ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Unsinkable metal structure mimics spiders and ants”
Nov. 7, 2019

A new metal structure is so water repellent that it refuses to sink — no matter how often it’s forced into water or how much it’s damaged or punctured. Could this lead to an unsinkable ship? A wearable flotation device that will still float after a puncture? Electronic monitoring devices that can survive in long term in the ocean?...The paper appears in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 65 media outlets, including Sky News (Isleworth, England: 18.93 million unique monthly visits), Popular Mechanics (New York, NY: 11.85 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Gigazine (Ibaraki-shi, Japan: 10.04 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.54 million unique monthly visits)
“Ski wax is being EATEN by animals at winter resorts and infiltrating the food chain at potentially toxic rates, scientists warn”
Nov. 6, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Ski wax is being eaten by animals at winter resorts and is building up across the food chain to potentially toxic rates, a study has found. Biologists concerned about the persistence of harmful chemicals in the environment took soil and animal samples from a popular Norwegian ski resort….The full findings of the study were published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Breitbart (Los Angeles, CA: 19.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Trees Often Better, Cheaper than Technology at Mitigating Air Pollution”
Nov. 6, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Planting trees and shrubs around factories and power plants may be a better air pollution mitigation strategy than installing scrubbing technologies, according to a new study….The findings, published this week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, showed natural remedies reduced air pollution by an average of 27 percent.

More than 90 media outlets, including Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 16.27 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), The Ohio State University (Columbus, OH: 10.92 million unique monthly visits), Firstpost (Mumbai, India: 7.71 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MarketWatch (New York, NY: 16.34 million unique monthly visits)
“Trump rollback on light bulbs will cost consumers and hurt the environment, lawsuit says”
Nov. 10, 2019

The phaseout of old-fashioned light bulbs is actively supported by a wide range of groups, including scientific bodies such as the American Chemical Society, consumer groups such as the Consumer Federation of America and the U.S. Public Interest Research Group, and environmental organizations such as the Sierra Club and the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN MY (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 10.03 million unique monthly visits)
“50 Best Foods for Diabetes”
Nov. 7, 2019

Pro tip: Eat your onions raw whenever you can for better benefits; a Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry study found the cholesterol-lowering properties were stronger in onions that were raw compared to those eaten cooked. Think: pico de gallo, sliced onions on sandwiches and burgers, or served in a Greek cucumber and tomato salad.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

Daily Star (London, England: 9.73 million unique monthly visits)
“China scientists create watch you can wear on your skin like a tattoo”
Nov. 6, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A new generation of video screens that are slim enough to be ‘tattooed’ onto the user’s skin have been demonstrated by a team of Chinese researchers. The futuristic stretchable screen is being touted as the next step for devices such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch but its uses could extend far beyond that, potentially opening the way to ever-closer integration of humans and robots. The findings of the team have been reported in the American Chemistry Society (ACS) Materials Letters section.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

MindBodyGreen (Brooklyn, NY: 8.80 million unique monthly visits)
“Could This Very Different Type Of Light Therapy Be The Future Of Diabetes Treatment?”
Nov. 5, 2019

Essentially, the researchers were able to restore part of the natural connection between increasing blood sugar levels and insulin production, a connection that goes awry in type 2 diabetes. The results of the study, published in ACS Synthetic Biology, showed that implanting these super light-sensitive beta cells led to better glucose tolerance, better regulation of blood sugar, reduced hyperglycemia, and higher levels of plasma insulin when exposed to blue light—all without medication.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

NBC News (Redmond, WA: 8.73 million unique monthly visits)
“Deadly mix of acid and bleach blamed for Buffalo Wild Wings death”
Nov. 8, 2019
Featuring: an ACS Expert

"Bleach by itself shouldn’t be deadly," said Rick Sachleben, a retired organic chemist and member of the American Chemical Society. "However when it’s a mixed with incompatible chemicals, it can generate toxic gasses and that’s probably what happened here." He said millions of homes and businesses across America use these cleaning agents that are perfectly safe when properly used — and potentially harmful if combined.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“OneQor Pharmaceutical Appoints Dr. Joseph Fortunak as Chief Scientific Officer”
Nov. 6, 2019

Dr. Fortunak's research includes Green Chemistry; novel, leapfrogging technologies; and pharmacokinetic enhancers to reduce the cost/toxicity of medicines and promote sustainable, global access. He has received numerous awards including the American Chemical Society "Heroes of Chemistry", and a US FDA Honor Award for Excellence and Innovation in Africa. Dr. Fortunak has over 100 publications and 35+ patents and patent applications.

More than 35 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (New York, NY: 1.83 million unique monthly visits), The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY: 1.54 million unique monthly visits) and Benzinga (Detroit, MI: 1.54 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.


Medinidia.com (Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits)
“New Treatment to Stroke Patients Discovered”
Nov. 8, 2019

Tiny transporters called liposomes were found to deliver treatment to stroke patients, revealed research carried out at The University of Manchester. Swarms of nanoparticles which are 15,000 times smaller than a pinhead may be able to deliver vital drugs to the brain, offering new hope to patients in the early stages of a stroke….Now the research carried out on mice and published today in the journal ACS Nano, shows that liposomes can potentially transport life-saving drugs across the barrier.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits) and Manchester University (Manchester, England: 2.11 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Study pinpoints new weapon to fight against deadly microbes”
Nov. 10, 2019

This study was conducted as an interdisciplinary collaboration between microbiologists, immunologists and engineers led by Dr Simon Corrie from Monash University's Department of Chemical Engineering and Professor Ana Traven from the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI). It was recently published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Applied Interfaces and Material.

More than 30 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers analyze levels of spicy compounds in chili peppers during ripening”
Nov. 7, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Anyone who has tasted a hot chili pepper has felt the burn of capsaicinoids, the compounds that give peppers their spiciness, as well as possible health benefits. Related pepper compounds, called capsinoids, have similar properties, minus the heat, so they are attractive as potential functional food ingredients and supplements. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have measured amounts of both compounds in three types of chili peppers as they ripen.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Amping up the pharma lab using electrochemistry”
Nov. 6, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Sparked by several high-profile reports, electrochemistry…is gaining popularity in the pharmaceutical field. Some researchers have embraced the technology as a tool to synthesize compounds that are difficult or impossible to make using traditional chemical reagents, and to do so in a safer, more environmentally friendly way, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Five additional media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Improved biosensor technology may lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating neurological disorders”
Nov. 11, 2019

A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and other neurological disorders. The technology, which features a unique graphene and gold-based platform and high-tech imaging, monitors the fate of stem cells by detecting genetic material (RNA) involved in turning such cells into brain cells (neurons), according to a study in the journal Nano Letters.

More than five media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

AniNews.in (New Delhi, India: 1.56 million unique monthly visits)
“Study finds way to make medical equipment infection-free”
Nov. 11, 2019

Researchers used nanoparticles to identify the presence of deadly microbes present on medical devices, like catheters, and make them infection-free. This study was conducted as an interdisciplinary collaboration between microbiologists, immunologists, and engineers…It was recently published in the American Chemical Society journal -- ACS Applied Interfaces and Material.

Five additional media outlets, including webindia123.com (Kochi, India: 1.19 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Hamilton Spectator (Hamilton, Canada: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“How lead levels in 5 Canadian cities compared to those in Flint, Michigan”
Nov. 5, 2019

The data in this chart is a statistical simulation of a dataset collected in Flint by the Virginia Tech team, and was verified by the same researchers. It was constructed in keeping with the method used by the team for a peer-reviewed academic paper published in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than five media outlets, including Waterloo Region Record (Kitchener, Canada: 432,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Prfree-org (Maharashtra, India: 1.15 million unique monthly visits)
“2-D Materials Market Overview, Industry Top Manufactures, Market Size, Industry Growth Analysis & Forecast to 2027”
Nov. 5, 2019

According to a recent study report published by Market Research Future, The global market of 2D materials is booming and expected to gain prominence over the forecast period….Graphene-based wearable textile close to commercialisation. ACS Nano says the method could allow the Graphene textiles to be produced at rates 150 metres per minute.

Breaking Israel News (Jerusalem, Israel: 601,000 unique monthly visits)
“Israeli Students Invent “Beeless’ Honey”
Nov. 11, 2019

The article, which was published in the ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering journal, describes the use of engineered bacteria to detect and measure harmful substances in food and water. The patient is for a device for preventing baldness based on body bacteria activity.

WebMD (New York, NY: 43.78 million unique monthly visits)
“High-Tech Pacifier May Monitor Baby’s Blood Sugar”
Nov. 1, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Parents of babies with type 1 diabetes have to prick their child's skin multiple times a day to check their blood sugar. But researchers may have developed a much easier way to check -- a sugar-sensing pacifier…. The findings were recently published in Analytical Chemistry, a journal of the American [Chemical] Society.

More than five media outlets, including U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 23.92 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Patch
(New York, NY: 36.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Iona College Chemistry Students Win Top Honors”
Oct. 30, 2019

In August, these remarkable chemistry students won top honors at National Meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS), in San Diego, California where the international chemistry community and the largest professional chemistry society in the world convened from August 24-28, 2019 to present their research.

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Better Than Nature: Why Fermenting Vanilla Is Good For Consumers, The Environment, And The Economy”
Oct. 30, 2019

Take vanilla, for example, the most popular flavor on the planet. The flavor comes from a molecule called vanillin, the main compound extracted from the vanilla bean. According to Chemical & Engineering News, about 85% of vanillin is chemically synthesized. Less than 1% actually comes from “real” vanilla, which involves arduous hand cultivation and harvesting from vanilla orchids, mostly in Madagascar.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.11 million unique monthly visits)
“15 Scary facts about plastic that you need to know!”
Oct. 31, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

A new study in the journal Environmental Science and Technology says it’s possible that humans may be consuming anywhere from 39,000 to 52,000 microplastic particles a year. With added estimates of how much microplastic might be inhaled, that number is more than 74,000. As if the issue of inhaling particulate matter from the air wasn’t enough!

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.54 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists develop on-the-spot saliva test for the drug Spice”
Oct. 29, 2019

Spice is not a single substance and can be one or a mixture of more than 100 subtly different man-made chemicals, making testing for it difficult….It is hoped that medical professionals will be able to trial the device within a year. The prototype test is featured in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than 165 media outlets, including Metro.co.uk (London, England: 13.55 million unique monthly visits), ITV (London, England: 11.50 million unique monthly visits), Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales: 2.35 million unique monthly visits) and Belfast Telegraph (Belfast, Northern Ireland: 1.72 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

independent.co.uk (London, England: 17.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Could Nazi scientists have found a cure to end the global malaria epidemic?”
Oct. 29, 2019

Now, work by Ward and his colleagues, reported this month in an article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, appears to corroborate the German claims. The forgotten compound killed mosquitoes in as little as one-fourth the time as DDT.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Hindustan Times
“Researchers engineer insulin-producing cells activated by light for diabetes”
Nov. 3, 2019

Researchers have found a way to engineer pancreatic beta cells that can enhance production of insulin in response to glucose levels when these cells are “switched on” by light. The study, published in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology, shows that glucose levels can be controlled in a mouse model of diabetes without pharmacological intervention.

More than 50 media outlets, including  ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), Tasnimnews (Tehran, Iran: 10.81 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The International Business Times
(New York, NY: 15.77 million unique monthly visits)
“New Battery Design Can Charge An Electric Car in 10 Minutes”
Oct. 30, 2019
Featuring: an ACS Expert

Ten minutes charging time to add 200 miles of driving range: scientists in the US have claimed a technological breakthrough that could resolve one of the key concerns surrounding all-electric vehicles…. But scaling up the design and bringing it to market may take a decade, Rick Sachleben, a member of the American Chemical Society told AFP.

More than 25 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (New York, NY: 8.40 million unique monthly visits), Firstpost (Mumbai, India: 7.71 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo! India (Bangalore, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“The day X-10 went critical”
Nov. 3, 2019
Featuring: an ACS National Historical Chemical Landmark

Once the war was over, the reactor was put to use for peacetime efforts, producing radioisotopes, utilised in industry, medicine and research….Recognised by the American Chemical Society as a National Historic Chemical Landmark in 2008, the control room and reactor face are still accessible to the public through tours provided by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Boing Boing (Kentfield, CA: 8.62 million unique monthly visits)
“A cloud weighs as much as 300 cars so why doesn’t it fall on our heads?”
Oct. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

This fascinating video from the American Chemical Society answers that question but unfortunately provides no answers about why so many clouds look like bunnies.

Dunya (Lahore, Pakistan: 6.33 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists develop blueprint of ‘quantum battery’ that never loses charge”
Nov. 3, 2019

A paper describing the research was published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry C. in July. The battery works by harnessing the power of "excitonic energy" — the state in which an electron absorbs sufficiently charged photons of light. The researchers found that their resulting battery model should be "highly robust to energy losses," thanks to the fact that their battery is prepared inside a "dark state" where it cannot exchange energy — by absorbing or releasing photons — with its surroundings.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 5.24 million unique monthly visits)
“Running outdoors can be great but a treadmill is a good option too”
Oct. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Researchers at the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry reviewed existing studies and concluded that there are benefits to mental and physical well-being from exercising in a natural environment. It revitalises, increases energy and leads to more positive engagement. If you exercise in nature, you will also notice a decrease in tension, confusion, anger and depression. This review was published in the research journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“EnerDynamic Hybrid Technologies Announces Appointment of Dr. Pritesh Kumar as Advisor to the Board of Directors”
Nov. 4, 2019

Dr. Kumar has been published in numerous scientific journals including the European Journal of Pharmacology, Pharmacology and Physiology, Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science and Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications.

More than 30 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (New York, NY: 1.83 million unique monthly visits), Benzinga (Detroit, MI: 1.54 million unique monthly visits) and Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 1.50 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

KOMO-TV (Seattle, WA: 4.76 million unique monthly visits)
“New studies find toxic flame retardants in TVs that migrate into our bodies”
Oct. 29, 2019

In a separate, peer-reviewed study recently published in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, authors found that new flame retardants designed to replace banned toxic chemicals are as toxic as original options. Further, the study found the new retardants are also escaping from TVs and other products in homes.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Yahoo! India (Bangalore, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits)
“8 Surprising Health Benefits of Mango Seeds”
Oct. 30, 2019

According to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, mango seeds have the potent ability to lower LDL cholesterol levels and stabilize overall cholesterol levels. This is due to the high polyphenol antioxidant activity in mango seeds.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

China.org.cn (Beijing, China: 2.09 million unique monthly visits)
“Chinese scientists develop new material for treatment of liver cancer”
Oct. 30, 2019

Chinese scientists have developed a nanometer material that can be used for liver cancer treatment, according to the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology under the Chinese Academy of Sciences Wednesday….A paper on the results of the research was published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces on Sept. 25.

More than five media outlets, including Ecns.cn (Beijing, China: 1.09 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Japanese chemists develop vicinal reaction for creating highly functionalized ketones”
Oct. 31, 2019

The Kanazawa team looked at ways to achieve this transformation using aldehydes, which contain a double bond between oxygen and carbon, as one of the two molecules grafted onto an alkene. As reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the goal was to create highly functionalized ketones, an important family of compounds in organic synthesis.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists propose new material for regenerative medicine capable of controlling immune response”
Nov. 1, 2019

Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with the University of Montana (USA) proposed a new promising material for regenerative medicine for recovery of damaged tissues and blood vessels….According to scientists, the proposed solution is a simpler way to control the immune response compared to existing ones. The results were published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

More than five media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Zawya.com (Dubai, India: 1.52 million unique monthly visits)
“Bahrain’s Noga planning to set up aromatics complex”
Oct. 30, 2019

The minister inaugurated the conference and exhibition on behalf of His Royal Highness Prime Minister Prince Khalifa bin Salman Al Khalifa, under whose patronage the three-day event is being held. It is organised by the American Chemical Society, represented by the Saudi Arabian International Chemical Sciences Chapter, in co-ordination with the Noga and supported by Saudi Aramco and a number of local and international companies.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Kids Activities (Flower Mound, TX: 1.05 million unique monthly visits)
“50 Science Games for Kids!”
Nov. 2, 2019

Using knowledge of chemistry, create homemade bouncy balls! Games possibilities are endless. Start with this list. Bugs on the run via American Chemical Society. Kids make molecules in the piston move faster or slower to guide bugs to a hungry chameleon. What fun!

Nigerian Tribune (Ibadan, Nigeria: 603,000 unique monthly visits)
“Could Turmeric Help Solve The Antibiotic Resistance Crisis?”
Nov. 2, 2019

“[H. pylori] is a globally-spread pathogen. It is estimated that up to 70% of people host this pathogen worldwide,” says professor Francisco Goycoolea of the School of Food Science and Nutrition in Leeds in the UK, and co-author of the paper that the team recently published in the journal ACS Applied Bio Materials.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Gizmodo (New York, NY: 36.70 million unique monthly visits)
“New Study Shows ‘Everybody on the Planet’ Is Exposed to Toxic Flame Retardants”
Oct. 22, 2019

A new study published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters reviewed more than a hundred papers—many of which this study’s authors were active researchers on—to learn more about the new class of flame retardants. What they found was pretty disturbing: These new chemicals—known as organophosphate ester flame retardants—have entered our environment in concentrations higher than the class of flame retardants that came before them.

More than 50 media outlets, including MEAWW (Los Angeles, CA: 19.59 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits) and National Post (Toronto, Canada: 3.17 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“To Combat Climate Change, We Also Need To Understand Our Black Carbon Footprint”
Oct. 24, 2019

In a recent article in Environmental Science and Technology, Dr. Hilkka Timonen from the Atmospheric Composition Research at the Finnish Meteorological Institute and co-authors urge the international community to establish the definition of a black carbon footprint.

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“How Neural Nets Will Personalize Medicine: Meet The Startup That’s Changing How We Find New Drugs”
Oct. 26, 2019

“We’ve been running the world's largest application of machine learning to drug discovery in history,” says Abe. He recently presented those project results [during a meeting of] the American Chemical Society. “This is a project that we've been running where we have over 250 projects with hundreds of universities in 36 countries,” he says. “We work on every major disease, we work on every protein class.”

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists on the Cusp of Disrupting How We Relate to Energy”
Oct. 23, 2019

Regardless, they presented [at a meeting of] the American Chemical Society evidence showing their hemp supercapacitor — a type of rechargeable battery — outperformed commercial supercapacitors by a large margin in both energy density and range of operational temperatures, for a fraction of the price of conventional graphene-based options.

BBC News (London, England: 16.33 million unique monthly visits)
“The battle to break plastic's bonds”
Oct. 23, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Prof Poeppelmeier and his colleagues at Northwestern University in Illinois, US, have developed a chemical technique which breaks down the bonds that make polyethylene - the plastic most commonly used to make the ubiquitous carrier bag - so indestructible.... His team published their breakthrough in the journal ACS Central Science.

More than 65 media outlets, including Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits), Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 16.27 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mirror (London, England: 12.24 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mercola.com
(Hoffman Estates, IL: 11.95 million unique monthly visits)
“We Are Eating Far Too Much Plastic”
Oct. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

A recent study by the nonprofit journalism organization Orb Media found major bottled water brands like Evian, Aquafina, Dasani and San Pellegrino contained significant amounts of microplastics.4 And research published in Environmental Science & Technology suggests people drinking only bottled water may receive more microplastics than those drinking tap water.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

New Florence. New Renaissance. (Tampa, FL: 10.93 million unique monthly visits)
“Skin based sensors”
Oct. 23, 2019

A new breakthrough out of Tufts University, just published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, could fast-forward us into a new era of wearable electronics that are woven like clothing, and even might be sewn into our skin and organs to track our health.

Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN: 10.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Science briefs: Nazi version of DDT may be more effective, chemist says”
Oct. 24, 2019

In postwar Allied intelligence reports that Ward examined, German scientists claimed their insecticide, called DFDT, was more effective than DDT. Allied officials dismissed those assertions. Now, Ward and his colleagues, reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, appears to corroborate the German claims. The forgotten compound killed mosquitoes in as little as one-fourth the time of DDT.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 10.81 million unique monthly visits)
“Kim Renee Dunbar Receives 2019 Basolo Award for Standout Contributions to Science”
Oct. 25, 2019

Each year, Northwestern University presents the Fred Basolo Medal to a distinguished contributor to science such as Kim Renee Dunbar. It signifies not only landmark individuals behind the advancement of science, but also the role models that inspire the students and future researchers of chemistry. The award is co-sponsored by the American Chemical Society Chicago Section.

More than 40 media outlets, including Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits), The Buffalo News (Buffalo, NY: 1.54 million unique monthly visits), Benzinga (Detroit, MI: 1.54 million unique monthly visits) and Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 1.50 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Bao Moi (Hanoi, Vietnam: 9.95 million unique monthly visits)
“Detects the effect of fullerene on lung cancer”
Oct. 25, 2019

Russian and Taiwanese scientists have discovered the anti-cancer effects of fullerene derivatives, opening up great opportunities in developing new effective drugs to treat non-small cell lung carcinoma. (non-small-cell lung carcinoma). According to the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry…fullerene has anti-cancer properties.

More than five media outlets, including News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

China Daily (Beijing, China: 5.83 million unique monthly visits)
“Instrumental analysis conference highlights major scientific breakthroughs”
Oct. 23, 2019

Keynote speakers at this year's summit include Mike McMullen, CEO of Agilent Technologies; Teruhisa Ueda, CEO of Shimadzu; and Nam Hoon Kim, vice-president at Global Applied Markets of PerkinElmer. All the three companies ranked among the top 10 scientific instrument makers worldwide in terms of sales in 2018, according to Chemical & Engineering News, a magazine published by the American Chemical Society.

The Sunday Times (London, England: 4.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Dash of turmeric holds key to beating superbugs”
Oct. 27, 2019

Using nanocapsules of curcumin — the plant compound that gives turmeric its bright yellow-orange colour — and other natural ingredients, they have successfully “disarmed” one of the world's most dangerous superbugs, Helicobacter pylori…. researchers say the study results, published in the journal ACS Applied Bio Materials, show it is effective.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Medical Daily
(New York, NY: 3.27 million unique monthly visits)
“Toddler Diabetes Test: New Pacifier Tracks Sugar Levels In Real Time”
Oct. 24, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

It may soon be easier for parents to monitor the blood sugar levels of their babies. A new pacifier with biosensors has been developed to detect and track diabetes in babies using only their saliva. The new toddler diabetes test, described in the journal Analytical Chemistry, promises to monitor glucose levels in real time. Researchers said the device offers a safe and easy way to diagnose diabetes in the smallest of patients.

More than 20 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Asharq AAwsat (London, England: 3.27 million unique monthly visits)
“Electric Shock: New Method to Kill Microbes”
Oct. 26, 2019

New research from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering introduces a revolutionary treatment for these infections, by utilizing electrochemical therapy (ECT) to enhance the ability of antibiotics to eradicate the microbes. The findings were published in The ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces journal.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

NaturalNews.com (Tucson, AZ: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Ginger: Prevent and treat common diseases with this powerful natural medicine”
Oct. 22, 2019

Researchers also found another compound that has been reported to have anti-tumor properties. A compound called 6-gingerol exhibited a cytotoxic effect on human and animal cancer cells. It inhibited cancer cell growth and contributed to the death of cancer cells, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. These compounds also don’t harm healthy cells, unlike conventional cancer treatments. Ginger also relieves nausea often caused by the treatments.

NaturalNews.com (Tucson, AZ: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“The science of smell: German researchers successfully recreate the enticing aroma of chocolate bars”
Oct. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Chocolate is a popular food ingredient, snack, guilty pleasure, flavor, drink, and superfood. It is loved by many not only for its mood-lifting properties, but also for its rich, widely varying taste and pleasant aroma. A new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry reported some interesting findings about this beloved food product.

Geek.com (New York, NY: 3.16 million unique monthly visits)
“Why Mole Day Is the Ultimate Holiday for Chemistry Lovers”
Oct. 23, 2019

The American Chemical Society says Mole Day typically occurs during National Chemistry Week, which features fun activities and meetings focused on the building blocks of chemistry. Science aside, Mole Day is also the perfect opportunity to show off your meme skills.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Why is Honey a Superfood? Scientists Discover New Proteins in Honey Responsible for the Superfood’s Antimicrobial Benefits”
Oct. 22, 2019

In a proteomic study published in the Journal of Natural Products, researchers from the Czech Republic discovered a number of proteins — some previously known, others newly identified — responsible for honey’s antimicrobial properties. They reported that honey bees supply these proteins in a stable ratio, but total protein quantity varies between different honeys.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Celiac disease is more than a gluten intolerance, science confirms”
Oct. 27, 2019

The study, published in the Journal of Proteome Research by scientists at the United States Department of Agriculture and Columbia University, took a closer look at the remaining 25 percent of wheat proteins to determine whether they also caused problems for celiac disease patients suffering from gluten intolerance.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“New method to turn wood into pharmaceutical ingredients”
Oct. 23, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Production of hazardous waste during drug manufacturing is a serious concern for the pharmaceutical industry….Researchers now report in the journal ACS Central Science a method to produce pharmaceutically relevant compounds in just two or three steps, with water as the only waste product, using renewable woodchips as starting material.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Benzinga (Detroit, MI: 1.54 million unique monthly visits)
“Immunoassay Market Growth, Product Type, Applications, Services and New Technology Brief 2019 | Share Overview, Regional Scope and Future Trends To 2025”
Oct. 24, 2019

Further, the technological advancements in the immunoassays, the medical instruments, and automated systems are benefiting the market growth. For instance, the American Chemical Society (ACS) suggested that clinical laboratories perform nearly 7 billion tests in the U.S. every year. Also, this number is likely to increase in the coming years owing to its efficacy and growing incidences of chronic illness globally.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Her Campus (Boston, MA: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Small Changes That Make a Big Difference”
Oct. 26, 2019

Since the microbeads attract and absorb toxic chemicals, this makes them highly toxic to wildlife and to humans that consume fish that had consumed microbeads. This is a huge issue since American households wash 808 trillion microbeads down the drain each day, according to a study published in Environmental Science and Technology by the American Chemical Society.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Ocean Cleanup unveils ‘Interceptor’ – Cleans up plastic in rivers”
Oct. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

The Ocean Cleanup has been taking heat from environmental groups for focusing on plastic waste in the oceans. Critics cite a study, Export of Plastic Debris by Rivers into the Sea, which was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology on October 11, 2017.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Futurism (Brooklyn, NY: 1.18 million unique monthly visits)
“This “Quantum Battery” Never Loses Its Charge”
Oct. 25, 2019

A team of scientists from the universities of Alberta and Toronto have laid out the blueprints for a “quantum battery” that never loses its charge….A paper describing the research was published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C. in July. The battery works by harnessing the power of “excitonic energy” — the state in which an electron absorbs sufficiently charged photons of light.

Five additional media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Decanter (London, England: 688,000 unique monthly visits)
“How to spot a corked wine”
Oct. 22, 2019

A potent compound with the catchy title of 2,4,6 – trichloroanisole (TCA) was identified as the main culprit of cork taint by researchers writing in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry in 1982. They conducted tests on European red and white wines and found that even tiny quantities of TCA could spoil your wine enjoyment.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits)
“Lead isotopes reveal coal fly ash contamination”
Oct. 22, 2019

A new forensic tracer that uses lead isotopes to detect coal fly ash in dust and other solids, including soil and sediments….Vengosh and his colleagues report the work in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. They analyzed 45 fly ash samples from 12 US coal-fired power plants between 2004 and 2013. Of the fly ash samples, 16 originated from Appalachian coal, 22 from coal in the Illinois Basin, and 7 from the Powder River Basin.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

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