ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Make Some Noise for Graphene Aerogel Speakers"
September 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Audio is one of the hot battlegrounds in mobile technology, but no matter how good speakers have become they still operate on the century-old concept of making sound by moving a diaphragm to push air molecules around. … Describing the invention in the American Chemical Society's journal Applied Materials and Interfaces [http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsami.6b03618], the scientists from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) led by Choong Sun Kim, claim that although other graphene-based speakers have been built, including a couple using aerogel, these are the first to be suitable for mass production.

Six media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemicals in indoor dust tied to antibiotic resistance"
September 17, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Slowing the rise of antibiotic-resistant “superbugs” may take more than just curbing overuse of antibiotics or eliminating antimicrobial chemicals from household products like soap and cosmetics, a new study suggests. It may also require taking a closer look at antimicrobial chemicals like triclosan that are found in indoor dust, said lead study author Dr. Erica Hartmann, a researcher at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois. … The current study doesn’t prove antimicrobials in dust cause antibiotic resistance, the authors note in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits) and Reuters (New York, NY: 49.8 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"The science of smartphone batteries and how to keep them charged"
September 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Whenever a new iPhone gets announced, there's one feature that every Apple lover is hoping for: improved battery life. We may not agree on headphone jacks, but we all want smartphones that can hold more juice. How else are we supposed to catch all those Pokémon? The latest video from the American Chemical Society gives some tips for making your battery last longer — all informed by chemistry, of course.

More than 30 media outlets, including Independent (London, U.K.: 107.8 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), The New Zealand Herald (Auckland, NZ: 7.4 million unique monthly visits), Komando (Phoenix, AZ: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), Metro (London, U.K.: 2.2 million unique monthly visits), Her.ie (Dublin, Ireland: 563,000 unique monthly visits), Thai Tech (Hong Kong, China: 152,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Shedding light on the limits of the expanded genetic code"
September 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In 2014, scientists made a huge news splash when they reported the ability to grow bacteria with an expanded genetic code. Critics feared the rise of unnatural creatures; others appreciated the therapeutic potential of the development. Now researchers have found that the expanded code might have an unforeseen limitation. A study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society reports that these novel components can damage cells when they are exposed to light.

Six media outlets, including Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Open-source research mechanism could lead to discovery of new, cheap medicines for malaria"
September 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Malaria is one of the leading causes of mortality in developing countries – last year killing more than 400,000 people. Researchers worldwide have found the solution for drug discovery could lie in open, “crowd-sourced” science. … Last night in ACS Central Science, an international consortium of researchers unveiled its findings for the project that has been five years in the making.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), The Conversation (Boston, MA: 2.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Global News (Canada: 4.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Cook with these 2 ingredients to cut your cancer risk"
September 12, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

You may not like spicy and sharp flavours of chili peppers and ginger, but new research suggests the ingredients, when paired together, work to lower your cancer risk. … Scientists out of the American Chemical Society (ACS) say that the spice combination works together – the pungent compound in ginger, called 6-ginergol, could counteract capsaicin’s potentially harmful effects, they say.

More than 12 media outlets, including Her.ie (Dublin, Ireland: 563,000 unique monthly visits), Science World Report (New York, NY: 185,500 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
“Meeting demand for 'natural' vanilla calls for creativity”
September 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In recent years, consumers have increasingly been looking for “natural” ingredients in their food products. But when it comes to one of the world’s most popular flavors, vanilla, meeting that demand has been difficult. So food scientists are scrambling for new ways to produce vanillin — the main vanilla flavor molecule — without losing the natural label.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Food waste may store solar, wind energy"
September 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Sugar alcohols - an abundant waste product of the food industry - mixed with carbon nanotubes could be used to store excess solar and wind energy for times when the Sun is down or the air is still, scientists have found. Electricity generation from renewables has grown steadily over recent years. … The study was published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 2.8 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Zee News (India: 471,700 unique monthly visits), GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 67.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Edible wrappers could replace plastic"
September 12, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A new film made of milk proteins is 500 times better than plastic at keeping oxygen away from food. And you can eat it. Source: American Chemical Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Inquisitr (U.S.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits) and India Live Today (India: 54,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Deccan Herald (India: 1.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Brain's chemical signals seen in real time"
September 13, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Neuroscientists have invented a way to watch the ebb and flow of the brain’s chemical messengers in real time. They were able to see the surge of neurotransmitters as mice were conditioned — similarly to Pavlov’s famous dogs — to salivate in response to a sound. The study, presented at the American Chemical Society’s meeting in Philadelphia recently, uses a technique that could help disentangle the complex language of neurotransmitters. Ultimately, it could lead to a better understanding of brain circuitry.

The Almanac (Palo Alto, CA: 24,300 unique monthly visits)
"Menlo couple lauded for helping public relate to science"
September 14, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Chocolate. … But suppose you're chemists talking about chemistry, a deep science, to the general public, as Menlo Park residents Howard and Sally Peters do. You're probably in need of a device to get people listening and interested. Chocolate, which has chemical properties, may be just the thing. It's worked out for the Peters. In recognition of nearly 20 years of talks and lectures about chocolate, its history and its chemistry, the American Chemical Society named Mr. and Mrs. Peters recipients of the 2016 Helen M. Free Award for outstanding public outreach.

Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Your Household Dust May Be Filled With These Hazardous Chemicals"
September 15, 2016

Ten chemicals suspected or known to harm human health are present in more than 90% of household dust samples, according to a new study. The research, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, adds to a growing body of evidence showing the dangers posed by exposure to a slew of chemicals people in developed countries encounter on a day-to-day basis. The chemicals come from a variety of household goods that includes toys, cosmetics, furniture, cookware and cleaning products.

More than 175 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), New York Daily News (New York, NY: 149.2 million unique monthly visits), Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), Epoch Times (China: 50 million unique monthly visits), AOL.com (New York, NY: 42.7 million unique monthly visits), Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits), Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Bloomberg (New York, NY: 17.6 million unique monthly visits), CBS News (New York, NY: 15.8 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), PBS.org (Washington, DC: 12.6 million unique monthly visits).

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"What The DEA's Plan To Schedule 1 Kratom Will Mean For Millions"
September 15, 2016

The DEA is planning to place the chemicals present in the ancient plant called kratom on the Schedule 1 Controlled Substances List at the end of this month. If that plan goes through, kratom will take a spot alongside drugs like heroin, MDMA and LSD—substances labeled as having “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.” Millions of people who drink a tea made from its leaves for a variety of reasons—from pain relief to depression—will abruptly lose a remedy they’ve come to rely on. … As one recent example, a study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society explored specific mechanisms that seem to make kratom alkaloids effective for pain management—the trigger that causes a large percentage of opioid addiction—though it’s not an opioid.

Six media outlets, including Seattle Weekly (Seattle, WA: 75,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The Problem with Vanilla"
September 14, 2016

Today, vanilla is so well-known that its very name means “common.” But for centuries, vanilla was a rare, New World flavor enjoyed mainly by European elites. That changed in 1841 thanks to a 12-year-old boy wielding a tiny stick. … This article is reproduced with permission from Chemical & Engineering News.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Modern-day alchemy: Researchers reveal that magnetic 'rust' performs as gold at the nanoscale"
September 15, 2016

Researchers from the University of Georgia are giving new meaning to the phrase “turning rust into gold”—and making the use of gold in research settings and industrial applications far more affordable. … In the new study published this summer in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C, the researchers used solution chemistry to reduce gold ions into a metallic gold structure using sodium citrate.

Six media outlets, including University of Georgia Today (Athens, GA: 19,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"One-pot synthesis towards sulfur-based organic semiconductors"
September 12, 2016

Thiophene-fused polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are known to be useful as organic semiconductors due to their high charge transport properties. … Nagoya, Japan - Dr. Lingkui Meng, Dr. Yasutomo Segawa, Professor Kenichiro Itami of the JST-ERATO Itami Molecular Nanocarbon Project, Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (ITbM) of Nagoya University and Integrated Research Consortium on Chemical Sciences, and their colleagues have reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, on the development of a simple and effective method for the synthesis of thiophene-fused PAHs.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MIT News (Cambridge, MA: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"High-capacity nanoparticle"
September 14, 2016

Nanoparticles offer a promising way to deliver cancer drugs in a targeted fashion, helping to kill tumors while sparing healthy tissue. However, most nanoparticles that have been developed so far are limited to carrying only one or two drugs. … In the same study, which appears in the Sept. 14 issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers also showed that when drugs are delivered by nanoparticles, they don’t necessarily work by the same DNA-damaging mechanism as when delivered in their traditional form.

More than 18 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), DNAindia.com (India: 738,100 unique monthly visits), Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 96,600 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), Mass Device (Brookline, MA: 74,400 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 73,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

U.S. Geological Survey (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Widespread Plastic Pollution Found in Great Lakes Tributaries"
September 14, 2016

Tiny pieces of harmful plastic, called microplastics, are prevalent in many rivers that flow into the Great Lakes, according to a study published today in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Results are also illustrated on a new USGS microplastics website.

More than 15 media outlets, including Cleveland.com (Cleveland, OH: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Minnesota Public Radio News (Saint Paul, MN: 468,000 unique monthly visits), KUOW (Seattle, WA: 177,600 unique monthly visits), WBFO NPR News (Buffalo, NY: 141,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists report new insights about properties of matter at the nanoscale"
September 14, 2016

UCLA nanoscience researchers have determined that a fluid that behaves similarly to water in our day-to-day lives becomes as heavy as honey when trapped in a nanocage of a porous solid, offering new insights into how matter behaves in the nanoscale world. … The research is published in the journal ACS Central Science.

More than 12 media outlets, including UCLA Newsroom (Los Angeles, CA: 181,000 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Worm (1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Battery invented by accident has the ability to last for 400 years"
September 16, 2016

Accidents’ happening in labs is not a good thing. But, what if that accident yields an unexpected result leading researchers to a system that could make batteries last up to 400 times longer than the best-performing batteries today? … The original idea of the research was to create a solid-state battery by replacing the common liquid in the lithium batteries with a much thicker electrolyte gel, according to their study published in the journal ACS Energy Letters. They also substituted the lithium in the batteries with gold nanowires for electric storage.

Eight media outlets, including Neowin (Plymouth, MI: 3.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"First multicellular organism inspires the design of better cancer drugs"
September 12, 2016

The first multicellular organism, Volvox, evolved from self-assembly of individual cells. Inspired by this organism, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a novel approach for treating cancer.  … Ashish Kulkarni, PhD, an instructor in the Division of Engineering in the Department of Medicine at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, and the lead author of the paper published in September issue of ACS Nano ("Algorithm for Designing Nanoscale Supramolecular Therapeutics with Increased Anticancer Efficacy"), said, "The algorithm saves a lot of time during the development of next generation cancer therapy.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WTVT-TB (FOX) (Tampa Bay, FL: Local Viewership 77,702)
"How to Keep Your Phone Battery Charged Longer"
September 14, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

[Transcript] we want longer battery life. Here couple tips and busted myths when it comes to your phone's battery. This comes from the American Chemical Society. It’s science. First remember the trick to let your cell phone burn all way down before charging that's true for those old batteries. Newer lithium ion batteries they don't need that. In fact it could be worse. Scientists say keep it right around the sweet spot, 50 percent half way. Then recharge.

WBIN (Boston, MA: Local Viewership 5,745)
"Selecting the right house plant could improve indoor air"
September 14, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] … one way you can remove harmful chemicals from the air is indoor plants research from the American Chemical Society's found the five best plants to purify air inside. The dracaena plant that takes in more of the gas and any other greenery, that's one of them. The jade plant also known as the friendship tree is the easiest to take care of.

… From the Blogs

Air Quality Matters
"Researchers hot on trail of heat from food; though, capturing it, the tricky part"
September 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

So much food gets eaten, but so much gets wasted too. … So, the American Chemical Society (ACS), in “Food waste could store solar and wind energy: Nano-Scale Heat Transfer in Carbon Nanotube – Sugar Alcohol Composite as Heat Storage Materials,”1 in its September 14, 2016 PressPac reported, “Electricity generation from renewables has grown steadily over recent years, and the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects this rise to continue. To keep up with this expansion, use of battery and flywheel energy storage has increased in the past five years, according to the EIA. These technologies take advantage of chemical and mechanical energy.”

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Cancer-causing Ingredient in Chili Peppers Soothed by Ginger"
September 9, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

It’s widely thought that ginger has health benefits — one of which may be to protect against an ingredient in chili peppers that has been linked to stomach cancer. Both ginger and chili peppers are commonly used in Asian cuisine. Chili peppers get their kick from capsaicin, which some research suggests also has plenty of health benefits. But a diet rich in capsaicin has also been linked to stomach cancer. … The study was published in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 50 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Vice (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Express (London, U.K.: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), I4U (U.S.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), The Hindu (Chennai, India: 804,500 unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Zee News (India: 471,700 unique monthly visits), Nature World News (129,100 unique monthly visits), Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Plants That Can Help Purify Indoor Air"
September 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Want to clear the air in your home or workplace? Get some greens, says research presented recently at the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting. But not just any greens: The new study looked at five common house plants and found that when it comes to removing harmful chemicals from the air, some are better than others.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Probing a mosquito protein for clues in the fight against Zika"
September 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As health departments around the U.S. boost efforts to combat Zika, scientists are working on new ways to kill the mosquitoes that carry the virus. One approach involves understanding the molecular mechanisms that keep the bugs alive so we can then undermine them. Scientists report in the ACS journal Biochemistry that they have revealed new structural insights on a key protein from Aedes aegypti, the mosquito species most often linked to the spread of Zika.

More than 10 media outlets, including GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Bringing graphene speakers to the mobile market"
September 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Graphene has been hailed as a wonder material since it was first made more than a decade ago. It's showing up in an increasing number of products, including coatings, sports equipment and even light bulbs. Now scientists are one step closer to making graphene audio speakers for mobile devices. They report in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a simple way to fabricate once-elusive thermoacoustic speakers using the ultra-thin material.

More than 12 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits)
"How to Fight Drug-resistant Bacteria"
September 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

This year, the U.S. reported for the first time that a patient had been infected by bacteria resistant to colistin, an antibiotic of last resort. The announcement followed several years of warnings that current antibiotics aren't diverse enough to fight pathogens as drug resistance spreads. The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, sums up how researchers are trying to stay ahead of the bugs.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Harvesting water from air with less energy"
September 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Getting clean water to communities in parched areas of the planet remains an ongoing challenge. Recent developments that harvest water from air have been proposed as a solution. However, the technology to do so consumes a lot of energy. But based on new modeling results, scientists now report in ACS’ journal Environmental Science & Technology ("Liquid-Desiccant Vapor Separation Reduces the Energy Requirements of Atmospheric Moisture Harvesting") that a new system design would require less energy and produce high-quality water.

Five media outlets, including Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Beer yeast is tame. Wine yeast is wild. Draw your own conclusions."
September 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Humans and microbes go way back. The bacteria, yeast and viruses that live in and on and around us have incredible sway over the way we live. But when it comes to culinary pursuits, yeasts stand out as our most stalwart cooking companions: These tiny creatures consume sugar and produce gases and alcohol as waste, giving our breads the bubbles of air that make them fluffy and delicious and lending beer its foamy, boozy power. … The flavors and aromas of beer all come down to chemistry. Reactions, a series from the American Chemical Society, takes a look at craft beer chemistry.

Real Simple (New York, NY: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Antibacterial ingredients in indoor dust could contribute to antibiotic resistance"
September 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Indoor dust is filled with antibacterial chemicals, says a new study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, and they could be contributing to deadly global health crisis of antibiotic resistance. Last week, the FDA ruled that several of these chemicals—such as triclosan and triclocarban—can no longer be added to household soaps. Not only do they not make products any more effective at killing germs and preventing illnesses, say scientists, but they have also been linked to hormone disruption, bacterial resistance, and cancer.

More than 22 media outlets, including Healthline (San Francisco, CA:16.4 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), GEN News (New Rochelle, NY: 112,200 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 73,000 unique monthly visits), Arizona State University Now (Tempe, AZ: 40,200 unique monthly visits), Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Around The O (Eugene, OR: 16,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Food Network (New York, NY: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Can We Trick Our Noses and Brains Into Enjoying Healthy Food?"
September 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Could the secret to making healthy yet bland dishes taste as decadently delicious as craveworthy comfort foods be as plain as the nose on your face? Quite possibly. … The scientists, who presented their device, the Gas Chromatograph-Olfactometry Associated Taste (GC-OAT), and accompanying research last week at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, say they have pinpointed a handful of “natural aromatic molecules” that affect the perception of taste.

Healio (Thorofare, NJ: 639,000 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers begin development of insulin pill"
September 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Researchers are developing an insulin pill that could make diabetes treatment less painful, according to a news release from the American Chemical Society. The pill relies on new technology: a neutral, lipid-based particle dubbed a “cholestosome” that houses the insulin. Insulin is difficult to deliver orally because it must pass through the highly acidic stomach environment, something insulin alone cannot do. By forming the lipid molecules into spheres, researchers found via computer modeling that the neutral particles are not destroyed by stomach acid.

More than 10 media outlets, including The Pharmaceutical Journal (London, U.K.: 105,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Genetically modified humans? CRISPR/Cas 9 explained"
September 6, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Thanks to a new, cheap and accurate DNA-editing technique called CRISPR-Cas9, targeted genetic modification in humans is no longer just the realm of science fiction. Both the British and U.S. governments recently gave scientists the thumbs-up to edit DNA in human embryos and adults using CRISPR. So does this mean that we can trim out genetic diseases or mutations? Or maybe even add in abilities like infrared vision, possibly creating a designer-baby dystopia? In the latest Reactions episode, we explain how CRISPR works, how it is being used today and what the future might bring for this landmark technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 73,000 unique monthly visits), Global Truth (36,400 unique monthly visits) and Berkeley (Berkeley, CA: 29,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"How That 'Old Book Smell' Could Save Priceless Artifacts"
September 7, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Odor-detecting devices like Breathalyzers have been used for years to determine blood-alcohol levels in drunk drivers. Now, researchers are using a similar method to sniff out the rate of decay in historic art and artifacts. By tracking the chemicals in "old book smell" and similar odors, conservators can react quickly to preserve priceless art and artifacts at the first signs of decay. In this Speaking of Chemistry, Sarah Everts explains how cultural-heritage science uses the chemistry of odors to save books, vintage jewelry and even early Legos.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Cosmos Magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"20 States Suffer From Toxic Algae, And We’re Doing Little To Stop It"
September 9, 2016

Thick, massive cakes of smelly green toxic algae bubbled up along beaches and rivers in South Florida’s coastal communities this summer. It was so serious, authorities declared a state of emergency. … That plan’s focus on reducing phosphorous runoff into waterways is in line with a recommendation a group of Canadian of U.S. scientists laid out in a paper published last month in the Environmental Science & Technology journal.

Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Firefighting Chemicals are Contaminating the Water of 16.5 Million People"
September 7, 2016

… In one study, published in June in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, researchers identified a clear link between levels found in drinking water and in the blood, suggesting a primary route of ingestion is through the tap. Another paper, published in August in the same journal, tracked down the source of the chemicals, finding they originated at airports, military bases and manufacturers of chemicals like Teflon and stain-proof coating, as well as wastewater treatment plants.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Tapping the Unused Potential of Photosynthesis"
September 7, 2016

Scientists from the University of Southampton have reengineered the fundamental process of photosynthesis to power useful chemical reactions that could be used to produce biofuels, pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. … In the study, published in ACS Synthetic Biology, the 'wasted' electrons were rewired to degrade the widespread environmental pollutant atrazine (a herbicide used in agriculture). Atrazine was banned from the EU over 20 years ago but is still one of the most prevalent pesticides in groundwater.

More than 10 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits) and ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"A more accurate sensor for lead paint"
September 8, 2016

A new molecular gel recipe developed at the University of Michigan is at the core of a prototype for a more accurate lead paint test. … "What's great is that it doesn't matter what color the paint is and it is so simple: anyone can tell the difference between a liquid and a gel," said Gesine Veits, a postdoctoral scholar in chemistry and first author of a paper on the work published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) and University of Michigan News (Ann Arbor, MI: 29,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Health (New York, NY: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"21 Things You Should Know About Grapefruit"
September 7, 2016

A grapefruit a day may help lower "bad" LDL cholesterol levels by as much as 15.5%, according to a 2006 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. In the study, researchers looked at 57 patients ages 39 to 72 who had high cholesterol and had undergone bypass surgery for heart trouble. For one month, some ate a grapefruit daily (either red or white) while others, the control group, did not. Grapefruit eaters, particularly those eating red, had a drop in bad cholesterol, while the control group did not.

Express (London, U.K.: 4.0 million unique monthly visits)
"HEART ATTACK breakthrough: Simple electric sensor could detect potentially fatal episode"
September 7, 2016

Cardiovascular diseases account for around 30 per cent of adult deaths in people aged between 30 and 70 tears old - great than the combined deaths from all types of cancer. The ability to diagnose cardiac disease is therefore of utmost concern to doctors. Experts said when someone has a heart attack, chemicals are released into their bloodstream in elevated amounts, and blood tests are therefore the key to diagnosis. … The study was published in the journal American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Sensors (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Material scientists turn nanotubes into super strong carbon"
September 6, 2016

Microstructures are the foundation of material strength. One of the most useful microstructures is the nanotube. Researchers at Rice University are working on new ways to utilize the nanometer-scale tube-like structures. Their latest strategy is discovery-by-collision. … The new research was published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Silicon Republic (Dublin, Ireland: 134,400 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Ottawa Citizen (Ontario, Canada: 874,000 unique monthly visits)
"Uranium mining contributes small fraction of total nuclear power emissions, study says"
September 8, 2016

Despite critics’ claims that mining and milling uranium is a hidden cost in the comparatively clean nuclear fuel cycle, extracting the radioactive material produces only a small fraction of the process’s total emissions, according to the author of a new study. … Parker’s paper, published in the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science and Technology, found that uranium mining contributes about one gram of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt hour to the nuclear fuel cycle.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Windsor Star (Ontario, Canada: 413,000 unique monthly visits), The Star Phoenix (Ontario, Canada: 214,000 unique monthly visits), Mining.com (Vancouver, Canada: 188,000 unique monthly visits) and Montreal Gazette (Montreal, Canada: 171,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Press Enterprise (Riverside, CA: 520,000 unique monthly visits)
"How to make scarce water resource stretch further"
September 9, 2016

With water resources dwindling in the West during a prolonged drought, three UC Riverside researchers have come up with an innovative approach to making the most of what’s available. … The strategy is outlined in depth in their paper, “Wastewater Reuse for Agriculture,” subtitled a “Regional Water Reuse Decision-Support Model for Cost-Effective Irrigation Sources.” The work appears in the online edition of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Eight media outlets, including The San Bernardino County Sun (San Bernardino, CA: 367,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medgadget (U.S.: 120,300 unique monthly visits)
"Device Detects Malignant Melanoma Type to Prescribe Proper Medication"
September 7, 2016

Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Basel, and the University Hospital Basel have developed and have been testing a device that can screen people with malignant melanoma for a specific genetic mutation. About half of malignant melanoma cases involve the BRAF gene that results in rapid cell division and drugs targeting this type of cancer are available. … From the study abstract in Nano Letters.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

News 12 Long Island (New York, NY)
"Ginger and chili peppers could work together to lower cancer risk"
September 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] ...on your spice rack. It’s in your morning checkup. New findings say chili pepper and ginger can cut our risk of the deadly disease. Scientists from the American Chemical Society looked at the effect of the popular spices. And they say when chili and ginger are combined - they create a compound that blocks tumors from growing.

… From the Blogs

Health Medicine Network
"Bringing graphene speakers to a mobile marketplace"
September 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Graphene has been hailed as a consternation element given it was initial done some-more than a decade ago. It’s display adult in an augmenting series of products, including coatings, sports apparatus and even light bulbs. Now scientists are one step closer to creation graphene audio speakers for mobile devices. They news in a biography ACS Applied Materials Interfaces an elementary proceed to fashion once-elusive thermoacoustic speakers regulating a ultra-thin material.

Steam Register
"Ginger And Chili Peppers Could Work Together To Lower Cancer Risk"
September 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Ginger and chili not only add spice and flavor to your favorite dish — they may also help you ward off cancer. … According to a study now published in the online Journal of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, capsaicin, a compound in chili peppers, and 6-gingerol, a component in ginger, could work together to lower the risk of cancer, possibly because 6-gingergol binds to capsaicin to form a super-strong compound that inhibits key tumor-growing receptors, The Daily Mail reported.

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