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ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“20 of the Best Hangover Foods to Ease Your Pain”
July 14, 2021

Alcohol puts a strain on the liver. But happily, our favorite toast topper contains certain compounds that can help protect against liver damage, per a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Avocados are also high in potassium, a mineral that’s lost during a drinking binge. Guess we know what we’ll be having for breakfast Saturday morning.

MSN Arabia (Dubai, United Arab Emirates: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“24 weird and wonderful life-changing tech from around the world”
July 19, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Plastic waste is a serious problem. It's causing all sorts of issues for our environment and for marine life as it makes its way into the oceans. Now researchers from the University of Chemistry and Technology in Prague have begun a study using self-propelled microrobots designed to clear up the waste. These bots are said to be about the size of a red blood cell and are able to use solar power to move while destroying microplastics as they go…. Adapted from ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

independent.co.uk (London, England: 13.69 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists create a new type of plastic that evaporates in the sun and air”
July 14, 2021

A group of Chinese scientists have created a type of plastic that degrades when it is exposed to sunlight and air, in what could be a breakthrough in the fight against plastic waste. The scientists… were experimenting with colour-changing plastics in 2020 when they realised that it broke down after a week of exposure to air and light…. The Huazhong University study was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets covered the story.

Chron.com (Houston, TX: 11.41 million unique monthly visits)
“Add Fatty Acids to Taste: New Technology Reveals Single Cancer Cells Have Different Appetites for Fatty Acids”
July 16, 2021

A new method… provides insights into cancer biology by allowing researchers to show how fatty acids are absorbed by single cells…. “This work is the first example of profiling fatty acid uptake in conjunction with aberrant protein signaling in cancer cells at single-cell resolution and represents an important advance in the single-cell metabolic assay,” said ISB Assistant Professor Dr. Wei Wei, co-corresponding author of a paper published today in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 95 media outlets, including SFGate (San Francisco, CA: 9.46 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits)
“India’s ‘warm’ vaccine shows results against all variants of concern”
July 16, 2021

The ‘warm’ vaccine formulations… result in antibodies that neutralise all current SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern…. The findings have been published (on Thursday) in the peer-reviewed ACS Infectious Diseases journal and will pave the way for clinical development leading to human trials.

More than 140 media outlets, including The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 8.17 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NDTV (New Delhi, India: 9.04 million unique monthly visits)
“Kindle With Colour Display? Researchers Develop New Electronic Paper That May Make It Possible”
July 13, 2021

Kindle and other Ebook readers generally use glare-free screens and a electronic ink display, or electronic paper, that only offers visuals in black and white, limiting their use to some extent. Researchers… are working on a new type of paper-thin screen that offers an optimal colour display and minimises energy consumption by using ambient light. Being energy-intensive also makes these screens commercially viable…. The researchers, who have published their study in the journal Nano Letters….

More than 20 media outlets covered the story.

Newsbreak (Mountain View, CA: 7.61 million unique monthly visits)
“SIUE’s O’Brien Receives 2021 American Chemical Society St. Louis Award”
July 17, 2021

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Professor of Chemistry Leah O’Brien, PhD, has won the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) St. Louis Section 2021 Saint Louis Award. She will accept the award Friday, October 1 at a banquet following a spectroscopy-focused research symposium to be held on the SIUE campus.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

The Seattle Times (Seattle, WA: 3.60 million unique monthly visits)
“Seattle study of breast milk from 50 women finds chemical used in food wrappers, firefighting foam”
July 18, 2021

The PFAS study of the 50 Puget Sound women was a cooperative effort involving researchers from Indiana University, the University of Washington’s Children’s Research Institute and Toxic-Free Future. Their findings went through peer review, and were published in a May edition of Environmental Science & Technology. This study represented the first PFAS analysis of breast milk in U.S. women since 2004, and offered a mixed progress report.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

World Economic Forum (Geneva, Switzerland: 2.24 million unique monthly visits)
“This new technology uses your smartphone to test for COVID-19”
July 17, 2021

Researchers… have developed a COVID-19 antibody test that makes use of a smartphone camera. The test could significantly improve the turnaround time and efficiency of infectious disease diagnosis, both for COVID-19 and beyond. The work is published in the latest issue of Nano Letters and involves U of T researchers from the Institute of Biomedical Engineering, department of chemistry in the Faculty of Arts & Science and Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Groundbreaking technology offers hope for people who have lost their sense of touch”
July 12, 2021

The technology involves a tiny sensor that is implanted in the nerve of the injured limb, for example in the finger, and is connected directly to a healthy nerve. Each time the limb touches an object, the sensor is activated and conducts an electric current to the functioning nerve, which recreates the feeling of touch…. The study was published in the prestigious journal ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists identify existing drugs that may inhibit SARS-CoV-2 virus”
July 13, 2021

The Yale researchers… used a combination of X-rays and computers to target the main SARS-CoV-2 protease, a key enzyme that plays an important role in COVID-19 infection. Perampanel was one of 14 drugs identified from a virtual screening effort to discover potential inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2, from an initial survey of about 2,000 known drugs…. The results of their research were published by the American Chemical Society.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Minimally invasive exosome spray may help repair the heart after myocardial infarction”
July 15, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Heart attack, or myocardial infarction, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although modern surgical techniques, diagnostics and medications have greatly improved early survival from these events, many patients struggle with the long-term effects of permanently damaged tissue, and the 5-year mortality rate remains high. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a minimally invasive exosome spray that helped repair rat hearts after myocardial infarction.

More than 15 media outlets covered the story.

MSN Health & Fitness (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“50 Secrets About Fast Food You Never Knew”
July 1, 2021

An Environmental Science & Technology study found phthalates to be associated with inflammation, and another study in Environmental Health connected higher exposure to phthalates with metabolic syndrome: a disease also commonly associated with increased levels of inflammation. Inflammation can cause a myriad of health problems, from obesity to nutrient deficiencies.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN Health & Fitness (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“15 reasons to eat more chocolate”
July 8, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

According to research presented at the 2014 American Chemical Society meeting, chocolate feeds the good microbes in your gut, helping it ferment into anti-inflammatory compounds.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 43.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Like in ‘Postapocalytpic Movies’: Heat Wave Killed Marine Wildlife en Masse”
June 29, 2021

As suffocating heat hits much of Western North America, experts are concerned about human safety and power failures….Power failures have increased by more than 60 percent since 2015, even as climate change has made heat waves worse, according to new research published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 25 media outlets, including FOX Business Network (New York, NY: 5.00 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 15.00 million unique monthly visits)
“AHA News: Watermelon Is a Summertime Staple. But What’s Hidden Behind the Sweetness?”
July 1, 2021

In a small 2013 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, citrulline in watermelon juice was credited with helping relieve sore muscles in athletes. Citrulline also is linked to the production of nitric oxide, which is important for the health of blood vessels. Several small studies suggest citrulline in watermelon extract could lower blood pressure, although those effects were seen in people eating the equivalent of more than 3 pounds of watermelon a day for six weeks.

More than 10 media outlets, including Drugs.com (Auckland, New Zealand: 6.28 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits)
“Agricultural boon: Researchers produce urea in single step at room temperature”
July 8, 2021

In what may lead to a key discovery for the agricultural sector, a group of research scholars from West Bengal has devised a method to produce urea (chemical fertilizer) at room temperature in a single step using nano-cataylst…. the study has been published in journals by the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Chemical Society.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News Break (Mountain View, CA: 7.61 million unique monthly visits)
“Barrios Technology awards a UHCL Chemistry professor a $5,000 scholarship”
July 5, 2021

The UHCL’s chemistry program provides opportunities for students seeking a bachelor’s or master’s degree in chemistry. The program attained the prestigious status of American Chemical Society or ACS accreditation in 2003, followed by re-accreditation in 2009. Any student from any level is encouraged to take advantage of the various research opportunities that the chemistry program offers.

National Geographic Magazine (Washington, D.C.: 6.79 million unique monthly visits)
“New cancer treatments may be on the horizon – thanks to mRNA vaccines”
July 8, 2021

And a study in a 2019 issue of the journal ACS Nano found that when mice with lymphoma (cancer of the lymphatic system) were given an mRNA vaccine along with a checkpoint inhibitor drug, they experienced significantly reduced tumor growth and 40 percent of them experienced complete tumor regression.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 6.45 million unique monthly visits)
“A Graphene ‘Camera’ Images the Activity of Living Heart Cells”
July 12, 2021

In a proof-of-principle experiment described in Nano Letters in June, McGuire and a group of physicists from UC Berkeley detailed how they created and ultimately successfully used a “camera” for recording electrical activity in living cells—which can be hard to monitor across large tissues in real time using other methods. It’s not an optical camera; this one is made from carbon atoms and lasers.

Live Science (New York, NY: 5.98 million unique monthly visits)
“Microbes in cow stomachs can help recycle plastic”
July 2, 2021

Microbes fished from the stomachs of cows can gobble up certain kinds of plastic, including the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) used in soda bottles, food packaging and synthetic fabrics…. Bacteria of the genus Acinetobacter also cropped up in high quantities in the liquid, and likewise, several species within the genus have been shown to break down synthetic polyesters, according to a 2017 report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

Lifehacker (New York, NY: 4.59 million unique monthly visits)
“Throw Your Fireworks Away the Right Way”
July 4, 2021

Most fireworks contain a mixture of fuel, an oxidizer (to provide the oxygen necessary for burning), and the color-producing metal- and chlorine-donating compounds, Elizabeth Wilson, a pyrotechnician licensed in California explained in an article for Chemical & Engineering News. And even though the firework has been set off, the remains could still contain some of the original chemicals.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Seeking Alpha (New York, NY: 3.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Standard Lithium: Faster, Cheaper And Greener Lithium Mining To Spark EV Revolution”
June 29, 2021

The company’s Scientific Advisors are a very impressive array of scientists and engineers with specific backgrounds that relate directly to Standard Lithium’s technology and goals. They include… Professor Barry Sharpless, who received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry in 2001 and the Priestley Medal, the American Chemical Society’s highest honor, in 2019.

Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Did lead poisoning cause downfall of Roman Empire? The jury is still out”
July 5, 2021
Publicized in: ACS video release

The empire's slow decline is typically attributed to barbarian invasions, failed military campaigns, economic challenges, government corruption, and an over-reliance on slave labor, among other factors. But it's also been suggested that the toxic effects of lead poisoning on increasingly erratic rulers may also have contribute to its demise—a debate that has been revisited in a new Reactions video from the American Chemical Society.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 2.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Polyhydroxyalkanoate Market Size Worth $105 Million by 2026 at 8% CAGR – Report by Market Research Future (MRFR)”
June 29, 2021

The journal American Chemical Society (ACS) Omega, reported that the bacterium Zobellella denitrificans ZD1 can consume wastewater and sludge to produce polyhydroxybutyrate. This biopolymer can be used instead of petroleum-based plastics and reduce the burden on landfills on the environment. The growing awareness about such an advantage encourages relationships between top-notch biotech firms and companies dealing in consumer goods.

More than 20 media outlets covered the story.

Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 2.82 million unique monthly visits)
“From Waste to Wealth: Converting CO2 into Butanol Using Phosphorous-Rich Copper Cathodes, finds a new GIST Study”
July 6, 2021

We are trying to develop a Cu-based electrode for electrochemical conversion of CO2 that avoids *CO dimerization and can help us increase the selectivity of the product so that additional power consumption from separation processes can be avoided," explains Mr. Minjun Choi, a Ph.D. student at the university and the paper's first author. Their research has recently been published in volume 6 (issue 6) of the journal ACS Energy Letters on 11 June 2021 and has been available online since 11 May 2021.

More than 85 media outlets covered the story.

Mint (New Delhi, India: 2.36 million unique monthly visits)
“The best fabric combos for cloth masks”
June 29, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The face mask has become the need of the hour in the fight against covid-19. It has also become a fashion statement, with many fabric choices available in the market. But have you ever thought about how effective are they, especially in containing a sneeze? Now, researchers at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Biomaterials Science and Engineering have used high-speed videos of a person sneezing to identify the optimal cloth mask design.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

ScienceAlert (Sheridan, WY: 1.97 million unique monthly visits)
“Ingeniously Simple Dental Treatment Could Heal Tooth Cavities Without Any Fillings”
July 5, 2021

Scientists have invented a product that can encourage tooth enamel to grow back, which means we could finally have a game-changing way to treat dental cavities…. The team has published their research in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

ScienceAlert (Sheridan, WY: 1.97 million unique monthly visits)
“For The First Time, Scientists Have Connected a Superconductor to a Semiconductor”
July 8, 2021

Scientists have succeeded in combining two exciting material types together for the very first time: an ultrathin semiconductor just a single atom thick; and a superconductor, capable of conducting electricity with zero resistance…. The research has been published in Nano Letters.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

The Epoch Times-Chicago Edition (Chicago, IL: 1.93 million unique monthly visits)
“Nearly Half of US Cosmetics Contain This Toxic Chemical”
July 11, 2021

This means that although the manufacture of these toxic chemicals may have stopped in the United States, they still can arrive back in the country via products made elsewhere. And, when it comes to cosmetics, the three-year study at Notre Dame, published in Environmental Science & Technology Letters, clearly indicates that the problem of PFAS chemicals in makeup is an ongoing issue, including a lack of labeling.

More than 10 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers develop smart wound dressing with built-in healing sensors”
June 28, 2021

The new study published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, with lead author Dr Adam Truskewycz (now at the University of Bergen, Norway), is the first to develop fluorescent magnesium hydroxide nanosheets that could contour to the curves of bandage fibers. The research team synthesised the nanosheets - which are 10,000 to 100,000 times thinner than a human hair - and embedded them onto nanofibres.

More than 15 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Breakthrough method for tracking mRNA molecules with fluorescence”
June 30, 2021

RNA-based therapeutics offer a range of new opportunities to prevent, treat and potentially cure diseases. But currently, the delivery of RNA therapeutics into the cell is inefficient. For new therapeutics to fulfil their potential, the delivery methods need to be optimised. Now, a new method, recently presented in the highly regarded Journal of the American Chemical Society, can provide an important piece of the puzzle of overcoming these challenges and take the development a major step forward.

More than 10 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Small biotech companies join with pharmaceutical giants to manufacture drugs”
June 30, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Many of the most promising new molecules to treat diseases come from smaller biotechnology firms, which often lack resources to scale up production when it's time for their drugs to go to large-scale clinical trials or the market. Now, a cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, describes how small biotechs are teaming up with big pharmaceutical outsourcing firms to manufacture their molecules.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Zinc-embedded polyamides inactivated SARS-CoV-w and influenza A”
July 1, 2021

In a recent study, interdisciplinary researchers demonstrated how they removed the IAV H1N1 and the SARS-CoV-2 from woven PA66 fabric to measure the number of remaining active viruses. Using this advancement, they found that a zinc-containing polyamide 6.6 (PA66)-based fabric decreased the IAV H1N1 and pandemic SARS-CoV-2 titer by approximately 2-logs (100-fold). The study provides new insights into the development of testing protocols for “pathogen-free” fabrics. This research is published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Shape of extracellular vesicles in body fluids could be a biomarker for identifying cancer types”
July 7, 2021

A recent study by scientists from Japanese universities has shown that the shape of cell-derived nanoparticles, known as "extracellular vesicles" (EVs), in body fluids could be a biomarker for identifying types of cancer. In the study, the scientists successfully measured the shape distributions of EVs derived from liver, breast, and colorectal cancer cells, showing that the shape distributions differ from one another. The findings were recently published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Study examines the effectiveness of fluorescent labels used to monitor liposome accumulation in tumors”
July 8, 2021

Dmitri Simber… has released the results of a new study of the effectiveness of different types of fluorescent labels used to monitor the accumulation of liposomes in tumors. The new study, titled "Liposomal Extravasation and Accumulation in Tumors as Studied by Fluorescence Microscopy and Imaging Depend on the Fluorescent Label," was published on July 1, 2021, in the prestigious journal of the American Chemical Society, ACS Nano.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

The Jerusalem Post (Jerusalem, Israel: 1.58 million unique monthly visits)
“Israeli team aims to restore sense of touch to those with nerve damage”
July 12, 2021

The technology… involves a tiny (half a centimeter by half a centimeter in size) sensor that can be implanted on a damaged nerve and connected to a healthy nerve. The implant, made of two small pieces of insulating material, generates static electricity by friction, meaning that it does not require any electricity or batteries…. The research was recently published in the peer-reviewed journal ACS Nano.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

The New Indian Express (Chennai, India: 1.47 million unique monthly visits)
“Chandigarh diary: Vaccination centres increase in Chandigarh and more”
July 6, 2021

Assistant Professor at the Department of Chemistry and Coordinator, National Interdisciplinary Centre of Vaccine, Immunotherapeutic and Antimicrobials of Punjab University, Dr. Deepak B Salunke has been invited to serve for a three year term as member of the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Medical Chemistry by Early Career Editorial Advisory Board.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

The List (New York, NY: 1.11 million unique monthly visits)
“When You Eat An Apple Seed, This Is What Happens To Your Body”
June 29, 2021

Amygdalin forms part of the apple seed's chemical defenses and, while it isn't harmful in itself, it can degrade into hydrogen cyanide when it's chewed or damaged…. Apples aren't the only fruit whose seeds contain amygdalin either; the seeds of many fruits in the Rosaceae family contain amygdalin, from apricots and peaches to cherries and even almonds (via American Chemical Society). 

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Study reveals role of balanced branched-chain amino acids supplementation in lipid metabolism”
July 7, 2021

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) are composed of leucine (Leu), isoleucine (Ile), and valine (Val). Since the three BCAAs share the same enzymes, they may have a competitive metabolic relationship, thus balancing dietary BCAAs is significant for nutrition. Recently, a team of researchers… revealed the role of balanced BCAAs supplementation in lipid metabolism.The study was published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry on June 10.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Fatherly (New York, NY: 1.03 million unique monthly visits)
“6 Reasons the Best Afterschool Activities Happen Outside”
June 29, 2021

A multistudy analysis of 1,252 subjects in Environmental Science & Technology showed that time spent outside improved self-esteem and mood across genders and age groups. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the still-developing minds and personalities of the youngest showed the greatest improvements in self-esteem with increased time spent outdoors.

*Production Note: We will not be issuing ACS in the News on July 6, 2021, due to the U.S. Independence Day Holiday. ACS in the News will resume on July 13, 2021, with a double edition.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“What Is the Pollen Count? 3 Best Ways to Check”
June 23, 2021

Your local pollen count may vary depending on the weather, as pollen spreads more easily when it's hot, dry, and windy. Rainy days might bring you down, but at least weed and grass pollen counts will be lower. Trees, not so much. A 2020 study published in Environmental Science & Technology Letters shows that a downpour decreases intact pollen concentrations, but it can also increase pollen fragments for as much as 11 hours after heavy rain.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“12 Surprising Things Your Bad Breath Is Trying to Tell You”
June 23, 2021

Breath mints may promise fresher breath but that promise is fleeting, according to research [published in a journal of] the American Chemical Society. That minty fresh scent is likely only masking the underlying odour problem and, even worse, the sugar in regular mints can feed stinky bacteria, making your problem worse. Skip the mints and focus on brushing and flossing, the researchers say.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“What’s the healthiest way to cook rice? Science weighs in”
June 24, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Researchers presenting at the American Chemical Society in Denver (ACS) have developed a way to cook rice which reportedly could reduce the calories absorbed by the body by up to 60%. To understand how it works, we need to look at what rice is made up of.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

MSN News Canada (Toronto, Canada: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Half of Portland area’s 22 top National Merit winners hail from just 2 schools”
June 27, 2021

Marissa Kuo: She received the outstanding applied chemistry award from the Portland chapter of the American Chemical Society at the Northwest Science Fair for her research on green chemistry methods for degrading neurotoxic herbicides. She interned at Portland State University in a computer science lab where she studied computer algorithms for night vision. She helped lead her school’s Asian Student Union and research club.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Authority Magazine (Baltimore, MD: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Mehran Moghadda of Kurvana: 5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started Leading a Cannabis or CBD Business”
June 24, 2021

Furthermore, Mehran is an advocate in the broader cannabis community. He is an active member on the Advisory Board for the University of California, Irvine’s Center for the Study of Cannabis, which is one of the first multi-disciplinary centers for Cannabis studies. He also maintains active memberships with the National Cannabis Industry Association, the California Cannabis Industry Association, the American Chemical Society, and the American Society for Testing and Materials.

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits)
“COVID-19 survivors may only need one shot of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine to be protected from the virus, study suggests”
June 23, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

For the study, published in ACS Nano, the team recruited 36 people who had previously gotten COVID-19 and 26 people with no known history of the virus. Each participant received one shot of either the Pfizer-BioNTech or the Moderna coronavirus vaccine. The 26 people with no history of COVID, and by virtue no antibodies, all developed antibody levels similar to someone with a mild infection of the virus after getting the first shot…

More than 115 media outlets, including U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 15.02 million unique monthly visits), Los Angeles Times (El Segundo, CA: 11.56 million unique monthly visits), Patch (New York, NY: 6.81 million unique monthly visits) and Drugs.com (Auckland, New Zealand: 6.28 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 8.17 million unique monthly visits)
“ARCI develops cost-effective catalysts for metal-air battery”
June 25, 2021

The results obtained were comparable to that of conventionally used noble metal-based catalysts with metal loading of 20 per cent or higher. The research has been published in the journal ACS Applied Energy Materials. The scientists have used an ion-exchange strategy that positions the metal ions in the carbon framework homogeneously, limits the particle size and offers control on composition and size at a very low loading of transition metal.

More than 25 media outlets, including Mint (New Delhi, India: 2.36 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Politico (Arlington, VA: 7.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Covid and the new spirit of collaboration”
June 23, 2021

Manuel Guzman, president of the American Chemical Society’s data and analysis division known as CAS, sees some encouraging change already underway. The pandemic “will redefine our business and how we operate,” he said. CAS has already begun to “push out science in a proactive way” for both clients and non-customers alike, he said.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Fast Company (New York, NY: 4.07 million unique monthly visits)
“There are thousands more toxic chemicals in plastic than we thought”
June 24, 2021

A new study finds that plastics release many more toxic chemicals throughout their life cycle than previously thought, posing significant risks to both people and the planet. Until now, only a small number of these chemicals have been properly studied. But the new paper published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology provides the most comprehensive database of chemicals in plastic, and offers a terrifying look into just how harmful the material may be.

More than 15 media outlets covered the story.

Everyday Health (New York, NY: 3.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Potentially Toxic Chemicals Called PFAS Are Common in Cosmetics, Study Finds”
June 22, 2021

For the study, which was published in June 2021 in Environmental Science and Technology Letters, scientists tested 231 cosmetic products — including concealers, eye makeup, foundations, lip color, and mascara — for fluorine, a marker of polyfluoroalkyl and perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). Overall, 52 percent of these products had high levels of fluorine, suggesting that the cosmetics likely contain high levels of PFAS.

More than 15 media outlets, including Smithsonian (Washington, D.C.: 2.79 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Seeking Alpha (New York, NY: 3.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Merck Desperate To Get Back In Coronavirus Race, With A Pill”
June 26, 2021

A testament to the effectiveness of new manufacturing techniques, is that this compound was first synthesized in late July 2020. The biological data was so encouraging that they had up to 210 people working on the project at one time. Unfortunately, not much has been released about the potential side effects yet. They were supposed to release the safety data at the Spring American Chemical Society meeting last month, but failed to elaborate.

Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 2.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Nth Cycle Announces Shawn Montgomery as VP of Operations”
June 24, 2021

Before joining Nth Cycle, Shawn served as COO of 7AC Technologies for where he led the commercialization of their technology resulting in a successful company sale to Emerson Electric in 2020. Prior to that Shawn has served in key roles such as General Manager of Seldon Technologies and Director of Operations at A123 Systems. Shawn received his ACS Certified Bachelor's in Chemistry from Ohio Wesleyan, his Masters in Inorganic Chemistry from Cleveland State University, and MBA from Tiffin University.

More than 60 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Protein found in cow’s milk could increase absorption of blueberries’ nutrients”
June 23, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Pairing blueberry pie with a scoop of ice cream is a nice summer treat. Aside from being tasty, this combination might also help people take up more of the "superfruit's" nutrients, such as anthocyanins. Researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry show that α-casein, a protein found in cow's milk, helped rats absorb more blueberry anthocyanins and their byproducts, boosting accessibility to these good-for-you nutrients.

More than 10 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Molecule derived from tarantula venom may help relieve chronic IBS pain”
June 23, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

For patients who have inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), the condition is literally a pain in the gut. Chronic -- or long-term -- abdominal pain is common, and there are currently no effective treatment options for this debilitating symptom. In a new study in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science, researchers identify a new potential source of relief: a molecule derived from spider venom. In experiments with mice, they found that one dose could stop symptoms associated with IBS pain.

More than 15 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers identify the best masks for blocking respiratory droplets”
June 24, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

During the COVID-19 pandemic, cloth face masks became a way to help protect yourself and others from the virus. And for some people, they became a fashion statement, with many fabric choices available. But just how effective are they, especially in containing a sneeze? Now, researchers reporting in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering used high-speed videos of a person sneezing to identify the optimal cloth mask design.

More than 35 media outlets covered the story.

Benzinga (Detroit, MI: 1.55 million unique monthly visits)
“The Clean Energy Compound That Could Change The World”
June 24, 2021

Some of the world's smartest minds are now predicting that using ammonia as a fuel source will play a massive role in the global war against climate change. In fact, industry trade publication Chemical & Engineering News reports that "ammonia could come to the (climate change) rescue by capturing, storing, and shipping hydrogen for use in emission-free fuel cells and turbines. Efforts are also underway to combust ammonia directly in power plants and ship engines."

More than 95 media outlets covered the story. 

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 44.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Makeup may contain potentially toxic chemicals called PFAS, study finds”
June 15, 2021

The "No PFAS in Cosmetics Act" was introduced in the US House and Senate on Tuesday, following the release of a new study that found high levels of a marker for toxic PFAS substances in 52% of 231 makeup products purchased in the United States and Canada. Some of the highest levels were found in foundations (63%), waterproof mascara (82%) and long-lasting lipstick (62%), according to the study published Tuesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than 860 media outlets, including MSN News (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.: 26.53 million unique monthly visits), FOX News (New York, NY: 21.55 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 15.02 million unique monthly visits), New York Post (New York, NY: 15.00 million unique monthly visits) and IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo Finance (New York, NY: 32.68 million unique monthly visits)
“XPhyto Therapeutics Corp. Featured in Syndicated Broadcast Covering Latest Progress Report on Mescaline Program for Psychedelic Therapies”
June 15, 2021

Mescaline (3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine) is a naturally occurring psychedelic compound found in certain cacti, such as peyote, and as recently reported in the publication ACS Pharmacology and Translational Science, naturalistic use of mescaline is associated with self-reported psychiatric improvements and enduring positive life changes.

More than 20 media outlets covered the story.

Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits)
“Aloe vera flower’s ‘herbal memory’ can store electronic data, says IIT-Indore study”
June 19, 2021

The work has been published in an international journals ‘ACS Applied Electronic Materials’. The “herbal memory” works on the principle of an electronic device called ‘memristor’, which stores information through electrical signals, unlike magnetic tapes and hard disks where the magnetic properties of materials are used.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

The Hill (Washington, D.C.: 8.05 million unique monthly visits)
“Inventor creates new material that can keep buildings cool without air conditioning”
June 15, 2021

A Boston professor created an invention that reflects the heat off of rooftops and even sucks the heat out of homes and buildings — and the real kicker is that it is 100 percent recyclable…. For his efforts, the American Chemical Society journal [ACS] Applied Materials & Interfaces featured his invention, and Zheng won a National Science Foundation CAREER Award grant for his research.

The Spruce (New York, NY: 7.63 million unique monthly visits)
“What Really Works to Get Rid of Skunk Odor”
June 15, 2021

What has been proven to work, according to a variety of sources, is a home concoction developed by Paul Krebaum and published [in] Chemical & Engineering News back in 1993: 1 quart 3% hydrogen peroxide, 1/4 cup baking soda, 1 teaspoon liquid detergent. Mix in a large, open container and use immediately.

News Break (Mountain View, CA: 7.61 million unique monthly visits)
“Is Zinc a Friend or Foe to Kidney Stones?”
June 16, 2021

The nutrient zinc can be both helpful and harmful when it comes to kidney stones, a new study finds. There have been two conflicting theories about the link between zinc and kidney stones. One suggests zinc stops the growth of the calcium oxalate crystals that make up the stones. The other suggests zinc changes the crystals' surfaces, which encourages further growth. Turns out both are correct, according to findings recently published in the journal Crystal Growth & Design.

More than five media outlets, including Drugs.com (Auckland, New Zealand: 6.28 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Patch (New York, NY: 6.81 million unique monthly visits)
“UC Berkeley News: Graphene ‘Camera’ Captures Real-Time Electrical Activity Of Beating Heart”
June 16, 2021

The graphene camera represents a new type of sensor useful for studying cells and tissues that generate electrical voltages, including groups of neurons or cardiac muscle cells. To date, electrodes or chemical dyes have been used to measure electrical firing in these cells. But electrodes and dyes measure the voltage at one point only; a graphene sheet measures the voltage continuously over all the tissue it touches. The development, published online last week in the journal Nano Letters….

More than 10 media outlets covered the story.

Patch (New York, NY: 6.81 million unique monthly visits)
“University of Iowa Names New University Distinguished Chairs”
June 17, 2021

Scherer joined the UI in 1998 and is a professor in the College of Engineering…. In addition, Scherer helped develop a new, innovative graduate research training program focused on sustainable water development. She has served as a member of the Environmental Protection Agency's Environmental Engineering Scientific Advisory Board and as associate editor of the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

IBNLive (Noida, India: 3.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Aliens are Real? Scientist Explains Why We Will Soon Find Life in Other Worlds”
June 17, 2021
Publicized in: ACS video release

In a video uploaded by the American Chemical Society on its science communication YouTube channel Reactions, scientist Samantha Jones explains where we are in the path of finding life on other planets. Jones starts with the question of what life is. According to NASA, life is a chemical system that has two basic features — it is self-sustaining and capable of Darwinian evolution.

Gizmodo (New York, NY: 3.48 million unique monthly visits)
“NASA Has Spotted Sneaky Methane Emissions From the Biggest Oilfield in America”
June 4, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

The Environmental Defense Fund calculated recently that methane emissions from the Permian could be four times higher than current EPA estimates… And knowing what kinds of facilities are leaking and how is key to figuring out a way to get emissions down. The new research, which was funded in part by NASA and published this week in Environmental Science & Technology Letters, shed some light on where the worst offenders are.

The Miami Herald (Doral, FL: 2.42 million unique monthly visits)
“Your pee could tell you if you have a brain tumor – with great accuracy, study says”
June 18, 2021

A urine test developed by researchers at the Nagoya University in Japan can pinpoint a person who has a brain tumor — regardless of its size or malignancy — with 100% accuracy, according to a new study…. It can be sterilized, produced on massive scales and completed by patients any time anywhere with “minimal effort,” according to the study published recently in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 55 media outlets, including ScienceDailly (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Financial Express (Noida, India: 1.98 million unique monthly visits)
“‘Wonder material’ graphene can help detect COVID variants quickly, accurately: Study”
June 17, 2021

These sheets were also tested in the presence of other coronaviruses, like Middle East respiratory syndrome, or MERS-CoV. The study, published in the journal ACS Nano on Tuesday, found that the vibrations of the antibody-coupled graphene sheet changed when treated with a COVID-positive sample, but not when treated with a COVID-negative sample or with other coronaviruses.

More than 30 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Carbon-based antimicrobial nanoweapons to fight COVID-19”
June 15, 2021

In a recent review article published in the journal ACS Nano, interdisciplinary researchers from across the world evaluated the role of carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs), such as fullerene, carbon dots, graphene, and their derivatives as promising alternatives to combat COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) and other microbial infections. Due to the mainly physical mode of action of CBNs, there is a low risk of antimicrobial resistance and a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“$1 million grant awarded to eliminate the need for drug refrigeration”
June 16, 2021

With a $1 million grant from Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Scott Medina, Penn State assistant professor of biomedical engineering, will study a new protein coating that could eliminate the need for drug refrigeration…. In 2020, Medina published a study in ACS Nano on delivering therapeutic medications directly to a precise area of the body through an acoustically sensitive carrier, guided by ultrasound. The proposed DARPA-funded study is a spin-off of that study's findings.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Bruisable artificial skin opens up opportunities for detecting damage in prosthetic devices”
June 16, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

When someone bumps their elbow against a wall, they not only feel pain but also might experience bruising. Robots and prosthetic limbs don't have these warning signs, which could lead to further injury. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed an artificial skin that senses force through ionic signals and also changes color from yellow to a bruise-like purple, providing a visual cue that damage has occurred.

More than 20 media outlets covered the story.

Salon (New York, NY: 1.62 million unique monthly visits)
“It’s raining “forever chemicals” in the Great Lakes”
June 15, 2021

The findings add to the growing body of research on airborne movement and deposition of PFAS. This past April, another group of researchers, from the College of Wooster, shared their findings from testing rainwater in Ohio and Indiana at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. The scientists found 17 different PFAS chemicals in the rainwater.

Inside Higher Ed (Washington, D.C.: 1.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Lukewarm on Juneteenth”
June 21, 2021

Cellas Hayes, a graduate research assistant in the University of Mississippi’s School of Pharmacy who recently published an opinion piece in ACS Chemical Neuroscience on the barriers scientists of color face, said he’d rather have a day off to vote than Juneteenth. “This is a time when people are actively passing voter suppression laws targeted towards minorities, even though they are not going to outright say it,” he said.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“How to shut down the power stations of cancer cells”
June 16, 2021

PDT is a non-toxic and non-invasive alternative to current treatments to eliminate cancer cells such as chemotherapy, radiation treatment, and elective surgery. For the patient, these treatments can have numerous side-effects that affect their quality of life, but fortunately, less abrasive options are in development…. At TU/e, Jan van Hest and his research group have been making steady progress on improving the PDT approach, as demonstrated by a study published in ACS Nano last year.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Cognitive care using medicinal plant peptides”
June 18, 2021

One way of tackling the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is to prevent the underlying adverse changes in the brain. A team of researchers from the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) has recently published a study in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, dedicated to neuroprotection against these toxic changes. They used tiny free-living soil worms—called Caenorhabditis elegans—and the often-ornamental butterfly pea plant for their exploration.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

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