ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

NBC News (New York, NY: 136.0 million unique monthly visits)
"This Paint May Pick Up Where Solar Panels Leave Off"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

In a few short years, house paint might be able to do more than simply brighten your walls. A team of researchers in Australia have created an experimental paint that attracts water molecules from the air and chops them up to produce hydrogen, a clean-burning fuel that can be used to generate electricity. … A paper describing the solar paint was published June 14, 2017 in the journal ACS Nano.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"5 Surprising Facts About Redheads That Make Them Rare"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

We can more easily spot a redhead in a crowd than a blonde or brunette. They are few and far between; about one to two percent of the population possesses natural red locks. … In the Reactions video, "The Chemistry of Redheads," the American Chemical Society explains redheads get their hair color and pale skin due to a genetic variant that causes their cells to produce reddish pheomelanin — a type of melanin.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The changing colors of the Statue of Liberty: Chemistry video reveals how New York's most famous landmark was turned green by the city's pollution"
June 29, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

New York's iconic, blue-green statue of liberty wasn't always green. When the statue was gifted to the US from France in 1885, she was actually a shiny copper color. A new video reveals the chemical reactions involving oxygen and even air pollution that led to her color change from copper to liberty green. … A video, published by the American Chemical Society, explains that the 305-foot (93 meter) statue was built over nine years in sections of copper skin on top of an iron skeleton.

More than 18 media outlets, including MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits), Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits), IFL Science (London, U.K.: 9.5 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Reader's Digest (New York, NY: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), India TV News (India: 1.9 million unique monthly visits) and Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogs"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

With a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement. In a study appearing in the ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach to training dogs and their handlers based on real-time analysis of what canines actually smell when they are exposed to explosive materials.

Slate (New York, NY: 12.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The Chemistry of Catnip"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Cat people know what this is all about—frisky, tripped-out felines entranced in drug-induced euphoria. Catnip, in other words. But did you know catnip didn’t evolve just to give your furbaby a buzz? In this video from Reactions, the YouTube channel of the American Chemical Society, you can learn about why catnip's origin is less about tripping kitties than it is insect sex. Really. Watch the explanation above.

IFL Science (London, U.K.: 9.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Microbots Could Be Used To Clear Water Of Bacteria"
June 29, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Access to safe drinking water is a human right, but in many parts of the world that’s more wishful thinking than a reality. Researchers now might have developed a new tool that could help remove dangerous bacteria from drinking water. The method, published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, employs a newly developed microbot that can move and kill off pathogenic bacteria like E. coli.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Mic.com (New York, NY: 6.0 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits) and Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The chemistry of July 4th: Scientists reveal what gives fireworks their red, white and blue as America prepares to let off a record $850m of pyrotechnics"
July 4, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

As July 4th celebrations erupt across America, the sky is set to be lit up with a rainbow of explosions, with the emphasis on red, white and blue. … From copper to calcium, researchers have pinpointed the compounds needed for each hue. John Conkling, a professor of chemistry at Washington College, recently demonstrated the science behind fireworks in a video for the non-profit American Chemical Society (below).

Four media outlets, including Quartz (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Tackling iron and zinc deficiencies with ‘better’ bread"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

The health effects of zinc and iron deficiencies can be devastating, particularly in developing countries. One strategy for addressing this problem involves fertilizing crops with the micronutrients. But no one has yet figured out whether these added nutrients end up in food products made with the fortified crops. Now researchers report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that this type of biofortification can boost micronutrients in bread, but other factors are also important.

Four media outlets, including Farms.com (Canada: 61,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Improving Chinese air pollution leads to business opportunities"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

China's trouble with smog and air pollution is well known, but air quality is beginning to improve as Chinese authorities start to tackle the problem. According to a story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, their efforts have made China a major market for those in the business of abating and measuring air pollution.

Four media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Quantum dots make the leap from TVs to antibacterial eye drops"
July 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Quantum dots are transforming electronic displays on TVs and tablets. But now, one group reports in ACS Nano that these tiny structures may someday provide relief for eye infections resulting from contact lens wear, trauma or some types of surgeries.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), The Register (London, U.K.: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial Synapses Could Lead to Smarter AI"
June 30, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Heads up, humanity. Artificial intelligence may be about to get a lot smarter. An international team of scientists has developed a new kind of synthetic synapse for artificial intelligence systems using the neural network model. … US and Chinese researchers have developed a synthetic synapse that can handle both kinds of signals, reconfiguring itself on the fly, according to new research published this week in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 12 media outlets, including News.com.au (Sydney, Australia: 19.5 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and MobiPicker (Chennai, India: 366,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Indoor air in schools could add to children’s exposure to PCBs"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

A new study has found that concentrations of airborne polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, inside schools could expose students to the compounds at higher levels than through diets. Researchers at the University of Iowa who conducted the study, published June 28 in Environmental Science & Technology, tested the air inside and outside six schools, four of which are within 1.5 miles of two waterways serving major industries in the area.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and University of Iowa Now (Iowa City, IA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The comeback kid – black phosphorus and its new potential"
July 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

When it was discovered over a century ago, black phosphorus was considered relatively useless. Over the past five years, however, the engineers and chemists have become intrigued by the material for its potential as an ultra-thin semiconductor, possibly ushering in a new age of flexible and smaller electronics. Now, one group reports in Nano Letters that some commonly held assumptions about black phosphorus are incorrect and that the material is exceptionally tunable.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"’Nanolock’ detects cancer mutation; could lead to early diagnoses, personalized therapies"
July 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

The moment when healthy cells turn into cancer cells is a critical point. And if caught early enough, many cancers can be stopped in their tracks. One group reports in ACS Sensors that they have developed an accurate and sensitive method that can recognize a particular mutation in the genetic code that has been implicated in the disease. It could help physicians diagnose cancers earlier and treat them with individualized therapies.

Four media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

WGN (Chicago, IL: local viewership 68,700)
"Do anti-wrinkle creams work?"
June 27, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

 [Transcript] Before you spend hundreds of dollars on anti-aging creams, listen to this. The American Chemical Society says all those breathless claims that creams can turn back time the clock are mostly empty hype. The Society says, there's no such thing as a facelift in a bottle... and people who use those magic potions can expect only modest results, at best. Researchers say anti-aging products typically fall into four categories -- vitamins, peptides, retinoids and hydroxy acids. And aside from temporarily tightening your skin, they don't make that much of a difference.

Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Find a New Way to Develop Practical Hydrogen Fuel Cells"
June 29, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Recently, one team has created an electrocatalyst to substitute the currently leading, but expensive, one of choice — platinum — that could help boost the fledging fuel-cell industry. Their research report can be found in the journal ACS Nano.

LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits)
"11 Body Parts Grown in the Lab"
July 3, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Regrowing a missing limb is no big deal — to a starfish or salamander, creatures that are well-known for using regenerative "superpowers" to replace missing arms and tails. For humans, though, what's lost is lost — or is it? … You can even observe this frequent and visible regeneration in one of your organs: your skin. In fact, humans shed their entire outer layer of skin every two to four weeks, losing about 18 ounces (510 grams) of skin cells per year, according to the American Chemical Society.

Asian Scientist (Singapore: 33,900 unique monthly visits)
"Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics"
June 28, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In a study published in ACS Nano, researchers have found that mimicking the structure of the powdery alligator-flag plant (Thalia dealbata) has enabled them to make a graphene-based aerogel that is both strong and flexible.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"What's the Truth About Apple Cider Vinegar When It Comes to Weight Loss?"
July 6, 2017

For decades, apple cider vinegar (which is referred to as ACV by its loyal fans) has been labeled as a superfood due its numerous health-boosting benefits. … Let's examine the science: Back in 2009, research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that ACV may help prevent accumulation of body fat and weight gain.

Eight media outlets, including MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits), Aol.com (New York, NY: 42.7 million unique monthly visits), Delish (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits), Country Living (Birmingham, AL: 2.1 million unique monthly visits) and Woman's Day (New York, NY: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Are microwaves safe or should we stop using them?"
July 6, 2017

Microwaves — where would mankind be without them? We use microwaves for just about anything: late-night bags of popcorn, occasional leftovers and let's not forget about our beloved Easy Mac. However, this kitchen staple proves controversial. … In a 2007 study published in The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers found that when microwaved, broccoli generally retained its minerals, but the broccoli lost its Vitamin C.

RT.com (Moscow, Russia: 39.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Revolutionary heroin vaccine could help stem opioid epidemic"
July 5, 2017

A vaccine blocking the euphoric effects of heroin could soon be on the way after it proved effective during trials in rhesus monkeys. Researchers hope to test the potentially revolutionary vaccine on humans. … The research was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including IFL Science (London, U.K.: 9.5 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Science groups ask Trump to retain advisory board integrity"
June 27, 2017

A coalition of science and engineering groups called on President Donald Trump on Tuesday to make sure that his review of the role of scientific advisory boards respects the importance of accurate scientific data. … The science groups include the American Chemical Society, American Meteorological Society, Crop Science Society of America and the Soil Science Society of America.

More than 50 media outlets, including New York Daily News (New York, NY: 149.2 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), The New York Times (New York, NY: 42.4 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), News Max (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.3 million unique monthly visits) and Minneapolis Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN: 1.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"What Are In Fireworks? A Look Inside The July Fourth Pyrotechnics As New Jersey Celebrates New Law"
July 1, 2017

The Fourth of July is peak summer for many Americans, complete with an activity-packed day away from work, barbecue in the sunshine (hopefully), a beautiful display of fireworks against the night sky and perhaps some hand-held sparklers and noise makers. … Most have what are called aerial shells inside with gunpowder and stars that are made of explosives and usually formed in small spheres or cubes, according to the American Chemical Society's 2010 report in its Chem Matters magazine.

More than 15 media outlets, including AccuWeather (State College, PA: 201.1 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Aol.com (New York, NY: 42.7 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits), San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits) and LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! Tech (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
Scientists create a circuit board that self-destructs when cooled
June 30, 2017

The idea of a circuit board that dissolves the moment it is cooled totally sounds like something out of the Mission: Impossible movies, or maybe a mystery heist flick where a rare computer disappears after being removed from its air-conditioned safe. In fact, it sums up the work being done by researchers at Vanderbilt University, described in a new paper published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Five media outlets, including Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits) and Electronic Products (131,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Incredible material that makes ANY flat object appear 3D under normal light could pave the way for a new generation of TVs and cameras"
July 6, 2017

A remarkable new material has been created that can make any 2D object appear 3D under normal light. The material, which features tiny structures millionths of a millimetre across, manipulate light in such a way that flat objects appear differently, in a similar way to a hologram. But unlike holograms, the illusion work no matter angle you look at it. … The full results were published in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits) and Laser Focus World (Tulsa, OK: 32,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inquisitr (U.S.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Male Fish are Turning Female, Growing Eggs Dues to Toxic Runoff From Prescription Birth Control Drugs"
July 3, 2017

Male fish are turning female and growing eggs in their testicles due to toxic runoff largely from prescription drugs, ecologists are warning. … The New York Times also noted a study from the journal Environmental Science and Technology that found antidepressants in the brains of fish collected downstream from wastewater treatment plants in Colorado and Iowa.

The Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Titration ColorCam is an app to help colour blind, visually impaired students"
July 3, 2017

Indian scientists have developed a smartphone app that helps colour blind and visually impaired students detect color changes in a routine lab experiment, thereby ensuring their active participation and independence. … The work has been documented in a technology report of the Journal of Chemical Education in June. For students who have low vision this can also be useful.

Six media outlets, including India Today (India: 6.2 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits) and The Hindu (Chennai, India: 804,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CBS News (New York, NY: 15.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Solar energy revolution hits barrier: Air pollution"
June 29, 2017

Solar energy is running into a pesky problem: air pollution worldwide. Researchers from Duke University found that air pollution — specifically airborne particles, which accumulate on solar cells — is cutting solar energy output by more than 25 percent in certain areas of the world, causing billions of dollars of losses. The research was published this week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

Eight media outlets, including Sputnik News (12.9 million unique monthly visits), Quartz (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits) and Clean Technica (1.6 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"New Invention Puts the Power of Static in Your Pocket"
July 5, 2017

For most people, static electricity is a mildly painful nuisance. However, engineers in recent years have been working to harness this seemingly random phenomenon to generate small amounts of electricity cheaply and easily. … The paper charger is described in a recent issue of the journal ACS Nano.

PopSugar (San Francisco, CA: 8.0 million unique monthly visits)
"This Summer, We're Spilling the Tea — on Our Hair, to Lighten It!"
July 3, 2017

Like many brunettes, I spent my Summers squeezing lemon juice onto my hair in hopes of its elusive lightening properties. Since I was a natural hair virgin, it seemed like the only way to go blond. Turns out, I may have been looking in the wrong grocery store aisle. Tea shares many of the same properties as hair dyes, minus the gunky chemicals. … According to this study from The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, brewed green tea creates catechins, antioxidants found in henna and many plant dyes.

Hindustan Times (India: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"The healthy kitchen: Use these 6 Indian ingredients to boost your health"
June 29, 2017

Most of us cringe at the thought of going on a diet. But who said healthy eating has to be boring and bland? Better health may be only a dash and sprinkle away as it turns out, you can add sizzle to your diet and still stay fit. … According to a Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry study, herbs have higher antioxidant activity than fruits, vegetables and some spices, including garlic.

Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Reconsider Obama fracking rules"
June 27, 2017

… Led by a research scientist from the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), a study published in Environmental Science & Technology concluded that previous methane emissions studies relied on measurements taken during peak emissions events, which are both episodic and not reflective of average emissions rates. As a result, they may significantly overstate methane emissions from oil and natural gas development.

Teen Vogue (New York, NY: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"How to Tell if Your Sunscreen Protects You From the Sun"
July 9, 2017

Few things evoke the carefree feelings of summer and beach vacations like the smell of sunscreen. … Retinyl palmitate, a form of vitamin A, appears as an inactive ingredient in many sunscreens. In fact, “it’s used in a lot of skin- and hair-care products,” Kristin M. Omberg, a chemist and fellow of the American Chemical Society, tells Teen Vogue. “Vitamin A helps skin produce new, healthy cells but can cause dryness and sun sensitivity.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Creating a Full Palette of Blues"
June 26, 2017

Georg Brandt, born on this day in 1694, holds the distinction of being the first named person to isolate a new metal since ancient times. … Bismuth was one of what Brandt considered to be “semi-metals” according to The Journal of Chemical Education: substances “which [resemble] the metals in color, weight and form but which [are] not malleable.”

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Organic chemist uses blow fly eggs as forensics tool"
July 5, 2017

Something new for the world of forensic science: solving crime mysteries with the help of blow fly eggs. With this, experts can establish the body’s time-of-death to within a few hours. … The research is published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The Chemistry of Olive Oil Will Make You an Instant Food Snob"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Dipping bread in a bowl of fresh, extra virgin olive oil ranks as one of the most pleasurable gastronomic experiences possible. But as this new Reactions video explains, there’s more to this delicious and surprisingly healthy condiment than meets the eye.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Geeks are Sexy (Los Angeles, CA: 1.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), YubaNet (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits) and GONG (New Orleans, LA: 92,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Economist (London, U.K.: 28.6 million unique monthly visits)
"A new antibiotic for drug-resistant tuberculosis"
June 22, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Tuberculosis has plagued humanity for thousands of years. The discovery in the 19th century of its cause, a bacterium (pictured above) called Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the consequent development of better hygiene, helped bring that plague under control. Then, in the mid-20th century, what many hoped would be the final nail in its coffin appeared: antibiotic drugs. Unfortunately, TB is back. After a few decades in which antibiotics did indeed seem to be working miracles, some strains of M. tuberculosis have evolved resistance to them. … As they and their colleagues describe in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, they have discovered a compound, produced by another bacterial pathogen that kills resistant strains of M. tuberculosis.

Six media outlets, including News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits) and Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Bloomberg Businessweek (New York, NY: 17.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Urban Farming Won't Save Us From Climate Change"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

In places such as New York and Boston, the appeal of the self-sustaining rooftop farm is irresistible. … Proponents claim that city vegetable gardens are a solution to nearly every urban woe, providing access to healthy foods in neighborhoods that lack it, as well as economic stimulation, community engagement, and significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. But a new study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology says that in colder climates such as the Northeast's, the emissions reductions are minimal.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), The Pig Site (Chicago, IL: 91,300 unique monthly visits), Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits) and Feed Stuffs (Boardman, OR: 16,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"New sensors could enable more affordable detection of pollution and diseases"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

When it comes to testing for cancer, environmental pollution and food contaminants, traditional sensors can help. The challenges are that they often are bulky, expensive, non-intuitive and complicated. Now, one team reports in ACS Sensors that portable pressure-based detectors coupled with smartphone software could provide a simpler, more affordable alternative while still maintaining sensitivity.

Six media outlets, including ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Sensors (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Health.com (New York, NY: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Do Anti-Aging Products Actually Work?"
June 23, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Plenty of over-the-counter anti-aging products make the enticing claim that they can turn back the clock, for a brighter, smoother, younger-looking complexion. And many people drop hard-earned cash on these seemingly magic serums, creams, and the like. But can these products really make 40 the new 20? Probably not, according to the American Chemical Society (sigh).

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report in ACS Nano that mimicking the structure of the "powdery alligator-flag" plant has enabled them to make a graphene-based aerogel that meets these needs.

Nine media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), New Electronics (London, U.K.: 25,000 unique monthly visits) and Graphene-Info (Lansing, MI: 14,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits)
"The Truth Behind Turmeric's Health Claims"
June 23, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Does turmeric emit a health aura so strong that it's needless to expound upon the specifics? … But these articles, while attention-grabbing (and mud-slinging), may have buried much of the nuance of the paper on which they all drew, The Essential Medicinal Chemistry of Curcumin, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry early this year. The article, which was the most comprehensive review of the effects of curcumin to date, concludes that the chemical “is an unstable, reactive, nonbioavailable compound and, therefore, a highly improbable lead” for potential pharmaceuticals.

More than 10 media outlets, including Food52 (Brooklyn, NY: 918,187 unique monthly visits), Danbury News-Times (Danbury, CT: 175,604 unique monthly visits), Connecticut Post (Bridgeport, CT: 166,048 unique monthly visits), The Stamford Advocate (Stamford, CT: 124,278 unique monthly visits), The Norwalk Hour (Norwalk, CT: 45,781 unique monthly visits) and Greenwich Time (Greenwich, CT: 34,048 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

AARP (Washington, DC: 6.0 million unique monthly visits)
"8 Healthy, White Foods"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Popcorn is a great low-calorie source of fiber, which plays a starring role in reducing cholesterol levels and controlling blood sugar. But there's more: It contains hefty amounts of concentrated cancer-fighting chemicals called polyphenols, according to research reported at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. Unfortunately, the hulls, the part of the popcorn that gets caught in your teeth, have the highest concentrations of fiber and polyphenols, so keep a toothpick handy.

Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)
"New Paint Turns Your Walls into Endless Power Sources"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Researchers have developed a solar paint that can absorb water vapour and split it to generate hydrogen – the cleanest source of energy. … The research has been published as “Surface Water Dependent Properties of Sulfur Rich Molybdenum Sulphides – Electrolyteless Gas Phase Water Splitting” in ACS Nano, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including The Science Times (Irvine, CA: 138,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

University of Hawaii News (Honolulu, HI: 422,011 unique monthly visits)
"Ralf Kaiser named American Chemical Society fellow"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

University of Hawaii at Mānoa Physical Chemist Ralf I. Kaiser has been elected to the 2017 class of Fellows of the American Chemical Society (ACS) for his outstanding contributions to science and the profession, and for his equally exemplary service to ACS. Kaiser is one of 65 members who will be inducted at the ACS National Meeting on August 21 during the Society’s 254th National Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C.

Four media outlets, including Chemical Processing (Atlanta, GA: 23,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"First dual-targeting nanoparticles lower cancer’s defenses and attack tumors"
June 21, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as one of the most exciting directions in cancer treatment.  But the approach only works in a fraction of patients and can cause nasty side effects. Now, in the journal ACS Nano, scientists report the development of the first dual-cell targeting immunotherapy nanoparticle that slows tumor growth in mice with different cancers. In their study, up to half the mice in one cancer group went into full remission after the treatment.

Four media outlets, including Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits) and Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fibre2Fashion (India: 237,100 unique monthly visits)
"US textile industry gaining new ground"
June 24, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Advancing technology in the textile and fibre sector is allowing the US textile industry to gain new ground after years of losing market share to overseas manufacturers, a report in the Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, says. US’ textile companies were crowded out of the market by low-cost overseas labour.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits)
"First CRISPR Crop Could Debut in 2020"
June 20, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The gene-editing technique known as CRISPR/Cas9 made a huge splash in the news when it was initially announced. But the first commercial product, expected around 2020, could make it to the market without much fanfare: It's a waxy corn destined to contribute to paper glue and food thickeners. The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores what else is in the works.

Yale 360 (New Haven, CT: 86,900 unique monthly visits)
“Climate-driven Change in Eating Habits Behind Drop in Mercury Accumulation for Polar Bears, Finds Study”
June 22, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Hair samples taken from southern Beaufort Sea polar bears between 2004 and 2011 found mercury levels down about 13 percent per year among adults, according to a study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 12 media outlets, including National Post (Ontario, Canada: 3.5 million unique monthly visits), The Province (Vancouver, Canada: 33,045 unique monthly visits), Edmonton Journal (Canada: 30,064 unique monthly visits), Calgary Herald (Alberta, Canada: 18,774 unique monthly visits), Ottawa Citizen (Canada: 11,594 unique monthly visits), Windsor News Online (Canada: 10,207 unique monthly visits) and Regina Leader-Post Online (Saskatchewan, Canada: 4,356 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"18 Reasons Summer is the Best Time To Lose Weight"
June 22, 2017

…  Make a point to leave the gym and exercise outside, even if it's just for 15 minutes! After all, a study published in Environmental Science and Technology found that exercising in a natural environment outdoors may improve energy levels and decrease stress more than working out inside—which can boost weight loss even more!

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Custom-built molecule shows promise as anti-cancer therapy"
June 22, 2017

Scientists at the University of Bath funded by Cancer Research UK have custom-built a molecule which stops breast cancer cells from multiplying in laboratory trials, and hope it will eventually lead to a treatment for the disease. … The study is published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Next-gen solvents capture carbon with half the energy"
June 20, 2017

U.S. energy production could increase with the help of an improved carbon capture technology that use about half the energy of today's standard technologies. Emissions captured at fossil fuel power plants could in turn be used to harvest more crude by injecting it into underground oil fields. …  These are called "water-lean" solvents and are the focus of a new paper in the American Chemical Society journal Chemical Reviews.

Six media outlets, including EIN News (San Antonio, TX: 102,300 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Richland, WA: 52,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Purdue University News (West Lafayette, IN: 8.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Research collaboration brings new concepts for potassium-ion batteries"
June 21, 2017

Researchers are making progress in developing rechargeable batteries based on potassium, a potential alternative to lithium that’s less expensive and far more plentiful, and also have shown how to derive carbon for battery electrodes from old tires. … The three papers were published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, Chemical Communications and the Journal of the Electrochemical Society.

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fast Company (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"From Breastfeeding To Gender Neutrality: Unicode's New Emojis Are Signs Of The Times"
June 19, 2017

Yes—new emojis! … And curious about what’s on tap for 2018’s emojis? Unicode has already released some of 2018’s emoji proposals; they include gender-neutral red-haired, curly-haired, white-haired, and bald faces, an evil eye charm, a mooncake, and a set of science-oriented emoji including a lab coat, a petri dish, DNA, and goggles. The science emoji are the result of a Unicode petition by GE and the American Chemical Society.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists 3D-print graphene foam, a first"
June 21, 2017

A team of researchers from Texas and China have managed to create graphene foam using a 3D printer. The production method could eventually yield commercial quantities of the material. … Scientists at Rice University and China's Tianjin University, however, have found a way to turn nongraphene starting materials into graphene foam using a 3D printer. Researchers detailed their breakthrough in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), News Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), 3ders.org (Netherlands: 276,000 unique monthly visits), 3DPrint.com (Washington, DC: 273,900 unique monthly visits), Biospace (San Francisco, CA: 187,100 unique monthly visits), 3D Printing Industry (176,200 unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Prevention (Emmaus, PA: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Foods You Should Be Eating After 40"
June 21, 2017

While cancer and heart disease might not have been huge concerns for you a few years ago, your risk for both jumps as you move into your 40s and beyond. … Cooking tomatoes may help your body absorb more of their healthy antioxidants, says research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Israel21c (Israel: 93,500 unique monthly visits)
"Multiple sclerosis study reveals possible trigger"
June 20, 2017

Multiple sclerosis, one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases, affects some 2.5 million people worldwide and has no known cure. … A study published by Israeli scientists in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS) pinpoints a structural instability in the myelin membranes, the “insulating tape” surrounding neurons.

Four media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and The Tower (Washington, DC: 25,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Gold nanoclusters possess surprisingly high wide-spectrum antimicrobial activity"
June 21, 2017

Researchers in Singapore have demonstrated that it is possible to confer antimicrobial activity to gold nanoparticles, which have long been considered as inert, by way of controlling their sizes to the nanocluster range. As the team reports in ACS Nano ("Antimicrobial Gold Nanoclusters"), they found that sub-2 nm sized gold nanoclusters showed antimicrobial effect that was absent from their larger counterpart, gold nanoparticles (>2 nm).

Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Devise New Catalyst for Organosilicon Compounds"
June 22, 2017

It is presently essential to design new catalysts for developing new and useful organosilicon compounds, which are in great demand in fields ranging from the electronics to the medical industries. … A report featured in ACS Catalysis highlights that the new catalyst obtained a turnover number of approximately 1,900,000 over a time span of 24 hours, far surpassing other supported-rhodium catalysts that have been developed to date.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.