ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Federal Data Shows Firefighting Chemicals In U.S. Drinking Water Sources"
August 9, 2016

A study of drinking water supplies throughout the U.S. shows that numerous sources are contaminated with firefighting chemicals….The study, published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, did not determine people's actual exposure to the chemicals. And the amounts found in most cases were very low.

More than 250 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Time (New York, NY: 52.8 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), Independent (London, U.K.: 107.8 million unique monthly visits), CNN (Atlanta, GA: 59.2 million unique monthly visits), Reuters (New York, NY: 49.8 million unique monthly visits), RT.com (Russia: 42.7 million unique monthly visits), Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Inquisitr (U.S.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), The Weather Channel (Atlanta, GA: 20.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), San Francisco Gate (San Francisco, CA: 14.9 million unique monthly visits), PBS.org (Washington, DC: 12.6 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.6 million unique monthly visits), CNBC News (New York, NY: 14.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits).

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Your Laundry May Be Harming Mother Nature"
August 12, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

In addition to all the other toxins floating around out there, it seems that some hidden chemicals that have attached to our clothes might be responsible for polluting our lakes and rivers….The findings, which were published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Environmental Science & Technology, indicate that such releases could have adverse impacts on both aquatic life and people.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 213,400 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 31.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Clothes that heal themselves through the power of squid teeth"
August 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Are you accident-prone? Self-repairing clothing may be in your future, thanks to Walter Dressick of the Naval Research Office and Melik Demirel of Pennsylvania State University. Dressick, Demirel and their team have developed an autonomous self-repairing mechanism for tears in textiles such as cotton, linen and wool, as published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 50 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), CNN (Atlanta, GA: 59.2 million unique monthly visits), RT.com (Russia: 42.7 million unique monthly visits), Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Mother Nature Network (New York, NY: 15.4 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Engadget (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Mirror (London, U.K.: 5.1 million unique monthly visits), The Christian Science Monitor (Boston, MA: 4.6 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), I4U (U.S.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), Irish Mirror (Dublin, Ireland: 1.0 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits), Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) and E&T Magazine (U.K.: 80,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Officials fear some Olympic athletes might be altering their genes to cheat in Rio"
August 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Add this to your list of signs we're living in the future: Genetically-enhanced Olympic athletes are a real thing we have to worry about now. Sarah Everts reports for Chemical and Engineering News that officials plan to test 2016 Rio athletes' tissue samples for markers of "gene doping" — a process that would alter their bodies' biological programming in order to obtain an unfair advantage in competition.

More than 18 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Tech Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Verge (U.S.: 18.7 million unique monthly visits)
"FDA ban on e-cigarette sales to minors starts today"
August 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The US Food and Drug Administration will officially start regulating the sale of e-cigarettes today….A recent study published last month in Environmental Science & Technology found that, in addition to carcinogenic toxins like formaldehyde already found in e-cig smoke, vapor from e-cigarettes contains two previously unidentified chemicals that can cause cancer.

More than 12 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 10.6 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Frankfurter fraud: Finding out what's in your hot dog"
August 10, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hot dogs are the perfect summer fare. But knowing for sure what you're getting inside a bun can be difficult. Now scientists have devised a method that could help prevent frankfurter fraud, which is especially important for those who can't eat certain types of meats. They report their approach in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 20 media outlets, including NDTV (New Delhi, India: 2.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Health News Digest (New York, NY: 787,000 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Dear Science: Why do hangovers happen, and how can I make them go away?"
August 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Here's what science has to say: Oh, boy. Do we have a cure for you! ... Here's a scientific explanation of what causes hangovers and how you can prevent them (other than, you know, drinking responsibly). (American Chemical Society).

Lifehacker.com (U.S.: 27.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Three Ways to Make Fish Smell Less "Fishy" With Science"
August 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

You buy some fish at the store, toss it in the fridge, and forget about it for a few days—until a very distinct smell reminds you that it’s there. Don’t toss it out just yet. It’s still edible and there’s a few ways to make it smell and taste more appealing. In this video from the Reactions YouTube channel, you’ll learn how to de-stink your fish with a little chemistry.

More than 18 media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Cosmos Magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits), The Fish Site (Sheffield, U.K.: 49,800 unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nature.com (London, U.K.: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemists to get their own preprint server"
August 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Chemists could soon be getting their own dedicated preprint server: the ChemRxiv. The American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, announced on 10 August that it wants to establish the site to help chemists to share early results and data with colleagues online, ahead of formal publication.

Eight media outlets, including Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits) and Ars Technica (San Francisco, CA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Wasabi vs. ‘Wasabi’"
August 11, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

You’ve probably never had wasabi. Don’t get us wrong: we’re not arguing that you’ve never eaten lime-green paste called “wasabi.” We’re saying that it’s not actually wasabi. Read on and check out the video below from the American Chemical Society for more.

Cosmos Magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits)
"The science of steroids – and how cheaters are caught"
August 8, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Steroids have legitimate medical uses, such as treating growth disorders and cancer, but many people associate them with drug cheats in sport. A type of steroid, called anabolic-androgenic steroids, encourages the body to make more and strengthen muscle….So how are steroid abusers caught? The American Chemical Society's Reactions team explains the intricate science in the video below.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Challenge to presidential candidates: Debate about science"
August 10, 2016

Climate change. Mental health. Space exploration. Vaccinations. The health of the oceans. Antibiotic-resistant superbugs. …The effort has the support of a wide swath of the scientific community -- from the American Chemical Society to the Geological Society of America to the Paleontological Society.

More than 15 media outlets, including The Indian Express (Noida, India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits), Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 73,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanoscale nails rupture bacteria but leave human cells intact"
August 11, 2016

A team of international researchers have built a bed of nails — but it isn’t your typical torture device. The black silicon material is covered in nanoscopic spikes designed to rip apart bacteria while leaving animal cells intact. It could offer huge medical benefits for surgical implants, according to a paper published in the American Chemical Society’s Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Eight media outlets, including Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.1 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Future Batteries Could Have Six Times More Capacity"
August 9, 2016

It's no secret that human beings have a serious battery addiction, and the ones we have right now aren't going to cut it forever….Then, obviously, the manufacturing process is going to have to be cost-effective, or else they'll never see the light of day. [ACS Nano via TechRadar].

Nine media outlets, including TechRadar (Bath, U.K.: 15.5 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Economist (London, U.K.: 28.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Bugs in the system"
August 13, 2016

Since its discovery in 2004 graphene, a form of carbon made of sheets a single atom thick, has been an invention in search of an application….Bacillus subtilis cells are normally short, plump cylinders with smooth surfaces. If they get dehydrated, though, they shrink. That makes them wrinkle up, much like a grape shriveling into a raisin. These wrinkles, Dr Berry and his team report in ACS Nano, can be patterned onto graphene.

The Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Toxic diet threatens reproduction of coastal California condors, study finds"
August 9, 2016

Captive-breeding programs have brought the California condor back from the edge of extinction, but habitat loss and lead poisoning have prevented a stable recovery in the wild….The findings, published this week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, also show that the coastal birds had elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyl, or PCBs, when compared to their inland counterparts.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Wired (San Francisco, CA: 6.1 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and The San Diego Union-Tribune (San Diego, CA: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ABC News Australia (Sydney, Australia: 21.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Cholesterol boosts progression of aggressive cancers, Australian study suggests"
August 9, 2016

An Australian-first study by Queensland researchers has revealed how fats, including cholesterol, increase the progression of aggressive cancers….The study has been published in the Journal of Proteome Research.

News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Your Java Jolt is Healthier Than Ever"
August 8, 2016

Don't leave your coffee cup sitting at the breakfast table….People who drink four or more cups of coffee throughout the day cut their risk of Type 2 diabetes by 50 percent, according to a study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Clues in Zika's genome"
August 12, 2016

University of Utah chemists have found that the Zika virus contains genetic structures similar to other viruses in the Flaviviridae family, and that these structures may serve as potential antiviral drug targets….In the study, accepted for publication in ACS Infectious Diseases, Aaron Fleming, Cynthia Burrows and colleagues at the U searched for patterns in the Zika genome called G-quadruplexes, which are regions of DNA rich in guanine, one of the four basic building blocks of genes.

Ten media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Biocompare (San Francisco, CA: 87,300 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WPBF (ABC) (West Palm Beach, FL: local viewership 53,900)
"A surprising way laundry adds flame retardants to surface waters"
August 12, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] it turns out your washing machine, could be responsible for pollution in lakes and rivers. That’s according to a new study from the American Chemical Society. Researchers say the problem has to do with chemicals added to everyday items, like furniture, mattresses, and clothes to prevent them from catching on fire. Those chemicals make their way into the environment through the washing machine.

FM News 101 KXL (Radio) (Portland, OR)
"Detecting a new doping trend among Olympic athletes"
August 12, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac
[Transcript] … Back in 2012 the rumors are flying about genetically enhanced athletes… but it wasn't until now that you are reading Chemical & Engineering news that, yes, they were going to do [tests] and if possible they see … suspicious tissues taken … for athletes that may have the gene doping.
More than 12 media outlets, including WFLA-AM (Radio) (Tampa Bay, FL), WOAI-AM (Radio) (San Antonio, TX), KLBJ-AM (Radio) (Austin, TX) and Newsradio 740 KTRH (Radio) (Houston, TX) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Circulate
"Squid teeth enable self-healing clothes"
August 12, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The idea of ‘make do and mend’ for clothing may bring up nostalgia, but it’s a sad truth that most of us can’t cut it with a needle and thread….Repair is a crucial ‘inner loop’ of the circular economy, but what if clothing could repair itself? In ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces this week, researchers have identified a protein from squid’s teeth that can give ‘self-healing’ properties to fabric.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Temporary 'tattoo' could offer new non-invasive way to monitor alcohol levels"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, USA, have developed new technology that could enable doctors and police to accurately measure blood alcohol levels through a temporary tattoo worn on the skin. … The work was published recently in the journal ACS Sensors.

More than 125 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits), Elite Daily (New York, NY: 16.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.6 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Dot (Austin, TX: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Quartz (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Vice (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), LosAngelesNews.net (Los Angeles, CA: 3.5 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), Glamour (U.S.: 2.5 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 2.5 million unique monthly visits), UC San Diego News (San Diego, CA: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), San Diego Union-Tribune (San Diego, CA: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), WPTV NBC 5 (West Palm Beach, FL: 1.0 million unique monthly visits), Fast Company (U.S.: 800,000 unique monthly visits), DNAindia.com (India: 738,100 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), NBC San Diego (San Diego, CA: 590,000 unique monthly visits), Zee News (India: 471,700 unique monthly visits), GoSanAngelo.com (San Angelo, TX: 366,100 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Egyptian chemist Zewail, Nobel prize-winner, dies at 70"
Publicized in: OPA news release
August 4, 2016

Ahmed Zewail, a science adviser to President Barack Obama who won the 1999 Nobel Prize for his work on the study of chemical reactions over immensely short time scales, has died at age 70….In a statement, the CEO of the American Chemical Society, Thomas Connelly Jr., described Zewail as “an exemplar scholar and statesman who will be greatly missed.”

More than 150 media outlets including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), ABC News (New York, NY: 24.4 million unique monthly visits), CBS News (New York, NY: 15.8 million unique monthly visits), Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Charlotte Observer (Charlotte, NC: 11.2 million unique monthly visits), San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits), Miami Herald (Miami, FL: 4.1 million unique monthly visits), Newser (Miami, FL: 3.9 million unique monthly visits), Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), CBC News (Toronto, Canada: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), The Seattle Times (Seattle, WA: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, GA: 1.6 million unique monthly visits), Newsday (Melville, NY: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), Times of Israel (Israel: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), WRAL 5 (Raleigh, NC: 913,400 unique monthly visits), Seattle Post-Intelligencer (Seattle, WA: 774,600 unique monthly visits), WTOP News (Washington, DC: 680,400 unique monthly visits), WHNS FOX (Greenville, SC: 577,400 unique monthly visits), WNCN CBS (Raleigh, NC: 556,600 unique monthly visits), The Fresno Bee (Fresno, CA: 526,100 unique monthly visits), The San Diego Union-Tribune (San Diego, CA: 503,000 unique monthly visits), KPTV FOX 12 (Portland, OR: 439,400 unique monthly visits), Star-Telegram (Fort Worth, TX: 434,400 unique monthly visits), San Antonio Express-News (San Antonio, TX: 428,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

AOL.com  (New York, NY: 42.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Could Easter Island hold the key to anti-aging?"
August 1, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

A promising anti-aging compound found around the statues of Easter Island continues to impress scientists, notes Metro. Called rapamycin, it is a naturally occurring by-product of bacteria from this area. According to an article published in Chemical and Engineering News, a soil sample containing the substance was first collected by a team of researchers in 1964.

More than 12 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits) and Metro (London, U.K.: 2.2 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

FOX News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits)
"7 germiest summer hot spots"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Here are seven summer germ hot spots and what you can do to prevent them from putting a damper on your fun. … Seawater can be contaminated with waste, but sand can actually harbor more fecal bacteria and stick around longer than bacteria found in water, a study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology found.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"How an enzyme in fireflies, click beetles and glow worms yields different colors"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

The glow of fireflies at dusk is a welcome sign of summer. The same enzyme that helps give these familiar bugs their characteristic flash of yellow, yields red light in acidic conditions. Similar enzymes are responsible for red and green lights in other beetles. Despite years of study, however, scientists still don't know the molecular details of how the enzyme works. Now, in the ACS journal Biochemistry, one team reports new insights into this mystery.

Four media outlets, including Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)
"What's really in your swimming pool?"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Whether you're just cooling down or swimming competitively, the pool is a summer staple. But before you dip in, you might want to jump in the shower. Scientists warn that bad hygiene among swimmers allows harmful disinfection by-products (DBP) to form in pools. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, dives into the issue to see how swimmers can tame potentially troubled waters.

MSN (New York, NY: 127.0 million unique monthly visits)
"49 health 'facts' you've been told all your life that are totally wrong"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

The myth that MSG (monosodium glutamate) is bad for you comes from a letter a doctor wrote to the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968, where he coined the phrase "Chinese restaurant syndrome" and blamed a variety of symptoms including numbness and general weakness on MSG. Further research has not backed him up. The scientific consensus according the American Chemical Society is that "MSG can temporarily affect a select few when consumed in huge quantities on an empty stomach, but it's perfectly safe for the vast majority of people."

Hawaii News Now (Honolulu, HI: 321,000 unique monthly visits)
"New toxins discovered in E-Cigarettes"
August 2, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Scientists have discovered two additional cancer causing toxins in the vapor of e-cigarettes. The chemicals, Propylene Glycol and Glycerin, are used to create the artificial smoke and transform into carcinogens when heated. Researchers at Lawrence Berkeley National laboratory also found the hotter the e-cigarette coil becomes, the more chemicals are released in its vapors. This means the first puffs would contain the fewest toxins. The study is published in 'Environmental Science and Technology'.

More than 18 media outlets, including WAFF 48 (Huntsville, AL: 272,600 unique monthly visits), WMC NBC 5 (Memphis, TN: 257,700 unique monthly visits), KFVS CBS 12 (Cape Girardeau, MO: 251,400 unique monthly visits), WSFA NBC 12 (Montgomery, AL: 237,700 unique monthly visits), WMBF NBC (Myrtle Beach, SC: 188,600 unique monthly visits), KTRE ABC 9 (Tyler, TX: 148,200 unique monthly visits), WECT NBC 6 (Wilmington, NC: 137,000 unique monthly visits), WLOX (Biloxi, MS: 100,200 unique monthly visits), KSWO ABC 7 (Lawton, OK: 86,800 unique monthly visits), KAIT 8 (Jonesboro, AR: 85,200 unique monthly visits), KWES NBC 9 (Midland, TX: 83,900 unique monthly visits) and KCBD NBC 10 (Lubbock, TX: 44,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits)
"Making nail polish while powering fuel cells"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Hydrogen is widely regarded as a promising and clean alternative energy source. The traditional source of hydrogen (H2) for fuel cell use is water, which is split into H2 and oxygen (O2). But O2 is a low-value product. So, this week in ACS Central Science, researchers report a new approach and a new catalyst that can produce not just hydrogen but also valuable chemicals, including the most common ingredient in nail polish.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The science of steroids: Keeping the Olympics fair"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

Recent news of Olympic doping scandals have led to strict penalties and a closer look at steroid testing. Chemistry plays a huge role on both sides of the performance-enhancing drug battle. On one side are officials and scientists, aiming to keep the competitions fair; on the other are underground or overseas chemists, creating new drugs to cheat the system. This week, Reactions goes into the science of steroids—what they are, what they do and how scientists test for them.

Nine media outlets, including Cosmos Magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Momtastic (Los Angeles, CA: 1.4 million unique monthly visits)
"How to Get Rid of Head Lice (Yes, Even Drug-Resistant Lice)"
August 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The start of the school year brings memories of school supplies, reuniting with friends, and the ever looming head check for lice. … With the new school year comes a new lice-related challenge: The American Chemical Society is reporting that at least 25 states predominantly have had incidents of lice resistant to permethrin, the drug in over-the-counter products typically used to treat it.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Tiny Satellites Take on NASA's Riskiest Missions"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

At the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, NASA is preparing tiny satellites the size of briefcases for a mission to Mars. Called CubeSats, swarms of these small marvels could potentially take on NASA's riskiest missions -- think exploring the surface of Venus or the volcanoes of Io -- at a lower cost than full-size, multi-instrument satellites. Matt Davenport and JPL Chief Engineer for Interplanetary Small Spacecraft Andrew Klesh geek out on CubeSats in the latest Speaking of Chemistry episode.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Cosmos Magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits)
"If tanned skin absorbs more light, how does it protect against UV rays?"
August 1, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

When we go outside, we expose ourselves to the most common carcinogen of all: ultraviolet (UV) rays in sunlight. Most of us know we should apply sunscreen to protect our skin, but some of us forget and suffer a flaky, irritated sunburn in return. In this video, produced by the American Chemical Society's Reactions team, take a look at how UV rays affect your body and your built-in chemical defense systems that try to stop any potential damage.

Elite Daily (New York, NY: 16.1 million unique monthly visits)
"4 Ways Chili Oil Can Seriously Upgrade All Your Summer Recipes"
August 4, 2016
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

… It’s easy to have a fire burning in your heart for the taste and sensations of chili peppers, but these delicacies also benefit the health of your heart. It’s the capsaicin and other capsaicinoids in chili peppers that can benefit your heart health. An American Chemical Society report noted that these substances support cardiovascular health. They do so by reducing cholesterol levels and helping blood flow properly through your blood vessels when a gene is contracting arteries and cutting down on normal blood flow.

The Epoch Times (China: 50.0 million unique monthly visits)
"This Fabric Can Repair Itself and Neutralize Toxins"
August 1, 2016

Engineers are developing fabrics for protective suits that not only self-heal but also shield people from toxic materials. They make the fabrics by dipping them in a series of liquids to create layers of material to form a self-healing, polyelectrolyte layer-by-layer coating….The team describes the technique in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

The Guardian (London, U.K.: 23.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Florida mobilizes to control mosquitos causing 'unprecedented' Zika outbreak"
August 4, 2016

A 500 square foot area in the Wynwood neighborhood of Miami, Florida is now the epicenter of the US fight against Zika, as federal and state health officials said at least 15 people were infected with the virus by local mosquitoes….“Resistance is always a potential in a living ecosystem,” Jeff Alvis, a business manager at Amvac Chemical told Chemical & Engineering News in February, about its effectiveness.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Moisture helps catalyst in fuel cells: Proton pinball on the catalyst"
August 2, 2016

The function of fuel cells is to transform chemical energy into electricity through a chemical reaction…. The team made some interesting discoveries: it seems the moisture, rather than making the processes less efficient, gives atoms in transit a "boost" thus significantly improving the overall efficiency of the system. The study, coordinated by Fabris, was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 4.0 million unique monthly visits)
"So what are these 'artificial preservatives' that McDonald's is nixing?"
August 3, 2016

McDonald's announced on Monday that it's scrapping the artificial preservatives from its Chicken McNuggets. That definitely wasn't enough info for us; what were the preservatives, and how did they work in the first place? Preservatives keep food from oxidizing (going rancid), growing bacteria and going through other natural chemical processes, according to an article written by Louisa Dalton for the American Chemical Society's Chemical and Engineering News publication back in 2002.

Four media outlets, including BioSpace (San Francisco, CA: 187,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Study: How male bees battle STDs"
August 2, 2016

Scientists have identified an important immune response in the semen of male honey bees, a discovery that may help researchers better protect colonies against disease….The newly discovered immune molecules, detailed in the Journal of Proteome Research, could be used to develop medications for infected bees.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists find a way of acquiring graphene-like films from salts to boost nanoelectronics"
August 1, 2016

An international collaborative of researchers has used computer simulations to find the minimum thinness of a slab of salt in order for it to break up into graphene-like layers. Based on the computer simulation, they derived the equation for the number of layers in a crystal that will produce ultrathin films with applications in nanoelectronics. Their findings were in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

Five media outlets, including Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Challenging the 'rigidity' for smart soft electronics"
August 3, 2016

Soft electronic devices, such as a smartphone on your wrist and a folding screen in your pocket, are looking to much improve your lifestyle in the not-too-distant future….Their findings were recently published as the cover article in the Journal of American Chemical Society and highlighted in the Spotlights ("High-Field-Effect Mobility of Low-Crystallinity Conjugated Polymers with Localized Aggregate").

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WGN (Chicago, IL: local viewership 67,900)
"Detecting blood alcohol content with an electronic skin patch"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

[Transcript] A flexible wearable electronic patch can detect blood alcohol levels instantly. The patch can even be programmed to send results wirelessly to a smartphone. The American Chemical Society's journal ACS Sensors report on the alcohol detection patch. Developers say it can be used by bartenders, friends or law-enforcement on the spot. …

… From the Blogs

The Pioneer
"Wearing This Tattoo Can Reveal Your Alcohol Levels"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Researchers have developed a flexible wearable sensor -- consisting of a temporary tattoo which sticks to the skin -- that can accurately measure a person's blood alcohol level from sweat. … The new alcohol sensor that is wearable, portable and could accurately monitor alcohol level in sweat within 15 minutes was described in the journal ACS Sensors.

Science Newsline
"Tiny Satellites Take on NASA's Riskiest Missions"
August 3, 2016
Publicized in: OPA news release

At the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, NASA is preparing tiny satellites the size of briefcases for a mission to Mars. Called CubeSats, swarms of these small marvels could potentially take on NASA's riskiest missions -- think exploring the surface of Venus or the volcanoes of Io -- at a lower cost than full-size, multi-instrument satellites. Matt Davenport and JPL Chief Engineer for Interplanetary Small Spacecraft Andrew Klesh geek out on CubeSats in the latest Speaking of Chemistry episode.

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