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ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

MSN Arabia (Dubai, United Arab Emirates: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“The Single Best Trick for Wearing a Face Mask When It’s Hot Out”
Aug. 4, 2020

Not only will cotton masks make you cooler, but they are also often more effective, according to Christopher Zangmeister, a researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology and co-author of a recent mask study published in the journal ACS Nano.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN IN (New Delhi, India: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Suncream made of skin pigment will help shield astronauts from lethal x-ray radiation, scientists suggest”
Aug. 4, 2020

Astronauts should be protected from dangerous radiation in deep space by using a hybrid of metal and melanin – the skin pigment that colours human beings’ hair, eyes, and bodies. Research published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society suggest a new material called selenomelanin, which has never been found to exist in nature, could block lethal x-rays from harming spacegoers.

Three additional media outlets, including Yahoo UK (London, England: 938,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN Arabia (Dubai, United Arab Emirates: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Coronavirus: Taste bud cells might not be a target of Covid-19”
Aug. 6, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

"An intriguing early symptom among some Covid-19 patients is the loss of the sense of smell and taste, which has led to the suspicion that the virus that causes the illness, SARS-CoV-2, could be targeting taste buds," said study authors from the University of Georgia in the US. "But the initial data from mice suggest that might not be the case," the authors wrote in a paper published in the journal ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science.

More than 40 media outlets, including Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits), The Economic Times (Gurgaon, India: 8.17 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN NZ (Auckland, New Zealand: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“8 foods you should be eating raw”
Aug. 7, 2020

Broccoli contains high amounts of an antioxidant compound called sulforaphane, which may help prevent cancer, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, inflammation, depression, and more harmful health conditions. And a study published in 2008 in Journal of Agricultural Food and Chemistry found that our bodies absorb sulforaphane more quickly when we eat broccoli raw instead of cooked.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

MSN MY (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Heat up your rice cooker and clean your masks!”
Aug. 7, 2020

According to a team of American researchers, electric cookers can be used to effectively clean N95 masks, worn to protect the wearer from covid-19…. The method tested functions due to the use of a dry heat cooking cycle that maintains the contents of the cooker at 100 degrees Celsius during 50 minutes and allows for decontamination of the masks inside and out. The results of the tests are explained in detail in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters.

More than 115 media outlets, including New York Post (New York, NY: 15.00 million unique monthly visits), Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits), Techno Holik (New Delhi, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits), The Economic Times (Gurgaon, India: 8.17 million unique monthly visits) and Inverse (New York, NY: 3.08 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“10 Toxic Ingredients You Didn’t Know Were In Your Fast Food”
Aug. 9, 2020

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (also referred to as PFASs) are fluorine-based chemicals in fast-food food packaging associated with cancer, fertility issues, low birth weight, and a weakened immune system, according to research published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than five media outlets, including Eat This, Not That! (Irvine, CA: 1.56 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“New Study Shows How Infrared Lasers Destroy Harmful Protein Aggregates in Alzheimer’s”
Aug. 4, 2020

A notable characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, is the formation of harmful plaques that contain aggregates — also known as fibrils — of amyloid proteins…. In their study, published in Journal of Physical Chemistry B, the scientists present the results of laser experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

More than 20 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fox News (New York, NY: 21.55 million unique monthly visits)
“Can you contract the coronavirus from secondhand smoke?”
Aug. 5, 2020

While secondhand smoke likely doesn’t directly cause the coronavirus, smokers can exhale infected droplets into the air, experts say…. “Dust may contain [thirdhand smoke] particles that are larger than coronaviruses,” Environmental Science and Technology researchers found last spring. “Thus, [thirdhand smoke and thirdhand aerosol] may harbor COVID-19.”

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Sky News (Isleworth, England: 4.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Coronavirus: Disposable face masks creating new plastic pollution crisis, experts warn”
Aug. 9, 2020

An estimated 194 billion disposable masks and gloves are being used worldwide every month as a result of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a study in Environmental Science and Technology. Most single use PPE is made from a variety of plastics, including polypropylene, polyethylene and vinyl.

More than 30 media outlets, including MSN UK (London, England: 67.15 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo UK (London, England: 938,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.08 million unique monthly visits)
“You can see American air pollution inequality from space”
Aug. 5, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

America’s disparities in air pollution are dramatic enough to be seen from space. Using data gathered by satellites and airplanes, researchers discovered rates of nitrous oxide (NO2) pollution vary significantly across neighborhoods in Houston, Texas. On average, NO2 pollution was 37 percent higher in non-white neighborhoods. This finding was published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, Australia: 2.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Seafood and eat it while knowing how much plastic is in it”
Aug. 5, 2020

Researchers from the University of Queensland have developed a way to simply test for what types of plastic are present in seafood and in what quantities. Lead author and PhD candidate Francisca Ribeiro said they dissolved the samples in an alkaline aqueous solution and then extracted the plastic and tested it using chemical analysis…. The research has been published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.89 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceAlert (Canberra, Australia: 1.97 million unique monthly visits)
“Spiderweb Is Slathered in Neurotoxins That May Subdue or Kill Prey, Scientists Say”
Aug. 6, 2020

"The findings from the current investigation may be relevant for scientists in several disciplines in life, environmental and toxinology sciences, forming a database and facilitating the design of future studies," Esteves and colleagues wrote in their paper…. This paper was published in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Five additional media outlets, including IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers develop a redox potential-controlled, cost-effective chemical production method”
Aug. 3, 2020

A team of researchers from Japan has demonstrated a light-based reaction that yields high numbers of the base chemical component required to produce bioactive compounds used in common industry products. They published their results on June 11 in Organic Letters.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“New study explores the safety of quat-containing disinfectants”
Aug. 6, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In the face of a persistent global pandemic, disinfectants are more important than ever. These products sometimes rely on quaternary ammonium compounds, or "quats," to kill bacteria and viruses on surfaces. However, some scientists have started to examine these compounds for their possible toxicity in cells and animals. A new story in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores the safety of quat-containing disinfectants.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Synthetic peptide can make multi-drug resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics”
Aug. 6, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a synthetic peptide that can make multidrug-resistant bacteria sensitive to antibiotics again when used together with traditional antibiotics, offering hope for the prospect of a combination treatment strategy to tackle certain antibiotic-tolerant infections…. The findings were published in the scientific journal ACS Infectious Diseases in May.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net
(Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“An ‘intelligent’ strategy for real-time evaluation of photothermal therapy efficiency on tumors”
Aug. 7, 2020

Recently, a research group led by Prof. LIANG Gaolin… collaborating with Dr. WANG Longsheng… reported an "intelligent" strategy of using organic nanoparticles to evaluate PTT efficiency on tumor in real time. The study was published online in ACS Nano on July 27.

More than five media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.89 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Nanomedicine-based strategy enhances anti-PD1 therapy to eradicate PTEN-negative GBM”
Aug. 7, 2020

A nanomedicine-based strategy for chemo-immunotherapy (CIT) of glioblastoma (GBM), which has the worst prognosis among brain tumors, was successfully developed…. These results has been published in ACS Nano (Impact Factor = 14.588 in 2019) issued on August 6 by the American Chemical Society.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

Benzinga (Detroit, MI: 1.55 million unique monthly visits)
“‘Psyched’: Canada Makes Psilocybin History, Usona Publishes New Method for Psilocybin Synthesis”
Aug. 7, 2020

The Usona Institute, a non-profit medical research institution based in Madison, Wisconsin, published a new development in the production of large quantities of Psilocybin. The technique was published and made publicly available in the open-access journal ACS Omega. This work is available to current GMP manufacturing labs.

Yahoo! (New York, NY: 159.76 million unique monthly visits)
“Experimental New COVID Test Could Actually Change Everything”
July 29, 2020

Linda Garner, an information scientist at CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society, told The Daily Beast on Tuesday that she was “excited by” the test’s initial findings that were published in medRxiv, in particular “the possibility of another genetic test that could be done at a point-of-care setting.”

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN Arabia (Dubai, United Arab Emirates: 69.47 million unique monthly visits)
“What is chemistry?”
July 29, 2020

"Everything you hear, see, smell, taste, and touch involves chemistry and chemicals (matter)," according to the American Chemical Society (ACS), a non-profit science organization for the advancement of chemistry, chartered by the U.S. Congress. "And hearing, seeing, tasting, and touching all involve intricate series of chemical reactions and interactions in your body."

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN MY (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Does the ghost of a conflict lie at the bottom of a Tibetan lake?”
Aug. 2, 2020

The sediments indicated that various metals, including chromium, nickel and zinc, had been released into the atmosphere at the time, fell on the glacier and eventually ended up on the bottom of the lake…. "It is not a 100 per cent verdict, but the most reasonable explanation we can find is the wars," Wang said in findings published in peer-reviewed journal Environmental Science & Technology last month.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 44.16 million unique monthly visits)
“Device could help patients test blood ammonia levels at home”
July 28, 2020

The researchers have since developed a prototype of a portable device that people could use to test ammonia levels at home. A paper describing their work was posted online in ACS Sensors, and they are preparing for studies that could make them eligible for U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 43.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Paris Beehives Trace Notre-Dame’s Toxic Fallout”
July 29, 2020

A study outlined this week in Environmental Science & Technology Letters found that honey samples collected northwest of the cathedral, downwind from the fire, contained nearly three times as much lead on average than did those from before the fire.

More than 70 media outlets, including Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 28.31 million unique monthly visits), Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 4.22 million unique monthly visits) and Sciences Et Avenir (Paris, France: 2.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, England: 22.71 million unique monthly visits)
“Weak mussels: Decreased iron levels in seawater due to climate change make the molluscs loosen their grip on rocks, study shows”
July 29, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Decreased iron levels in seawater due to climate change are making mussels loosen their grip on the rocks on which they live, a study has shown. The shelled molluscs attach themselves to surfaces — like rocks or ropes — using a sticky 'plaque' and hair-like threads that link the plaque to the mollusc's inner tissues. Mussels need iron to make this adhesive… The full findings of the study were published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 4.22 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fox News Channel (New York, NY: 16.74 million unique monthly visits)
“Super space sunblock made from skin pigment could shield astronauts from radiation”
July 28, 2020

And just like beachgoers slathering on sunscreen, explorers on the moon or Mars may one day shield themselves using creams containing a new bioengineered material called selenomelanin, created by enriching the natural pigment melanin with the metal selenium…. Additional tests demonstrated that engineered bacteria fed selenium could produce selenomelanin, meaning the substance could be manufactured in space. The results were published July 8 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

ScienceAlert (Sydney, Australia: 4.33 million unique monthly visits)
“A New ‘Forever Chemical’ Has Been Detected in Arctic Seawater For The First Time”
July 29, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Looking at the waters of the Arctic, researchers were able to detect 29 different PFAS coming in and going out of the Arctic Ocean, and, worryingly, one compound – the supposedly less persistent HFPO-DA – has been identified in these waters for the first time…. The research has been published in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including Inverse (New York, NY: 2.28 million unique monthly visits) and IFL Science (London, England: 1.44 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 2.28 million unique monthly visits)
“New Jersey dirt is only thing tough enough to eat “forever chemicals” PFAS”
July 29, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

This class of chemicals, known by the abbreviation PFAS, are found in all sorts of products, including compostable takeout containers. They have been shown to disrupt human hormones and increase the risk of certain types of cancer…. PFAS are concerning because they remain intact for a super long time in the environment. But new research in the journal Environmental Science & Technology shows that one type of bacteria can actually break down this tough and nasty environmental pollutant.

BGR (New York, NY: 1.36 million unique monthly visits)
“This new fabric is like wearing an air conditioner”
July 30, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Personal cooling solutions that keep a person comfortable without the need to cool an entire room would be ideal, and researchers have been working on new textiles that do just that. Now, a new paper published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces reveals the invention of a new type of wearable fabric that essentially pumps heat away from the body and allows the wearer to remain cool as a result.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Research may provide new insights into wound healing”
July 29, 2020

When we get a wound on our skin, the cells in our bodies quickly mobilize to repair it. While it has been known how cells heal wounds and how scars form, a team led by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis has determined for the first time how the process begins, which may provide new insight into wound healing, fibrosis and cancer metastasis…. Results of the research were published in ACS Nano on July 28.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

MSN (Redmond, WA: 69.47 million unique monthly visits)
“CBG May Be The New CBD, But Proceed With Caution”
July 24, 2020

There’s more. CBG may have antibacterial properties. It’s been used to break down methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in mice, according to a study published in the American Chemical Society [ACS] Infectious Diseases. “CBG is interesting in a lot of different ways,” says Peter Grinspoon, MD, primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital, instructor at Harvard Medical School, and board member of the advocacy group Doctors For Cannabis Regulation.

More than 10 media outlets, including Refinery29 (New York, NY: 4.25 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN
(Redmond, WA: 69.47 million unique monthly visits)
“8 Foods You Should Be Eating Raw”
July 24, 2020

Broccoli contains high amounts of an antioxidant compound called sulforaphane, which may help prevent cancer, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, inflammation, depression, and more harmful health conditions. And a study published in 2008 in Journal of Agricultural Food and Chemistry found that our bodies absorb sulforaphane more quickly when we eat broccoli raw instead of cooked.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Yahoo! (New York, NY: 27.14 million unique monthly visits)
“University of Regina researchers find that “Ghost Fleas” in some Prairie lakes contribute to high levels of methylmercury in fish”
July 21, 2020

Hall, whose research focuses on how mercury moves in the environment, worked with data that Dr. Peter Leavitt, a professor of limnology at the U of R, began collecting 23 years ago. The pair, along with other U of R researchers, published their findings in a recent paper "Mercury Elevator in Lakes: A Novel Vector of Methylmercury Transfer to Fish via Migratory Invertebrates" in Environmental Science & Technology Letters of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including Markets Insider (New York, NY: 4.64 million unique monthly visits) and Financial Times (London, England: 4.32 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

BBC News (London, England: 23.74 million unique monthly visits)
KFC wants to make 3D bioprinted chicken nuggets in ‘restaurant of the future’
July 21, 2020

KFC is trying to create the world's first chicken nuggets made, not from an actual chicken, but produced in a laboratory…. According to a study by the American Environmental Science & Technology Journal, the technology of growing meat from cells has minimal negative impact on the environment.

More than 135 media outlets, including MSN (Redmond, WA: 69.47 million unique monthly visits), Medium (San Francisco, CA: 44.16 million unique monthly visits), independent.co.uk (London, England: 14.03 million unique monthly visits), New York Daily News (New York, NY: 472 million unique monthly visits) and Popular Mechanics (Center Valley, PA: 3.26 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IBM (Armonk, NY: 9.66 million unique monthly visits)
“New Macromolecule Could Hold Key to Reversing Antibiotic Resistance”
July 21, 2020

Going forward, we will seek to leverage the knowledge gained in this study, our prior work in automated, programmatic polymer synthesis—published last year in the Journal of the American Chemical Society— and IBM’s AI capabilities to rapidly develop novel polymeric adjuvants. Applications of these new treatments can potentially range from treating drug-resistant pathogens and cancer to new antiviral therapies. 

One additional media outlet covered the story.

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong: 4.41 million unique monthly visits)
“Coronavirus tests could be done faster using Chinese researchers’ new technique, US university says”
July 22, 2020

Chinese researchers working in the United States have developed a method that their research university has claimed could open the door to dramatically shortening the time needed to test for Covid-19. Published late last month in the peer-reviewed journal ACS Nano, the researchers’ report said that the new approach provided “an agile and facile avenue” to overcome the limit for “fast and ultra-sensitive detection” of droplets from the samples.

More than 35 media outlets, including Fortune (New York, NY: 4.33 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 4.22 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

China Daily (Beijing, China: 2.45 million unique monthly visits)
“Australian university develops 20-minute COVID-19 blood test”
July 20, 2020

A simple blood samples test developed by Australia's Monash University could detect positive COVID-19 cases in about 20 minutes. Based on commonly used blood typing infrastructure, researchers at the Melbourne-based university developed a simple agglutination assay to identify antibodies generated in response to COVID-19 infection, according to the university…. The study has been published in the journal ACS Sensors.

More than 10 media outlets, including Australian Financial Review (Sydney, Australia: 683,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland: 2.10 million unique monthly visits)
“US rivers are facing a crisis – but scientists show there is hope”
July 23, 2020

“Gold plus palladium work really well, as we found, to get rid of nitrites [but are very expensive]. We were very excited about that. That work led to the more recent work.” That new research was published in the journal ACS Catalysis in November 2019 and found that rhodium catalyst could effectively replace palladium. “It’s basically a nanomaterial – the same as a catalytic converter in a car – but for water.”

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Daily Kos (Washington, D.C.: 1.78 million unique monthly visits)
“WOW2: Late July’s Trailblazing Women and Events in Our History – 2020”
July 25, 2020

July 23, 1892 – Icie Hoobler born, biochemist and physiologist, first woman to head a local section of American Chemical Society and to serve as its national president, Director of the Research Laboratory of the Children’s Fund of Michigan.

Prokerala.com (Kerala, India: 1.13 million unique monthly visits)
“What will it take to make effective Covid-19 vaccine?”
July 24, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

With the global pandemic still in full swing, scientists around the world are working to develop an effective vaccine for Covid-19 virus in record time but they don't all agree on how to get there and what "effective" really means. In the study, published in the journal Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the experts spoke with researchers, doctors and business leaders to shed light on some of the challenges vaccine developers are facing.

More than 20 media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 533,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“A new method for mechanical stimulation of neural cells”
July 20, 2020

In addition to responding to electrical and chemical stimuli, many of the body's neural cells can also respond to mechanical effects, such as pressure or vibration. But these responses have been more difficult for researchers to study, because there has been no easily controllable method for inducing such mechanical stimulation of the cells. Now, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have found a new method for doing just that…. The finding is reported in the journal ACS Nano

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 4.22 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Stanford researchers develop a portable device for rapidly detecting blood ammonia levels”
July 21, 2020

In the August issue of ACS Sensors, Chu, Kanan, Veltman and colleagues Natalia Gomez-Ospina and Chun Tsai have published the product of their collaboration: a handheld, portable ammonia detector that - like glucometers used to measure blood sugar - assesses ammonia levels from a finger or earlobe prick.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“High-quality lab procedures crucial to discovery of effective drugs”
July 21, 2020

New research from the University of Bath in the UK suggests the quality of the lab procedure (or assay) used for these screenings (measured by the "Z' value") has a much bigger impact on the ability to identify effective new molecules than was previously thought…. In a paper published this month in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Dr Lloyd identifies 75 examples of 'hit' molecules that went on to the next stage of early drug discovery.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Dragonflies can help measure mercury pollution”
July 22, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A citizen science program that began over a decade ago has confirmed the use of dragonflies to measure mercury pollution, according to a study in Environmental Science & Technology. The national research effort, which grew from a regional project to collect dragonfly larvae, found that the young form of the insect predator can be used as a "biosentinel" to indicate the amount of mercury that is present in fish, amphibians and birds.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“New pathways that could help treat RNA viruses identified”
July 22, 2020

In their paper, recently published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, the researchers looked specifically at an RNA fragment from the HIV-1 virus and its interaction with a ligand/inhibitor, a complex compound that is known to interfere with the virus replication process. Using computer modeling, the researchers discovered the pathways of the inhibitor unbinding from the viral RNA in several rare events…

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