ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

The Economist (London, England: 19.19 million unique monthly visits)
“New ways to pluck water from desert air”
Jan. 11, 2020

Even in inland deserts, though, moisture is often present in the air as water vapour. The problem is extracting this vapour effectively and cheaply…. Steven Suib and his colleagues, who have just reported their result in Environmental Science and Technology Letters….

MSN IN
(Ahmedabad, India: 10.03 million unique monthly visits)
“18 Super Dirty Spots at the Gym That Can Make You Sick”
Jan 11, 2020

Swimming is a low-impact cardio exercise many people prefer over sweating for an hour on a treadmill or a bike. Most pools are filled with disinfectants like chlorine to clean contaminants like sweat, skin lotion, and urine. But pool waters are still 2.4 times more likely to contain gene-altering agents than tap water, according to a study published in the Environmental Science & Technology journal.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Prokerala.com (Kerala, India: 2.93 million unique monthly visits)
“Insulin to improve treatment for diabetes patients developed”
Jan. 10, 2020

In a promising discovery that could improve the clinical delivery of insulin for people living with diabetes, researchers have developed a non-fibrillating form of human insulin…. The study, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, said that fibrils can arise when insulin compounds aggregate together forming clumps.

More than 20 media outlets, including webindia123.com (Cochin, India: 1.19 million unique monthly visits) and Outlook India.com (Mumbai, India: 429,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

HGTV (Knoxville, TN: 2.62 million unique monthly visits)
“20 Surprising Items You Can’t Recycle Curbside”
Jan. 7, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

According to [a paper published by] the American Chemical Society, 93 percent of thermal receipts — that is, the slick kind printed with a heat process instead of traditional ink — contain Bisphenol A (BPA), an endocrine disruptor that can pose serious health risks.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Growing influenza vaccines inside chicken eggs can make them less effective, say some experts”
Jan. 8, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Flu season is underway in the Northern Hemisphere, sickening millions of people and in rare cases, causing hospitalization or death. The best prevention is a flu shot, but it's not unusual for these vaccines to be less effective than intended. Some researchers suspect that the common practice of producing vaccines in chicken eggs could be partially to blame, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Single-particle method helps determine isoelectric point of viruses”
Jan. 8, 2020

Viruses are not easy to characterize. But we need to because being able to quickly predict the surface charge of viruses opens up new possibilities for vaccine purification and making gene therapy treatments for eye diseases and muscular dystrophy…. Her latest paper, published in Langmuir, focuses on using surface charge to determine a virus' isoelectric point, a common way to characterize viruses.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists find way to combine two main coding languages into single ‘bilingual’ molecule”
Jan. 9, 2020

The nucleic acids of DNA encode genetic information, while the amino acids of proteins contain the code to turn that information into structures and functions. Together, they provide the two fundamental codes underlying all of life. Now scientists have found a way to combine these two main coding languages into a single "bilingual" molecule. The Journal of the American Chemical Society published the work by chemists at Emory University.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 1.51 million unique monthly visits)
“Rattlesnakes Use Their Unique Scales To Collect Drinking Water In The Desert”
Jan. 9, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

“Regardless of the physical state of the collected water, these snakes are reported to flatten (dorsoventral flattening) their bodies considerably and at times form a tight coil for rain harvesting, presumably to enhance the collection of rain droplets,” write the authors in the journal ACS Omega.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Times of Israel (Jerusalem, Israel: 1.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Israeli researchers find way to create and control elusive terahertz waves”
Jan. 9, 2020

A group of researchers at Tel Aviv University say they have developed a new way to produce and control terahertz waves, an elusive type of electromagnetic wave, using nanometric materials…. The results were recently published in both Nature Communications and Nano Letters

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Juraforum.de (Hanover, Germany: 1.12 million unique monthly visits)
“Watch chemical reactions in real time”
Jan. 8, 2020

The researchers at the joint laboratory of EPFL and Empa in Sion have developed a reactor system and an analysis method with which they can observe the production of synthetic natural gas from carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen (H2) in real time for the first time…. Imaging catalysis: Operando investigation of the CO2 hydrogenation reaction dynamics by means of infrared thermography; ACS Catalysis

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

New Atlas (Melbourne, Australia: 1.04 million unique monthly visits)
“Liquid metal shredder kills superbugs without drugs”
Jan. 12, 2020

One of humanity’s biggest threats is also the smallest – bacteria. With antibiotic resistance on the rise, we may be heading towards a future where even minor infections become lethal again. But now, researchers at RMIT in Australia have found a new method for killing these superbugs that they can’t resist – magnetic nanoparticles that physically tear them to shreds…. The research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

The List (Cincinnati, OH: 991,000 unique monthly visits)
“When you drink coffee every day, this is what happens”
Jan. 8, 2020
Publicized in: ACS national meeting release

To top it all off, no other foods provide the antioxidant benefits that coffee does, according to a study [published] by the American Chemical Society. No wonder that's where Americans overwhelmingly get their daily dose of these important substances. This certainly makes a strong case for choosing to drink coffee every day.

Mercola.com (Hoffman Estates, IL: 955,000 unique monthly visits)
“Experts Fear Flame Retardants Are Triggering a Health Crisis”
Jan. 8, 2020

In a meta-analysis study published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, 5 researchers posed the question of whether the use of organophosphate ester flame retardants (OPFRs), the replacement for PBDEs, was a better choice. They compared OPFRs with PBDEs across a range of properties with regard to the interaction in the environment and evidence of levels measured indoors, among the general population and evidence of adverse health effects.

TreeHugger (New York, NY: 659,000 unique monthly visits)
“Which of these mushrooms could kill you?”
Jan. 7, 2020
Publicized in: ACS video release

Can you tell the difference between safe mushrooms and poisonous ones? ... To help you along with that mission, we have a video produced by American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios that tests viewers on their identification skills. Watch below and learn the difference between tasty and fatal!

marketscreener.com (Annecy, France: 528,000 unique monthly visits)
“Greenlane: Rice engineers find a way to turn water pollution into valuable chemicals”
Jan. 7, 2020

Rice University researchers have identified a simpler way to rid water of cancer-causing pollutants and turn them into valuable chemicals…. The study, published in the journal ACS Catalysis, challenges the idea that only palladium-based catalysts are effective for nitrite reduction and expands the frontiers of the reduction process.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

IGN.com (San Francisco, CA: 43.56 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists Can Now Make Synthetic Spider Web Silk”
Dec. 25, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting release

“We can now use bacteria to produce something as good as nature,” says synthetic biologist Fuzhong Zhang of Washington University in St. Louis during an annual meeting for the American Chemical Society. Spider silk is a unique material that is extremely lightweight yet very, very strong. A single strand of dragline silk—which is what spiders suspend themselves from their web with—is roughly five times as strong as steel at the same diameter.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 29.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Testing drivers for cannabis is hard. Here’s why”
Jan. 2, 2019

The handheld device is designed to measure the electrical resistance of semiconductor-enriched carbon nanotubes that are 100,000 times smaller than a human hair and are good at conducting electricity. THC and other compounds bind to the surface and change the electrical acoustics…. The Pitt crew's findings were published in the American Chemical Society's ACS Sensors journal in July.

More than 35 media outlets, including CNN International (Atlanta, GA: 22.24 million unique monthly visits), KOVR-TV (West Sacramento, CA: 16.78 million unique monthly visits) and Good Day Sacramento (West Sacramento, CA: 12.83 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.11 million unique monthly visits)
“This thin film is a promising addition to the anti-bacterial toolbox”
Dec. 24, 2019

With the microbial infections becoming smarter at developing antibiotic resistance, we need new and innovative ways to fight back. And that’s exactly what researchers at McMaster University (Canada) have come up with. They have developed a transparent plastic film that has the ability to repel all kinds of microbes, including the antibiotic-resistant superbugs…. Complete research was published in ACS Nano.

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.54 million unique monthly visits)
“You really CAN eat yourself younger: Nutritionist DR JOSH AXE explains how adding collagen to your diet can smooth wrinkles, beat cellulite and give you lustrous hair”
Jan. 5, 2019

Cinnamon. Who doesn't love cinnamon? This delicious spice's active component, cinnamaldehyde, actually promotes collagen synthesis within skin fibroblasts (the cells that play a critical role in tissue repair), according to research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 23.04 million unique monthly visits)
“Meat Loaf: Here Are His Claims About Greta Thunberg And Climate Change”
Jan. 5, 2020

… Climate-warming trends over the past century are extremely likely due to human activities.” The web site also includes statements from multiple scientific organizations, such as the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Medical Association, the American Meteorological Society, and the American Physical Society, all agreeing with this assertion.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Daily Kos (Washington, D.C.: 19.12 million unique monthly visits)
“WOW2: Late December’s Women Trailblazers and Events in Our History – 2019”
Dec. 28, 2019

Anna J. Harrison born, American organic chemist, first woman president of the American Chemical Society; chemistry professor (Mount Holyoke College 1945-89); noted for research on ultraviolet spectroscopy. She helped increase public understanding of science and technology, and was active supporter of women in science.

Breitbart (Los Angeles, CA: 19.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Desalination discharge a boon to fish along the coast of Australia”
Dec. 19, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Though new desalination plants continue to be constructed, few studies have closely examined the effects of plant discharge on marine life. Kelaher and his colleagues tracked biodiversity near the Sydney plant’s discharge for seven years, including a period when the plant ceased operations. The research team reported their results Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Guardian (London, England: 14.62 million unique monthly visits)
“New form of uranium found that could affect nuclear waste disposal plans”
Dec. 20, 2019

Many governments are planning to dispose of radioactive waste by burying it deep underground. However, new research has found that in such storage conditions a new chemical form of uranium can temporarily occur, while small amounts of uranium are released into solution. If uranium is in solution, it could make its way into groundwater…. published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

VICE (Brooklyn, NY: 14.61 million unique monthly visits)
“Influencers Unknowingly Promoted Fake Drink Made With Cyanide”
Dec. 20, 2019

Earlier this week, three well-known reality-stars-turned-Instagram celebrities and their agents took part in a segment on Blindboy, and they were each asked to promote a diet drink called Cyanora. The drink does not exist, mostly because its ingredient list includes the extremely poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide. (The American Chemical Society says that hydrogen cyanide was used in Nazi-run extermination camps, and has also been used to execute death row inmates in some U.S. states.)

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Daily Express (London, England: 13.55 million unique monthly visits)
“High blood pressure: Eating this type of soup could lower your reading”
Jan. 6, 2020

One mealtime staple that has been shown to lower a high blood pressure reading is chicken soup. Research published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry attributed the blood-pressure lowering benefits to a chemical found in the soup known as ACE inhibitor.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 12.55 million unique monthly visits)
“How a lesson learned from lotus flowers could give us self-cleaning solar panels”
Dec. 16, 2019

This work (which was published in the American Chemical Society journal Langmuir) therefore focused more on the ability of these self-cleaning surfaces to remove dust particles. The forces that attach and detach particles from surfaces during self-cleaning, and the effect of nanotextures on these forces, are far less fully understood.

Popular Mechanics (Center Valley, PA: 11.85 million unique monthly visits)
“Airplane Poop Is Dangerous”
Dec. 26, 2019

Scientists tested airplane sewage from five different German airports and discovered it contained a significantly higher abundance and diversity of antibiotic-resistant microbes, compared to sewage tested at a nearby wastewater plant and even nearby hospitals, according to research published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Contrasting water-wetting behaviour used for anti-counterfeiting measure”
Jan. 4, 2020

“The pattern which is highly water-loving allows water to get in thus allowing light to pass through without much scattering. This makes the pattern visible when it is wet,” explains Supriya Das from IIT Guwahati and first author of a paper published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. “The rest of the region is highly water-repelling so there is trapped air that scatters light and hence remains opaque.”

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“IIT-G offers new tech to tap energy from water”
Dec. 30, 2019

A team of researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology-Guwahati (IIT-G) has developed materials that can produce energy from flowing or stagnant water in households…. Their findings were published in the journal, ACS Applied Nano Materials.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“A hybrid system to treat waste water, produce bio-diesel”
Dec. 23, 2019

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology, Hyderabad (IITH) are developing algal-bacterial hybrid systems that can reduce the cost of waste water treatment, in addition to providing practical routes to producing recyclable water and bio-diesel…. The results of this work have been published in the past couple of years in reputed peer-review journals such as Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

FOX Business Network (New York, NY: 10.81 million unique monthly visits)
“How to get rid of a hangover with these food and drink remedies”
Jan. 1, 2020

Avocados, the popular green fruit spread over toast contains compounds that are said to help protect against liver damage, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The ubiquitous fruit seen around brunch menus is also loaded with potassium, which is depleted during heavy drinking.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Fars News Agency (Tehran, Iran: 10.64 million unique monthly visits)
“Deadly ‘Superbugs’ Destroyed by Molecular Drills”
Dec. 17, 2019

Researchers at Rice University, Texas A&M University, Biola University and Durham (U.K.) University showed that motorized molecules developed in the Rice lab of chemist James Tour are effective at killing antibiotic-resistant microbes within minutes…. The researchers reported their results in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

More than 10 media outlets, including AniNews.in (New Delhi, India: 1.56 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Firstpost (Mumbai, India: 7.71 million unique monthly visits)
“Novel smart skin changes colour when it comes in contact with heat, can help in camouflage”
Dec. 30, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

After conducting research on smart skins of animals like chameleons, researchers develop a flexible smart skin that changes its colour when comes in contact with sunlight and heat. The study was published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets, including Deccan Chronicle (Secunderabad, India: 3.00 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo! India (Bangalore, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Firstpost (Mumbai, India: 7.71 million unique monthly visits)
“Noida scientists develop novel ‘invisible ink’ to detect fake currency”
Dec. 30, 2019

Scientists at Shiv Nadar University here have developed a low-cost security ink that may help detect counterfeit currency, and could be employed in official documents and medical diagnosis. The new ink, described in the peer-reviewed Journal of Physical Chemistry C, offers improved security features compared to existing inks that are multi-component and, therefore, more expensive, the researchers said.

More than five media outlets, including Financial Express (New Delhi, India: 3.01 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Atlantic
(Washington, D.C.: 6.96 million unique monthly visits)
“What Happens to Meat When You Freeze It for 35,000 Years”
Dec. 24, 2019
Featuring an ACS Expert

The muscle of the frozen mammoths changes as well, like meat left in the freezer for too long. (In this case, many, many millennia too long.) The formation of ice crystals would pierce the muscle fibers of the meat, says Matt Hartings, a food chemist at American University. Frozen, the meat might still be reasonably solid and, well, meat-like. But once defrosted, he says, “it’ll be turned into a goo.”

AKIpress News Agency
(Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan: 5.73 million unique monthly visits)
“Food products decreasing stress naturally named”
Dec. 17, 2019

According to a study published in the Journal of Proteome Research, these dark delights are rich in antioxidants, which can help manage stress by lowering the number of stress hormones in the body. However, you need to confirm that the chocolate bar doesn’t contain an unnecessary amount of sugar.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

StyleCraze (Hyderabad, India: 5.24 million unique monthly visits)
“Foods You Should Be Eating Raw”
Dec. 27, 2019

[Broccoli] offers our body a seamless nutrition bundle with calcium, potassium, vitamin C, and it also has sulforaphane, a cancer fighting compound that also helps in lowering blood sugar levels, provides antioxidants to our body, and also improves the health of our heart. One of the studies found in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry showed that a person who ate raw broccoli was found to absorb more sulforaphane when compared to a person who consumed cooked broccoli.

EatingWell Magazine (Shelburne, VT: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“What Is Pomelo and How Can I Use It?”
Dec. 19, 2019

A 2019 study in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry also found that pomelo peel, which is used in China to treat cough, abdominal pain and indigestion, showed what the authors called "an anti-inflammatory effect … which might provide a novel nutritional strategy for inflammatory diseases."

EatingWell Magazine (Shelburne, VT: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“12 Superfoods to Help You Eat Healthy for $1 or Less”
Dec. 20, 2019

A 1-ounce serving (23 nuts, 162 calories) has 37 percent of your daily value for vitamin E-a nutrient many Americans fall short on. Almonds also deliver some calcium, fiber and folate. Not only that, a serving of almonds has as many flavonoids as a cup of green tea, according to a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

EatingWell Magazine
(Shelburne, VT: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“30 Healthy Low-Carb Foods to Eat”
Dec. 21, 2019

An easily portable serving of protein, one cheese stick contains just 80 calories for 6 grams of protein and less than 1 gram of carbohydrate. Plus, a small recent study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that eating cheese may produce good bacteria that keep your gut healthy.

CBC News Network
(Toronto, Canada: 3.80 million unique monthly visits)
“How liquid salt could be the answer to oilsands tailings ponds”
Dec. 28, 2019

They believe the ionic liquid process could be used by in-situ projects as well. The team, which received funding from the Canada Excellence Research Chairs Program, has obtained a patent and the work was recently published by the American Chemical Society.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Rat study hints at the benefits of psychedelic micro-dosing”
Dec. 31, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

They gave male and female rats very small doses of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), the principal psychoactive component in the hallucinogenic brew ayahuasca. Their results suggest DMT microdosing can promote neural plasticity in key brain circuits related to anxiety and depression…. The study was published in March in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Long-lasting household chemicals could age the body from the inside out”
Dec. 25, 2019

A May paper published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology showed that two major chemicals, perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) are linked to cellular aging. These long-lasting chemicals, their research suggests, are linked to shorter telomeres (protective caps on the edges of chromosomes) and have some strange effects on DNA.

Men’s Health
(New York, NY: 3.36 million unique monthly visits)
“Your Sweat Can Give Away How Drunk You Are”
Jan. 4, 2020

Jan Halámek, an assistant professor of chemistry at the University at Albany, works as a forensic chemist and has a fully dedicated lab at the college. There, he and his students have uncovered something pretty wild: Your perspiration can totally give you away if you've been pulled over for drunk driving. The research was published last month in the scientific journal Analytical Chemistry.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Medindia.com
(Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits)
“New Paper-based Test to Diagnose Lyme Disease Developed”
Dec. 20, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

A new blood test to quickly and sensitively diagnose Lyme disease at early stages has been developed by researchers. The findings of the study have been reported in ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science (Washington, D.C.: 3.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Light-hearted baseballs could explain surge in homers”
Jan. 3, 2020

Subtle changes in the hearts of baseballs might help explain why the number of home runs has surged in Major League Baseball since June 2015, Chemical & Engineering News reports. Using tools including scanning electron microscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, researchers reported in ACS Omega in late 2019 that the cores of balls used in 2016 and 2017 were less dense than those in balls used from 2014 to June 2015.

NaturalNews.com (Tucson, AZ: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Naturally occurring plant carbohydrate in cranberries could help prevent UTI”
Dec. 31, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In a study published in the Journal of Natural Products, researchers from The University of Mississippi and the University of Georgia explored this beneficial property of cranberries and attempted to determine its source. Using pigs as test subjects, they discovered that a relatively unknown plant carbohydrate present in cranberries is responsible for their anti-adhesive effects, which can effectively stop the recurrence of UTI.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

NaturalNews.com (Tucson, AZ: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Microbe found in Ethiopian volcano’s strongly acidic saltwater hints microorganisms could have survived in similar conditions on Early Mars”
Dec. 28, 2019

According to a study published in ACS Earth and Space Chemistry, the polyextreme hydrothermal systems of the Dallol hydrothermal field is so different from other environments, that should evidence of life be found in its waters, it would make Dallol “a site of unique astrobiological significance,” noting that such a discovery may offer a better understanding of the limits of life-supporting habitats on Earth and other Earth-like planets.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“A Way Found to Use Perovskite to Make Fertilizer & Hydrogen”
Dec. 19, 2019

To address these issues, in a recent study, reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, carried out at Tokyo Tech, a group of researchers led by Prof. Masaaki Kitano devised a novel method for the low-temperature synthesis of one of such oxygen-substituted perovskites with the chemical name BaCeO3?xNyHz and tested its performance as a catalyst to produce ammonia.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Mealworms Can Safely Consume Toxic Additive-Containing Plastic Says Researchers”
Dec. 30, 2019

Tiny mealworms may hold part of the solution to our giant plastics problem. Not only are they able to consume various forms of plastic, as previous Stanford research has shown, they can eat Styrofoam containing a common toxic chemical additive and still be safely used as protein-rich feedstock for other animals, according to a new Stanford study published in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 35 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), Biglobe (Tokyo, Japan: 11.56 million unique monthly visits) and Excite Japan (Tokyo, Japan: 10.57 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Proof of a Decades-Old Theory Hides in the Thinnest of Materials”
Dec. 21, 2019

By layering two-dimensional (2D) materials, scientists as The University of Manchester and Cornell University have confirmed electrochemical phenomena based on theory established in the 1950s…. Published in ACS Nano, a team of researchers based in the Department of Chemistry and the National Graphene Institute, have been able to fabricate a device with a diameter as small as 5 micrometres.

Five additional media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Army Releases Top 10 List Of Coolest Science, Technology Advances”
Dec. 20, 2019

Army and academic researchers are looking at how to monitor Soldier health and performance in real-time, by developing unique biorecognition receptors. These future bioreceptors are small, simple to produce, inexpensive, and robust to environmental stresses…. Chemical Reviews published this research (see Related Links below).

More than 10 media outlets, including DVIDS (Atlanta, GA: 1.32 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Listverse (Wellington, New Zealand: 3.11 million unique monthly visits”
“10 Common Words We Almost Spelled Differently”
Dec. 21, 2019

Aluminum finally won in the US as the metal got more common. The American Chemical Society (ACS) sealed its fate when it accepted it as the official spelling in 1925. The American Chemical Society did that because most Americans were using it anyway but it finalized every future argument about the correct spelling.

Anchorage Daily News (Anchorage, AK: 2.12 million unique monthly visits)
“Ranked-choice voting initiative favors no one but voters”
Dec. 28, 2019

The state of Maine uses ranked-choice voting, and five states — all typically Republican-favoring — use the system for military and overseas voters in runoffs: Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and South Carolina. Robert’s Rules of Order recommends preferential voting, and many private organizations use it for their elections, including the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, the American Chemical Society, and the Society of Actuaries.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

China.org.cn (Beijing, China: 2.09 million unique monthly visits)
“New polymer material may help batteries become self-healing, recyclable: study”
Dec. 24, 2019

Engineers at the University of Illinois (UI) have developed a solid polymer-based electrolyte in batteries that can self-heal after damage, and the material can also be recycled without the use of harsh chemicals or high temperatures…. The new study has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 25 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), TechNews tw (Taipei, Taiwan: 6.59 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

China.org.cn (Beijing, China: 2.09 million unique monthly visits)
“Paper industry waste liquor can be reused in green technology: study”
Dec. 17, 2019

Chinese researchers have disclosed that the components of the paper industry's waste liquor can be applied in green technology, according to research published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. The treatment of spent cooking liquor, or waste liquor, is critical for the clean production of pulp in the paper industry.

More than five media outlets, including Xinhuanet (Beijing, China: 711,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

iDiva (Mumbai, India: 1.81 million unique monthly visits)
“A Recap Of 2019, Health News That Made Us Sit Up and Take Notice”
Dec. 30, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

So, in 2019, what were we talking about when we spoke about health?... A study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology says it's possible that humans may be consuming anywhere from 39,000 to 52,000 microplastic particles a year.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Artificial sweetener derivatives show improved activity against tumor-associated enzymes”
Dec. 19, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Saccharin received a bad rap after studies in the 1970s linked consumption of large amounts of the artificial sweetener to bladder cancer in laboratory rats…. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry have made artificial sweetener derivatives that show improved activity against two tumor-associated enzymes.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Modern wheat does not impair gastrointestinal health in mice compared with heirloom variety”
Dec. 18, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Most have not been diagnosed with a wheat-related medical condition, yet they seem to feel better when they don't eat gluten-containing foods. A possible explanation is that modern varieties of wheat are responsible. But now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have shown that a popular modern variety does not impair gastrointestinal health in mice compared with heirloom wheat.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Simple, new test can detect dangerous levels of fluoride in drinking water”
Dec. 16, 2019

Costing just pennies to make, the system only needs a drip and a flick: Drip a tiny water droplet into a prepared test tube, flick the tube once to mix it and wait. If the water turns yellow, then an excessive amount of fluoride -- exceeding the EPA's most stringent regulatory standards -- is present…. The research was published online last week (Dec. 13) in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“ACS’ special issue highlights top research trends and key developments in chemistry”
Dec. 19, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science. As 2019 draws to a close, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting the year's biggest stories in chemistry, top research trends and important developments in a special issue.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Smart, nature-inspired system provides continuous information on patient’s health”
Dec. 17, 2019

Researchers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and China's Xidian University present, in Chemical Reviews, a comprehensive review of smart systems that provide continuous information on a subject's health. These nature-inspired systems are based on advanced hybrid sensing, artificial intelligence, and cloud computing.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists identify molecules capable of inhibiting DNA methylation, effectively killing malaria parasites”
Dec. 31, 2019

Scientists at the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS decided to investigate the epigenetic mechanisms behind this plasticity, in particular DNA methylation. They identified molecules capable of inhibiting DNA methylation and effectively killing even the most resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites. The results of their research were published on November 27, 2019 in the journal ACS Central Science.

Five additional media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Promega and MilliporeSigma sign license agreement to expand the potential of CRISPR”
Jan. 2, 2020

A paper in the journal ACS Chemical Biology explains how the Promega HiBiT Protein Tagging System can be combined with CRISPR-Cas9-mediated gene editing to tag endogenous proteins and simplify their study under natural expression conditions. Another paper also in ACS Chemical Biology explains a strategy for monitoring PROTAC-mediated degradation of endogenously tagged HiBiT-BET family members in live cells.

More than five media outlets, including Global Banking & Finance Review (London, England: 552,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Benzinga (Detroit, MI: 1.54 million unique monthly visits)
“3D Printers and Potential Indoor Air Quality Concerns Examined in New Study”
Dec. 27, 2019

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology published a study in a September issue of the journal, Environmental Science & Technology. The study examined the impact 3D printers can have on indoor air quality (IAQ) and respiratory health.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Engineering360 (Albany, NY: 1.36 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers develop self-healing sensor sweatband”
Dec. 19, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Researchers from South Korea’s Kangwon National University have developed a self-healing sweat sensor device for monitoring health. The sweatband can measure the presence of electrolytes in the wearer’s sweat and can heal itself in the event it is damaged during use. The study appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Healthy Holistic Living (Tampa, FL: 1.21 million unique monthly visits)
“Wine Kills Germs That Cause Sore Throats And Dental Plaque, Says Awesome Study”
Dec. 18, 2019

You’ve probably heard about the health benefits of wine and internally rolled your eyes a bit. Sure, wine goes great with dinner, but it can’t actually make you healthier, right? Well, what you might not know is that a glass of cabernet can help you fight off your next sore throat. A 2007 study published in The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explored wine’s ability to fight off oral streptococci and Streptococcus pyogenes. These bacteria cause dental plaque and sore throats, respectively.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Prfree-org (Pune, India: 1.15 million unique monthly visits)
“2-D Materials Market Size, Trend, Market Price, Industry Growth, Leading Players And Region – Forecast To 2027”
Jan. 2, 2020

Graphene-based wearable textile close to commercialisation. ACS Nano says the method could allow the Graphene textiles to be produced at rates 150 metres per minute.

Ancient Origins (Dublin, Ireland: 935,000 unique monthly visits)
“Ancient Egyptian Makeup: Beauty and Protection with Poison”
Dec. 24, 2019

The knowledge of ancient Egyptians and their salves, ointments and makeup were considered so advanced that we got our word for chemistry from them. Says a story on the American Chemical Society website about the French researchers’ work…

Interesting Engineering (San Francisco, CA: 927,000 unique monthly visits)
“Scientists Create Flexible Plastic Wrap That Repels All Forms of Bacteria”
Dec. 18, 2019

Taking their inspiration from nature itself, the scientists took the water-repellent lotus leaf as an example for their plastic wrap. Their surface works through a mixture of nano-scale surface engineering and chemistry…. Their findings were published in the journal ACS Nano on December 13.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

EIN News (Washington, D.C.: 657,000 unique monthly visits)
“Iranian Researchers Treat Liver Lesions Using Stem Cells”
Dec. 18, 2019

The results of the study, published in the international journal “ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces” showed that the use of polymer-encapsulated secretory vesicles improves the hepatic status of the animal compared to the conventional method. Using this new method improved the anti-fibrotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, and liver regeneration effect by secretory vesicles of mesenchymal stem cells by 40 to 50%.

STAT (Boston, MA: 580,000 unique monthly visits)
“We wish we’d written that: STAT staffers share their favorite stories of 2019”
Dec. 24, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The redemption of James Wilson, gene therapy pioneer
By Ryan Cross, Chemical & Engineering News
When a young man in Wilson’s clinical trial of a gene therapy died, in 1999, it basically shut down the field for a decade — and made Wilson a pariah. C&EN’s profile shows us not only how the tragedy made Wilson reassess his approach to science but also how it turned him into one of gene therapy’s most outspoken critics…

Global Banking & Finance Review (London, England: 552,000 unique monthly visits)
“Konkuk University Research Team Develops a New Alcoholic Fermentation Method”
Dec. 19, 2019

Konkuk University team (Principal Investigator: Prof. Byung Uk Lee) succeeded in electrospraying viable bacterial cells in 2008 (Journal of Aerosol Science, European Aerosol Assembly) and developed an electrospray cell patterning method at cellular resolution using the vibrational electrical field in 2010 and 2015 (Analytical Chemistry, Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology).

One additional media outlet covered the story.

CleanTechnica (Ventura, CA: 541,000 unique monthly visits)
“'Zombie' Solar Energy Storage System From 1980s Revived By Science”
Jan. 5, 2020

Norbornadiene-quadricyclane has been studied for solar energy storage since at least 1983, when the American Chemical Society published a paper aptly titled, “Norbornadiene-quadricyclane system in the photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy” in the journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Process Design and Development.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits)
“Arctic sea spray aerosols mimic those in California”
Dec. 23, 2019

The Arctic is warming faster than any other place on Earth, leading to the formation of sea spray aerosols similar to what researchers see in California appearing during the Arctic winter, according to a new study…. The study appears in American Chemical Society [ACS] Central Science. The National Science Foundation funded the work.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 29.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists develop superbug-resistant, self-cleaning plastic wrap”
Dec. 13, 2019

"We developed the wrap to address the major threat that is posed by multi-drug resistant bacteria," Leyla Soleymani, an engineering physicist who co-led the research, published Friday in the journal ACS Nano, told CNN. "Given the limited treatment options for these bugs, it is key to reduce their spread from one person to another," she added.

More than 215 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, England: 23.54 million unique monthly visits), Sky News (Isleworth, England: 18.93 million unique monthly visits), Tasnimnews (Tehran, Iran: 10.18 million unique monthly visits) and Irish Independent (Dublin, Ireland: 10.00 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Salon (New York, NY: 23.93 million unique monthly visits)
“Weed vapes may not be safe from vaping-linked health problems”
Dec. 10, 2019

A recent study published in the September issue of academic journal ACS Omega, titled “Aerosol Gas-Phase Components from Cannabis E-Cigarettes and Dabbing: Mechanistic Insight and Quantitative Risk Analysis,” is raising questions about what happens when additives are put into cannabis vaping products.

More than five media outlets, including CBC News Network (Toronto, Canada: 3.80 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.54 million unique monthly visits)
“Frostbite breakthrough as scientists create a GEL that can cure patients of serious injuries caused by freezing temperatures”
Dec. 12, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Frostbite injuries could be cured by using a new spray-on medicine, according to scientists. The condition is caused by fluid inside the body freezing. It can lead to infections, gangrene and even death, if not treated quickly…. The findings were published in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering by the American Chemical Society.

More than 25 media outlets, including DonaminHaber.com (Istanbul, Turkey: 16.46 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

AOL.com (New York, NY: 23.01 million unique monthly visits)
“Can drinking coffee actually reduce dementia risk?”
Dec. 12, 2019

A 2015 study in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Natural Products found that two ingredients in coffee, cafestol and caffeic acid, “increased insulin secretion when glucose was added.” The researchers also found that cafestol in particular “increased glucose uptake in muscle cells, matching the levels of a currently prescribed antidiabetic drug.”

More than 10 media outlets, including Yahoo! Lifestyle (New York, NY: 8.84 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NPR (Washington, D.C.: 21.97 million unique monthly visits)
“Aluminum’s Strange Journey From Precious Metal To Beer Can”
Dec. 10, 2019

America went with Davy's "aluminum." It was listed as the preferred spelling in The Century Dictionary (published in New York) in 1889 and as the only spelling in the Webster Unabridged Dictionary of 1913. The American Chemical Society initially sided with the scientific community and called it "aluminium." But by 1925, with the lightweight metal's uses on the rise in the U.S., the society relented and switched to "aluminum."

India.com (Mumbai, India: 16.43 million unique monthly visits)
“Weight Loss: Consume Ginger Tea to Shed Those Extra Kilos”
Dec. 13, 2019

Inflammation is one of the causes behind weight gain and ginger tea can help you get rid of it. Having a poor diet, various harmful chemicals in the body and germ cause inflammation and harm your body. The anti-inflammatory properties of ginger help in healing inflammation. This is what a study published in the Journal of Natural Products states.

Popular Mechanics (New York, NY: 11.85 million unique monthly visits)
“Your Sweat Can Give Away How Drunk You Are”
Dec. 12, 2019

Jan Halámek, an assistant professor of chemistry at the University at Albany, works as a forensic chemist and has a fully dedicated lab at the college. There, he and his students have uncovered something pretty wild: Your perspiration can totally give you away if you've been pulled over for drunk driving. The research was published last month in the scientific journal Analytical Chemistry.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Live Science (New York, NY: 11.85 million unique monthly visits)
“New Anti-Aging Clinical Trial Begins. For $1 Million, You Can Be a Participant.”
Dec. 11, 2019

The Libella therapy aims to help cells rebuild telomeres by activating a gene in their DNA that would normally be switched "off." The gene, called TERT, contains instructions to build a protein called "telomerase," an enzyme that adds molecules to the end of telomeres and prevents the structures from shortening during cell replication, according to a 2010 report in the journal Biochemistry.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Jackfruit in your chocolate”
Dec. 13, 2019

The jackfruit is having its moment this year. After being widely lauded as a vegan alternative to meat, the vegetable- fruit has suddenly found a new band of followers: chocolatiers. It all started when a recent study published in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry mentioned that vacuum-fried and powdered jackfruit seeds emanate aromas that mirror the fragrance of ground cocoa.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Tackling drug-resistant A. baumannii”
Dec. 14, 2019

“One dose of the molecule was able to achieve 65% biofilm disruption when the concentration used was 64 microgram per ml. If we use the molecule repeatedly then it can completely disrupt the biofilm,” says Swagatam Barman from JNCASR, the first author of a paper published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

The Economic Times (Gurgaon, India: 9.14 million unique monthly visits)
“INNOVATION: Researchers develop technique to remove 98 per cent of solar panels dust”
Dec. 12, 2019

This new technique removes 98 per cent of dust particles. In a new study published in the journal ACS Langmuir the researchers confirmed that modifying the surface properties of solar panels may greatly reduce the amount of dust remaining on the surface, and significantly increase the potential of solar energy harvesting applications in the desert.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“‘Soft sensors’ are about to make the human body more online than ever”
Dec. 11, 2019

A team from Imperial College London announced Tuesday that they had made a breakthrough in the quest to create force-sensitive sensors in stretchy and squeezy form factors. The findings were published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“This foam can absorb CO2 from the atmosphere”
Dec. 11, 2019

In a new study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, researchers from Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology and Stockholm University explain how a “bio-based hybrid foam” can be used to capture the CO2. This new material was made by combining gelatin and cellulose with zeolites, minerals known for their absorbent properties.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Simplemost (Cincinnati, OH: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“This Chicken Pot Pie Bubble-Up Casserole Is The Perfect Comfort Food For Chilly Winter Nights”
Dec. 13, 2019

Kristin simplifies this recipe for busy cooks even further by subbing frozen veggies for fresh (don’t worry, frozen vegetables have the same nutrient profile as fresh vegetables, according to research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry).

Reader’s Digest (White Plains, NY: 3.51 million unique monthly visits)
“Is Using Titanium Dioxide in Food Safe?”
Dec. 12, 2019
Featuring an: ACS Expert

In fact, the titanium dioxide mostly got its cancer-causing reputation because it’s in the form of tiny particles that can be inhaled into the lungs—not because of a response to the chemical itself, says Hans Plugge, senior toxicologist with 3E Company and American Chemical Society expert. “It irritates the lung lining,” he says. “Eventually it causes enough injury that it causes a cancer-like response.”

Reader’s Digest (White Plains, NY: 3.51 million unique monthly visits)
“10 Foods That May Help Lower Your Breast Cancer Risk”
Dec. 13, 2019

Chinese researchers reviewed 21 studies and found that people with the highest intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 is in this category) from fish had a 14 percent reduction in breast cancer risk compared to those with the lowest intake. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, omega-3 fatty acids may also decrease breast density in obese postmenopausal women, according to a 2019 study in the Journal of Proteome Research.

ESPN (Bristol, CT: 3.34 million unique monthly visits)
“These researchers think poop could unlock athletic supremacy. Are they right?”
Dec. 13, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting release

And in August 2017, Scheiman presented his first study of marathon runners, in which he identified a bacteria whose high numbers seemed to correlate with athletic exertion, at the annual conference of the American Chemical Society. So far, the field hasn't arrived at any one, concrete conclusion.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

NaturalNews.com (Tucson, AZ: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Improve your mood naturally by eating more “stress-free foods” and taking brain-health boosting supplements”
Dec. 13, 2019

According to a study published in the Journal of Proteome Research, these dark delights are rich in antioxidants, which can help manage stress by lowering the number of stress hormones in the body. However, you need to confirm that the chocolate bar doesn’t contain an unnecessary amount of sugar.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Hindu Business Line (Chennai, India: 3.01 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists find new clues to treat Huntington’s disease”
Dec. 10, 2019

Scientists across the world have been working to find a cure for it. Some leads have been found, and efforts are underway to develop them into drugs. Researchers involved in the present study had themselves found two years ago that a naturally available molecule called Myricetin could help in arresting the progress of the disease and published a report on their work in the journal ACS Chemical Biology.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Molecular drills target and destroy deadly superbugs”
Dec. 12, 2019

Molecular drills have gained the ability to target and destroy deadly bacteria that have evolved resistance to nearly all antibiotics. In some cases, the drills make the antibiotics effective once again…. The researchers reported their results in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CleanTechnica (New York, NY: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“COP25 Got You Down? “Impossible” Solar Cells To The Rescue!”
Dec. 14, 2019

For all the particulars, check out the team’s article newly published in the journal ACS Applied Energy Materials under the title, “Growth of AlGaAs, AlInP, and AlGaInP by Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy.” Shorter version: this is a relatively inexpensive pathway for fabricating the kind of ultra-efficient III-V solar cells that are currently available only for space applications because they are too expensive for the Earth-bound market.

Engineering360 (Albany, NY: 1.36 million unique monthly visits)
“New sensor can detect nerve toxins”
Dec. 10, 2019

Chemists from the University of Alberta have developed a paper-based sensor capable of detecting nerve toxins associated with chemical warfare…. The findings appear in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

DVIDS (Atlanta, GA: 1.32 million unique monthly visits)
“Micromotor nanotoxoid: A novel delivery vehicle for oral vaccines”
Dec. 13, 2019

Though tiny in stature, a nano-sized particle boasts a large surface area and can be manipulated to deliver drugs to a specific site in the body…. Dr. Liangfang Zhang and colleagues at the UCSD have developed this next-generation vaccine-delivery platform that works as intended in mice (a proof of concept). Earlier this year, Zhang and colleagues published an article on this DTRA CB-sponsored research in Nano Letters, a peer-reviewed journal.

India-West (San Leandro, CA: 692,000 unique monthly visits)
“Exposure to DDT May Explain High Rates of Diabetes in Indian Americans, Say UC Davis Researchers”
Dec. 11, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Indian Americans who may have been exposed to high levels of DDT are likely to be at greater risk for developing diabetes, concluded researchers at the University of California, Davis, in a study published Nov. 20 in the American Chemical Society’s journal Environmental Science & Technology.

TheFix.com (Brooklyn, NY: 684,000 unique monthly visits)
“Listening to ketamine”
Dec. 13, 2019

Ketamine is not the only compound that can induce rapid synaptic plasticity: Other psychedelics, such as ecstasy (MDMA), acid (LSD), and DMT also trigger similar structural changes in neurons and rapid antidepressant effects in rodents, researchers at the University of California at Davis recently found. The effects don’t hinge on getting high, the team reported in March in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

Qatar Tribune (Doha, Qatar: 675,000 unique monthly visits)
“QU students showcase graduation projects on environmental issues”
Dec. 12, 2019

The Department of Chemistry & Earth Sciences at the College of Arts & Sciences, Qatar University (QU), recently hosted Undergraduate Research Presentations for students, as well as an honouring ceremony for Qatar University American Chemical Society (QUACS) Student Chapter for their participation in events and community services.

EIN News (Washington, D.C.: 657,000 unique monthly visits)
“Green growth: Africa chooses between renewables and fossil fuels”
Dec. 10, 2019

But planned fossil fuel expansion also poses a risk to air quality. The mortality rate from air pollution caused by fossil fuels will rise each year to 48,000 avoidable deaths in 2030, a study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology in November estimated.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits)
“How to Make Ammonia with Cobalt and Crystals”
Dec. 11, 2019

Researchers manipulated a two-dimensional crystal—molybdenum disulfide—and turned it into a catalyst by removing atoms of sulfur from the lattice-like structure and replacing the exposed molybdenum with cobalt…. The research, from the Rice University Brown School of Engineering lab of materials scientist Jun Lou, appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits)
“8 Chemists Toast the Periodic Table’s 150th Birthday”
Dec. 12, 2019

As the American Chemical Society noted earlier this year, “Changes to the periodic table continue to this day and will likely keep surprising us in the future. As recently as 2016, scientists officially filled the four final gaps in period 7—elements 113, 115, 117, and 118.”

Production Note: We will not be issuing ACS in the News on December 24 and December 31, 2019 due to the Christmas and New Year holidays. ACS in the News will resume on January 7, 2020.

ACS Publications logo

ACS authors reach a worldwide audience.

Contact

Email ACSinthenews@acs.org to receive this information by email each week.