ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How Your Favorite Beverage Protects You from Disease"
November 25, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Are you a java junkie? A wine aficionado? A connoisseur of microbrews? Or perhaps you stick with the Queen's cherished Earl Grey tea? Regardless of your favorite, all have health benefits — as long as you don't overdo. … Xanthohumol, a natural flavonoid found in hops used to make beer, may be able to counteract oxidative cell damage that contributes to brain diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. A study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that xanthohumol protects neurons, and could slow the development of brain disorders.

WebMD (Orlando, FL: 27.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Mercury Levels Dropping in North Atlantic Tuna"
November 23, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Mercury levels in one tuna species have decreased along with industrial emissions of the dangerous chemical element, a new study finds….The findings were published recently in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 25 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), Health (New York, NY: 7.6 million unique monthly visits), MedicineNet.com (San Clemente, CA: 7.2 million unique monthly visits), The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), St. Louis Post-Dispatch (St. Louis, MO: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Wisconsin State Journal (Madison, WI: 898,700 unique monthly visits), Lincoln Journal Star (Lincoln, NE: 832,900 unique monthly visits), Latin Post (New York, NY: 657,600 unique monthly visits), Arizona Daily Star (Tucson, AZ: 534,100 unique monthly visits), The Times of Northwest Indiana (Munster, IN: 500,000 unique monthly visits), Quad-City Times (Davenport, IA: 310,200 unique monthly visits), Missoulian (Missoula, MT: 302,900 unique monthly visits), Billings Gazette (Billings, MT: 217,400 unique monthly visits), Rapid City Journal (Rapid City, SD: 211,900 unique monthly visits), Montana Standard (Butte, MT: 204,600 unique monthly visits) and Nature World News (129,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

How Stuff Works (Atlanta, GA: 40.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Turkey Fryers Explode"
November 23, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Not everyone gets up at the crack of dawn to put their turkey in the oven on Thanksgiving. All over the U.S., and particularly in the South, around midday, people put their turkeys in a fryer. Not only is this a fast method, typically taking just an hour to cook, but the bird also comes out particularly moist and juicy. … For more information, check out the video above from the American Chemical Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Inverse (5.8 million unique monthly visits), Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), WTOP Radio (Washington, DC: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), American Council on Science and Health (New York, NY: 149,800 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) and Info-Europa (32,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Turning To Transforming Carbon Dioxide Into Rocks To Reduce Global Carbon Emissions"
November 21, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

With the Paris Climate Agreement coming into force on Nov. 4, reducing carbon emissions has become a matter of high priority for most nations. The process requires, among others, capturing and storing carbon. … Published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, the project talks about carbon dioxide (CO2) being injected into basalt and how it was transformed into solid rock in a span of two years.

More than 15 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), Engadget (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Vice (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Clean Technica (1.6 million unique monthly visits), The Science Explorer (Midland, Canada: 141,800 unique monthly visits), ZME Science (Bucharest, Romania: 136,200 unique monthly visits) and Nature World News (129,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Cosmos Magazine (Australia: 302,000 unique monthly visits)
"What really causes pimples and acne?"
November 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Acne afflicts up to 50 million Americans each year, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. But is it true that hormones and carbohydrate-filled foods really cause the biggest symptom of acne – pimples? Hair follicles produce an oil known as sebum, which limits the amount of water entering our skin. … Check out the American Chemical Society’s video above for more, as well as tips on how to minimise and control acne.

Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits)
"Did comets kick-start life on Earth?"
November 24, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

The origins of life on Earth are still shrouded in mystery. One compelling possibility is that comets delivered the building blocks for life eons ago. This week, Speaking of Chemistry explains the chemistry behind how these icy, lumpy space rocks might have seeded life on Earth.

Thrillist (New York, NY: 5.1 million unique monthly visits)
"13 Ridiculous Facts About Poop That’ll Make You Poop Your Pants"
November 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

… Scientists presenting to the American Chemical Society last year said that there are tiny fragments of metal everywhere -- beauty products, deodorant, even socks -- that wind up literally flushed down the drain. Metals like gold, silver, platinum, and everyone's favorite, vanadium, are present in commercially viable amounts in poop.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Are Developing A Battery That Charges In Seconds And Lasts For A Week"
November 22, 2016

Over the last decade, smartphones have got better in almost every conceivable way….A study published in ACS Nano has revealed a new process for creating flexible super-capacitors which take seconds to charge, provide power for more than a week and can be recharged more than 30,000 times.

More than 100 media outlets, including Yahoo! Tech (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 55.0 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), BGR (U.S.: 11.2 million unique monthly visits), India Today (Noida, India: 9.7 million unique monthly visits), Android Authority (9.6 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Trusted Reviews (London, U.K.: 9.1 million unique monthly visits), Firstpost (India: 7.8 million unique monthly visits), Red Orbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits) ZDNet (U.S.: 6.5 million unique monthly visits) and Wired (San Francisco, CA: 6.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Human cells with a 'built-in circuit' help prevent tumor growth"
November 25, 2016

Researchers at the University of Southampton have engineered cells with a 'built-in genetic circuit' that produces a molecule that inhibits the ability of tumours to survive and grow in their low oxygen environment. … The study, which was funded by Cancer Research UK and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, is published in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), The Chandigarh Tribune (Chandigarh, India: 633,500 unique monthly visits) and The Tech News (24,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Developing graphene microwave photodetector"
November 25, 2016

A joint team has developed cryogenic microwave photodetector which is able to detect 100,000 times smaller light energy compared to the existing photodetectors….The research findings were published on November 9, 2016 in Nano Letters, the international academic journal published by the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Glamour (U.S.: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"A Brief and Somewhat Disappointing History of Female Libido Boosters"
November 25, 2016

… Italian adventurer and ultimate ladies' man Giacomo Girolamo Casanova claimed to use oysters to woo his lovers. … He may have actually been onto something: A study presented to the American Chemical Society in 2005 found that oysters are rich in D-aspartic acid (D-Asp) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), amino acids which spur the release of hormones associated with sex drive in rats (testosterone for male rats and progesterone for females).

KTRK ABC 13 (Houston, TX: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"7 ways cranberry sauce can help you live longer"
November 23, 2016

Whether you choose canned or homemade, cranberry sauce can deliver a healthy dose of vitamins and minerals that can mean a longer life….In fact, a long-term study by the American Chemical Society found the antioxidants in cranberries also appeared to help raise HDL "good" cholesterol as well.

Four media outlets, including WABC ABC 7 (New York, NY: 1.3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The San Diego Union-Tribune (San Diego, CA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Opioid vaccines ready for human testing, Scripps researchers say"
November 22, 2016

Kim Janda and colleagues at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla said they’ve developed two opioid vaccines that can reduce overdose deaths among people addicted to the prescription painkillers….His team’s research was published online Tuesday in the journal ACS Chemical Biology.

Eight media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Nanotechnology boosts solar power heating"
November 23, 2016

Solar power, along with tidal power and wind power, represents the leading alternative energy technology….The research has been reported to The Journal of Physical Chemistry, in a research study called “Titanium nitride nanoparticles as plasmonic solar heat transducers.”

Four media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Knowridge
"How to fry a turkey without burning your house down"
November 22, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

There are three times more cooking fires — the most common cause of house fires — on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year….With the holiday coming up, Reactions teamed up with the District of Columbia Fire Department to explain the chemistry behind grease fires, how they happen and how to avoid them this Thanksgiving.

I-Connect 007
"A Phone That Charges in Seconds? UCF Scientists Bring it Closer to Reality"
November 25, 2016

A team of UCF scientists has developed a new process for creating flexible supercapacitors that can store more energy and be recharged more than 30,000 times without degrading…. “If they were to replace the batteries with these supercapacitors, you could charge your mobile phone in a few seconds and you wouldn’t need to charge it again for over a week,” said Nitin Choudhary, a postdoctoral associate who conducted much of the research published recently in the academic journal ACS Nano.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Solar smart window could offer privacy and light control on demand"
November 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Smart windows get darker to filter out the sun's rays on bright days, and turn clear on cloudy days to let more light in. This feature can help control indoor temperatures and offers some privacy without resorting to aids such as mini-blinds. Now scientists report a new development in this growing niche: solar smart windows that can turn opaque on demand and even power other devices. The study appears in ACS Photonics.

Six media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Fast-cooking dry beans provide more protein, iron than ‘slower’ varieties"
November 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Beans are a versatile, inexpensive staple that can boost essential nutrients in a diet, especially for people in low-resource areas where food options are limited. To get the most out of these legumes, new research suggests choosing fast-cooking dry beans could be the way to go. A study in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that fast-cooking beans retained more protein, iron and other minerals than "slower" dry beans.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), The Siasat Daily (India: 428,000 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits) and Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Red Orbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Study finds insects are healthier than beef, and you should eat them"
November 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As the global population expands and the middle class in developing nations grow, the demand for meat is projected to rise substantially-- a major cause for concern. Meat production is high-resource activity, and greater demand could a catastrophic strain of resources like water and land. The solution could be a greater production of insects for food purposes, according to a new study from the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Four media outlets, including M2 New Zealand magazine (New Zealand: 88,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Humans could use cryogenics to FREEZE vital cells and body tissue for ‘future use’"
November 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Experts from the American Chemical Society have mastered a technique which lets them freeze blood and then defrost it to treat emergency patients. The researchers said that preserving "cells and certain tissues" is now "a reality". However, doctors from the ACA warned that "freezing and reanimating your body is still science fiction". Their research focused on blood, which can currently be stored for just 42 days by chilling it. The team have found two new molecules which allow blood to be frozen without ice forming and killing the cells.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"Controversial drug approval stirs deep concerns — and hope"
November 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In September, the Food and Drug Administration approved Exondys, a controversial treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy based on tenuous data from just 12 patients. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores what the decision could mean for future drugs for Duchenne and other rare diseases.

The Nigerian Guardian (Nigeria: 171,000 unique monthly visits)
"Health risks from hydroelectric projects, pesticides’ exposure"
November 17, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

As Nigeria intensifies efforts towards boosting electricity supply by establishing more hydroelectric projects and improving agricultural outcomes with pesticides, scientists have warned that these practices are associated with health risks. According to a new study published in Environmental Science & Technology, over 90 percent of potential new Canadian hydroelectric projects are likely to increase concentrations of the neurotoxin methylmercury in food webs near indigenous communities.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"They may save us yet: Scientists found a way to turn our carbon emissions into rock"
November 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Earlier this year, a project in Iceland reported an apparent breakthrough in the safe underground storage of the principal greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide — an option likely to be necessary if we’re to solve our global warming problem. … In their results reported Friday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, they go beyond the Carbfix project in several key ways, McGrail said.

More than 25 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Vice (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), The Christian Science Monitor (Boston, MA: 4.6 million unique monthly visits), Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (Pittsburgh, PA: 830,000 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Stars and Stripes (Washington, DC: 522,000 unique monthly visits), Albuquerque Journal (Albuquerque, NM: 466,000 unique monthly visits), Climate Central (Princeton, NJ: 262,000 unique monthly visits), The Bend Bulletin (Bend, OR: 183,000 unique monthly visits), Nature World News (129,100 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits), The Cortez Journal (Cortez, CO: 25,700 unique monthly visits) and Bonner County Daily Bee (Sandpoint, ID: 24,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The formula for a PERFECT cup of coffee: Mathematician reveals the best way to make a brew"
November 15, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Coffee is one of the most widely consumed drinks in the world, with two billion cups drunk worldwide every day. … In an episode of the video series 'Reactions' from the American Chemical Society published online earlier this year, chemistry experts share their tips for making quality coffee.

Health (New York, NY: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"This Video Shows Exactly What Causes Acne, and the Best Ways to Prevent It"
November 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Pimples are no fun. And despite those reassurances we got as awkward teenagers that we’d grow out of them, many of us still deal with acne—at least occasionally—as adults. But have you ever wondered exactly what’s going on in your body that’s causing those zits? Sure, you know it has something to do with oil and dirt and hormones, but what’s with the redness and swelling, and those whiteheads just begging to be popped? This video from the American Chemical Society breaks down breakouts like we’ve never seen before.

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong, China: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Six things distance runners need to know, according to scientists, about energy, sweat and ‘the wall’"
November 20, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Why do muscles burn during a marathon? How does sweat cool the body? What exactly happens that causes a runner’s high? In a recent video by the American Chemical Society, experts explain that the science of distance running. Here are a few things you should know.

Four media outlets, including Cosmos magazine (Australia: 302,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanopolymer-modified protein array can pinpoint hard-to-find cancer biomarker"
November 18, 2016

A Purdue University biochemist has developed a novel method for detecting certain types of proteins that serve as indicators for cancer and other diseases. … W. Andy Tao, a Purdue professor of biochemistry, has developed a novel protein array, a high throughput platform to analyze multiple proteins in parallel, for separating glycoproteins from unmodified proteins. Tao also demonstrated its effectiveness for identifying glycoproteins associated with bladder cancer. The findings were published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Purdue University News (West Lafayette, IN: 8.1 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), GEN News (New Rochelle, NY: 112,200 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Mutation for multicellular life was a backbone changer"
November 16, 2016

Just as a boat can be driven off course by a log in its path, a single, random mutation can send life in a new direction. That scenario, says University of Oregon biochemist Ken Prehoda, illustrates how a random mutation sparked a huge jump in the evolutionary course of a protein important for the evolution of animals. … The paper, now online, will be featured with an illustration on the cover of the Nov. 23 issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Six media outlets, including Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) and Astrobiology Magazine (Washington, DC: 38,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Novel catalyst design opens possibility to hydrogen vehicle"
November 18, 2016

New research affiliated with UNIST has presented a novel strategy for a non-precious metal catalyst that can replace rare and expensive platinum (Pt)-based catalyst, currently used in hydrogen fuel cells. In their study, published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society, Professor Sang Hoon Joo of Energy and Chemical Engineering and his team have devised a new synthetic strategy to boost the activity of iron- and nitrogen-doped carbon (Fe-N/C) catalyst that can realize low-cost hydrogen fuel cell.

Four media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Supercomputer models play key role in finding new drug candidates to combat antibiotic resistance"
November 17, 2016

Supercomputer simulations at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have played a key role in discovering a new class of drug candidates that hold promise to combat antibiotic resistance. In a study led by the University of Oklahoma with ORNL, the University of Tennessee and Saint Louis University, lab experiments were combined with supercomputer modeling to identify molecules that boost antibiotics' effect on disease-causing bacteria. … Details of the study were published in ACS Infectious Diseases.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists Discover Why the Nose Is Hypersensitive to Sulfur Odors"
November 18, 2016

Gas leaks, garlic breath, skunks in the neighborhood—ah, the scent of thiols. The human nose is particularly sensitive to these sulfur-containing compounds, which is no surprise given that they are often associated with things to avoid. …  As they reported this fall in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers discovered that the same receptors in the nose that pick up these unpleasant-smelling molecules also bind with particles of copper that reside in nasal mucus.

Fast Company (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Bill Gates Is Working With A Swiss Perfume Company To Make Toilets Smell Better"
November 16, 2016

Roughly 800,000 children in the developing world die each year from pathogens and diseases associated with unsafe water and poor sanitation. … The first step to fixing that is by providing more toilets and better infrastructure, which Bill Gates is attempting to do with his quest to build a better toilet for the developing world. … To pull off that feat, however, Firmenich had to conduct a fairly unappealing field study. First, they collected stool samples from India, Africa, the U.S, and Switzerland, and synthesized them to define a universal spectrum of stink. Those findings were published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology in 2013

Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"New class of drugs could combat antibiotic resistance"
November 18, 2016

Researchers have discovered a new class of drugs that boosts the effect of antibiotics on disease-causing bacteria and holds promise for combating resistance to antibiotics. … Combining laboratory experiments with supercomputing modeling, the researchers identified four new chemicals that seek out and disrupt bacterial proteins called "efflux pumps,” a major cause of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, according to the study published in the American Chemical Society's Infectious Diseases journal.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Molecular imaging hack makes cameras ‘faster’"
November 18, 2016

A new Rice University technique grabs images of chemical processes that happen faster than most laboratory cameras are able to capture them. The technique, super temporal resolution microscopy (STReM), allows researchers to view and gather useful information about fluorescing molecules at a frame rate 20 times faster than typical lab cameras normally allow. The work by Rice chemist Christy Landes and her team, along with Rice electrical engineer Kevin Kelly, appears in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), I4U (U.S.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

KOMO-AM (Radio) (Seattle, WA)
"The buzz about edible bugs: Can they replace beef?"
November 16, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] You don't have to be a meat eater to get protein. … The Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry says eating bugs is a helpful alternative to beef. Crickets are highest in iron. Grasshoppers, mealworms and crickets have more calcium, copper, zinc and magnesium than a sirloin steak.

More than 10 media outlets, including FM News 101 KXL (Portland, OR), WLS-AM (Radio) (Chicago, IL), WTAQ-AM (Radio) (Green Bay, WI), KTRS-AM (Radio) (St. Louis, MO) and 1340 WEPM (Clarksburg, WV) covered the story.

KPLA-FM (Radio) (Columbia, MO)
"Selecting the right house plant could improve indoor air"
November 17, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] ...You may want to give a gift to your local nail salon with in it. It’s the dracaena plant. According to the American Chemical Society, that plant can clean the air as well as some ventilation systems. How about that! Removing harmful chemicals and pollutants from the air. … The researchers were testing plants for their purification qualities and particularly how well they removed VOCs from the air, volatile organic compounds, which can be found in paint, furniture, dry-cleaning, acetone the ingredient in nail polish remover. Because inhaling VOCs can make many people develop sick building syndrome which can cause dizziness and severe allergies. The researchers found this dracaena plant can absorb an amazing 94% of acetone.

… From the Blogs

Kansas City Infozine
"Solar smart window could offer privacy and light control on demand"
November 19, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Smart windows get darker to filter out the sun’s rays on bright days, and turn clear on cloudy days to let more light in. This feature can help control indoor temperatures and offers some privacy without resorting to aids such as mini-blinds. Now scientists report a new development in this growing niche: solar smart windows that can turn opaque on demand and even power other devices. The study appears in ACS Photonics.

Knowridge
"How to stop acne with science"
November 18, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Breakouts are a pain and can happen well into your 40s. While there’s no cure to make acne instantly go away, there are a few science-backed tips you can use to help minimize the number of pimples that pop up. This week, Reactions goes into the chemistry behind acne: what causes it, how to prevent it and what you can do to treat it.

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ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.