ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"How depression can muddle thinking"
February 15, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation….The findings, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, could lead to the development of new depression treatments that would address associated cognitive problems.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Making sodium-ion batteries that last"
February 15, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Lithium-ion batteries have become essential in everyday technology….Now, scientists have developed an anode material that enables sodium-ion batteries to perform at high capacity over hundreds of cycles, according to their report in the journal ACS Nano.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Eating Fish? Then You’re Eating Plastic, Too"
February 14, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Synthetic fleece is something of a modern miracle. It keeps us warm and cozy, is easily cleaned and doesn’t even require we harm any animals to make it….They published their findings in the journal Environmental Science and Technology in September 2016.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"What's holding up CRISPR-based cures"
February 15, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

The gene-editing tool called CRISPR that can quickly and cleanly remove specific pieces of DNA has revolutionized biotechnology. Many researchers believe the technique could end thousands of ailments. So what's needed to realize CRISPR's potential? Another breakthrough. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, runs down the latest attempts to find it.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Plant-made virus shells could deliver drugs directly to cancer cells"
February 15, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Viruses are extremely efficient at targeting and delivering cargo to cells. In the journal ACS Nano, researchers report they have harnessed this well-honed ability -- minus the part that makes us sick -- to develop virus-like nanoparticles to deliver drugs straight to affected cells.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Mass Device (Brookline, MA: 46,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"This new battery runs on seawater"
February 13, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

There have been so many new approaches to batteries lately that it's hard to keep track of them all, but most of them have one thing in common: they are all cheaper and safer than lithium-ion batteries….The salt water is not just acting as an electrolyte; according to the American Chemical Society newsletter it is actually a "catholyte — an electrolyte and cathode combined.”

AARP (Washington, DC: 6.3 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Not-So-Super Foods"
February 19, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Did you throw up your hands in frustration at the recent news that turmeric may not be such a super-spice for health? Unfortunately, it's not alone….But when the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry reviewed studies on curcumin, the mighty compound in turmeric, researchers found no evidence that it offered much of any medicinal benefits.

Inverse (5.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Sea Snails Clap Back to Climate Change"
February 15, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Have you heard of periwinkles?...Scientists studying the periwinkles have observed an ability to “rejigger” their shell-making process, customizing them to adapt to the new conditions. The research was published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CTV News (Toronto, Canada: 5.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Milk vs. dark chocolate this Valentine's Day? Find out what science says"
February 14, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Whether you celebrate or shun Valentine’s Day, there’s a good chance you’ll indulge in some chocolate being passed around today….A new video co-produced by the American Chemical Society (ACS), sets up a “scientific showdown” between milk and dark chocolate, using research that examined their potential benefits and value.

Prevention (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"The Scary Way Your Fast Food Packaging Could Be Making You Sick"
February 13, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

You’re probably under no illusion that fast food is good for you or the environment….Turns out, the paper your burger or sandwich is wrapped in, the cardboard box containing your pizza, or even the pastry bag cradling your croissant may contain synthetic chemicals linked to serious health issues that can then leach into your food, according to a new study published in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

Six media outlets, including Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 2.5 million unique monthly visits), The Alternative Daily (Jupiter, FL: 701,400 unique monthly visits) and ThirdAge.com (San Francisco, CA: 657,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Reader’s Digest (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"There’s a Reason Pools Smell the Way They Do—and It’s Not Chlorine"
February 19, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Even though accidents can happen hopefully, all adults know peeing in a pool is certainly not cool….The American Chemical Society has released a shocking video revealing how our own waste can poorly interact with pool disinfectants.

Birmingham Mail (Birmingham, U.K.: 2.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Do cough medicines work? Doctors tell us"
February 19, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Expensive cough medicines are absolutely useless and have almost no effect, doctors have warned….The American Chemical Society said only cough drops were proven to work, although boiled sweets have the same results.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Green Tea Could Help Power Wearable Electronics"
February 16, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Wearable electronics are here — the most prominent versions are sold in the form of watches or sports bands….Researchers report in ACSThe Journal of Physical Chemistry C a new flexible and compact rechargeable energy storage device for wearable electronics that is infused with green tea polyphenols.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Industrial Equipment News (U.S.: 340,000 unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 153,100 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"A closer look at what caused the Flint water crisis"
February 18, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Flint, Michigan, continues to grapple with the public health crisis that unfolded as lead levels in its tap water spiked to alarming levels….They confirm in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology that the lead that had accumulated on the interior surface of the pipes was the most likely source of the lead contamination.

Drug Discovery & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 96,600 unique monthly visits)
"Commercial Weight-Loss Drug Could Help Treat Opioid Addiction"
February 13, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Scientists are working to come up with new therapies to curb America’s opioid epidemic and aid hospitals, doctors and public health officials in this fight. Now one team reports in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that the commercial weight-loss drug lorcaserin, when given to rats who had been self-administering oxycodone, appeared to reduce their use of and craving for the opioid.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Get ready for the 'stretchphone': Radical new circuits could lead to shape changing screens and smart clothes and wallpaper"
February 16, 2017

Researchers have developed the first stretchable circuit made using just an inkjet printer. This makes the mass production of 'smart fabric,' stretchy screens possible in the near future….The smart fabric research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Lifehacker (U.S.: 27.3 million unique monthly visits), The Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), BGR (U.S.: 11.2 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits) and Michigan State University Today (East Lansing, MI: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Graphene foam gets big and tough: Nanotube-reinforced material can be shaped, is highly conductive"
February 14, 2017

A chunk of conductive graphene foam reinforced by carbon nanotubes can support more than 3,000 times its own weight and easily bounce back to its original height, according to Rice University scientists….The research appears in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Four media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Why calorie-restricted diets could be a bad idea"
February 16, 2017

I assume that most people, if offered an easy formula to lengthen their lifespan while retaining good health, would grab the opportunity with both hands….Biochemical studies (eg Huiru Tang and others, Journal of Proteome Research, 2016) have shown that low calorie diets reduce oxygen stress and disturbance of energy metabolism.

Reader’s Digest (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Ways to Sneak in Workouts When Out with Friends"
February 20, 2017

A decadent brunch is a weekend staple, but all those omelettes and mimosas can add up….Just five minutes of walking outdoors can boost your mood, raise your immune system, and give you an overall sense of well-being, according to a study published in Environmental Science & Technology.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)
"New compounds increase glucose uptake into fat cells"
February 20, 2017

New molecules which scientists hope could one day become drugs for both cancer and diabetes have been created at the University of Bath….The research is published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Four media outlets, including HealthCanal (NC: 23,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Organic Authority (U.S.: 1.0 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Fabulous Reasons You Should be Making and Drinking Rose Water"
February 16, 2017

Rose water can be traced back to the 10th century, during the Persian empire where rose petals were used to decorate and flavor Persian cuisine….A study published in the December 2005 edition of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry showed that rose extract exhibited a strong ability to combat free radicals.

TechWorm (982,300 unique monthly visits)
"This flow battery can last a full 10 years on single charge"
February 17, 2017

While we have moved from basic cell phones to feature phones and now smartphones, one thing has remained constant. …  If all things go according to the plan of Harvard University researchers, we could see a new Flow Battery which would power any device for a full 10 years before need a recharge. … The research was published in ACS Energy Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Popular Mechanics (New York, NY: 4.5 million unique monthly visits), Android Community (Gilbert, AZ: 279,000 unique monthly visits), SpaceDaily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Utility Dive (Washington, DC: 86,200 unique monthly visits), Energy Matters (Australia: 83,700 unique monthly visits) and Wall Street Pit (New York, NY: 57,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mass Device (Brookline, MA: 46,800 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers develop luminesent carbon nanodots to track drug delivery"
February 13, 2017

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed photo-luminescent carbon nanodots that exhibit reversible switching of their optical properties in cancer cells. The team’s work was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and
Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits)
"Good, Good, Good, Good Vibrations"
February 17, 2017

Five years of hard work and a little “cosmic luck” led Rice University researchers to a new method to obtain structural details on molecules in biomembranes….The details appear this month in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

Four media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Printed Electronics World
"Squishy supercapacitors bathed in green tea could power wearables"
February 20, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Wearable electronics are here — the most prominent versions are sold in the form of watches or sports bands. But soon, more comfortable products could become available in softer materials made in part with an unexpected ingredient: green tea. Researchers report in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry C a new flexible and compact rechargeable energy storage device for wearable electronics that is infused with green tea polyphenols.

Terra Daily
"Some marine creatures may be more resilient to harsher ocean conditions"
February 17, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

As the world continually emits carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, the oceans are taking a hit, absorbing some of it and growing more acidic. Among other effects, scientists have found that coral reefs and oyster hatcheries are deteriorating as a result. However, scientists studying a type of sea snail report a bit of bright news in the ACS journal Environmental Science and Technology: The animal can adapt by rejiggering its shell-making process and other functions.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131 million unique monthly visits)
"Are We Eating Our Fleece Jackets? Microfibers Are Migrating Into Field And Food"
February 6, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

The innovation of synthetic fleece has allowed many outdoor enthusiasts to hike with warmth and comfort….The results, published in September of last year in Environmental Science and Technology, were eye-opening. Each wash of a jacket shed microfibers up to 2 grams.

More than 15 media outlets, including KQED Public Radio (San Francisco, CA: 2.5 million unique monthly visits), Oregon Public Broadcasting (Portland, OR: 672,700 unique monthly visits) and Capital Public Radio (Sacramento, CA: 465,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! Beauty (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Pesky Stink Bugs Might Make Your Wine Taste Like Cilantro"
February 6, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Stink bugs, specifically brown marmorated stink bugs, have been found in 43 states across the United States and in four Canadian provinces, posing a threat to the crops they encounter. According to a recent study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, these bugs may change the taste of wine.

Four media outlets, including The Daily Meal (New York, NY: 698,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"The science of excruciating pain, as when parents step barefoot on a Lego brick"
February 9, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Tuesday night, in an act of movie-promotion-slash-celebrity-torture, comedian and actor Will Arnett walked barefoot across a pile of Lego bricks….In March, the American Chemical Society produced a video on the materials behind the “soul-crushing” phenomenon.

More than 35 media outlets, including MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits), Miami Herald (Miami, FL: 12.9 million unique monthly visits), Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 11.2 million unique monthly visits), Sacramento Bee (Sacramento, CA: 10.3 million unique monthly visits), The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, GA: 8.7 million unique monthly visits), The Twin Cities Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN: 7.3 million unique monthly visits) and the New Zealand Herald (Auckland, New Zealand: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fortune (New York, NY: 26.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Your Fast Food Wrapper Might Still Be Toxic"
February 2, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Despite an effort to clean up production of fast food wrappers, new research suggests a significant share likely still contain highly fluorinated chemicals linked to cancer and other ailments….Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters, reveal that 40% of overall samples tested positive for fluorine, which suggests the presence of perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs).

More than 20 media outlets, including Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits), The Japan Times (Tokyo, Japan: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), The Hindu (Chennai, India: 804,500 unique monthly visits), KXAS NBC 5 (Fort Worth, TX: 766,500 unique monthly visits) and WTTG FOX 5 (Washington, DC: 533,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits)
"What It Means If Your Snot Is Green"
February 6, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Feeling sniffly, but not sure if you’re coming down with a bug? Take a cue from your used Kleenex. As the American Chemical Society's latest Reactions video explains, the color and consistency of snot can serve as a barometer of your health.

More than 10 media outlets, including Health Magazine (New York, NY: 13.5 million unique monthly visits), New York Magazine (New York, NY: 10.5 million unique monthly visits) and Cosmos Magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Commercial weight-loss drug could help treat opioid addiction"
February 8, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Scientists are working to come up with new therapies to curb America's opioid epidemic and aid hospitals, doctors and public health officials in this fight. Now one team reports in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience that the commercial weight-loss drug lorcaserin, when given to rats who had been self-administering oxycodone, appeared to reduce their use of and craving for the opioid.

Seven media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Knowridge (Sydney, Australia: 31,500 unique monthly visits) and Pharmaceutical Processing (Rockaway, NJ: 29,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Peacock feathers inspire researchers to develop ‘greener’ way to dye clothes"
February 6, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Inspired by the dazzling multi-coloured peacock feathers, researchers have developed a new and non-polluting method to colour textiles without the use of traditional dyes that enter streams and rivers, causing environmental pollution….The study appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Six media outlets, including Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.2 million unique monthly visits) and The Lahore Daily Times (Lahore, Pakistan: 178,100 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Exposure to a newer flame retardant has been on the rise"
February 8, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Out of concern that flame retardants -- polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) -- cause health problems, the U.S. government worked with manufacturers to start phasing them out in 2004….Now researchers report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters that exposure to at least one of the newer compounds has increased significantly over the past decade.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The A.V. Club (U.S.: 11.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Read This: Food scientist says MSG isn’t bad, is delicious"
February 7, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

In this age of organic, all-natural food, an argument in favor of MSG—a non-essential amino acid that’s often used as a flavor enhancer, especially in Chinese takeout—might not go over well. But food scientist Steve Witherly is not only speaking out against MSG’s bad reputation, but essentially positing it as the next must-have for your spice rack….[A video from the] American Chemical Society, for example, states that “MSG can temporarily affect a select few when consumed in huge quantities on an empty stomach, but it’s perfectly safe for the vast majority of people.”

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Video: Milk versus dark chocolate: A scientific showdown"
February 7, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Valentine's Day is nearly here. Whether you're spending it with your significant other or flying solo, chocolate is often in the mix. But which is the better choice: milk or dark chocolate? Reactions pits the two against each other in a scientific showdown, highlighting research on chocolate's potential health benefits, flavor, aphrodisiac properties and more.

Four media outlets, including Knowridge (Sydney, Australia: 31,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Bravo TV (Burbank, CA: 5.2 million unique monthly visits)
" 7 Secretly Sexy Foods You Didn't Know Were Aphrodisiacs"
February 6, 2017
Publicized in: EAC National Meeting news release

If you're planning on doing the cooking this Valentine's Day (because who wants to get gouged for an astronomical restaurant meal that'll be half the price the next night?), forget worrying about finding the perfect scented candles or making a sexy playlist, and focus more on tossing in a few all-natural aphrodisiacs to your recipes.... A study presented at the American Chemical Society annual meeting in 2005 stated that after scientists extracted two obscure amino acids from oysters (and mussels too) and injected them into rats, they triggered the release of testosterone in males and progesterone in females.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"The Search for Human Pheromones"
February 10, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Molecules known as pheromones are a potent form of chemical communication in the animal kingdom, able to convey a creature's gender, fertility and more with scent alone….The latest episode of Speaking of Chemistry examines the quest for human pheromones, and what's really in those sketchy "pheromone" colognes.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Knowridge (Sydney, Australia: 31,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Chemistry World (London, U.K.: 645,300 unique monthly visits)
"Synthetic cells pass Turing test and chat to natural counterparts"
February 7, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Artificial cells have been created that can ‘talk’ to bacteria – the first time two-way chemical communication between synthetic cells and natural cells has been achieved. (American Chemical Society) The work could provide a much sought after yardstick to determine how lifelike artificial cells are by their ability to fool natural cells, akin to the Turing test for machine intelligence. Further applications could involve artificial cells controlling complex networks of natural cells.

Five media outlets, including ZME Science (Bucharest, Romania: 136,200 unique monthly visits) and Wall Street Pit (New York, NY: 57,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Environmental News Network (33,400 unique monthly visits)
"Recycling yogurt waste to produce electricity, nutrients and more dairy foods"
February 8. 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

America’s appetite for Greek yogurt has skyrocketed over the past decade. But for every container of Greek yogurt consumed, you could fill two or three more with the acid whey it produces. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the interesting ways scientists are making use of the byproduct.

Yahoo! Tech (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Going Green: Tomorrow’s tires could be made from your lawn clippings"
February 10, 2017

Tire production is a multi-billion dollar industry that manufactures billions of tires every single year….However, things could soon change due to new research coming out of the University of Minnesota, where chemists have developed a more eco-friendly way to manufacture tires by making them out of grass and trees — and without affecting the color, shape or performance in the process. The research was published this week in the journal ACS Catalysis.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), University of Minnesota (Minneapolis, MN: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), WCCO CBS 4 (Minneapolis, MN: 665,700 unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"15 Worst Things About Valentine's Day Chocolates"
February 2, 2017

Cocoa powder is naturally acidic, and this can be a major flavor turnoff for many people's palates….And when we say significantly, we're talking a nearly 90 percent decrease in these flavanols, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Can We Charge Batteries With Greenhouse Gases?"
February 10, 2017

Climate change is bad, and humans are causing it with all of our cars and factories belching greenhouse gases into the atmosphere….The researchers can recharge the battery by switching the solution, and published their results in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters last month.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Silicon Republic (Dublin, Ireland: 104,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Should Scientists Engage In Activism?"
February 8, 2017

Have you heard that scientists are planning a march on Washington? ... In October, a remarkable editorial appeared in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. The essay, by University of California, Berkeley engineering professor and Water Center Director David Sedlak, ES&T’s editor-in-chief, expressed concern that some of his colleagues in the field had crossed the “imaginary line” between scientist and advocate.

More than 18 media outlets, including CNBC News (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), Vox (New York, NY: 17.2 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits), LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits) and Albany Times Union (Albany, NY: 912,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits)
"9 Reasons You Should Be Eating More Citrus"
February 9, 2017

You already know that citrus (like oranges, lemons, tangerines, limes and grapefruit) is an excellent source of immune-boosting vitamin C—which is why so many people reach for these fruits during cold and flu season…. In a study of patients who had undergone bypass surgery published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers found that antioxidant-rich red grapefruit helped lower "bad" LDL cholesterol as well as triglyceride levels.

Five media outlets, including Health Magazine (New York, NY: 13.5 million unique monthly visits) and Southern Living (Tampa, FL: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Epoch Times (China: 50 million unique monthly visits)
"Chocolate for Your Sweetheart"
February 11, 2017

Chocolate doesn’t just come in heart shaped boxes, but it might also be good for your real heart, too….According to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, in terms of healthy antioxidant content, the chocolate hierarchy in order from best to worst is: cocoa powder, unsweetened baking chocolate, dark chocolate, semi-sweet chocolate chips, milk chocolate, chocolate syrup.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The Super Bowl Ad With Bill Nye Got At Least Three Chemistry Details Wrong"
February 5, 2017

Let’s get something out of the way. I love Bill Nye….The American Chemical Society has an entire division dedicated to chemical safety. The #chemsafety hashtag on Twitter is an active community where professionals talk about safety questions and issues in their labs and in the news.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Will your next spectacles have METAL lenses? Harvard researchers reveal radical new material that could replace glass in everything from phones to eyewear"
February 8, 2017

Harvard researchers have created a new lens material that is much thinner than glass….Zhujun Shi, a PhD student in Professor Carpasso's lab and a co-author of the research published in the journal Nano Letters, said: 'This platform is based on single step lithography and is compatible with high throughput manufacturing technique such as nano-imprinting.'

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! Tech (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"A new study uses cancer-seeking fluorescents to light the way for surgeons"
February 7, 2017

Scientists have developed a new method for helping surgeons recognize and remove even the smallest cancerous tumors — by quite literally lighting the way with tiny fluorescent particles. As described in a new study published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Omega, the technique involves loading microscopic expansile nanoprobes with the fluorescent particles.

Four media outlets, including Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits)
"High-Tech Paper Could Be Reused Up to 80 Times"
February 7, 2017

Even in an increasingly digital world, there's still a need for printed text….The paper, described in Nano Letters, is blue rather than white, and it's covered in a nanoparticle coating that is sensitive to UV light. These titanium dioxide nanoparticles are mixed with Prussian blue pigment (the blue color in blueprints), which becomes colorless when its particles gain electrons.

Six media outlets, including Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) and ZME Science (Bucharest, Romania: 136,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Move Over Graphene: Scientists Simulate New Material Tougher Than Graphene"
February 7, 2017

The superiority of graphene as the hardest, highly flexible and stronger material with superconducting qualities is under challenge after researchers from Rice University simulated a one-dimensional chain of boron atoms….The research has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including Futurism (1.9 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Building a better microbial fuel cell, using paper"
February 6, 2017

The concept behind microbial fuel cells, which rely on bacteria to generate an electrical current, is more than a century old….Their findings have been published in ACS Energy Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 11.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Element from coal ash that can cause deformities in fish found in NC lakes"
February 7, 2017

High levels of an element found in coal ash have been detected in fish in two lakes where Duke Energy coal-fired power plants are located, Duke University researchers reported Tuesday….The peer-reviewed study was published Monday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Duke University News (Durham, NC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), WBTV CBS 3 (Charlotte, NC: 400,000 unique monthly visits) and The Durham Herald-Sun (Durham, SC: 54,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Harvard University News (Cambridge, MA: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Long-lasting flow battery could run for more than a decade with minimum upkeep"
February 9, 2017

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new flow battery that stores energy in organic molecules dissolved in neutral pH water….The research, published in ACS Energy Letters, was led by Michael Aziz, the Gene and Tracy Sykes Professor of Materials and Energy Technologies and Roy Gordon, the Thomas Dudley Cabot Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Materials Science.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Interesting Engineering (933,400 unique monthly visits), Steemit (633,400 unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Overcoming hurdles in CRISPR gene editing to improve treatment"
February 7, 2017

More and more scientists are using the powerful new gene-editing tool known as CRISPR/Cas9, a technology isolated from bacteria, that holds promise for new treatment of such genetic diseases as cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophy and hemophilia….Details appear in a recent issue of the journal ACS Nano.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), University of Massachusetts News (Amherst, MA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

SheKnows (Scottsdale, AZ: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Health Myths About Tea We Need to Stop Believing"
February 8, 2017

First things first: Let’s give tea the credit it’s due….A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry claimed that the same amount of catechins (antioxidants linked with a reduced risk of some cancers) were absorbed from tea with milk as from tea without.

Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Slime is back! The gross, sticky, goopy mess is a hit again with kids"
February 9, 2017

Drugstores are struggling to keep glue – yes, ordinary white schoolhouse glue – on the shelves….Sarquis taught teachers how to use slime as a classroom tool, though back in the 1980s she called it "gluep," and published several related papers in the Journal of Chemical Education.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists develop new stem cell technique for bone repair"
February 8, 2017

Researchers from Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea, or UNIST, have developed a method of repairing bone using a mix of stem cells and a carbon material with photocatalytic properties….The study was published in ACS Nano.

Six media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Palm Beach Post (West Palm Beach, FL: 2.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Getting Outside is So Good for You"
February 12, 2017

John Keats once wrote, "The poetry of the earth is never dead."...According to the American Chemical Society's journal Environmental Science & Technology, as little as five minutes exercising in a park, working in a backyard garden, hiking on a nature trail, or even sitting in a plant-filled setting will benefit your mental health.

Four media outlets, including WSB Radio (Atlanta, GA: 329,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Rice University News (Houston, TX: 1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Better scaffolds help scientists study cancer"
February 8, 2017

Testing treatments for bone cancer tumors may get easier with new enhancements to sophisticated support structures that mimic their biological environment, according to Rice University scientists….The research is detailed in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), 3Dprint.com (433,300 unique monthly visits), 3Ders (309,200 unique monthly visits), Texas Medical Center (Houston, TX: 304,100 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and TCT Magazine (U.K.: 29,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WISH-IN (CW) (Indianapolis, IN: local viewership 41,100)
WISH-IN (CW)
February 6, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

[Transcript]...So you would think those meds would work really well for those feeling under the weather. But according to several studies and reviews compiled over the last ten years, that's just not the case. The American Chemical Society is the latest to weigh-in on cough care. Cough syrups are intended to do things like suppress the cough reflex and help with decongestion, but most show no benefit in clinical reviews or conflicting results.

… From the Blogs

Asian Scientist
"Nanoparticles That Help Crops Absorb Fertilizers"
February 7, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Nanoparticle-based slow-release fertilizer could help reduce the amount of fertilizer used while improving food production in developing nations. A study describing a method to create this environmentally-friendly solution has been published in ACS Nano.

Wessex Life Science Cluster
"Recycling yogurt waste to produce electricity, nutrients and more dairy foods"
February 8, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

America's appetite for Greek yogurt has skyrocketed over the past decade. But for every container of Greek yogurt consumed, you could fill two or three more with the acid whey it produces. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, takes a look at the interesting ways scientists are making use of the byproduct.

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