ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"So, that *might* not actually be wasabi you’re having with your sushi"
July 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

… According to a video published by the American Chemical Society, Sarah Everts, the senior editor of Chemical & Engineering News says that the pistachio green condiment that we so loving call wasabi is probably not actually that at all. “The wasabi most of us have eaten is a mix of European horseradish, hot mustard, and green dye,” Everts says in the video. “That’s because true Japanese wasabi is extremely difficult to cultivate.”

More than 15 media outlets, including Bustle (New York, NY: 119.3 million unique monthly visits), How Stuff Works (Atlanta, GA: 40 million unique monthly visits), HelloGiggles (New York, NY: 19.1 million unique monthly visits), Elite Daily (New York, NY: 16.1 million unique monthly visits) and Metro (London, U.K.: 2.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Harvesting water from air with less energy"
July 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Getting clean water to communities in parched areas of the planet remains an ongoing challenge. Recent developments that harvest water from air have been proposed as a solution. However, the technology to do so consumes a lot of energy. But based on new modeling results, scientists now report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that a new system design would require less energy and produce high-quality water.

Eight media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits) and Science News Journal (116,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Hydrogel scaffold helps repair injured spinal cord"
July 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Spinal cord injuries can be devastating because the damaged nerves do not regenerate on their own, which often leads to permanent impairment. Scientists have been investigating methods to encourage regrowth, but so far there are no treatments that reliably restore nerve function. Now, a group reports in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering a strategy that regrows nerve cells and restores motor function in rats with spinal cord injuries.

Six media outlets, including Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits) and Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 42.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Grinding Chemicals Together in an Effort to be Greener"
July 18, 2016

… “Chemists typically aren’t as concerned about solvents as they should be,” said David Constable, the director of the American Chemical Society’s Green Chemistry Institute. Many commonly used solvents, like chloroform, acetone and hexane, are harmful and volatile, posing risks to people who inhale them as well as the environment.

The Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 3.7 million unique monthly visits) also covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers propose new approach to target chemotherapy medications specifically to sarcomas"
July 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Sarcoma is an aggressive form of cancer responsible for up to 20 percent of childhood cancers. Tumors often first appear in the extremities and the abdomen. Surgery is a primary treatment, but it often is combined with chemotherapy. This week in ACS Central Science, researchers propose a scheme to target chemotherapy medications specifically to sarcomas, leading to greater efficacy and fewer side effects.

Nine media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 213,400 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 96,600 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada: 1.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Baby greens pack a big nutritional punch"
July 24, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

...Microgreens, younger than baby greens, are usually picked when they’re one to three inches tall, seven to 14 days after germination. Some, though, may be harvested 21 days after growth begins. … According to a 2012 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, these young, tiny greens may have a nutritional edge over their older cousins.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"Molecule made by bacteria could hold the key to the fountain of youth"
July 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Humans have long been searching for the fountain of youth, but scientists may have already found it — or at least something close to it. Rapamycin, a compound with medicinal properties, has found new life as a possible anti-aging drug. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a closer look at the compound to see if researchers have really found the secret to staying young.

Three media outlets, including Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Whole Foods Magazine (South Plainfield, NJ: 46,000 unique monthly visits)
"New Findings Suggest Hops Extract Could Prevent Breast Cancer"
July 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

New laboratory findings published in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, suggest hops, a cone-like flower, could reduce the risk of breast cancer. Led by Judy Bolton, professor and head of medicinal chemistry and pharmacognosy in the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) College of Pharmacy, researchers applied hops extract to “two different breast cell lines to see if they would affect estrogen metabolism,” which Bolton notes as a key mechanism in the development of breast cancer.

Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits)
"Moving Diagnostics out of the Microwell"
July 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

On many TV shows that depict chemistry in action, scientists are shown using bulky flasks and metal vats to perform reactions. In real labs, countless chemical reactions occur in microwells on small plastic plates. Scientists have relied on them for years in diagnostics and other applications, but that could change with a new approach that uses tiny, evaporating droplets suspended on "pillars." Researchers report the technique in the American Chemical Society's journal Analytical Chemistry.

Four media outlets, including Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)
"We Need Proper Protein Intake To Build Muscle, But How Much Should You Really Eat After A Workout?"
July 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Working out your muscles is an essential (and tiring) task, but feeding them afterwards may be just as important. During a bicep curl or a squat session, your muscles experience micro tears that require repair; this is where protein comes in. A new video produced by the American Chemical Society delivers the science behind muscle building.

Four media outlets, including Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

About.com (New York, NY: 19.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Fun Vintage Stuff Made with Bakelite, or is it Catalin?"
July 19, 2016

… The applications for this plastic were indeed vast, according to the American Chemical Society: "Bakelite can be molded, and in this regard was better than celluloid and also less expensive to make. Moreover, it could be molded very quickly, an enormous advantage in mass production processes where many identical units were produced one after the other. Bakelite is a thermosetting resin—that is, once molded, it retains its shape even if heated or subjected to various solvents."

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Key improvement for fuel cells: Work improves understanding of process that stops reactions"
July 18, 2016

Washington State University researchers have determined a key step in improving solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), a promising clean energy technology that has struggled to gain wide acceptance in the marketplace. The researchers determined a way to improve one of the primary failure points for the fuel cell, overcoming key issues that have hindered its acceptance. Their work is featured on the cover of the latest issue of Journal of Physical Chemistry C.

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"The Enduring Climate Legacy of Mauna Loa"
July 20, 2016

… But it’s still the observatory’s continuous carbon measurements—the longest running in the world—that draw the most attention. Today, the graph based on those measurements is largely known by another name: the Keeling Curve, which Thomas J. Barton, a former president of the American Chemical Society, called “an icon of modern science.”

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Gas sensors 'see' through soil to analyze microbial interactions"
July 18, 2016

Rice University researchers have developed gas biosensors to "see" into soil and allow them to follow the behavior of the microbial communities within. In a study in the American Chemical Society's journal Environmental Science and Technology, the Rice team described using genetically engineered bacteria that release methyl halide gases to monitor microbial gene expression in soil samples in the lab.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Sensors (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The First Comprehensive Look at Global Food Waste Is as Bad as You'd Expect"
July 19, 2016

From produce that rots in delivery trucks to oversized portions on restaurant plates, we waste vast amounts of food. … They ran the numbers for 169 countries (98 percent of the world's population) and calculated that in 2010—the year with the most recent data available—20 percent more food was available globally than what the human population needed. Overall, the higher a country's standard of living, the more food it wasted. The results were published in Environmental Science & Technology.

Inhabitat.com (New York, NY: 968,100 unique monthly visits)
"MIT researchers discover silk holds the key to vastly improved filtration"
July 21, 2016

MIT and Tufts University researchers found silk is good for more than clothes, cool furniture, or bulletproof vests. They found a way to extract tiny silk building blocks, called nanofibrils, that vastly improve filtration techniques. Others attempted to extract these nanofibers in the past, but largely failed, and the researchers detailed their process to success in a paper published recently in the journal Nano Letters.

Mother Earth News (Topeka, KS: 836,700 unique monthly visits)
"New Study on Fracking and Water Contamination"
July 20, 2016

For years, researchers, environmentalists, and community members living near horizontal hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) sites have argued that this questionable method of extracting natural gas contaminates drinking water. … This year, he and Robert B. Jackson published findings from the Pavillion study in Environmental Science & Technology. Their published findings show that not only did fracking operations pose an above- and belowground risk to drinking water, they strongly affected both.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"'Rivet graphene' proves its mettle"
July 18, 2016

Nanoscale "rivets" give graphene qualities that may speed the wonder material's adoption in products like flexible, transparent electronics, according to researchers at Rice University. The Rice lab of chemist James Tour reported the creation of "rivet graphene," two-dimensional carbon that incorporates carbon nanotubes for strength and carbon spheres that encase iron nanoparticles, which enhance both the material's portability and its electronic properties. The material is the subject of a paper in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

College Candy
"Sushi Lovers Beware: That Green Stuff Next to your Spicy Tuna Roll Isn’t Actually Wasabi"
July 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

If you’ve devoured a couple hundred spicy tuna rolls in your day, we have bad news: that green dollop you’ve come to know as wasabi is actually an imposter. “The truth is, you’ve probably never eaten real wasabi,” Chemical & Engineering News senior editor Sarah Everts says in a recent video from the American Chemical Society.

The Wall Street Journal (New York, NY: 22.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Turn Burnt Bread Into Fire-Resistant Foam"
July 14, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

By burning bread, researchers in China are making cheap fire-resistant foam able to shield against electromagnetic interference. In ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces today, the scientists report the recipe for their high-tech burnt toast. They make the foam by mixing flour, water and yeast, guided by a normal bread recipe.

More than 12 media outlets, including Popular Science (New York, NY: 7.0 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Not so green after all! Fuel efficient cars may be churning out MORE pollutants than previously thought"
July 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Motorists hoping to save money and the environment with a fuel efficient car may want to take a closer look at what their vehicle has under the bonnet. … 'We found that in some cases, you need up to a 20 per cent improvement in fuel economy in order to offset black carbon emissions,' said Dr. Naomi Zimmerman, lead author of the two studies which will be published in two papers in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 12 media outlets, including Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), University of Toronto News (Toronto, Canada: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Scientific Computing (Rockaway, NJ: 59,100 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131 million unique monthly visits)
"A Chemist Accidentally Creates A New Blue. Then What?"
July 16, 2016

Mas Subramanian wasn't expecting blue. In 2009, as part of his lab at Oregon State University, Subramanian — a professor of materials science — was working with students to manufacture new materials that could be used in electronics. They would mix and grind chemicals, then heat them to over 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. One grad student, Andrew E. Smith, took a particular mix out of the furnace to find it had turned a surprising, bright blue color. … Subramanian and Smith, along with OSU chemistry professor Arthur Sleight, filed to patent the YInMn material before publishing a paper on their discovery with other collaborators in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including OPB Radio (Portland, OR: 277,800 unique monthly visits), GPB News (Atlanta, GA: 60,400 unique monthly visits) and Capital Public Radio (Sacramento, CA: 28,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 7.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Plastic Packaging Gets a Million-Fold Upgrade"
July 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Most forms of plastic packaging — water bottles, pill bubbles, sealed clamshells that require sweat and blood to pry into — do their jobs just fine, or almost too well. But for highly moisture-sensitive products, the average plastic isn’t enough. … Scientists developed packaging that involves a single-atom layer of graphene on flexible polymer films to keep moisture out, according to the American Chemical Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Hops extract studied to prevent breast cancer"
July 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An enriched hops extract activates a chemical pathway in cells that could help prevent breast cancer, according to new laboratory findings from the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research at the University of Illinois at Chicago. … The new research is published in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

More than 25 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Indian Express (India: 12.6 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Express (London, U.K.: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits), Deccan Chronicle (India: 227,300 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 213,400 unique monthly visits), Biospace (San Francisco, CA: 187,100 unique monthly visits), Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 157,900 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and HealthCanal (NC: 23,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The rise of OLED displays could lead to shatterproof phones"
July 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

These days, it seems like gadgets are constantly improving, and now the next big development may be organic light-emitting diodes, or OLEDs. The technology promises to improve your phones' quality, durability and even foldability. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the market for this technology and why it is expected to more than double by 2020.

Four media outlets, including GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

InStyle (New York, NY: 2.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Is Watermelon Juice the New Coconut Water?"
July 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

If there is such thing as a quintessential summer fruit, it has to be the vibrant watermelon. … A study published by the American Chemical Society showed that drinking the natural elixir helps to alleviate muscle soreness, so if you’re planning on participating in a strength-training session that engages all those muscles you’re not usually using, the juice will help alleviate some post-workout discomfort.

NWF Daily News (Fort Walton Beach, FL: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"A new study shows that even clean swimming pools are filled with disgusting bacteria"
July 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The garden hose might be a safer option to cool off with than your swimming pool this summer. That clean water may not be as clean as you think, according to new research. A recent study published in the Environmental Science & Technology revealed that disinfectants used to keep pools clean can create hazardous disinfection byproducts (DBPs) when mixed with sweat, urine, and beauty products.

More than 25 media outlets, including Wicked Local (Framingham MA: 581,000 unique monthly visits), Providence Journal (Springfield, IL: 159,100 unique monthly visits), Daily Press (Victorville, CA: 117,400 unique monthly visits), CantonRep.com (Canton, OH: 110,100 unique monthly visits), Holland Sentinel (Holland, MI: 104,600 unique monthly visits), The State Journal-Register (Springfield, IL: 90,400 unique monthly visits), Gaston Gazette (Gaston, NC: 81,300 unique monthly visits), Pocono Record (Stroudsburg, PA: 80,200 unique monthly visits), The Norwich Bulletin (Norwich, CT: 61,200 unique monthly visits), Sentinel Standard (Ionia, MI: 55,500 unique monthly visits), Metro West Daily News (Framingham, MA: 50,400 unique monthly visits), Cape Cod Times (Hyannis, MA: 41,600 unique monthly visits) and The Register-Mail (Galesburg, IL: 25,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Essence (New York, NY: 764,500 unique monthly visits)
"How Sushi Can Help Fight Allergies"
July 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

From keeping our sushi together to becoming a healthy alternative to chips, seaweed has solidified it’s place in our lives and the list of reasons to love it are growing. According to a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, one variety of seaweed—healthy snackers' favorite low-calorie form—could possibly help counteract food allergies.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Fluorescence Is Like A Rave At the Molecular Level"
July 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Ever wonder why your highlighters glow in the dark? How about glow sticks at a rave? Our world is full of glowing objects that awe us even into adulthood, and their existence is easily explained. At least, it’s easy to understand thanks to the American Chemical Society, which released a video to explain why some stuff you have glows in the dark as part of its Reactions: This is Chemistry series.

Five media outlets, including Laughing Squid (San Francisco, CA: 975,300 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Refinery29 (New York, NY: 56.8 million unique monthly visits)
"That Isn't Wasabi On Your Sushi"
July 17, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Spicy news, sushi lovers: No longer is artificial crab meat the primary impostor invading our beloved rice-and-seaweed feasts. It turns out, the alleged wasabi we slather on our tuna sashimi is likely fake. "The truth is, you've probably never eaten real wasabi," Chemical & Engineering News senior editor Sarah Everts says in a recent video from the American Chemical Society.

More than 18 media outlets, including Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Uproxx (Culver City, CA: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laughing Squid (San Francisco, CA: 975,300 unique monthly visits)
"The Chemistry Explaining Why Cutting Onions Cause People to Cry"
July 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

In “Why Do Onions Make You Cry” by the American Chemical Society video series Reactions, the narrator explains why onions and other allium plants have such a strong odor and why onions, in particular, cause tears when cut.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Bye, Bye, Coffee Cups: Why San Francisco Banned Foam Products"
July 11, 2016

In one of the most extensive such bans in the U.S., San Francisco recently voted to outlaw commonly used foam products due to their environmental impact. … To make expanded polystyrene (EPS), engineers surround tiny gas bubbles with polystyrene, resulting in this foam-like material, according to Rick Sachleben, a member of the American Chemical Society's panel of experts.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Green Chemistry Is The Path To Chemical Safety"
July 14, 2016

… Individual businesses and coalitions like the American Chemical Society (ACS) Green Chemistry Institute and the industrial sectors drawn into it (e.g. pharmaceuticals and chemical manufacturers) have begun to respond to their main driver, consumer pressure, and are becoming more competitive by incorporating green chemistry - their gains in productivity are likely to offset any potential costs of reducing their environmental impact.

Everyday Health (New York, NY: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"8 Foods That Boost Your Mood"
July 12, 2016
… In another 2009 study published in the Journal of Proteome Research, dark chocolate was found to reduce the stress hormone cortisol and help normalize stress-related differences in energy metabolism and gut microbial activities.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Germs add ripples to make 'groovy' graphene"
July 11, 2016

Graphene, a two-dimensional wonder-material composed of a single layer of carbon atoms linked in a hexagonal chicken-wire pattern, has attracted intense interest for its phenomenal ability to conduct electricity. Now University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have used rod-shaped bacteria -- precisely aligned in an electric field, then vacuum-shrunk under a graphene sheet -- to introduce nanoscale ripples in the material, causing it to conduct electrons differently in perpendicular directions. … The finding is reported in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 12 media outlets, including Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Faster, precise silica coating process for quantum dot nanorods"
July 11, 2016

Materials researchers at North Carolina State University have fine-tuned a technique that enables them to apply precisely controlled silica coatings to quantum dot nanorods in a day - up to 21 times faster than previous methods. In addition to saving time, the advance means the quantum dots are less likely to degrade, preserving their advantageous optical properties. … The paper, "Silica Overcoating of CdSe/CdS Core/Shell Quantum Dot Nanorods with Controlled Morphologies," is published online in the journal Chemistry of Materials.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and The Engineer (London, U.K.: 79,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Can hot dogs be made healthier?"
July 15, 2016

When it comes to drawing up lists of healthy food, the ever popular hot dog is unlikely to make the final cut. Can this popular street food be made healthier? Chemists think they have the answer. … The researchers have developed and used olive oil “bulking agents,” which replace the less healthy animal fats. … The research is published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Four media outlets, including Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits)
"Engineers create new technique for testing nanomaterials"
July 14, 2016

A University of California, Irvine engineer has invented a method for analyzing nanowires at temperatures approaching 800 degrees Fahrenheit in first-ever experiments, showing the valuable role the materials could play in converting excess heat from machines and electronics into useable electricity. "Auto manufacturers and tech startups are trying to utilize and commercialize heat-to-electricity applications, but first they need highly efficient building blocks to make that happen," said Jaeho Lee, UCI assistant professor of mechanical & aerospace engineering and lead author of a study in the current issue of Nano Letters.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Gas 2
"Direct Gas Injection May Have A Fatal Flaw"
July 17, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The quest for higher fuel economy has led to the development of new fuel injection systems. … On average, she says, boosting fuel economy five to nine percent would probably cancel out the warming effects of black soot and score a net positive for the climate. The research findings are published in the Environmental Science and Technology journal.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.