ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Breaking news from ACS’ 249th National Meeting

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial Sweetener Saccharin Shows Promise In Cancer Treatment"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

You may have heard whispers that the artificial sweetener saccharin (commonly known as Sweet‘N Low) is a carcinogen. But according to a new study presented today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, it could actually be useful in developing treatments for aggressive cancers by deactivating a protein found to facilitate the spread of cancer.

U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Smog Plus Pollen May Mean Even More Sneezing"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Certain air pollutants may boost the potency of a birch tree pollen that plays a big role in seasonal allergies, researchers say. In laboratory tests and computer simulations, researchers found that two pollutants -- ozone and nitrogen dioxide -- have a significant effect on the pollen, called Bet v 1. Specifically, these pollutants appear to provoke chemical changes in the pollen that seem to raise its potency. … The investigators were scheduled to present the findings Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

More than 30 media outlets, including News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.0 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Health Central (New York, NY: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Health24.com (Cape Town, South Africa: 157,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), The New Indian Express (Chennai, India: 93,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) and Big News Network (Sydney, Australia: 42,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Fox News (New York, NY: 25.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial sweetener may help treat aggressive cancers, study finds"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

For years, negative reports have surrounded artificial sweeteners, claiming evidence of everything from being a carcinogen to causing cardiovascular disease. But now new research suggests a popular sugar substitute could lead to new treatments for some of the most common types of cancers. In findings presented at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), a team of researchers from the University of Florida College of Medicine examined how saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet 'N Low®, Sweet Twin® and Necta®, reacted with a protein found in aggressive cancer cells.

WebMD (Orlando, FL: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Vitamin D Supplements Might Slow Prostate Cancer"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Vitamin D supplements may slow or prevent low-grade prostate cancer from progressing, a small new study suggests. "Vitamin D decreases inflammation in tissues, and inflammation is a driver of cancer," explained Bruce Hollis, the study's lead researcher and a professor of pediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. … The study results were scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

More than 15 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Turning 'packing peanuts' into POWER: Packaging foam could be used to create batteries that charge your phone"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The small foam pieces used to protect fragile goods in boxes could soon power your phone thanks to a battery breakthrough. Researchers have developed a way of turning the so-called 'packing peanuts' into carbon, which can then be added to the types of lithium batteries used in everyday gadgets. During tests the packing peanut-based batteries could store 15 per cent more power than current technology - and they even outperformed similar batteries made of graphite. They presented their findings at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 50 media outlets, including Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits), Pacific Standard Magazine (North Hollywood, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Engadget (U.S.: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The potency of airborne allergens may be boosted by air pollution"

March 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

It often appears as if allergic conditions are worsened by air pollution. The American Chemical Society has reported via Newswise on March 22, 2015, that air pollutants could boost the potency of common airborne allergens. Air pollutants associated with climate change could also be a primary contributor to the unparalleled increase in the number of people who are seen sneezing, sniffling and wheezing during allergy season.

The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits)
"These Guys Roam Your Backyard at Night but Scientists Just Used Them to Create an Antivenom That Could Save Thousands of Lives"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

There’s no playing opossum here. It has been known for several decades that opossums were not susceptible to venomous snakebites — some even eat poisonous snakes. But research that could lead to a possible antidote for human use didn’t move forward until recently. … “It appears that the venom protein may bind to the peptide, rendering it no longer toxic,” Komives said in a statement, presenting the team’s findings Sunday at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"A Compound From Plants Could Replace Bitumen to Make Roads Greener"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Construction teams around the world rely on bitumen—an incredibly sticky by-product of crude oil production—as the main binding agent for asphalt. But a team of scientists reckon that a compound found within plants could help replace it, making road-building a greener, more sustainable practice. Such attempts haven't worked. But Slaghek explained at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society yesterday that integrating lignin into the bitumen at the molecular level does produce a useable mixture for road-laying.

More than 18 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Build (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

 

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)

"Foam Packing Peanuts May Hold Key To Better Smartphone Batteries"

March 23, 2015

Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

 

Researchers have discovered a new way to convert Styrofoam packing peanuts into a usable energy source -- namely, a component of quick-charging lithium batteries. The discovery could possibly reduce the price of smartphones as well as help curb waste. … The research will be presented at the American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition, which started this week and runs through March 26.

Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Vitamin D may keep low-grade prostate cancer from becoming aggressive"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

New research presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society suggests that taking vitamin D supplements may slow or reverse the progression of low-grade prostate tumors, without the need for surgery or radiation therapy.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"New opossum-based antivenom could save thousands of lives"

March 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists will report in a presentation today that they have turned to the opossum to develop a promising new and inexpensive antidote for poisonous snake bites. They predict it could save thousands of lives worldwide without the side effects of current treatments. The presentation will take place here at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The meeting features nearly 11,000 reports on new advances in science and other topics. It is being held through Thursday.

More than 15 media outlets, including Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), LaboratoryEquipment.com (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Healthday (Norwalk, CT: 226,000 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Disinfectant chlorine may promote antibiotic resistance"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Interacting with pharmaceuticals in water, chlorine, a common disinfectant used in water treatment, may encourage the formation of unknown antibiotic compounds that could add to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance, a study warns. The research was presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Denver.

More than 20 media outlets, including Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Healthline (San Francisco, CA: 3.3 million unique monthly visits), Science World Report (New York, NY: 101,700 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits), University Herald (New York, NY: 53,700 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (U.S.: 28,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Special microbes make anti-obesity molecule in the gut"

March 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Microbes may just be the next diet craze. Researchers have programmed bacteria to generate a molecule that, through normal metabolism, becomes a hunger-suppressing lipid. Mice that drank water laced with the programmed bacteria ate less, had lower body fat and staved off diabetes -- even when fed a high-fat diet -- offering a potential weight-loss strategy for humans. The team will describe their approach at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 7 media outlets, including Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

SciCasts
"Special Microbes Make Anti-Obesity Molecule in the Gut"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Microbes may just be the next diet craze. Researchers have programmed bacteria to generate a molecule that, through normal metabolism, becomes a hunger-suppressing lipid. … The team will describe their approach a presentation at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

ClickGreen
"Scientists find link between traffic pollution and increase in allergies"

March 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Two air pollutant groups linked to climate change could also be a major contributor to the unparalleled rise in the number of people sneezing, sniffling and wheezing during allergy season. …  The findings will be presented today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society.

Sci GoGo
"Opossum-based antidote to snake venom could save thousands of lives"

March 22, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A peptide found in opossums that can be manufactured easily could provide a novel and inexpensive antidote for venomous snake and scorpion bites. The researchers behind the discovery believe it could save thousands of lives worldwide, without the side effects of current antivenom treatments. … Details of the work were presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

…IN OTHER NEWS

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"What Does 'Hypoallergenic' Mean? Apparently Whatever Manufacturers Want It To Mean, Scientists Say"

March 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Have we all been fooled? A new video from the American Chemical Society (above) reveals that many household products labeled as "hypoallergenic" -- from cosmetics to baby products -- are not backed by scientific evidence indicating that they are, indeed, less likely to provoke allergic reactions in customers (which is basically what that word means).

More than 20 media outlets, including Salon (New York, NY: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), Raw Story (Washington, DC: 10.0 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"The chemistry of craft beer"

March 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

The flavors and aromas of beer all come down to chemistry. Reactions, a series from the American Chemical Society, takes a look at craft beer chemistry.

More than 75 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), Salon (New York, NY: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), NOLA.com (New Orleans, LA: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Lockerdome (U.S.: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Daily Herald (Chicago, IL: 449,900 unique monthly visits), Bend Bulletin (Bend, OR: 247,200 unique monthly visits), New Zealand Herald (N.Z.: 183,000 unique monthly visits), Charleston Daily Mail (Charleston, WV: 116,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Image quality of MRI's can be improved by green tea"

March 21, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

An Indian-root researcher in Germany has found another, great use for green tea - to enhance the picture quality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRIs) testing. Sanjay Mathur, chief of the establishment of inorganic science at University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany, effectively utilized mixes from green tea to help picture growth tumors in mice. … "The catechin-covered nanoparticles are guaranteeing contender for utilization in MRIs and related applications," Mathur said in his paper that showed up in journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 25 media outlets, including Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 75,700 unique monthly visits), Khaleej Times (Dubai, UAE: 63,000 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 19,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 12,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
""Biodegradeable" Plastic Is Not So Biodegradeable After All"

March 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Biodegradeable plastic, now often found in plastic bags and bottles, contains additives that are supposed to get microbes to break down tough plastic faster. But a new study from Michigan State University finds that some of these additives may actually doing, well, jackshit. … [Environmental Science & Technology].

More than 20 media outlets, including UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), SpaceDaily (Sydney, Australia: 75,500 unique monthly visits) and Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 18,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 24.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Chemistry lesson: Here's how your microbrew was born"

March 16, 2015
Publicized in: OPA news release

Do you love quad IPAs with high alcohol content, or pistachio cream ale and stout beer infused with bacon? A new video in the American Chemical Society's "Reactions" series shows how chemistry makes microbrews like these come to life.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New approach to improve IVF treatment"

March 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA PressPac

Women who have difficulty getting pregnant often turn to in-vitro fertilization (IVF), but it doesn't always work. Now scientists are taking a new approach to improve the technique by studying the proteins that could help ready a uterus for an embryo to implant in its wall. Their report could help researchers develop a new treatment that could potentially increase the success rate of IVF. The study appears in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research.

More than 5 media outlets, including R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Mixing Bleach Is The Cleaning Mistake You Definitely Don't Want To Make"

March 17, 2015

Even though green cleaning practices have made their way into many homes, some jobs are best left to that time-tested combination of bleach and elbow grease. According to scientists at the American Chemical Society (ACS), that's actually one of the only times bleach should get mixed with something else.

ABC News (New York, NY: 21 million unique monthly visits)
"10 Habits of People Who Love to Work Out"

March 22, 2015

When the weather outside is nasty, it's natural to want to take exercise inside. But if it's nice and bright out, bike along that lakefront path, run through your neighborhood early in the morning, or find an outdoor yoga class. "Nature makes you feel alive—and when you feel great, you are more likely to want to do the workout again," says Minardi. Besides, in one 2011 study in Environmental Science & Technology, sweating outdoors was associated with a boost of energy, more engagement in the activity, and better mental wellbeing. Go ahead—sweat, and say ahhh.

More than 5 media outlets, including Health Magazine (New York, NY: 6.7 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The Plot Sweetens"

March 21, 2015

These white carrots came out top of blindfold taste trials in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry and were demonstrated to have the highest amounts of aromatic flavour chemicals. Sadly, what they have in flavour they lack in nutrition, containing virtually no carotene or anthocyanins.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Electric Cars Can Make Cities Cooler"

March 19, 2015

Electric vehicles have gotten a lot of support because they have the potential to reduce air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Now it seems these cars may have another benefit—cooler cities. …  A study published in Environmental Science & Technology in 2011, for instance, concluded that electric cars in China actually generated more harmful air pollution than gasoline cars because the country's electricity came largely from coal-fired power plants.

Chicago Tribune (Chicago, IL: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"North Central College student first to earn nation’s only degree in chemical microscopy"

March 17, 2015

North Central College senior Marissa Bartz is looking forward to June when she'll become the first to complete the nation's only program offering a bachelor's degree in chemical microscopy. … Students in North Central College's innovative chemical microscopy program gain a solid liberal arts education during three years of study in the American Chemical Society-accredited curriculum.

Breaking news from ACS’ 249th National Meeting

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"This Cooking Trick Cuts Rice Calories in Half"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Strangely enough, it involves adding fat. A cup of white rice has about 200 calories—not insignificant considering it’s most often used as a small part of a larger dish. But there’s an easy, natural way to make rice less caloric: add a little fat, then let it cool. According to research presented at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting, using coconut oil and a refrigerator can slash calories by as much as 60%.

More than 75 media outlets, including Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), WTOP.com (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), Cosmopolitan (New York, NY: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 92,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)

"Opossums could one day save victims of poisonous snake bites, researchers predict"
March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Let's face it, friends: Opossums aren't the most beloved creatures, at least by humans. But these little guys could save your life one day. Opossums have a knack for fending off the effects of poisonous snake bites, and a team of researchers say they've developed the makings of an antivenom therapy without the same kind of nasty side-effects that burden current therapies. Led by San Jose University Prof. Claire F. Komives, the team presented the findings Sunday at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society.

More than 25 media outlets, including The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 405,000 unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits) and Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! News  (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Don’t Throw Away the Packing Peanuts, They Could Charge Your Gadget"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Millions and millions of packing peanuts are used to protect fragile shipments every year, and scientists have discovered how to put them to good use. Scientists have discovered a new technology that converts polystyrene packing peanuts into high performance carbon electrodes to make lithium-ion batteries. … The team will present their paper “Upcycling of Packing-Peanuts into Carbon Microsheet Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries” at the 249th American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition in Denver taking place from March 22 to 26.

More than 30 media outlets, including Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), PC Magazine (New York, NY: 2.5 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Canoe (Toronto, Canada: 225,000 unique monthly visits) and Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"In the future, you may be able to turn invisible with this roll-on squid tape"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

For the past century or so, military scientists say, the United States has been locked in a perpetual search for new ways to deceive its enemies' eyes. In World War II, strategists covered military equipment in netting and coated it with dull-colored paint. More recently, researchers have been outsmarting thermal imagery by experimenting with fabrics that mask a soldier's heat signature...The team was able to coat reflectin onto a surface "similar to common household packing tape," according to a video (below) released by the American Chemical Society. What resulted is a sheet of invisibility stickers that can be used for camouflage.

More than 35 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Science World Report (New York, NY: 101,700 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
"Eat rice cold for fewer calories"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists say they have found a way to make rice less calorific - boil it with coconut oil and then refrigerate for half a day before eating. According to the Sri Lankan researchers, treating rice in this way reduces its calories by up to 60%. They told the American Chemical Society how the method made the starch in the rice less digestible so the body took on less fuel than it otherwise would. UK nutrition experts cautioned there was no quick fix to losing weight.

NBC News (New York, NY: 32.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Colorado Marijuana Study Finds Legal Weed Contains Potent THC Levels"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

This is not your father's weed. Colorado marijuana is nearly twice as potent as illegal pot of past decades, and some modern cannabis packs triple the punch of vintage ganja, lab tests reveal for the first time...What's really in — and not in — Colorado's retail weed surprised LaFrate. After analyzing more than 600 samples of bud provided by certified growers and sellers, LaFrate said he detected little medical value and lots of contamination. He presents those findings Monday to a national meeting of the American Chemical Society, a nonprofit scientific group chartered by Congress.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"New Research On Appetite-Suppressing Bacteria Could Help Fight Obesity"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists already know that different kinds of gut bacteria -- those microbes inside our GI tracts that don't share our DNA yet are oh-so-integral to our health -- play crucial roles in breaking down our food, producing some vitamins and keeping harmful microbes at bay. For people struggling with excess weight and obesity, there is even more exciting emerging research on how gut bacteria may play a role in helping maintain our weight. … Sean Davies of Vanderbilt University presented some tantalizing research Mar. 22 at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society conference in Denver, Colorado.

More than 20 media outlets, including Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits), RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 405,000 unique monthly visits), Nature World News (106,900 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 92,900 unique monthly visits), NUTRAingredients.com (Crawley, U.K.: 43,000 unique monthly visits) and EndoNurse (Phoenix, AZ: 13,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Yahoo! Health (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Yes, Your Allergies Are Getting Worse (No, You’re Not Imagining It)"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

With the start of spring comes the beginning of allergy season for so many. But before you solely blame the newly blossoming trees for your worst-allergy-season-ever itchy eyes and runny nose, consider the new research presented yesterday at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society indicating that the rise in allergy diagnoses and symptoms could be tied to an increase of certain environmental pollutants caused by climate change.

More than 50 media outlets, including The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Fox19.com (Cincinnati, OH: 185,900 unique monthly visits), WNCT.com (Greenville, NC: 173,900 unique monthly visits), My Fox Philly (Philadelphia, PA: 160,500 unique monthly visits), The Week (U.S.: 468,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) and Kait8.com (Jonesboro, AZ: 119,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

BBC News (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
"Gold in faeces 'worth millions'"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

US researchers are investigating ways to extract the gold and precious metals from human faeces. The group identified gold in waste from American sewage treatment plants at levels which if found in rock could be worth mining. Details were outlined at the 249th national meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Denver.

More than 100 media outlets, including Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits), The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 20.1 million unique monthly visits), Guardian (London, U.K.: 16.5 million unique monthly visits), CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Inquisitr (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits), The Verge (U.S.: 26.6 million unique monthly visits), The Blaze (New York, NY: 26.2 million unique monthly visits), Gawker (U.S.: 21.3 million unique monthly visits), New York Post (New York, NY: 11 million unique monthly visits), Mic (New York, NY: 20.9 million unique monthly visits), Salon (New York, NY: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Vice (U.S.: 6.3 million unique monthly visits), London Evening Standard (London, U.K.: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), New Scientist (London, U.K.: 3 million unique monthly visits), The Economic Times (India: 1.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), RT (Russia: 587,700 unique monthly visits), News.com.au (Sydney, Australia: 572,800 unique monthly visits), Express (London, U.K.: 393,800 unique monthly visits), I4U News (Lewes, DE: 96,200 unique monthly visits), ZME Science (Bucharest, Romania: 89,300 unique monthly visits), e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) and The Herald (Glasgow, Scotland: 64,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

New York Daily News (New York, NY: 39.1million unique monthly visits)
"Marijuana tripled in strength in the last 30 years: study"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

These potency levels are high. Marijuana is three times more potent than it was in the '80s, experts say.

A new study carried out by Andy LaFrate, president of Charas Scientific, a research lab in Colorado, tested the potency in more than 600 marijuana samples from recreational pot merchants and concluded that it's more potent than illegal pot from past decades. "We've seen a big increase in marijuana potency compared to where it was 20 or 30 years ago," LaFrate said in a video released by the American Chemical Society. "I would say the average potency of marijuana has probably increased by a factor of at least three."

More than 100 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 11.5 million unique monthly visits), CNBC (New York, NY: 11.1 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), Daily Caller (U.S.: 8.5 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), LiveScience (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Healthline (San Francisco, CA: 3.3 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Vocativ (New York, NY: 496,200 unique monthly visits), 10tv.com (Columbus, OH: 265,200 unique monthly visits), 19actionnews.com (Cleveland, OH: 225,200 unique monthly visits), WRCBtv.com (Chattanooga, TN: 84,800 unique monthly visits), Business Insider Australia (Sydney, Australia: 67,400 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Convert Packing Peanuts Into Better Battery Parts"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Packing peanuts are great at protecting valuables, but what in the heck do you do with them once they've done their job? "Although packing peanuts are used worldwide as a perfect solution for shipping, they are notoriously difficult to break down, and only about 10 percent are recycled," Dr. Vilas Pol, an associate professor of chemical and materials engineering at Purdue University, said in a written statement. … The new findings are scheduled to be presented at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting, held in Denver from March 22-26.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Vitamin D may keep prostate cancer from becoming lethal"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

As men age they become more vulnerable to being hit with prostate cancer. The American Chemical Society reported via Newswise on March 22, 2015, vitamin D may keep prostate cancer which is low grade from becoming aggressive. This research will be presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits) and University Herald (New York, NY: 53,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Discovery News (Silver Spring, MD: 11.5 million unique monthly visits)
"New Snakebite Antidote Borrows from Opossum's Immunity"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Snakebite victims may one day have the humble opossum and its curious immunity to snake venom to thank for an antidote that can be made cheaply and administered in as large a dose as needed, without side effects. During an annual meeting and exposition being held this week by the American Chemical Society in Denver, a research team out of San Jose State University announced it had synthesized part of a serum protein from opossums that protected laboratory mice from the venom of both U.S. diamondback rattlesnakes and Russell's vipers from Pakistan.

CBS News (New York, NY: 7.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Vitamin D supplements may slow prostate cancer"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Vitamin D supplements may slow or prevent low-grade prostate cancer from progressing, a small new study suggests. "Vitamin D decreases inflammation in tissues, and inflammation is a driver of cancer," explained Bruce Hollis, the study's lead researcher and a professor of pediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. … The study results were scheduled for presentation Monday at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

Forbes (New York, NY: 10.1 million unique monthly visits)
"New Study Shows How Marijuana's Potency Has Changed Over Time"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Marijuana has definitely evolved in the last few decades. Its potency is higher than ever: A lab in Colorado has just analyzed 600 samples of marijuana, both recreational and medical, and found that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) content has risen markedly, whereas cannabidiol (CBD), which many say has therapeutic value, has declined...Though the results of the new study may be disappointing to some, they’re clearly needed, since they show where the market is now and where it needs to go.

The results of the study will be presented this week at a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Denver.

The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 20.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Simple rice-cooking hack could reduce calories by 60 per cent"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

It sounds too good to be true but a simple change to the way rice is cooked could reduce its calorie content by 60 per cent. Scientists in Sri Lanka have discovered that cooking rice with a teaspoon of coconut oil then refrigerating it for 12 hours more than halves the number of calories absorbed by the body. The change remains even if it is reheated. The research was presented at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"HIV treatment: New inexpensive agents can block virus ability to replicate and develop resistance"

March 20, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

New and affordable drugs that check the HIV virus from developing resistance are in progress, according to scientists who will present their findings at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Denver.

More than 15 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (U.S.: 28,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Feces contains gold worth millions"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Human feces contains gold and other precious metals that could be worth hundreds of millions of dollars, experts say. Now the trick is how to retrieve them -- a potential windfall that could also help save the planet. "The gold we found was at the level of a minimal mineral deposit," said Kathleen Smith, of the US Geological Survey, after her team discovered metals such as platinum, silver and gold in treated waste....The findings were presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, taking place in Denver through Thursday.

WTOP.com (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Once maligned artificial sweetener can help fight … cancer?"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

In an ironic twist, an artificial sweetener once considered to be a possible carcinogen, may hold a key to fighting especially aggressive cancers. It turns out the sugar replacement saccharin binds onto, and deactivates a protein that helps cancer grow and spread without impacting the healthy tissue surrounding tumors. … The American Chemical Society says learning how to turn off the protein “carbonic anhydrase IX”  may lead to ways to stop the spread of cancers in the breast, liver, kidney, pancreas, brain and lungs.

More than 40 media outlets, including Toronto Sun (Toronto, Canada: 358,600 unique monthly visits), Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), Global News (Canada: 311,400 unique monthly visits), Deccan Chronicle (India: 167,900 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 92,900 unique monthly visits), Fox 21 Online (Duluth, MN: 31,400 unique monthly visits)

Mother Nature Network (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Are your allergies getting worse?  Blame air pollution"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

No, you aren't imagining it — your allergies really are getting worse. And you can thank air pollution for the extra sniffles and sneezes...New research, presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, uncovered how common pollutants interact with allergens at the chemical level, amplifying the effect — and the symptoms — of allergies. According to the study, two common pollutants including ozone, a component of smog, and nitrogen dioxide, which is created by diesel exhaust, alter the chemical makeup of airborne allergens, making them that much more potent.

My Fox Washington DC (Washington, DC: 696,000 unique monthly visits)
"Sugar substitute may help treat aggressive cancers, study says"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

For years, negative reports have surrounded artificial sweeteners, claiming evidence of everything from being a carcinogen to causing cardiovascular disease. But now new research suggests a popular sugar substitute could lead to new treatments for some of the most common types of cancers. In findings presented at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), a team of researchers from the University of Florida College of Medicine examined how saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet 'N Low®, Sweet Twin® and Necta®, reacted with a protein found in aggressive cancer cells.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 3.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Squid-inspired invisibility stickers can now help soldiers hide in daylight"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists have designed invisibility stickers which could help soldiers evade detection even from infrared cameras. The researchers will present their work at the 249th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver this week. “Soldiers wear uniforms with the familiar green and brown camouflage patterns to blend into foliage during the day, but under low light and at night, they’re still vulnerable to infrared detection,” says researcher Alon Gorodetsky of the University of California at Irvine.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Highlights from the inaugural issue of ACS Central Science"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Today, ACS is launching its first open access multidisciplinary research journal. Aspiring to communicate the most novel and impactful science developments, ACS Central Science will feature peer-reviewed articles reporting on timely original research across chemistry and its allied sciences.

More than 4 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits)
"Mimicking nature's chemistry to solve global environmental problems"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Poop could be a goldmine -- literally. Surprisingly, treated solid waste contains gold, silver and other metals, as well as rare elements such as palladium and vanadium that are used in electronics and alloys. Now researchers are looking at identifying the metals that are getting flushed and how they can be recovered. This could decrease the need for mining and reduce the unwanted release of metals into the environment. A talk about their recent work will be one of nearly 11,000 presentations here at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, taking place here through Thursday.

More than 5 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Mining the secrets of carbohydrates for new leads on antibiotics"
March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Laura Kiessling, Ph.D., thrives on steep learning curves. So when she started her research lab, she took a risk and plunged into the wide-open field of carbohydrates, which despite their ubiquity and notoriety for expanding waistlines, have many secrets. Now, her team has stumbled on something about these molecules that opens up new possibilities for fighting bacteria that are resistant to known antibiotics. She will present her latest discovery during "The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Lecture" at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 4 media outlets, including e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

… TV and Radio News

WABC-NY ABC (New York, NY: local viewership 288,769)
"Air pollutants could boost potency of common airborne allergens"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] A health alert. Global climate change could make your allergies worse. Research being presented at a meeting for the American Chemical Society found that air pollutants could be an aggravating factor. They may cause changes to airborne allergens that make it smaller.

More than 100 media outlets, including WSMV-NAS NBC (Nashville, TN: local viewership 166,963), KSAT-SAT ABC (San Antonio, TX: local viewership 150,275), KUTV-SLC CBS (Salt Lake City, UT: local viewership 69,443), KOMO-SEA ABC (Seattle, WA: local viewership 66,579), KNXV-PHX ABC (Phoenix, AZ: local viewership 57,188), KFVS CBS (Paducah, KY: local viewership 48,649), WALB NBC (Albany, GA: local viewership 46,330), WALA FOX (Mobile, AL: local viewership 39,797), WREG-MEM CBS (Memphis, TN: local viewership 38,780), KMIZ ABC (Columbia, MO: local viewership 28,312), KNSD-SD NBC (San Diego, CA: local viewership 27,078), WITI-MILW FOX (Milwaukee, WI: local viewership 26,572), WWSB ABC (Tampa Bay, FL: local viewership 24,686), KFDA CBS (Amarillo, TX: local viewership 24,365), KSNT NBC (Topeka, KS: local viewership 21,451), WTVM-BIRM NBC (Birmingham, AL: local viewership 21,259), KTTC NBC (Rochester, MN: local viewership 19,048), WPMT-HAR FOX (Harrisburg, PA: local viewership 15,682), WVBT-NFK FOX (Norfolk, VA: local viewership 12,896), KCAU ABC (Sioux City, IA: local viewership 10,787), KPTM FOX (Omaha, NE: local viewership 10,028), KAVU ABC (Victoria, TX: local viewership 9,784), KOBI NBC (Medford, OR: local viewership 9,582), WGXA FOX (Macon, GA: local viewership 9,123), YNN Austin (Austin, TX: local viewership 7,756) and KTVO ABC (Ottumwa, IA: local viewership 7,382) covered the story.

WKRC-CIN CBS (Cincinnati, OH: local viewership 104,958)
"Legalizing marijuana and the new science of weed"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] Tests show marijuana is far stronger than it used to be. Data released today by the American Chemical Society comes from a lab that examined marijuana in Colorado, where recreational use of the drug became legal last year. The study found about 20 percent THC in marijuana today, compared to 4 percent in the 80's. THC is the compound that produces the high.

More than 50 media outlets, including KNSD-SD NBC (San Diego, CA: local viewership 28,507), KTHV CBS (Little Rock, AR: local viewership 14,768), WZVN-FTM ABC (Fort Myers, FL: local viewership 14,327), KXII CBS (Sherman, TX: local viewership 13,544), WWTV CBS (Traverse City, MI: local viewership 11,303), WDEF CBS (Chattanooga, TN: local viewership 7,251), KCLO CBS (Rapid City, SD: local viewership 5,248), KXLH CBS (Helena, MT: local viewership 1,826), KSWT CBS (Yuma, AZ: local viewership 1,146), KFXF FOX (Fairbanks, AK), KOA Radio (Denver, CO), KIRO Radio (Seattle, WA) and KNX Radio (Los Angeles, CA) covered the story.

WXMI-GR Fox (Grand Rapids, MI: local viewership 76,323)
"Popular artificial sweetener could lead to new treatments for aggressive cancers"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] for years... negative reports have surrounded artificial sweeteners... saying they were carcinogenic. But now in findings presented at the national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society... a team of researchers explain how saccharin reacted with a protein found in aggressive cancer cells. The protein allows tumors to thrive and potentially metastasize to other parts of the body... the study suggests saccharin would selectively block the activity of that protein... stopping the cancer cells from growing and spreading.

More than 10 media outlets, including KDRV ABC (Medford, OR: local viewership 24,005), WVAH FOX (Charleston, WV: local viewership 13,317) and WTOP Radio (Washington, DC) bad transcript covered the story.

KSHB-KC NBC (Kansas City, MO: local viewership 28,594)
"Turning packing peanuts into energy-storing battery components"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] … "These carbonaceous materials, as they're called, have a very large surface area. That means they can store more lithium ion material, creating a higher capacity, faster charging battery. The team's materials actually outperformed current commercial batteries," a video for the American Chemical Society says. Currently, the anodes of lithium-ion batteries are created from graphite. This new process though could change that. Lead researcher says he got the idea when he was setting up a new lab and all the new equipment came with packing peanuts. Only about 10 percent of packing peanuts made in the US are recycled every year. …

More than 5 media outlets, including WCPO-CIN ABC (Cincinnati, OH: local viewership 13,543) covered the story.

KPNX-PHX NBC (Phoenix, AZ: local viewership 12,348)
"Sewage — yes, poop — could be a source of valuable metals and critical elements"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] ...turns out that said business contains microscopic nuggets of gold, silver and rare metals. What have you been eating. According to the research which was presented at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, yesterday. The recovery of these metals may not only be commercial but could also decrease the need for mining and significantly reducing the damage to the environment.

More than 10 media outlets, including WBFO Radio (Buffalo, NY), WBUR Radio (Boston, MA), WESA Radio (Pittsburgh, PA) and WUNC Radio (Raleigh, NC) covered the story.

WBUR Radio (Boston, MA)
"Opossum-based antidote to poisonous snake bites could save thousands of lives"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] they're almost half a million people a year are bitten by poisonous snakes and 20,000 of those died, but there is hope for cutting the number of those deaths. Research presented at the American Chemical Society conference in Colorado suggests they can be saved thanks to America's only marsupial,  the opossum.

More than 4 media outlets, including WUNC Radio (Raleigh, NC) covered the story.

… From the Blogs

Net News Ledger
"Vitamin D May Keep Low-Grade Prostate Cancer From Becoming Aggressive"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Taking vitamin D supplements could slow or even reverse the progression of less aggressive, or low-grade, prostate tumors without the need for surgery or radiation, a scientist will report today. His team will describe the approach in one of nearly 11,000 presentations at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The meeting is being held here through Thursday.

Health AIM
"Opossum-Based Antivenom Can Save Thousands Of Lives"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists have found a way to produce a new and inexpensive antidote for venomous snake bites, through opossums. Opossums, scientific name Didelphimorphia, make up the largest order of marsupials in the Western Hemisphere, were found by scientists to shrug off snake bit venom with no ill effects. The findings of the study entitled “Opossum-based antidote to venom from snakebites could save thousands of lives” were published last March 22 on the journal of American Chemical Society (ACS).

Science Blog
"Real ‘skinny water’? Special microbes make anti-obesity molecule in the gut"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Microbes may just be the next diet craze. Researchers have programmed bacteria to generate a molecule that, through normal metabolism, becomes a hunger-suppressing lipid. Mice that drank water laced with the programmed bacteria ate less, had lower body fat and staved off diabetes — even when fed a high-fat diet — offering a potential weight-loss strategy for humans. The team will describe their approach in one of nearly 11,000 presentations at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, taking place here through Thursday.

SciCasts
"Popular Artificial Sweetener Could Lead to New Treatments for Aggressive Cancers"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Saccharin, the artificial sweetener that is the main ingredient in Sweet ‘N Low, Sweet Twin and Necta, could do far more than just keep our waistlines trim. According to new research, this popular sugar substitute could potentially lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive, difficult-to-treat cancers with fewer side effects. The finding will be presented today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Breaking news from ACS’ 249th National Meeting

Time (New York, NY: 85.5 million unique monthly visits)
"There Might Be More Nutritious Chocolate On the Horizon"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists are looking to make chocolate a not-so-guilty pleasure. Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa, a professor of food science and technology at the University of Ghana, and his team have figured out a new process for making chocolate that’s healthier and contains more antioxidants. Chocolate’s antioxidants are thought to be responsible for some of its health perks related to cardiovascular health and memory support. Capitalizing on those antioxidants could not only provide better nutrition, but could be of interest to the candy industry. The researchers presented their process at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in Denver on Tuesday.

More than 100 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (New York, NY: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), CBS Philly (Philadelphia, PA: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), CBS Detroit (Detroit, MI: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), CBS 8 (San Diego, CA: 367,000 unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Newser (Miami, FL: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), The Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), Global News (Canada: 311,400 unique monthly visits), 19 Action News (Cleveland, OH: 225,200 unique monthly visits), Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits), Money Talks News (New York, NY: 102,600 unique monthly visits) and The University Herald (New York, NY: 53,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131 million unique monthly visits)
"Quality-Testing Legal Marijuana: Strong But Not Always Clean"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Recreational marijuana has been legalized in four states, but that doesn't mean it's a tested consumer product. Some of those potent buds are covered in fungus while others contain traces of butane, according to an analysis of marijuana in Colorado... Because many growers don't yet test their weed for potency, two buds might vary in their THC content – and in effects. So even if a manufacturer uses the same recipe every time, their products might vary from brownie to brownie. Since labs like CHARAS Scientific are the ones evaluating every marijuana product, they are the ones who can use their analyses to look for trends. They presented some of their findings on Monday at an American Chemical Society meeting in Denver.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science News (Washington, DC: 429,000 unique monthly visits), Royal Society of Chemistry (Cambridge, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits) and American LiveWire (U.S.: 42,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"How This Cooking Method Will Allow You To Eat Rice And Lose Weight"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Are you avoiding rice to control your weight? You may soon get to relish your favourite rice delicacies as introducing a little change in cooking methods can cut calorie content by half, researchers say. Scientists from Sri Lanka have found that adding a teaspoon of coconut oil while cooking and refrigerating it for 12 hours after it is cooked more than halves the number of calories absorbed by the body. They added that reheating the rice does not alter the benefits. The findings were presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Denver.

More than 50 media outlets, including Glamour (U.S.: 452,000 unique monthly visits), Times of India (New Delhi, India: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 101,500 unique monthly visits), Food Navigator (France: 45,000 unique monthly visits) and GoodFood (Sydney, Australia: 41,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

NBC News (New York, NY: 32.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Mining Poop for Gold? The Payoff Could Be Precious"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Instead of flushing millions down the toilet, humans could be mining their poop for gold. That's at least what some researchers with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) think. They're looking for ways to squeeze metals like gold and silver out of solid waste...Kathleen Smith, a USGS geologist, thinks people could make more of these biosolids; they're full of tiny particles of metals that find their way into waste through beauty products, detergents and even odor-resistant clothing. There are two good reasons to try to pull these metals out of poop, according to Smith, who's presenting her research on the subject at an American Chemical Society meeting this week.

More than 50 media outlets, including The Denver Post (Denver, CO: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), LiveScience (New York, NY: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), The Economic Times (India: 1.6 million unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 537,000 unique monthly visits) and The Bend Bulletin (Bend, OR: 254,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 23.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists have discovered a simple way to cook rice that dramatically cuts the calories"

March 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Rice, the lifeblood of so many nations' cuisines, is perhaps the most ubiquitous food in the world...."What we did is cook the rice as you normally do, but when the water is boiling, before adding the raw rice, we added coconut oil—about 3 percent of the weight of the rice you're going to cook," said Sudhair James, who presented his preliminary research at National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on Monday. "After it was ready, we let it cool in the refrigerator for about 12 hours. That's it."

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits)
"Push to start mining gold from poo"

March 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

We are flushing millions worth or precious metals down the toilet. When you are sitting on the toilet it turns out you are also sitting on a gold mine. Faeces is the last place you would expect to find gold, but scientists have suggested mining raw sewage for precious metals. According to research by the American Chemical Society, human waste flushed down the toilet contains a fortune worth of silver, platinum and gold.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Chocolate May Soon Be Healthier And More Delicious"

March 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Did you hear that? The faint, sweet sound of children laughing? This may be because researchers may have found a way to make chocolate more nutritious and taste even better that it currently does...The news, which, for some, may sound too good to be true, was presented Tuesday March 24, at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Newsweek (U.S.: 39.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Making Healthier Chocolate That Tastes Better, Too"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Long before it winds up in a candy bar or another type of confection, chocolate begins its life as a cocoa bean. These beans, about the size of peanuts, are found within the seed pods of the Theobroma cacao plant, which is grown in many tropical regions of the world to produce cocoa...Their findings, presented March 24 at the annual meeting of American Chemical Society in Denver, show that the pod storage step breaks down some of the more bitter polyphenols—a broad class of plant-based chemicals—converting them to more “chocolaty” flavors upon roasting.

Examiner.com (Atlanta, GA: 22.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial sweetener may treat aggressive cancers"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

An artificial sweetener once known as a cancer risk can now help in fighting aggressive cancers. According to a study led by several University of Florida researchers, saccharin, branded as a carcinogen in the early '70s, may help in fighting aggressive forms of cancer...Although we believe there is a plethora of evidence that disputes saccharin as a carcinogenic agent, we are not sure of the consequences of increasing someone's saccharin, or other artificial sweetener intake significantly." This study was published in the journal Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry.

More than 30 media outlets, including WorldNews (New York, NY: 18.8 million unique monthly visits), News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7 million unique monthly visits), NewsOK (Oklahoma City, OK: 3.1 million unique monthly visits), Z News (India: 312,900 unique monthly visits), News 4 JAX (Jacksonville, FL: 289,200 unique monthly visits) and The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 75,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Storing Cocoa Pods Longer May Make Chocolate Healthier"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Researchers say they have found a way that might make chocolate healthier and more delicious..."We decided to add a pod-storage step before the beans were even fermented to see whether that would have an effect on the polyphenol content," Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa, of the University of Ghana, said in a news release from the American Chemical Society (ACS).

WebMD (Orlando, FL: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Metals, Fungus Found in Colorado’s Marijuana"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Legal marijuana grown in Colorado is two to three times as potent as what was sold on the black market 30 years ago, according to test results released this week at a scientific meeting in Denver...LaFrate shared the findings at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

AOL (U.S.: 40.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Could human poo be mined for gold?"

March 25, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists claim that human excrement could be worth a fortune, after they identified valuable minerals in poo - including gold. Researchers in the US were examining sludge from sewage treatment plants, and said that if the levels of minerals they found had been identified in rocks, they would have been classed as commercially viable for mining. At a meeting of the American Chemical Society, Kathleen Smith of the US Geological Survey highlighted that as well as gold, the waste also included copper, palladium and vanadium.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Are sewers breeding new superbugs? Chlorine reacts with drugs dumped in the water to create antibiotic-resistant bacteria"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Antibiotic resistance is one of the most significant threats to the future of human health...The findings were presented at the National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) by Dr. Olya Keen from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

International Business Times (U.K.: 10.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Evolution of Marijuana: How The Strength and Potency Of Pot Has Changed Over Time"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A new study has revealed that marijuana is becoming stronger with increased potency level as compared to the version that existed years ago. The scientists in Colorado conducted the study after the state legislature legalised marijuana in 2014...The results of the study will be presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Denver by Charas Scientific.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Plants could pave the way for greener roads"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The road of the future will probably be incredibly high-tech: able to inform drivers of hazardous conditions, charge buses, and even communicate with the cars driving on top of it. But will the road of the future be made of green asphalt?...In new research announced at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, scientists found ways to make lignin-bitumen compounds that can reduce the amount of bitumen by half, and create road sealants that can be customized based on a particular area's climate. Warmer places can use a mixture that stays hard, even in hot weather that would normally make roads sticky, while road workers in colder climates might choose a mixture that stays more pliable, even in freezing temperatures.

More than 20 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 110 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (New York, NY: 27.7 million unique monthly visits) and Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

ABC 7 WXYZ (Detroit, MI: 2.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers at Purdue University turning packing peanuts into power"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Researchers are taking something you regularly get in the mail—and turning it into power. Purdue University scientists have developed a way to convert packing peanuts into electrodes for rechargeable batteries. They simply heat the peanuts in a furnace to between 500 and 900 degrees Celsius. That material is then reduced to carbon sheets or carbon nanoparticles...Their findings will be presented this week at an American Chemical Society National meeting in Denver.

More than 20 media outlets, including WorldNews (New York, NY: 18.8 million unique monthly visits), Treehugger (New York, NY: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Top Tech News (Los Angeles, CA: 34,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Want rice with HALF the calories? Cook it with coconut oil and refrigerate it overnight before eating"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Do you love rice but are worried about your weight? The good news is scientists have now discovered a way to reduce the calorie content by 60 per cent - simply by the way it is cooked...The research was presented at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society.

Inquisitr (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial Sweetener Saccharin Could Help Fight Cancer"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The artificial sweetener saccharin has been given a bad rap and most people try to avoid it at all costs, however, a new study suggest maybe you shouldn’t...The new information, released on Monday at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, indicated the artificial sweetener can be useful in developing treatments for aggressive cancers by deactivating a protein found to facilitate the spread of cancer, according to a report in Yahoo News.

The Weather Network (Canada: 760,800 unique monthly visits)
"Air pollution may be supercharging common airborne allergens in our warming world"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Have you noticed your allergies getting worse, or that more people are suffering from them, from year to year. According to new research, air pollution and climate change may be to blame. At the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, taking place this week in Boulder, CO, researchers have presented evidence that air pollutants - specifically ground-level ozone and nitrogen dioxide - are capable of altering some of the most common and potent allergen around, making them even more potent.

More than 15 media outlets, including WILX 10 (Lansing, MI: 565,800 unique monthly visits), Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits), DoctorsLounge (178,700 unique monthly visits) and Monthly Prescribing Reference (Congers, NY: 72,900 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Fat turns from diabetes foe to potential treatment"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A new weapon in the war against type 2 diabetes is coming in an unexpected form: fat. Researchers have discovered a new class of potentially therapeutic lipids, called fatty-acid esters of hydroxy fatty acids (FAHFAs). These lipids are found at lower levels in people with insulin resistance, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, compared with those who don't have the condition. Administering FAHFAs to diabetic mice improved their glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, opening a surprising avenue for the development of novel medications for the disease...The above story is based on materials provided by American Chemical Society (ACS).

Five media outlets covered the story, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits).

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Looking to space to quantify natural gas leaks on Earth"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

The recent increase in natural gas production could provide a bridge to a lower carbon future because it generates half the carbon dioxide (CO2) of coal when burned. However, natural gas that is leaked into the atmosphere could speed global warming and climate change. That's because its primary component, methane, is a much more powerful greenhouse gas than CO2. Understanding the leakage rate is critical to assessing the environmental benefit of natural gas, but there is much controversy, debate and confusion among scientists and policy-makers over just how much methane is lost to the atmosphere. Researchers today will present new methods to determine methane's leakage rate and problems inherent in discovering and assessing leakage at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Seven media outlets covered the story, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits) and e! Science News (Quebec, Canada: 82,000 unique monthly visits).

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits)
"Squid Inspire Stickers that May Help Soldiers"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Squid are the ultimate camouflage artists, blending almost flawlessly with their backgrounds so that unsuspecting prey can't detect them. Using a protein that's key to this process, scientists have designed "invisibility stickers" that could one day help soldiers disguise themselves, even when sought by enemies with tough-to-fool infrared cameras. The researchers presented their work today at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). ACS, the world's largest scientific society, is holding the meeting through Thursday. It features nearly 11,000 presentations on a wide range of science topics.

Four media outlets covered the story, including Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 30,000 unique monthly visits).

Health24 (Cape Town, South Africa: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
"Vitamin D supplements might slow prostate cancer"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Vitamin D supplements may slow or prevent low-grade prostate cancer from progressing, a small new study suggests. "Vitamin D decreases inflammation in tissues, and inflammation is a driver of cancer," explained Bruce Hollis, the study's lead researcher and a professor of paediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston...The study results were scheduled for presentation at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

… TV and Radio News

KDKA-PIT CBS (Pittsburgh, PA: local viewership 112,336)
"Air pollutants could boost potency of common airborne allergens"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] Each year more people suffer from seasonal allergies experts believe air pollution and climate may change. Climate change may make the symptoms worse according to the researchers at the American Chemical Society. They believe pollutants can cause chemical changes in the airborne allergy triggers and make them more potent. Researchers are studying the effect of fog and pollution on the immune system.

More than 100 media outlets, including WITI-MILW FOX (Milwaukee, WI: local viewership 86,490), KRQE-ABQ CBS (Albuquerque, NM: local viewership 39,671), WFMZ MeTV (Philadelphia, PA: local viewership 33,200), KVVU-LV FOX (Las Vegas, NV: local viewership 23,522), WLBT NBC (Jackson, MS: local viewership 21,875), KMPH-FRES FOX (Fresno, CA: local viewership 20,651), WATE ABC (Knoxville, TN: local viewership 20,303), KCRG-IOW ABC (Iowa City, IA: local viewership 17,010), KUTV-SLC CBS (Salt Lake City, UT: local viewership 15,715), YNN Austin (Austin, TX: local viewership 5,179) and KAUZ CBS (Wichita Falls, TX: local viewership 4,567) covered the story.

WDAF-KC FOX (Kansas City, MO: local viewership 82,789)
"Popular artificial sweetener could lead to new treatments for aggressive cancers"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] Researchers from the University of Florida found that saccharin selectively blocks protein found in cancer cells. Researchers think that the chemical may be able to stop cancer cells from growing and spreading; however, additional research is needed. The findings were recently presented at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Eight media outlets covered the story, including KDRV ABC (Medford, OR: local viewership 21,883) and WTVR-RIC CBS (Richmond, VA: local viewership 19,242).

MyTV20 (Detroit, MI: local viewership 17,354)
"Turning packing peanuts into energy-storing battery components"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] … Researchers have developed a way to convert packing peanuts into electrodes for rechargeable batteries. The new eco-friendly solution is needed because only 10% of packing peanuts are recycled. The packing peanuts can remain in landfills for decades. The findings will be presented this week at an American Chemical Society national meeting in Denver.

KYW Radio (Philadelphia, PA)
"Vitamin D may keep low-grade prostate cancer from becoming aggressive"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] … ...men suffer from prostate cancer to avoid surgery or radiation new research suggests, as we hear from KYW medical editor Dr. Brian McDonough. “It's a small study just 37 people, but a researcher presenting at the American Chemical Society meeting believes that if you give people with prostate cancer vitamin D, it may slow down its growth. Apparently, vitamin D impacts a protein called growth differentiation factor 15 or GDF 15 and giving the vitamin D can reduce inflammation. …

KNSD-SD NBC (San Diego, CA)
"Legalizing marijuana and the new science of weed"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript]  The amount of THC found in pot is higher than 30 years ago. THC is the psychoactive compound in pot that makes you high. A lab tested samples in Colorado where the drug is legal. Scientists presented their findings Monday at the American Chemical Society's National Meeting.

WTKR-NFK CBS (Norfolk, VA: local viewership 36,831)
"Special microbes make anti-obesity molecule in the gut"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] Researchers have programmed microbes to generate a molecule that, through normal metabolism in the gut, suppresses hunger. In tests, lab mice that drank water with the microbes stayed lighter and leaner for up to 3 months after treatment. That’s today’s health news, in a minute. The source is the American Chemical Society.  

Four media outlets covered the story, including KLBK CBS (Lubbock, TX: local viewership 8,839).

KOPB Radio (Portland, OR)
"New low-calorie rice could help cut rising obesity rates"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

[Transcript] … Help is at hand as new research shows that it might be possible to keep the calories down in a rice-rich diet. Sudhair James is presenting his research on this to the American Chemical Society conference taking place in Colorado. “What we are trying to do here is we just want to convert the digestible form of the starch to a non-digestible form.”

Ten media outlets covered the story, including News KNPR Radio (Las Vegas, NV), Capital Public Radio (Sacramento, CA), KUT 90.5 Radio (Austin, TX) and KNOW Radio (Minneapolis, MN).

… From the Blogs

Science Blog
"New low-calorie rice could help cut rising obesity rates
"
March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists have developed a new, simple way to cook rice that could cut the number of calories absorbed by the body by more than half, potentially reducing obesity rates, which is especially important in countries where the food is a staple. The presentation will take place here at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society. The meeting features nearly 11,000 reports on new advances in science and other topics. It is being held through Thursday.

SciCasts
"New Lead Against HIV Could Finally Hobble the Virus’s Edge"

March 19, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Since HIV emerged in the ‘80s, drug “cocktails” transformed the deadly disease into a manageable one. But the virus is adept at developing resistance to drugs, and treatment regimens require tweaking that can be costly. Now scientists at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) are announcing new progress toward affordable drugs that could potentially thwart the virus’s ability to resist them.

New Kerala
"Now, 'programmed' microbes to help you beat obesity"

March 23, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

In a bid to come up with new ways to fight obesity, scientists have now have programmed bacteria to generate an anti-obesity molecule in the gut. The molecule, through normal metabolism, becomes a hunger-suppressing lipid, and in the study, mice that drank water laced with the programmed bacteria ate less, had lower body fat and staved off diabetes, even when fed a high-fat diet, offering a potential weight-loss strategy for humans. The study is due to be presented at the 249th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Sound Medicine
"Opossums' Superpower May Benefit Humans"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

To some, an opossum is just a giant rat that scared you from ever going into your garage again. But North America's only marsupial may also hold the key to cheaply saving thousands of lives a year. Bites from venomous snakes have little effect on opossums, so researchers at San Jose State University isolated a component of opossum blood and used it to counteract venom -- without the rash, fever or other side effects that can accompany standard treatments. … Dr. Claire Komives, a chemical engineer who presented the findings Monday at a meeting of the American Chemical Society, says the peptide was actually discovered in the nineties -- it was even patented -- but its potential for treating snake bites had gone unnoticed.

The Independent (London, U.K.: 35.million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists have discovered a simple way to cook rice that dramatically cuts the calories"

March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Rice, the lifeblood of so many nations' cuisines, is perhaps the most ubiquitous food in the world. In Asia, where an estimated 90 percent of all rice is consumed, the pillowy grains are part of almost every meal..."What we did is cook the rice as you normally do, but when the water is boiling, before adding the raw rice, we added coconut oil—about 3 percent of the weight of the rice you're going to cook," said Sudhair James, who presented his preliminary research at National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) on Monday. "After it was ready, we let it cool in the refrigerator for about 12 hours. That's it."

Gizmodo (U.S.: 27.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Can Artificial Sweetener Offer Cure For Aggressive Cancers? Seems Like It"

March 27, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Artificial sweetener can do more than just sweeten your foods, as a new study has found that the popular sugar substitute may lead to the development of drugs capable of combating aggressive cancers, with fewer side effects...The finding will be presented at the 249th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

The Times-Picayune (New Orleans, LA: 6.9 million unique monthly visits)
"2 easy changes in cooking rice could cut calories by 50%"

March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Scientists in Sri Lanka have found a simple new way to cook rice that may cut the calorie count as much as 50 percent, the Washington Post has reported. Imagine the thousands of pounds that Louisiana residents could collectively shed.  Sudhair James presented his preliminary findings at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society this week. All they did was cook rice normally, adding 3 percent coconut oil of the weight of the rice to the boiling water before adding the rice. Then, they cooled it 12 hours.

More than 50 media outlets, including Tech Times (New York, NY: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 4.2 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (1.9 million unique monthly visits), CBS Chicago (Chicago, IL: 1.8 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Meal (New York, NY: 465,900 unique monthly visits), National Monitor (Washington, DC: 437,800 unique monthly visits), The Raw Food World News (Ojai, CA: 177,000 unique monthly visits), Redbook Magazine (U.S.: 166,900 unique monthly visits), Pioneer News (U.S.: 121,300 unique monthly visits), The American Bazaar (Germantown, MD: 58,100 unique monthly visits), Techly (Australia: 45,900 unique monthly visits), and Daily Science Journal (33,100 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 6.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Could SACCHARIN help beat Cancer? Researchers say artificial sweetener could inhibit cell growth"

March 27, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Saccharin could help beat cancer - despite first being thought to cause it, researchers have found. University of Florida Health researchers have found that the artificial sweetener can inhibit cancer cell growth. They say it could be used to slow the cancer's growth, providing the opportunity for radiation or chemotherapy to be more effective at killing off the cancer cell...The findings were published recently in the journal Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry and are being presented on Wednesday at the American Chemical Society convention in Denver.

More than 15 media outlets, including Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 978,200 unique monthly visits), Empire State Tribune (Tel Aviv, Israel: 73,800 unique monthly visits), and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.6 million unique monthly visits)
Safer Antifreeze Made from Food Additive and Nanoparticles
March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

If you’re the kind of person who religiously watches true crime series (we’ll talk about The Jinx finale later), you may have heard that antifreeze is a super fun ‘n’ easy way to poison people if you can trick them into randomly drinking large quantities of a fluorescent green or yellow liquid that smells approximately like Gatorade...At an American Chemical Society press conference that took place yesterday, representatives from ACTA Technology told attendees that they are hoping to have the food industry using their new, fancy, extra-smooth, decidedly-not-poisonous antifreeze by next year.

More than 50 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits),)TakePart (U.S.: 6.7 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Gizmag (Victoria, Australia: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), The Columbus Dispatch (Columbus, OH: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 972,800 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), Chemistry World (London, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits), and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Why We Could Soon Be Mining Our Poop for Gold and Silver"

March 27, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A common misconception about how we deal with human waste is that we simply filter it at our waste treatment facilities and that, beyond the outlay for these facilities, it has little environmental impact. That’s not true though...“We’re interested in collecting valuable metals that could be sold, including some of the more technologically important metals, such as vanadium and copper, that are in cell phones, computers and alloys,” Dr. Smith reportedly told other researchers gathered at the 249th national meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 20 media outlets, including Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits), Times Live (Johannesburg, South Africa: 189,000 unique monthly visits), Chemistry World (London, U.K.: 156,000 unique monthly visits), JCK Magazine (Washington, DC: 152,200 unique monthly visits), and Mail & Guardian (Johannesburg, South Africa: 61,200 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

TakePart (U.S.: 6.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Get Ready for a Gold Rush in Your Bathroom"

March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

People have gone to the ends of the earth in search of precious metals such as gold and silver. Now scientists are starting to look for them much closer to home—in the sewage you send to your local wastewater treatment plant...More work needs to be done to figure out how to extract tiny amounts of metals without harming the remaining organic matter. Smith said microbes may be able to bioaccumulate the minerals, making them easier to remove. She presented her study this week at an American Chemical Society conference.

Metro (London, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Good news: Chocolate is about to get healthier and even more tasty"

March 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

This is not a drill: Chocolate is about to get healthier and even more tasty *blinks* *rubs eyes*. The boys in the lab have put their juicy brains to best possible use and come up with a production technique that not only enhances the flavour of chocolate, but makes it better for us. Currently, during the process of turning cocoa into chocolate, many of antioxidants are lost. But by storing the cocoa pods for longer antioxidants are more plentiful. The research was unveiled by Dr Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa of the University of Ghana during a presentation at the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including NASDAQ (New York, NY: 1.2 million unique monthly visits), Hello! Magazine (New York, NY: 547,700 unique monthly visits), WKRC Local 12 (Cincinnati, OH: 88,800 unique monthly visits), Wall Street OTC (Los Angeles, CA: 53,500 unique monthly visits), RTT News (51,500 unique monthly visits), and InterCooler (Mitchell, SD: 49,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

RedOrbit (Dallas, TX: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Turning algal blooms into biofuel"
 
March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Water-borne algal blooms from farm fertilizer runoff can destroy aquatic life and clog rivers and lakes, but scientists will report today that they are working on a way to clean up these environmental scourges and turn them into useful products. The algae could serve as a feedstock for biofuels, and the feedstock leftovers could be recycled back into farm soil nutrients. A multi-pronged nutrient bio-remediation system is the goal of a team of scientists who will present their research at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

More than 25 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Popular Science (New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits), Science World Report (New York, NY: 101,700 unique monthly visits), Water World Magazine (U.S.: 29,100 unique monthly visits), Dairy Herd Management (Lenexa, KS: 29,100 unique monthly visits), and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 21,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 6.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Novel plastic could spur new green energy applications, 'artificial muscles'"
 
March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A plastic used in filters and tubing has an unusual trait: It can produce electricity when pulled or pressed. This ability has been used in small ways, but now researchers are coaxing fibers of the material to make even more electricity for a wider range of applications from green energy to "artificial muscles." They will report progress on a novel form of this plastic at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,800 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 127,600 unique monthly visits),and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Popular Science
(New York, NY: 3.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Squid-inspired tape could help camouflage soldiers"
March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Now you see it, now you don't. No matter the color or texture of their surroundings, squid are masters of camouflage, blending in to the scenery to avoid detection. Now, researchers from the University of California Irvine have isolated the source of the creature's disappearing act: a protein appropriately named reflection. Additionally, when the researchers layered this protein on a piece of tape, it rendered the tape invisible in particular wavelengths of light. The researchers presented their work this week at the meeting of the American Chemical Society in Denver.

More than 5 media outlets, including The Columbian (Vancouver, WA: 285,800 unique monthly visits) covered the story

Bay News 9
(St. Petersburg, FL: 258,400 unique monthly visits)
"Opossums could help treat venomous snake bites"
March 29, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Researchers are studying a cheaper and faster way to treat venomous snake bites, and the study focuses on a marsupial that could help ease the pain. Scientists say opossums are immune to snake venom, but if a venomous snake bites a human, it can be deadly...That’s why Dr. Claire Komives with San Jose’ State University presented her research at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting. Her research is working toward developing an opossum-based antidote.
More than 7 media outlets, including Science 2.0 (Reno, NV: 203,500 unique monthly visits) and ALN Magazine (U.S.: 27,400 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

SpaceDaily (Sydney, Australia: 75,500 unique monthly visits)
"New technology converts packing peanuts to battery components"
 
March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Researchers have shown how to convert waste packing peanuts into high-performance carbon electrodes for rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that outperform conventional graphite electrodes, representing an environmentally friendly approach to reuse the waste...The new findings are being presented during the 249th American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition in Denver on March 22-26. The work was performed by Etacheri, Pol and undergraduate chemical engineering student Chulgi Nathan Hong.

More than 4 media outlets, including Cosmos Magazine (Australia: 66,600 unique monthly visits) covered the story.

From the Blogs

Scicasts
"Novel Plastic Could Spur New Green Energy Applications, ‘Artificial Muscles’, Says Study"

March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A plastic used in filters and tubing has an unusual trait: It can produce electricity when pulled or pressed. This ability has been used in small ways, but now researchers are coaxing fibres of the material to make even more electricity for a wider range of applications from green energy to “artificial muscles.” They will report progress on a novel form of this plastic at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

HealthCanal
"New lead against HIV could finally hobble the virus’s edge"

March 26, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

Since HIV emerged in the ‘80s, drug “cocktails” transformed the deadly disease into a manageable one. But the virus is adept at developing resistance to drugs, and treatment regimens require tweaking that can be costly. Now scientists at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) are announcing new progress toward affordable drugs that could potentially thwart the virus’s ability to resist them.

Science Blog
"Fat turns from diabetes foe to potential treatment"

March 24, 2015
Publicized in: OPA National Meeting news release

A new weapon in the war against type 2 diabetes is coming in an unexpected form: fat. Researchers have discovered a new class of potentially therapeutic lipids, called fatty-acid esters of hydroxy fatty acids (FAHFAs). These lipids are found at lower levels in people with insulin resistance, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, compared with those who don’t have the condition. Administering FAHFAs to diabetic mice improved their glucose metabolism and insulin secretion, opening a surprising avenue for the development of novel medications for the disease. The team will describe their approach in one of nearly 11,000 presentations at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society, taking place here through Thursday.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.