives job creation and economic growth.”

The New Orleans Advocate (Baton Rouge, LA: 213,000 unique monthly visits)
"Old school or hybrid, ya-ka-mein is post-Mardi Gras hangover relief by the quart"
February 14, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

… The anecdotal faith in old sober’s abilities was backed up by the findings of a scientific study, presented a few years ago when the American Chemical Society met in New Orleans. The study explained that salty broth helps replace sodium and potassium depleted by alcohol’s diuretic effect (read: all those bathroom trips), and added that eggs, a key ingredient, are loaded with cysteine, an amino acid that helps remove harmful acetaldehyde from the body. Alyson Mitchell, a food chemist with the University of California, Davis, called ya-ka-mein “a good example of intuitive science — an effective remedy, and with the scientific basis revealed only years later.”

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Graphene on toast? Edible electronics could help shield you from food poisoning"
February 15, 2018

From helping detect cancer cells to acting as a kick-ass superconductor, graphene is capable of all kinds of amazing feats. But how does it taste? Believe it or not, that’s one of the questions being asked by researchers at Rice University — and the answers may turn out to be a bit more profound than you may think. … A paper describing the work was published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

More than 50 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), Genius Kitchen (New York, NY: 15.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), British Telecommunications (London, U.K.: 8.3 million unique monthly visits) and MedIndia (Chennai, India: 7.0 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Texas' Excess Emissions Spike After Natural Disasters"
February 15, 2018

… These types of emissions that result from startups, shutdowns or malfunctions are often referred to as "excess" or "upset" emissions and are particularly pronounced during times of natural disasters, as was the case with Hurricane Harvey. However, as we document in a newly published study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, they also occur regularly during the routine operation of many industrial facilities, sometimes in large quantities.

More than 50 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), WTOP (Washington, DC: 3.3 million unique monthly visits), The Conversation (Boston, MA: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Connecticut Post (Norwalk, CT: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) and Madison.com (Madison, WI: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Heroin Vaccine Could Prevent Overdoses, Help Addicts In Recovery"
February 14, 2018

One day there might be a heroin vaccine that stops people from becoming addicted to the opioid drug and prevents overdose. Scientists took a step in that direction when they designed a new drug that has shown promise in mice, offering the immunized animals “significant protection from lethal heroin doses,” according to a study in the journal Molecular Pharmaceutics.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Caller (Washington, DC: 9.6 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Monthly Prescribing Reference (New York, NY: 258,500 unique monthly visits), Cetus News (U.S.: 94,600 unique monthly visits), Medical Laboratory Observer (Sarasota, FL: 43,000 unique monthly visits) and Physician’s Briefing (Norwalk, CT: 42,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.
Sputnik News (19.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Russian Scientists Create Light-Emitting Nanoantennas"
February 13, 2018

Perovskite is a rare mineral (calcium titanium oxide) used recently to produce electricity from solar batteries. The scientists' designs will increase perovskite's functionality: new nanoparticles could become a prospective base for building compact optoelectronic devices such as LEDs or biomarkers. The results of the research have been published in Nano Letters, a leading Nanophotonics magazine.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Scalable two-dimensional materials advance future-gen electronics"
February 12, 2018

Since the discovery of the remarkable properties of graphene, scientists have increasingly focused research on the many other two-dimensional materials possible, both those found in nature and concocted in the lab. … They published their work, "Diffusion-Controlled Epitaxy of Large Area Coalesced WSe2 Monolayers on Sapphire," in the journal Nano Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Penn State News (State College, PA: 204,300 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), New Electronics (London, U.K.: 66,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Cells 'walk' on liquids a bit like geckos"
February 14, 2018

Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that cells can 'walk' on liquids a bit like the way geckos stick to other surfaces. … In this study, published in Nano Letters, the researchers report the successful growth of skin cells at the surface of liquid oil droplets.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Your Tango (New York, NY: 5.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The Pros And Cons Of Drinking Coffee (And How It Really Affects Your Health)"
February 16, 2018

If you're like two-thirds of Americans, you probably started your day with at least one cup of coffee. … According to the American Chemical Society, coffee is actually the leading source of antioxidants in the typical American diet, likely because we drink so much of it.

Nature (London, U.K.: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"From proposals to snarks: the messages that scientists sneak into their papers"
February 14, 2018

… Peer reviewers, it seems, must be on the lookout for striking similarities to lines from Star Wars — and, infamously, everybody missed that an interloper had drawn a stick man fishing in a water tank in a schematic diagram included in a 1955 paper in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

WTOP (Washington, DC: 3.3 million unique monthly visits)
"8 quirky things that can help you de-stress"
February 12, 2018

By now, most people have tried the de-stressing staples: deep breathing, massages, hot baths and hot yoga, just to name a few. … Thanks to science, our chocolate cravings don’t have to be a bad thing. One study published in the Journal of Proteome Research in 2009 found that eating dark chocolate reduces levels of stress hormones.

IEEE Spectrum (New York, NY: 1.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Exposing the Power Vampires in Self-Driving Cars"
February 15, 2018

… "We knew there was going to be a tradeoff in terms of the energy and greenhouse gas emissions associated with the equipment and the benefits gained from operational efficiency. I was surprised that it was so significant,” says to Greg Keoleian, senior author on the paper published today in the journal Environmental Science & Technology and director of the University of Michigan Center for Sustainable Systems.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Green Car Congress (104,000 unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), University of Michigan News (Ann Arbor, MI: 74,000 unique monthly visits), Wireless Design Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 65,400 unique monthly visits), Public (U.S.: 41,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Best Life (New York, NY: 245,000 unique monthly visits)
"30 Best Ways to Lower Your Heart Attack Risk"
February 12, 2018

… These tart and tasty fruits (specifically the red variety) are able to reduce cholesterol, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Adding one grapefruit a day to your morning routine can significantly reduce the fats in the blood that lead to heart attacks, found the researchers.

The Daily Gazette (Schenectady, NY: 225,000 unique monthly visits)
"Straws, sure, but what other plastic can you eliminate?"
February 18, 2018

No matter how hard I try, I cannot get away from disposable plastics. … A 2015 study in “Environmental Science and Technology” found that U.S. households were responsible for washing 800 trillion microbeads a day down the drain, and 8 trillion of them ended up in rivers, lakes and oceans.

Energy Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits)
"Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect"
February 16, 2018

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacky University Olomouc demonstrated for the first time a single molecule piezoelectric effect. The study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society represents a breakthrough in understanding the electromechanical behavior of individual molecules and provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale.

Eight media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

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