ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Drugs.com (Auckland, NZ: 26.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Mercury in traditional Tibetan medicine could be harmful"
September 17, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The high mercury (Hg) concentration contained in traditional Tibetan medicine (TTM) could be harmful to humans and contribute to the environmental Hg burden in Tibet, according to a study published in the Aug. 7 issue of Environmental Science & Technology.

Five media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits) and Doctors Lounge (U.S.: 769,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

CBS News (New York, NY: 26.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Why eye doctors say you should never sleep in contact lenses"
September 21, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Health experts are urging the estimated 45 million Americans who wear contact lenses to break a common but dangerous habit. … It's also important to consider how you dispose of lenses. Starr notes that many people with disposable lenses either flush them down the toilet or toss them in the sink. According to [research presented at a meeting of] the American Chemical Society, this adds about 6 to 10 tons of plastic to U.S. wastewater each year.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.2 million unique monthly visits)  
"The Global Air Quality Map: September 16, 2018 Snippets"
September 17, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

… A recent major study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology helped cement what has been clear to the team for a long time: to really understand local air quality, you need a lot of data and you need to analyze it very carefully. But once you do, an entire emergent picture unfolds itself, that tells a story we can no longer afford to put off.

Vox (San Francisco, CA: 15.9 million unique monthly visits)
"More than ever, our clothes are made of plastic. Just washing them can pollute the oceans."
September 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

It’s no secret that too many of the plastic products we use end up in the ocean. But you might not be aware of one major source of that pollution: our clothes. …  A paper in Environmental Science and Technology estimated that “a population of 100,000 people would produce approximately 1.02 kilograms of fibers each day.”

Four media outlets, including Put This On (Los Angeles, CA: 140,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Live Science (New York, NY: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)  
"Why Does OJ Taste Bad After You Brush Your Teeth?"
September 18, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

There's nothing like a fresh, tangy glass of orange juice to go with your morning oatmeal. But if you've just brushed your teeth, you may find that the beverage tastes … less than delicious. … According to [a Reactions video by] the American Chemical Society, SLS not only suppresses our sweetness receptors, but also wipes out our phospholipids — compounds that hinder our bitterness receptors. In effect, our taste buds suddenly taste a lot more of OJ's bitter taste than its sugary-sweet goodness.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Green tea compound helps siRNA slip inside cells"
September 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Drinking green tea has been linked to health benefits ranging from cardiovascular disease prevention to weight loss. Although many of these claims still need to be verified in the clinic, an antioxidant in green tea called epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) appears to have beneficial effects in cells and animals. Now, researchers have found a surprising use for EGCG: sneaking therapeutic RNAs into cells. They report their results in ACS Central Science.

More than 15 media outlets, including Business Standard (India: 8.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), The Pioneer (India: 266,000 unique monthly visits) and Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (New Rochelle, NY: 112,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"One year after Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico"
September 20, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

On September 20, 2017, Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico, wreaking destruction that still lingers. The Category 4 storm caused a humanitarian crisis that ultimately cost nearly 3,000 lives, and imperiled Puerto Rico's economy, universities and environmental health. Yet chemists there remained resilient and united in their resolve to recover from the devastating storm, according to this week's cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)  
"‘Hoppy’ beer without exploding bottles and too much alcohol"
September 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The forgotten art of "dry-hopping" beer to enhance flavor is back in vogue. But this practice sometimes has undesirable side effects, such as an unexpectedly high alcohol content and high pressures that could cause beer bottles to break. Now, research published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry explains the biochemical basis of these unintended consequences, which could help brewers create "hoppy" beverages without the quality-control and safety issues.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits) and Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Men's Journal (New York, NY: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)  
"Big Balding Breakthrough: This New Wearable Regrows Hair on Mice"
September 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Some guys embrace baldness like a badge of honor. In fact, for guys like The Rock, Jason Statham, and Vin Diesel, their hairless heads are a hallmark of their personas. But for some guys, balding is just plain dreadful. … Well, new research, published in ACS Nano, may provide some comfort. Researchers believe they can regrow hair with a photostimulator.

Eight media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 3.2 million unique monthly visits) and The Guardian Nigeria (Nigeria: 446,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Engineering 360 (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)  
"New Solar Clean Water Generator Design Inspired by Origami Technique"
September 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Research [published by] the American Chemical Society developed a new solar steam generator that is a huge step towards globally available clean drinking water. Access to clean drinking water is scarce in many areas of the world and researchers believe that we are getting closer to a global water crisis.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Solar Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"How silver nanoparticles cut odors"
September 22, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

Trendy workout clothes may advertise that special silver nanoparticles embedded in the fabric will cut the sweaty odor that builds up from repeated gym visits. It turns out there’s some truth to these claims. Silver can kill the bacteria that cause B.O., and new techniques, including nanotech, allow clothing manufacturers to incorporate silver that doesn’t come out in the wash or harm the environment. In this video, Reactions explains how all of that is possible.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Yahoo! News (U.K.: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)  
"No more scraping? Anti-frosting advance could mark end of frozen windshields"
September 18, 2018

With autonomous and flying cars on the horizon, there’s a whole lot that we’re excited about in the automotive world. But ask us on a frosty Monday morning in darkest winter as we’re scraping the ice off our windshield while muttering curse words under our breath, and you’ll find us to be a lot less enthused. In those moments, the car-related technology we want more than anything else in the world is a frost-resistant windshield. … A paper describing this research was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 18 media outlets, including Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 30.0 million unique monthly visits), Xinhuanet (China: 12.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), China.org (China: 775,000 unique monthly visits), Earth.com (Reno, NV: 430,100 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits) and ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Amazing female scientists to inspire your daughters"
September 17, 2018

Jacqueline Barton is a chemistry professor at the California Institute of Technology. She was awarded the American Chemical Society’s Priestley Medal in 2015 for her work on electron transport in DNA, which helps cells discover and repair mistakes. Barton’s recent research shows that disruption in this transport process may contribute to cancer.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 36.9 million unique monthly visits)  
"CAS collaboration with iChemLabs empowering scientists to do better research in less time with SciFinder-n"
September 18, 2018

CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society, partnered with iChemLabs to optimize the efficiency of chemical structure drawing in SciFinder-n®, especially in touch devices, using ChemDoodle®. Built on the trusted chemical research collection from CAS, SciFinder-n sets a new standard with remarkably relevant search, incredible ease of use and answers you can take right to the lab.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 19.2 million unique monthly visits)  
'New Microscope Shows the Quantum World in Crazy Detail"
September 21, 2018

The transmission electron microscope was designed to break records. … But high resolution isn’t the machine’s only trick. In a paper recently accepted to Nano Letters, a team led by McMorran has developed a new type of image you can take with the microscope. This method can image materials normally transparent to electrons, such as lightweight atoms like lithium.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Are you taking your N supplement?"
September 17, 2018

There’s an intrinsic link between Nature and nutrition. And as we divorce ourselves from Nature, we are also moving away from real food and its nutrients that sustain. …  A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, showed that beta carotene in carrots, peas, spinach suffered a 50% loss when put into cold storage. The ones stored for the longest duration had the lowest levels.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Circular Fluorescent Dyes for Biological Imaging Developed"
September 19, 2018

University of Oregon chemists have created a new class of fluorescent dyes that function in water and emit colors based solely on the diameter of circular nanotubes made of carbon and hydrogen. The six-member team reported the discovery that is now being explored for its potential use in biological imaging in the journal ACS Central Science.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

The Scientist (New York, NY: 250,000 unique monthly visits)  
"The Challenges of Bringing Service Dogs into the Lab"
September 18, 2018

… “It’s a very delicate balance,” says Patricia Redden, a professor of chemistry at Saint Peter’s University who raises service dogs and has served on American Chemical Society committees developing guidance on the admission of service dogs to chemistry labs. “You can’t really come out and say, ‘No, we absolutely categorically will not allow them.’ But on the other hand, you don’t want to come out and say, ‘Absolutely, you can bring your service dog in.’”

Four media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits)
"Neutrons Produce First Direct 3D Maps of Water During Cell Membrane Fusion"
September 21, 2018

New 3D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion are accelerating scientific understanding of cell development, which could lead to new treatments for diseases associated with cell fusion. … The research, published in Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, could provide new insights into diseases in which normal cell fusion is disrupted, such as Albers-Schönberg disease (osteopetrosis), help facilitate the development of fusion-based cell therapies for degenerative diseases, and lead to treatments that prevent cell-to-cell fusion between cancer cells and non-cancer cells.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NBC News (New York, NY: 136.0 million unique monthly visits)
"How tiny magnets could save a historic warship that once sailed for King Henry VIII"
September 10, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

A sunken 16th-century British warship that was once the pride of King Henry VIII’s fleet is getting a high-tech touch-up — with help from microscopic magnets designed to preserve the ship’s once-waterlogged wood for generations to come. … There are thousands of other shipwrecks around the world that could be treated with these magnetic nanoparticles, according to [research presented at a meeting of] the American Chemical Society, and they could also be used to save other historic artifacts.

Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Ants surrender their venomous secrets"
September 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Venoms produced by snails, snakes, scorpions and spiders contain numerous bioactive compounds that could lead to therapeutic drugs or insect-specific pesticides. Yet little is known about venoms produced by insects, in part because each bug contains such a tiny amount. Researchers recently responded to this challenge by conducting one of the first intensive studies of ant venom. They have now published their findings in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research.

Men’s Health (New York, NY: 5.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Could We Soon Be Using A Wearable Device For Regrowing Hair"
September 14, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

There's no denying that wearables are the future of healthcare - whether it's monitoring our steps, tracking our heart rate or reminding us to burn more calories. But now new research might be paving the way for a wearable that could help attend to your melon. A group of scientists have developed a flexible, wearable photostimulator that has proved successful in speeding up hair growth in mice. Results have been published in ACS Nano.

More than 17 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 8.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) and Latest LY (India: 826,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Navigating the path to a Ph.D."
September 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

For many college students with chemistry-related majors, the next step in their career path is not always clear. Should they go to graduate school? If so, how does one choose a research program and advisor? What if something unexpected happens? These and many other questions about the chemistry graduate school experience are tackled in this week's cover story for Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Modern version of ancient musical instrument detects poisons"
September 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Also known as the thumb piano, the mbira is an African musical instrument that has been around in one form or another for at least 3,000 years. Now, however, scientists have developed a new version that – when combined with a smartphone – can detect toxic substances and possibly even counterfeit medication. … Source: American Chemical Society

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits) and Medgadget (U.S.: 120,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"What are eye crusties made of?"
September 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

The substance that builds up in the corners of your eyes as you sleep has a variety of colloquial names: eye crusties, sleep, eye dust. But why does it appear every morning? And what is it actually made of? In this video, Reactions explains the chemistry of eye crusties.

Engineering.com (Mississaugua, Canada: 643,100 unique monthly visits)
"Nanobots Could Soon Play a Military Role in Detoxifying Lethal Nerve Agents"
September 13, 2018
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

A team of scientists at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society revealed last month that it has gained significant traction in making nanobots a reality. The team’s work on the use of chemical energy to create motion gave life to the idea that enzyme catalysis could be used to cause enzymes themselves to move, thus serving as vehicles to enable nanorobotics.

Physics World (U.K.: 271,000 unique monthly visits)
"US societies join forces in $10m drive to tackle diversity"
September 12, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

Five leading US scientific societies have come together to launch a new programme to boost the number of women and people from underrepresented racial and ethnic minorities in science. The Inclusive Graduate Education Network (IGEN) will receive $10m over the next five years from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to improve diversity in astronomy, chemistry, geoscience, materials science, engineering and physics. The five societies are the American Astronomical Society (AAS), the American Chemical Society, the American Geophysical Union, the American Physical Society (APS) and the Materials Research Society.
 
Four media outlets, including University of Southern California News (Los Angeles, CA: 138,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Independent (London, U.K.: 107.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Inside museums, where items are supposed to last forever, plastics are perishing"
September 13, 2018

The custodians of Neil Armstrong’s spacesuit at the National Air and Space Museum saw it coming. A marvel of human engineering, the suit is made of 21 layers of various plastics: nylon, neoprene, Mylar, Dacron, Kapton and Teflon. … Art is not spared either, as Georgina Rayner, a conservation scientist at Harvard Art Museums, showed at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in Boston this month.

New York Post (New York, NY: 23.9 million unique monthly visits)
“Google Street View to start mapping air pollution”
September 12, 2018

Google announced it will be expanding its Street View partnership with Aclima, an environmental sensor network, to map air pollution around the globe...That study, published in Environmental Science & Technology, used sensor data from Oakland, Calif. to reveal air pollution levels can vary drastically along one street.

More than 3 media outlets, including TechCrunch (San Francisco, CA: 12.5 million unique monthly visits) and VentureBeat (San Francisco, CA: 9.4 million unique monthly visits)

News 18 (India: 20.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial anti-oxidant 100 times more potent"
September 12, 2018

A well-known artificial anti-oxidant, TEMPO, is up to 100 times more powerful than nature's best and could help counteract everything from skin damage to Alzheimer's disease, a study has found. … The study, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, may lead to the development of a pharmaceutical therapy to help prevent free radical damage.

More than 16 media outlets, including NDTV (New Delhi, India: 9.2 million unique monthly visits), The Week (India: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 5.2 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Latest LY (India: 826,000 unique monthly visits) and Outlook India (India: 302,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Daily Star (Dublin, Ireland: 13.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Liver disease diet: Eating These five foods can help you to cut risk"
September 12, 2018

Research found in [a study reported by] the American Chemical Society showed that the fruit contains chemicals that can slow liver damage. Study author, Dr Kawagishi, said: “Beside offering taste and nutrition, avocados seem to improve liver health. People should eat more of them.”

Scientific American (New York, NY: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)  
"Who Invented the iPhone?"
September 13, 2018

… Meanwhile, John Goodenough, now 95, continues his groundbreaking research. Only a few months ago he published a landmark study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Among its claims? That Goodenough had created a lithium battery for electric cars that can be used 23 times more than the current average.

Geek.com (New York, NY: 3.2 million unique monthly visits)  
"Can High-Capacity Sodium-Ion Compete With Rechargeable Lithium Batteries?"
September 13, 2018

Lithium-ion batteries are the bane of electronics’ existence: expensive, resource-hogging, and energy intensive, they aren’t very sustainable in the long run. But sodium may be. At least, scientists at the University of Birmingham hope so. Researchers are swapping one element for another, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Clean Technica (1.6 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Gizbot (Singapore: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Android Headlines (U.S.: 472,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits) and Electronics Weekly (Ireland: 144,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.  

Science magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Beyond government grants: Widening your funding net"
September 13, 2018

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund supports Manny Curotto, professor and chair of chemistry and physics at Arcadia University in Pennsylvania, in his fundamental research on quantum methods, a field that is relevant to energy storage. The fund gives nearly 200 grants a year, totaling USD 17 million in 2017, and is part of a larger ACS program supporting research and education.

The Modesto Bee (Modesto, CA: 567,000 unique monthly visits)  
"An MJC professor donned a crazy wig to teach chemistry. A national group took note"
September 15, 2018

The American Chemical Society honored Steven Murov, professor emeritus at Modesto Junior College, for his colorful way of teaching chemistry. Murov received the Helen M. Free Award for Public Outreach at the group’s annual meeting in Boston last month.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.