ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 67.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists have bad news about your cough syrup"
January 14, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

No medicine cabinet is fully stocked without some good old cherry-flavored cough syrup -- or at least that's how it feels during cold and flu season. But does that stuff even work? This new video from the American Chemical Society (ACS) gives us the scoop. Spoiler alert: Not really. … But despite all that, most studies on the topic have found no evidence that over-the-counter cold medicines actually suppress or stop coughing. In many cases, they've performed no better than a placebo.

More than 20 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Refinery29 (New York, NY: 23.7 million unique monthly visits), British Telecommunications (London, U.K.: 8.3 million unique monthly visits), Men’s Health (Emmaus, PA: 5.5 million unique monthly visits), Delish (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits) and Cosmos magazine (Australia: 302,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Turmeric May Not Be a Miracle Spice After All"
January 12, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Turmeric, the bright yellow spice often used in curries, mustards and golden milk lattes, has gained quite a reputation as a superfood. It’s been touted for its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, and hailed as a natural defense against cancer and Alzheimer’s disease. That reputation, however, may have just gone down a notch: A new review of scientific literature on curcumin, the most well-known chemical in turmeric, suggests that the compound has limited, if any, actual health benefits. There may still be reason to include the “golden spice” in your diet, say the authors of the new review, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than 25 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits), USA Today (Washington, DC: 29.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits), Stuff (New Zealand: 8.9 million unique monthly visits), Health (New York, NY: 7.6 million unique monthly visits), Quartz (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Nature.com (London, U.K.: 3.5 million unique monthly visits), iTech Post (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits) and UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 42.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Bitter Fate of Coffee Beans"
January 9, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Q. What chemical changes occur with dark-roasting coffee beans? Are they what make coffee bitter? A. The hundreds of chemicals that are extracted when coffee is brewed interact with one another, and with a person’s taste buds in ways that scientists are still sorting out. … Adding a pinch of salt to a cup of coffee can counteract bitterness, the American Chemical Society suggests.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Is your FLEECE killing marine life? Washing synthetic fabrics releases toxic microplastics into the sea"
January 12, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

It is the time of year when many are digging out their cosy fleeces for winter walks in the countryside. But comfy fleeces may seem less appealing following a warning that their tiny plastic microfibres are getting into our diet through sardines and oysters. … [A news story] by the American Chemical Society now also has the warning from environmentalists that these plastic fibres, following the microbead scandal, are ‘the biggest plastic pollution issue you haven’t heard of yet’.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Looking for life in all the right places — with the right tool"
January 11, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Researchers have invented a range of instruments from giant telescopes to rovers to search for life in outer space, but so far, these efforts have yielded no definitive evidence that it exists beyond Earth. Now scientists have developed a new tool that can look for signs of life with 10,000 times more sensitivity than instruments carried on previous spaceflight missions. Their report appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

Six media outlets, including GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits), The Daily Galaxy (San Francisco, CA: 147,200 unique monthly visits) and Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Testing breast milk for cannabinoids"
January 11, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

With the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana spreading across the country, the drug's use is reportedly increasing among pregnant women. It stands to reason that many of these women will continue to use marijuana after they give birth. Now researchers have developed a new method to help determine what this means for infants' potential exposure to the active compounds in marijuana in breast milk. Their report appears in the journal ACS Omega.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Nanoarray sniffs out and distinguishes multiple diseases"
January 11, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Before modern medical lab techniques became available, doctors diagnosed some diseases by smelling a patient’s breath. Scientists have been working for years to develop analytical instruments that can mimic this sniff-and-diagnose ability. Now, researchers report in the journal ACS Nano ("Diagnosis and Classification of 17 Diseases from 1404 Subjects via Pattern Analysis of Exhaled Molecules") that they have identified a unique “breathprint” for each disease.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Wasabi served at most sushi restaurants is not what you think it is"
January 14, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

You've probably never had real wasabi, no matter how much sushi you've eaten. The vast majority of wasabi consumed in America is simply a mix of horseradish, hot mustard, and green dye, according to a new video from the American Chemical Society. In fact, about 99% of all wasabi sold in the US is fake, The Washington Post reports.

More than 12 media outlets, including The San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits), Seattle Pi (Seattle, WA: 4.1 million unique monthly visits), My San Antonio (San Antonio, TX: 945,000 unique monthly visits), Albany Times Union (Albany, NY: 912,000 unique monthly visits) and CT Post (Bridgeport, CT: 362,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits)
"50 Sweet Facts About Your Favorite Candies"
January 13, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

It’s no surprise that candy delights kids and adults alike. We love sweets so much that the average American eats about 22 pounds of candy each year. Whether you’re looking to impress your friends or simply brush up on your candy trivia, check out these 50 sweet facts about your favorite candies. … According to the American Chemical Society, eating 262 fun-sized Halloween candy bars would poison a 180-pound person. But don't worry about death by candy—you'd vomit before you’d be able to down 262 candy bars in one sitting.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Using E. coli to detect hormone disruptors in the environment"
January 13, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been implicated in the development of obesity, diabetes and cancer and are found in a wide array of products including pesticides, plastics and pharmaceuticals. EDCs are potentially harmful, even at low concentrations, equal in some cases to mere milligrams dissolved in in a swimming pool full of water. Now researchers report in ACS Central Science that they can quickly detect environmentally relevant concentrations of EDCs using engineered E. coli bacteria.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"The legal battle over CRISPR"
January 9, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

CRISPR could potentially engineer super crops, make designer animal models for research and even snip out genetic diseases. Experts say that billions of dollars are at stake. But the landmark technology is embroiled in a legal battle over who controls the patent on CRISPR. The latest episode of Speaking of Chemistry highlights everything you need to know about biotech's biggest patent case.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and The Science Explorer (Midland, Canada: 141,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Does Hot Water Sometimes Freeze Faster Than Cold Water?"
January 10, 2017

File this under “counterintuitive:” Under certain conditions, scientists and curious folks alike have observed hot water freezing faster than cold water. This effect is more than just surprising. It seems to fly in the face of what’s known about chemistry and physics. Not everyone is convinced that this effect — known as the Mpemba effect — is real. … More recently, scientists have been taking an atom-level view, invoking quirks in a chemical interaction known as hydrogen bonding to explain the Mpemba effect. The most recent report with a hydrogen bonding claim was published just a few weeks ago in the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, though researchers who spoke to Science News magazine appear skeptical about whether the research connects this cause to the Mpemba effect.

Six media outlets, including Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits), Futurism (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits) and Wall Street Pit (58,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Verge (New York, NY: 24.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Percentage of intersex fish drops after sewage treatment plant upgrades"
January 11, 2017

A sewage treatment plant in Canada has figured out a way to reduce the levels of chemicals that stick around in the treated wastewater, according to a new study (Environmental Science & Technology). These include chemicals that have caused fish to develop both male and female sex organs. Eliminating them from our water system is important because they are devastating fish populations, and they can end up back in our bodies, too.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and CBC News (Toronto, Canada: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Measuring how perovskite solar films efficiently convert light to power"
January 11, 2017

Solar cells made with films mimicking the structure of the mineral perovskite are the focus of worldwide research. But only now have researchers at Case Western Reserve University directly shown the films bear a key property allowing them to efficiently convert sunlight into electricity. … The findings, published in the journal Nano Letters, indicate that solar cells could be made thicker without harming their efficiency, said Xuan Gao, associate professor of physics and author of the paper.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Create First 2-D Electride"
January 11, 2017

Researchers have brought electrides into the nanoregime by synthesizing the first 2D electride material. Electrides are ionic compounds, which are made of negative and positive ions. But in electrides, the negative "ions" are simply electrons, with no nucleus. The electrons are very close to each other and very loosely bound, causing them to act as an electron gas. … The researchers, led by Scott C. Warren, an assistant professor of applied physical sciences and chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, have published a paper on the demonstration of the 2D electride in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Reader’s Digest (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The Safest Ways to Get Rid of Leftover Medication"
January 12, 2017

Even though it may seem like the easy thing to do, flushing medication down the toilet is one of the worst things you can do. According to American Chemical Society (ACS), pharmaceuticals are found not only in our waterways but in our drinking water, too. The contamination may already be harming aquatic life and may even be affecting people.

ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits)
"Ultra-fast, ultra-sensitive platinum selenide gas sensors"
January 13, 2017

Researchers from Trinity College Dublin, Ireland have shown that PtSe2, a little-studied transition metal dichalcogenide has potential for a variety of uses. In particular, PtSe2 is an excellent high performance gas sensor, and fabrication is compatible with silicon chip foundrys. … This research, published in ACS Nano, demonstrates the potential of PtSe2 in a range of applications, and presents this little-studied material as an excellent candidate for further investigation.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WCBS-NY (CBS) (New York, NY: National Viewership 2,333,342)
"Does cough syrup really work?"
January 14, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

[Transcript] The next time you get sick, you may want to pass on the cough syrup. The American Chemical Society found that most cough syrups don't really work. Researchers say the best way to deal with a cough is a humidifier, a steamy shower and some cough drops. They also say cough syrups do have one benefit. They can sometimes help you get some sleep.

More than 60 media outlets, including KUSA-DEN (NBC) (Denver, CO: Local Viewership 97,012), WDAF-KC (FOX) (Kansas City, MO: Local Viewership 79,857), WCVB-BOS (ABC) (Boston, MA: Local Viewership 68,230), WTTE-CBO (FOX) (Columbus, OH: Local Viewership 65,231), WPTV (NBC) (West Palm Beach, FL: Local Viewership 61,020), KFSN-FRES (ABC) (Fresno, CA: Local Viewership 56,563), WTAE-PIT (ABC) (Pittsburgh, PA: Local Viewership 56,146), WFXT-BOS (FOX) (Boston, MA: Local Viewership 51,055), WTVT-TB (FOX) (Tampa Bay, FL: Local Viewership 50,362), WSYR (ABC) (Syracuse, NY: Local Viewership 48,376), WPIX-TV (CW) (New York, NY: Local Viewership 47,355) and WFLD-CHI (FOX) (Chicago, IL: Local Viewership 45,363) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Civilized
"This Breathalyzer Could Diagnose 17 Different Diseases"
January 12, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Diagnoses of more than a dozen diseases are just an exhalation away with a futuristic breathalyzer being developed by scientists. A new study on the device has found that by simply having patients breathe into it, doctors can diagnose 17 different diseases, including lung cancer, irritable bowel syndrome and multiple sclerosis. … The full study can be viewed online in the journal ACS Nano.

All Media NY
"Study Finds that Curcumin Has Little Therapeutic Benefit"
January 11, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Despite widespread belief, a new study found that curcumin, a compound found in turmeric, offers little to no therapeutic benefit. Hailed for years as a natural treatment for a variety of health issues, the consensus that curcumin boosts health began back in the 1990's. But new research from the American Chemical Society found that curcumin is unstable under physiological conditions, meaning it is not readily absorbed by the body.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"One Breath Into This Breathalyzer Can Diagnose 17 Diseases"
January 5, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

A single breath into a newfangled breathalyzer is all doctors need to diagnose 17 different diseases, including lung cancer, irritable bowel syndrome and multiple sclerosis, a new study found….If it’s made available to doctors, the device could be an “affordable, easy-to-use, inexpensive and miniaturized [tool] for personalized screening, diagnosis and follow-up,” the researchers wrote in the study, which was published online Dec. 21 in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 100 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 55.0 million unique monthly visits), RT.com (Moscow, Russia: 39.8 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits), USA Today (Washington, DC: 29.9 million unique monthly visits), Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), The Economist (London, U.K.: 28.6 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Uproxx (Culver City, CA: 19.4 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), I Heart Radio (New York, NY: 14.5 million unique monthly visits), RawStory (Washington, DC: 10.0 million unique monthly visits) , Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits), The San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits), Science Alert (8.2 million unique monthly visits) and Engadget (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"New tattoo ink may improve treatment for skin cancer patients"
December 23, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Researchers have developed a new tattoo ink that glows only under certain light conditions and disappears later….Testing in mice showed that tattoos created with these nanoparticles did not cause inflammation and lasted for three months. The study was published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 22 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), iTech Post (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), The Chandigarh Tribune (Chandigarh, India: 633,400 unique monthly visits), Zee News (India: 471,700 unique monthly visits), The Siasat Daily (Hyderabad, India: 428,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits) and Deccan Chronicle (India: 227,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Does Cough Syrup Actually Work?"
December 5, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

No medicine cabinet is fully stocked without some good old cherry-flavored cough syrup—or at least that’s how it feels during cold and flu season. But does that stuff even work? This new video from the American Chemical Society (ACS) gives us the scoop. Spoiler alert: Not really.

More than 25 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), The New York Post (New York, NY: 23.6 million unique monthly visits), Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits), Real Simple (New York, NY: 15.4 million unique monthly visits), Health Magazine (New York, NY: 13.5 million unique monthly visits), Infowars (U.S.: 7.9 million unique monthly visits), Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Attn.com (U.S.: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), iTech Post (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits) and The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Voice of America News (Washington, DC: Weekly audience 123 million)
"Radioactive Material Found in Fracking Waste; Searching Space for H20"
December 21, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

US oil and natural gas production has been boosted in recent years by a drilling process known as hydraulic fracturing, commonly called “fracking.”...A new study published in the American Chemical Society’s Environmental Science and Technology, which examined solid well waste from Marcellus shale in Pennsylvania, finds that the waste contains naturally occurring radioactive material that had not been previously reported.

Four media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Some baby teething toys may contain hormone-disrupting chemicals"
December 18, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Some baby teething toys marketed as nontoxic may contain chemicals that could interfere with hormones involved in normal growth and development, a study suggests….All of the products tested positive for one of those chemicals, bisphenol-A, even though most of the teethers were marketed as BPA-free, researchers report in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Five media outlets, including Paste Magazine (Decatur, GA: 6.9 million unique monthly visits) and Mercola.com (U.S.: 5.9 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! Tech (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Magnetic Supersense Could Inspire Ultrasensitive Prosthetic Limbs"
January 3, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Robots that are capable of "feeling" their way around the world, thanks to hairy electronic skin, could be one step closer to reality, according to a new study….To mimic the human sense of touch, the team built artificial hairs using magnetic cobalt-based microwires — commonly used, durable filaments that are as flexible as human hairs — the researchers wrote in the study, which was published online Nov. 25 in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 10 media outlets, including The Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits), LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), DNAindia.com (India: 738,100 unique monthly visits) and Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits)
"New Vaccines May Prevent Fatal Opioid Overdoses"
December 21, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Prescription opioid drugs have become such an epidemic in the United States they now cause more fatalities than heroin each year, leaving addiction scientists scrambling…. In the current study, published in ACS Chemical Biology, the researchers made one vaccine for hydrocodone, dubbed Hydro-TT, and one for oxycodone, Oxy-TT.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Red cabbage microgreens could reduce risk of cardiovascular disease"
December 30, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Many of us were told to "eat our greens" as children….Study co-author Thomas T.Y. Wang, of the United States Department of Agriculture in Beltsville, MD, and colleagues recently reported their findings in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 10 media outlets, including New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Bel Marra Health (Cambridge, MA: 367,400 unique monthly visits), The Irish Sun (Dublin, Ireland: 283,700 unique monthly visits), The Belfast News Letter (Belfast, U.K.: 123,900 unique monthly visits), Latinos Health (Irvine, CA: 68,600 unique monthly visits), FreshPlaza (Netherlands: 40,600 unique monthly visits) and Knowridge (Sydney, Australia: 31,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Watching water freeze"
December 21, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Every winter, snow and ice dusts mountains and makes roads slick in cold climates. This phenomenon is ages old, but a detailed explanation for how ice crystals form has eluded us. In a study appearing in the journal ACS Omega, scientists now report a method to visualize ice in three dimensions as it grows.

Four media outlets, including Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Fast-cooking Dry Beans Provide More Protein, Iron than ‘Slower’ Varieties"
December 22, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Beans are a versatile, inexpensive staple that can boost essential nutrients in a diet, especially for people in low-resource areas where food options are limited…. A study in ACS Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that fast-cooking beans retained more protein, iron and other minerals than “slower” dry beans.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"How To Care For Your Cast Iron Skillet With Science"
December 20, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

The cast iron skillet: for the untrained, that big greasy thing you wish your roommate would put away, and for the expert, virtually the only pan that really matters. One source of controversy among skilleteers is how to actually care for the slimy metal hunk. The folks over at the American Chemical Society's Reactions channel recently produced a video explaining some of the scientifically-best practices.

Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Cold Weather Can Actually Help You Burn Calories"
December 23, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

This time of year is filled with opportunities to pack on extra pounds….But we love how the American Chemical Society spells out the science for us in this new video, and shows us exactly how the process goes down. It’s a great reminder of how hard our bodies are working beneath the surface, even when we’re barely moving a muscle.

More than 12 media outlets, including Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), CNN (Atlanta, GA: 67.3 million unique monthly visits), Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits), Lifehacker (U.S.: 27.3 million unique monthly visits), Health Magazine (New York, NY: 13.5 million unique monthly visits), iTech Post (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Travel + Leisure (New York, NY: 2.2 million unique monthly visits) and Knowridge (Sydney, Australia: 31,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"It Takes The Right Rock To Sequester Carbon"
December 27, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

Finally, we have a way to sequester huge amounts of CO2 deep in the ground in a way that is stable for geologic time. And it’s all about finding the correct rock to do it….Research continues on how to make this practical, and cheap, and how to couple it with carbon capture, but this is a real breakthrough as reported in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Peanut allergies: you've been doing it wrong"
January 5, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

The American Chemical Society explains why some people are allergic to peanuts and how new research could help decrease the number of children suffering from peanut allergies.

CBS News (New York, NY: 15.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Your brain on alcohol, and more science fodder for New Year's revelers"
December 28, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

Ever wonder what happens inside your brain when you’re toasting in the New Year?...A new video from Reactions, the YouTube channel of the American Chemical Society, helps explain what’s happening when you drink, why you get drunk, even why you take more frequent bathroom breaks.

More than 12 media outlets, including RT.com (Moscow, Russia: 39.8 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits) and Laughing Squid (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Sorry, But We're Making You Relive 2016's Worst Beauty Moments"
December 23, 2016
Publicized in: EAC National Meeting news release

It's safe to say that 2016 probably won't go down as the greatest year in American — or world — history…."What we found was that 104 out of the 109 lice populations we tested had high levels of gene mutations, which have been linked to resistance to pyrethroids," researcher Kyong Yoon said in a study, which was presented at the American Chemical Society [meeting]. Pyrethroids are the active ingredient commonly found in lice treatments.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Flame retardant exposure linked to income, BMI and household smoking"
December 21, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

A class of flame retardants known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been phased out of production in the U.S. out of concern for their potential neurotoxic effects, particularly in young children….Now a new report in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology examines the factors that help predict which children could be at a higher risk for exposure to these compounds.

Five media outlets, including American Council on Science and Health (New York, NY: 94,700 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, GA: 3.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Tasting garlic through your feet offers insight into Vicks for cough"
January 3, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

I saw your article about putting Vicks VapoRub on the soles of the feet to stop a nighttime cough. … Scientists associated with the American Chemical Society performed a cool experiment. They reported that if you put a freshly cut clove of garlic in a plastic bag, rub it on the sole of your foot and then tie the plastic bag around your foot, you will taste and smell garlic after about an hour.

Six media outlets, including The Youngstown Vindicator (Youngstown, IN: 280,000 unique monthly visits), Tuscaloosa News (Tuscaloosa, AL: 130,300 unique monthly visits) and Fresh Plaza (Netherlands: 40,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Eight Futuristic Foods You'll Be Eating in 30 Years"
January 2, 2017

We ate some weird stuff in 2016….One 2011 study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology found that cultured meat would involve 7–45 percent lower energy, 78–96 percent lower greenhouse gas emissions, and 99 less land use than conventionally produced European meat.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How Sewage Plants Hurt Fish, And How They Can Help"
December 30, 2016

Deformities linked to estrogen-like chemicals decreased dramatically in fish after a wastewater treatment plant in Canada got an upgrade….Fortunately, the research[er] Servos and his group reported this week in Environmental Science & Technology shows one way we might fix that.

Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Rugged Rudolph: Scientists discover why reindeer antlers are so strong"
December 20, 2016

A team of scientists from the U.K.’s Queen Mary University of London have discovered the secret behind what makes reindeer antlers so tough. In a report published Monday in the ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, the team said it used X-ray techniques and computer modeling to get a closer look at the antlers.

More than 15 media outlets, including Yahoo! Tech (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), BGR (U.S.: 11.2 million unique monthly visits), Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Express (London, U.K.: 4.0 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"How Much Damage Does Indulging Over the Holidays Actually Do?"
December 23, 2016

It's the most wonderful (er, unhealthy) time of the year. But honestly, the effects of holiday indulgences – particularly in regard to weight gain – tend to be wholly overblown….Walking outside significantly boosts energy and mood, according to research in Environmental Science and Technology.

Four media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits) and MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Graphene ‘Nano-Chimneys’ Offers Cooling Solution For Nano-Electronics"
January 8, 2016

The problem of releasing the accumulating heat in graphene and carbon nanotube junctions has been addressed with a novel solution….Findings of the research were published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Physical Chemistry.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"New class of hydrogen sulfide donor molecules"
December 30, 2016

Molecules with the potential to deliver healing power to stressed cells -- such as those involved in heart attacks -- have been created by University of Oregon researchers….Separate portions of the research were detailed in proof-of-concept papers in the Journal of the American Chemical Society in June and in November in Angewandte Chemie, an international journal.

More than 12 media outlets, including India Today (Noida, India: 10.0 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and the University of Oregon News (Eugene, OR: 1.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Thrillist (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Why does popcorn pop?"
December 22, 2016

Without it, going to see Rogue One doesn't feel like a complete experience….As the heating takes place, the starch inside turns into a sort of gel. The popping of the shell (and not the starch) allows the gel to expand rapidly. That gel turns "into thin, jelly-like bubbles" as it hits the air, according to American Chemical Society.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Antivenom made from nanoparticles could eventually treat bites from any snake"
December 20, 2016

Not all antivenom is created equal….They do bind some other proteins as well. But after incubating their nanoparticles with blood serum and then adding a mix of PLA2 molecules, the researchers found that the toxins pushed the other proteins out of the way, binding more tightly to the nanoparticles than anything else, they report this month in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Five media outlets, including Medgadget (U.S.: 120,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Associations Now (Washington, DC: 11,000 unique monthly visits)
"How to keep your employees in 2017"
December 15, 2016

The American Chemical Society makes professional development a priority. “Over the past few years ACS has invested in the onward career development of its staff,” says Scott J. Oliphant, director of human resources. “This includes setting the expectation that managers will develop their teams and supporting those endeavors but, ultimately, you have to empower everyone in the workforce to take control of his or her own career development.”

Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Develop New Way To Clean Cancer-Causing Chromium From Drinking Water"
December 24, 2016

There is good news that chromium-6 the cancer-causing chemical in drinking water can be neutralized….The research was published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. The paper explains how Giammar and his team used electricity under a process called electrocoagulation.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Washington University News (St. Louis, MO: 1.8 million unique monthly visits) and Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

National Public Radio (Washington, DC)
"Tasting garlic…with your feet!? Weird food chemistry tricks"
December 24, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

[Transcript]  The old saying goes ‘Your feet are the window to your mouth’. Crazy as it may sound, you can taste garlic through your feet and it works like this according to the American Chemical Society, they put this out. You put a piece of raw garlic in a garbage bag, you put your bare feet in the bag and you wait about an hour.

More than 25 media outlets, including WBUR (Radio) (Boston, MA), WNYC-FM (Radio) (New York, NY), WHYY (Radio) (Philadelphia, PA), KOPB-FM (Radio) (Portland, OR), Capital Public Radio (Sacramento, CA), News KNPR (Radio) (Las Vegas, NV), WDDE 91.1 FM (Radio) (Philadelphia, PA), WAMU-FM (Radio) (Washington, DC), WBFO-FM (Radio) (Buffalo, NY), WYPR-FM (Radio) (Baltimore, MD), KUOW-FM (Radio) (Seattle, WA) and 89.7 WGBH (Radio) (Boston, MA) covered the story.

WJBK-DET (FOX) (Detroit, MI: local viewership 90,700)
"Scientists create nanoarray to help diagnose disease"
December 28, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

[Transcript] A possible new purpose for a familiar tool. Doctors could use your breath to diagnose a disease. This is interesting. The American Chemical Society is testing a machine that could help spot diseases. The machine can measure the chemical makeup of your breath that could reveal a medical problem.

Six media outlets, including WWSB (ABC) (Tampa Bay, FL: local viewership 23,300), WKYC-CLE (NBC) (Cleveland, OH: local viewership 22,600) and KTNV-LV (ABC) (Las Vegas, NV: local viewership 7,600) covered the story.

WGN (Chicago, IL: local viewership 73,100)
"This is your brain on alcohol"
December 29, 2016
Publicized in: EAC news release

[Transcript] You know that drinking too much can mess up your mind... but do you know how? Here's the science. The American Chemical Society says the ethanol in alcohol slows you down. It also releases stimulants in your body. It releases the feel-good chemical dopamine in your brain and it alters everything from your breathing to your body temperature. All those effects, taken together, lead to impaired thoughts and actions, and even blackouts -- in other words, drunk behavior.

Five media outlets, including KOSA (CBS) (Odessa, TX: local viewership 11,900) covered the story.

KNBC-LA (NBC) (Los Angeles, CA: local viewership 21,600)
"Do you burn more fat in the cold?"
Publicized in: EAC news release

[Transcript] …  Apparently the cold can help you burn some calories. The cold may help kickstart your 2017 weight loss. American Chemical Society released that video claiming shivering in the cold causes muscles to contract and produces a hormone which turns your white fat cells into the brown ones that you receive when working out.

Four media outlets, including KBCW 44 Cable 12 (San Francisco: local viewership 16,300) covered the story.


… From the Blogs

 
Science Newsline (Japan)
"The Biggest Chemistry-related Stories from 2016"
December 21, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

From green pools at the Olympics to regulatory reforms, chemistry-related news made big waves in 2016. Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reviews the most intriguing chemistry stories this year to affect the industry, the environment and the public.

Dentistry Today (U.S.)
"Baby Teethers Still Contain Toxic Materials"
December 23, 2016
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Dentists typically advise new parents to bring their babies in for their first exam once the first tooth erupts. During that visit, though, clinicians should discuss teething toys as well. The American Chemical Society reports that despite labeling to the contrary, all of the teethers that were tested in a recent study included bisphenol-A (BPA) and other endocrine-disruptors that leached at low levels.

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