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ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“These are the 10 best locations in the United States for UFO enthusiasts to buy a home”
Oct. 15, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The researchers wrote in American Chemical Society Analytical Chemistry that they’ve developed a fully automated microchip electrophoresis analyzer that could help find organic biosignatures in soil — or life on other planets. Read more about that at Deseret.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

MSN IN (Hyderabad, India: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“There’s a 60 Percent Chance This Toxin Is in Your Water, Study Finds”
Oct. 15, 2020

One study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters on Oct. 14, found that toxic chemicals may be far more prevalent in drinking water than previously thought. The researchers estimated that more than 200 million Americans could have per- and poly-fluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in their drinking water at a concentration of 1 part per trillion (ppt) or higher.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 43.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded to 2 Scientists for Work on Genome Editing”
Oct. 13, 2020

Along with these high-profile experiments, other scientists are using Crispr to ask fundamental questions about life, such as which genes are essential to a cell’s survival. Crispr “solves problems in every field of biology,” said Angela Zhou, an information scientist at CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Your Microbiome Gut-Health Test Might Be Full of It”
Oct. 15, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

… scientists recently published research in ACS Nano in September 2020, describing a capsule that functions as an ingestible laboratory. It collects samples throughout the gastrointestinal tract for scientists to have a more representative idea. Perhaps in the future, these tests could tell us about the geographical organization of our microbiome.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Synthetic DNA controls the release of drugs to Cancer cells only”
Oct. 16, 2020

When the nano-drug package encounters cancer cells, the microRNA strands in cancer cells bind to the synthetic DNA — it breaks down the bond, releasing the drug. Since mucins are naturally occurring in the body, their release does not pose any danger of side-effects…. Complete Research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits)
“New ‘wearable paint’ PRINTED directly on the body to monitor vital signs is powered by the user’s movements and can be washed off after data is gathered”
Oct. 12, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Researchers have developed a wearable circuit that could be printed on the body to monitor body temperature, blood oxygen levels and other vital signs…. The team, whose research was published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, hopes to tailor the circuitry to monitor symptoms of the novel coronavirus.

More than 10 media outlets, including MSN UK (London, England: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), The Sun (London, England: 10.02 million unique monthly visits) and IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo Finance (New York, NY: 19.25 million unique monthly visits)
“Cullgen Announces “Featured Article” Publication of First in Class TRK Protein Degraders in Journal of Medicinal Chemistry”
Oct. 16, 2020

Cullgen Inc…. announced that the company’s internal program to develop selective degraders that target key proteins within the TRK family has been published by the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. The paper, entitled "Discovery of First-in-class Potent and Selective Tropomyosin Receptor Kinase Degraders", has been selected as a Featured Article by the editors of the journal based on the novelty and scientific merit of the work.

More than 35 media outlets, including Financial Times (London, England: 5.23 million unique monthly visits) and BusinessWire.com (San Francisco, CA: 2.30 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits)
“Bhubaneswar: Drugs combo can help fight virus, claims IISER study”
Oct. 14, 2020

“The combination of drugs like ivermectin, famotidine and doxycycline could offer a fight against Covid-19,” said Malay Kumar Rana and Parta Sarathi Sengupta, assistant professor and a post-doctoral fellow in the department of chemical science, IISER. The proposal has been published in an international journal, ACS Pharmacology and Translational Science as a Viewpoint, in its September issue.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

The Economic Times (Gurgaon, India: 8.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Come winter, Covid-19 cases may surge as virus spreads more via respiratory droplets, says scientists”
Oct. 15, 2020

While transmission of the novel coronavirus as small aerosol particles is more significant in summer, direct contact with respiratory droplets may be more pronounced in the winter months, according to a new research. The modelling study, published in the journal Nano Letters, also noted that the currently followed physical distancing guidelines are inadequate in curbing the transmission of COVID-19.

More than 40 media outlets, including MSN IN (Hyderabad, India: 67.15 million unique monthly visits) and Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 5.20 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CBC News (Toronto, Canada: 7.41 million unique monthly visits)
“Government calls on private sector to come up with compostable, recyclable pandemic gear”
Oct. 16, 2020

One peer-reviewed study published in the academic journal Environmental Science & Technology estimated the world is using 129 billion disposable masks and 65 billion disposable gloves each month. Most of those products are made from non-biodegradable, petroleum-based polymers and are designed to be used only once and then discarded. In Canada, the vast majority end up in landfills — or are incinerated if they are deemed to be a biohazard.

More than five media outlets, including MSN News Canada (Toronto, Canada: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Patch (New York, NY: 6.81 million unique monthly visits)
“In The Cannabis Patch, A Patchwork of Safety Standards”
Oct. 15, 2020

Other efforts are underway to assist state regulators in developing consistent, science-based rules for contaminant testing in cannabis products including foods, drinks and concentrates… Organizations including the Association of Analytical Chemists , the American Society for Testing and Materials and the American Chemical Society have all established committees in recent years tasked with developing methods and standards for cannabis testing.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

snopes.com (Tacoma, WA: 6.66 million unique monthly visits)
“Bleached Halloween Pumpkin Post Sparks Vitriolic, Misinformed Backlash”
Oct. 14, 2020
Featuring an: ACS Expert

We asked experts from the American Chemical Society to confirm whether household bleach, when left on a carved porch pumpkin, will harm wildlife. Richard Sachleben, an organic chemist and ACS member, said in an email that so long as people “don’t dump a large quantity of bleach into the environment,” using a bleach diluted with water to treat a pumpkin shouldn’t harm wildlife. “It will kill bacteria on the pumpkin, which is how bleach treatment extends the life of the pumpkin,” he said in an email.

Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Popeye would approve: Spinach could hold key to renewable fuel cell catalysts”
Oct. 16, 2020

When it comes to making efficient fuel cells, it's all about the catalyst. A good catalyst will result in faster, more efficient chemical reactions and, thus, increased energy output. Today's fuel cells typically rely on platinum-based catalysts. But scientists at American University believe that spinach… would make an excellent renewable carbon-rich catalyst, based on their proof-of-principle experiments described in a recent paper published in the journal ACS Omega.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Study sheds new light on how toxic PFAS chemicals spread from release sites”
Oct. 16, 2020

The findings could help researchers to better predict how pollutants in these foams spread from the spill or release sites -- fire training areas or airplane crash sites, for example -- into drinking water supplies…. Using a series of laboratory experiments described in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, Pennell and his colleagues showed that the firefighting foam mixture does indeed behave much differently than individual compounds.

More than five media, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits) outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Study uncovers novel mechanical mechanism of metastatic cancer cells in substrates of different stiffness”
Oct. 16, 2020

During metastasis, cancer cells actively interact with microenvironments of new tissues. How metastatic cancer cells respond to new environments in the secondary tissues is a crucial question in cancer research but still remains elusive. Recently, researchers… discovered a novel mechanical mechanism of metastatic cancer cells in substrates of different stiffness… This study was published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters on Sept 18, 2020.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Nanoparticles release bursts of calcium to reverse multidrug resistance in tumor cells”
Oct. 18, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Multidrug resistance (MDR) -- a process in which tumors become resistant to multiple medicines -- is the main cause of failure of cancer chemotherapy. Tumor cells often acquire MDR by boosting their production of proteins that pump drugs out of the cell, rendering the chemotherapies ineffective. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed nanoparticles that release bursts of calcium inside tumor cells, inhibiting drug pumps and reversing MDR.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Tiny Diamonds Allow Doctors to Check Wounds Without Removing The Dressing”
Oct. 19, 2020

Suitably doped nanodiamonds have shown themselves to be extremely sensitive temperature probes. When exposed to green-light lasers and microwaves, the tiny crystals glow red above a certain temperature. Khalid has co-authored a paper in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces demonstrating the potential for these tiny diamonds as heat sensors in wounds.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Microdosing With LSD May Boost Brain Growth Factors, New Research Suggests”
Oct. 13, 2020

To do so, they gave 27 volunteers a placebo and a microdose of LSD on separate days, while measuring their blood plasma BDNF levels every two hours. Results, which are published in the journal ACS Pharmacology and Translational Science, showed that a 5-microgram dose of LSD led to an increase in BDNF, which peaked after four hours, while 20 micrograms of the drug caused the growth factor to peak after six hours.

Yahoo News (Sunnyvale, CA: 149.32 million unique monthly visits)
“A Nobel science first: More than one woman winner, no man”
Oct. 7, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Women have won the most prizes in medicine with 12, seven in chemistry and four in physics. “For too long, many many discoveries made by women have been underplayed and they have simply not been recognized,’’ American Chemistry Society President Luis Echegoyen, a chemistry professor at the University of Texas El Paso. “The under representation of women in science has been too clear.’’

More than 425 media outlets, including MSN News Canada (Toronto, Canada: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.: 26.53 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits), independent.co.uk (London, England: 13.91 million unique monthly visits), ABC News (New York, NY: 12.86 million unique monthly visits) and Associated Press (New York, NY: 5.81 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN IN (Hyderabad, India: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Popeye Was Right: Spinach Can Be Used to Fuel Cells, Find Scientists in New Study”
Oct. 6, 2020

The study was led by four scientists from the Department of Chemistry, Washington University and published in ACS Omega. “This work suggests that sustainable catalysts can be made for an oxygen reduction reaction from natural resources,” lead author Professor Shouzhong Zou was quoted by Earth.com.

More than five media outlets, including Republic World (Mumbai, India: 4.39 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 43.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded to 2 Scientists for Work on Genome Editing”
Oct. 7, 2020

Along with these high-profile experiments, other scientists are using CRISPR to ask fundamental questions about life, such as which genes are essential to a cell’s survival. CRISPR “solves problems in every field of biology,” said Angela Zhou, an information scientist at CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society.

More than five media outlets, including MSN IN (Hyderabad, India: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

TIME (New York, NY: 8.61 million unique monthly visits)
“‘We Want to Help the World Better Understand China.’ Meet Chen Xiaoqing, the Film Director Using Food to Make Friends”
Oct. 6, 2020

When a devastating earthquake flattened San Francisco in 1906, that city’s Chinatown was prioritized for reconstruction because of the tourist dollars it brought in. By 1919, the American Chemical Society was advising that Chinese food was good for health. A decade later, nearly a third of American counties had at least one Chinese resident, many of whom opened restaurants.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

IBNLive (Noida, India: 3.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Wearable Body Sensors That Can Be Printed Directly on Human Skin are Straight Out of a Sci-fi Movie”
Oct. 10, 2020

According to researchers, wearable sensors will now be printable, like a temporary tattoo on the human skin. They also claim this printing can be achieved without the use of heat! Huanyu "Larry" Cheng from Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in the Penn State Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics led the team that made this science-fiction style device a reality. Their findings can be found in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 20 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Stretchable conductive hydrogel could help repair damaged peripheral nerves”
Oct. 7, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Injuries to peripheral nerves –– tissues that transmit bioelectrical signals from the brain to the rest of the body –– often result in chronic pain, neurologic disorders, paralysis or disability. Now, researchers have developed a stretchable conductive hydrogel that could someday be used to repair these types of nerves when there's damage. They report their results in ACS Nano.

More than 30 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.89 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Study explains why milk is an effective way to quench the burn of spicy food”
Oct. 12, 2020
Publicized in: ACS video release

Maybe you've heard that milk is the perfect way to extinguish that spicy food burn. Why is milk so effective? And what if you can't drink milk? This week, our lactose-intolerant host, Sam, tries to figure out her options by chatting with expert Alissa Nolden, Ph.D.. Sam and George eat peppers and try to quench the burn for science. Spoiler alert: One of them does a heck of a lot better than the other. Reactions is a video series produced by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Theoretical model explains biological phenomena that keep bacteria in shape”
Oct. 7, 2020

Fat bacteria? Skinny bacteria? From our perspective on high, they all seem to be about the same size. In fact, they are. Precisely why has been an open question, according to Rice University chemist Anatoly Kolomeisky, who now has a theory. The "minimal model" by Kolomeisky… and lead author Hamid Teimouri and Rupsha Mukherjee… appears in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

The Star (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 1.18 million unique monthly visits)
“Local study among world’s most cited paper”
Oct. 11, 2020

The research paper, produced by academics from Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR) Faculty of Engineering and published in the Journal of Energy & Fuels, was awarded “Energy & Fuels Top 25 Most Cited Articles in 2016” by Clarivate Analytics recently. Titled “Recent Advancements, Fundamental Challenges, and Opportunities in Catalytic Methanation of Carbon Dioxide (CO2)”…

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Development of precision drug delivery tool to treat traumatic brain injury”
Oct. 7, 2020

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Southern California has developed a precision drug delivery tool to selectively treat areas of the brain damaged during a traumatic brain injury (TBI)…. This invention has been tested using two different therapeutics, and the results appear in the journals Frontiers in Chemistry and Molecular Pharmaceutics.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Scripps Jupiter scientists find possible COVID-19 drug strategy in new study”
Oct. 1, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Their findings from the proof-of-concept study were published Wednesday in ACS Central Science, an open-access peer-reviewed scientific journal. The study focused on a site within the coronavirus, called its frameshifting element, that is critical in how the virus replicates itself using RNA genetic material after infecting a cell. The element functions like a clutch in a car, enabling the production of different proteins that help the coronavirus make copies of itself, according to Scripps.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. .

MSN IN (New Delhi, India: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“What Is Monk Fruit? Get the Facts on This Zero-Calorie Sweetener”
Oct. 3, 2020

Additionally, according to a study in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, monk fruit is also thought to offer anti-inflammatory benefits, which could potentially play a role in preventing cancer and diabetes. However, more research is needed to determine what amount of monk fruit you would need to consume to potentially reap these benefits.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

INSIDER (New York, NY: 8.76 million unique monthly visits)
“8 foods that boost your immune system and can help keep you healthy”
Sept. 30, 2020

For example, a 2016 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that green tea catechins can improve the response of t-cells, which are cells that attack viruses. Increased t-cells are associated with an improved immune response. A 2018 study published in the Journal of Immunology Research also found that polyphenols help the body signal when an immune response is needed.

More than five media outlets, including MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 5.20 million unique monthly visits)
“Indian scientists find method for early diagnosis of peptic ulcer-causing bacteria”
Oct. 4, 2020

Experiments by the team has shown direct evidence of unique isotope-specific water metabolism in the human body in response to the individual’s water intake habit. They have shown that different isotopes of exhaled water vapour are strongly linked with various gastric disorders during the process of human respiration, it said. This work… was recently published in the journal ‘Analytical Chemistry’ of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Men’s Health (New York, NY: 4.16 million unique monthly visits)
“How to Clean Your Mask for Better COVID-19 Protection”
Oct. 2, 2020

In random news, a new study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters found that the dry heat of an electric cooker (like an Instant Pot) can sanitize face masks. Researchers in this particular study cleaned N95 masks during a 50-minute cycle, but study co-author Thanh Nguyen, Ph.D., a professor of civil engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, says this method will likely work on cloth face masks, too.

Three additional media outlets, including MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

euronews (Lyon, France: 3.48 million unique monthly visits)
“Here’s a look inside a COVID-19 waste facility in Abu Dhabi”
Oct. 2, 2020

Mounting medical waste is one of the major causes impacting natural surroundings. This is in a large part due to the use of plastic-based personal protective equipment (PPE) according to the United Nations, which says the amount of medical waste has multiplied during the pandemic. The city of Wuhan produced 247 tonnes of medical waste from February to March, which was six times the normal rate according to [a study published by] the American Chemical Society.

Three additional media outlets, including MSN South Africa (Cape Town, South Africa: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Developing pharmaceutical compounds that fight deadly bacteria that are drug-resistant last resort”
Sept. 30, 2020

The researchers explained in their study, published in the latest issue of the Journal of Medicine Chemistry (Journal of Medicinal Chemistry), that their drug molecules successfully target VRE infection, and have the necessary properties to fight this type of bacteria in both the circulatory and gastrointestinal tract.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers develop single-use treatment for ear infections that doesn’t need refrigeration”
Sept. 30, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Outer ear infections, which affect millions of people each year, are typically caused by the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Repeatedly administering antibiotic drops, the standard treatment, can be a problem for some people, and the only single-use suspension currently available needs to be kept and handled cold. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering have developed a single-use treatment that doesn't require refrigeration.

More than 10 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Eat This, Not That! (Irvine, CA: 1.56 million unique monthly visits)
“50 Ways to Lose Weight Without Exercise”
Sept. 28, 2020

Here's another reason to skip the gym: not only do studies show your body burns more calories when you exercise outdoors compared to indoors, but an Environmental Science & Technology study recently found that you're also more likely to report a greater sense of pleasure, enthusiasm, and self-esteem and lower sense of depression, tension, and fatigue simply by walking in nature compared to on a dreary treadmill.

Two additional media outlets, including MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“New material senses neurotransmitters in the brain”
Oct. 2, 2020

A new glutamate-sensing material could lead to new insights into the workings of the human brain…. This pivotal discovery… was led by three scientists from Purdue University. Their fields of study are so disparate that without this project, they may never have collaborated. The results of their combined efforts—published in Applied Materials and Interfaces, a magazine of the American Chemical Society—could lead to breakthroughs in each of their disciplines.

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