ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"This Is the Scientific Way to Cook Pasta. But Is It the Best?"
March 25, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

What’s the best way to cook pasta? Fascinating question. … Earlier this week, the American Chemical Society partnered with PBS to release a surefire guide on how to cook pasta the “scientific” way, which, by extension, is deemed the best. It dispels certain pernicious myths that guide casual pasta-cooking. Condensed into a three-minute video, embedded below, this scientifically-sound methodology calls for careful manipulation of the protein-starch interaction.

More than 20 media outlets, including The Independent (London, U.K.: 107.8 million unique monthly visits), Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), HelloGiggles (New York, NY: 19.2 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Tree Hugger (New York, NY: 6.6 million unique monthly visits), Men's Fitness (New York, NY: 5.9 million unique monthly visits), The Evening Standard (London, U.K.: 3.9 million unique monthly visits) and Food52 (1.6 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits)
"These Google Street View cars just got a new job — spotting harmful methane leaks in big cities"
March 22, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

A new partnership among scientists, environmentalists and technology experts is helping to reveal leaks in urban natural gas pipelines. And they’re hoping their efforts could help cities cut down on accidental emissions of methane, one of the world’s most potent greenhouse gases. The project, which is described in a paper out this week in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, is a collaborative effort among Colorado scientists, the advocacy group Environmental Defense Fund and Google’s Street View program.

More than 30 media outlets, including RT.com (Moscow, Russia: 39.8 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), CBC News (Ottawa, Canada: 21.1 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), PBS.org (Washington, DC: 12.6 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Vice (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Inverse (5.8 million unique monthly visits), KUSA NBC 9 (Denver, CO: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), Yale University News (New Haven, CT: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), CityLab (Washington, DC: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Discover Magazine (New York, NY: 1.7 million unique monthly visits) and Chemistry World (London, U.K.: 645,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Prescription weight-loss drug may help with opioid addiction"
March 25, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

A prescription weight-loss medication can decrease the urge to use opiates such as oxycodone, according to a recent study. The researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston found that the drug, lorcaserin, reduced the use and craving for the opioid oxycodone in preclinical studies. … The study is published in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

More than 25 media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), The San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco, CA: 9.0 million unique monthly visits), Hindustan Times (India: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Aol.com (New York, NY: 42.7 million unique monthly visits)
"10 breakfast foods to help you ace your job interview"
March 21, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

A 2010 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests that blueberries may help to improve memory function, so count on those little blue orbs to help with the "What do you know about our company?" question. Sprinkle berries over yogurt, cereal, or pancakes.

Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits)
"5 surprising ways being a redhead affects your health"
March 23, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Research suggests that redheads experience pain more intensely than others, and may even require more anesthesia for surgery. The reason isn't entirely clear, but as this video from the American Chemical Society explains, one theory is that ginger DNA may heighten neural activity in the periaqueductal grey—a part of the brain that controls some pain sensation.

Five media outlets, including Southern Living (Birmingham, AL: 1.0 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Microfibre shed from spandex or fleece apparel imperils marine life"
March 23, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Washing a single polyester jacket or spandex yoga pants can send tiny synthetic microfibres into waterways, where they can absorb toxins and get eaten by marine species. The invisible nightmare, coming out from many households' washing machines, was uncovered by a study made by environmental experts from Bren School of Environmental Science and Management, University of California, Santa Barbara. … The complete report was recently published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Lab-on-a-glove’ could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer’s fingertips"
March 22, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

There's a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds -- organophosphate nerve agents -- can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable "lab-on-a-glove." The report on the glove appears in the journal ACS Sensors.

More than 12 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), University of California San Diego (La Jolla, CA: 3.7 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits) and Medgadget (U.S.: 120,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Accounting for sex differences in biomedical research"
March 22, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

When it comes to health, a person's sex can play a role. More women in the U.S. have autoimmune diseases than men, for example, whereas boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than girls. Yet biomedical research on disease and possible new treatments often studies only one sex. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores efforts to change this practice.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists develop new bone grafting material from sea urchin spines"
March 22, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

More than 2 million procedures every year take place around the world to heal bone fractures and defects from trauma or disease, making bone the second most commonly transplanted tissue after blood. To help improve the outcomes of these surgeries, scientists have developed a new grafting material from sea urchin spines. They report their degradable bone scaffold, which they tested in animals, in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Latin Post (New York, NY: 408,000 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits) and The Science Times (Irvine, CA: 138,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Tests show 3D bioprinted human cartilage cells can be safely implanted"
March 23, 2017
Publicized in: EAC National Meeting news release

Scientists in Sweden successfully implanted 3D bioprinted human cartilage cells in an animal model. Researchers hope the breakthrough paves the way for the technology's use in human patients. … Last year, the research team presented the structural integrity of their human cell-derived, 3D-printed cartilage at the 251st National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Birmingham Mail (Birmingham, U.K.: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"This is how much WEE is really in a swimming pool"
March 21, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

A study into the amount of urine in swimming pools has revealed just how high the levels are. And, as Mirror Online reports, the results are NOT pretty. … Researchers then used the ACE concentration of the two pools over three weeks to estimate their levels of urine, according to the study, which was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters.

Five media outlets, including The Alternative Daily (Jupiter, FL: 701,400 unique monthly visits) and Public Radio International (700,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (Little Rock, AR: 942,500 unique monthly visits)
"Dark-roasting coffee beans creates bitter antioxidants"
March 22, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Q: What chemical changes occur with dark-roasting coffee beans? Are they what make coffee bitter? A: The hundreds of chemicals that are extracted when coffee is brewed interact with one another, and with a person's taste buds in ways that scientists are still sorting out. But recent studies by Thomas Hofmann of the Technical University of Munich and others point to some substances produced by roasting coffee beans as the key culprits. … Adding a pinch of salt to a cup of coffee can counteract some bitterness, the American Chemical Society suggests.

Three media outlets, including Northwest Arkansas Democrat-Gazette (Lowell, AR: 67,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Industrial Equipment News (U.S.: 340,000 unique monthly visits)
"How to Make Tomatoes Taste Good Again"
March 21, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Why are so many supermarket tomatoes tasteless and rock hard? In the 1990s, breeders developed a tomato that produces less of the hormone ethylene, so they stay hardened for shipping and then ripen in store. That delayed ripening combined with other breeding moves have made tomatoes bigger, redder and great for shipping, but also less satisfying in salad. This video from the American Chemical Society shows how scientists are learning how tomatoes mature so that soon you may see and taste entirely different tomatoes at the supermarket.

Science Newsline (circulation information not available)
"Kavli Lectures: Physical chemistry of polymer networks, CRISPR systems for genome editing"
March 22, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Advances in understanding polymer networks and CRISPR-inspired genome engineering tools will be the topics of a pair of Kavli Lectures at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place April 2 to 6 in San Francisco.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits)
"How pine tree bark could revolutionise your trip to the dentist: Scientists discover root extract can strengthen teeth and make fillings last for longer"
March 24, 2017

But now scientists have worked out how to make fillings stay in the teeth for much longer. The breakthrough was made possible by an extract from the bark of pine tree roots, which scientists discovered alters the chemical structure of teeth to make them stronger and allow fillings to bind to them better. … The results, published in the Journal of Organic Chemistry, showed that the pine bark extracts strengthened the dentine in the teeth, which remained even a year after application.

Four media outlets, including New Zealand Herald (New Zealand: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Bloomberg Businessweek (New York, NY: 17.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Researchers Think They're Getting Closer to Making Spray-On Solar Cells a Reality"
March 20, 2017

Imagine a future when solar cells can be sprayed or printed onto the windows of skyscrapers or atop sports utility vehicles -- and at prices potentially far cheaper than today’s silicon-based panels. It’s not as far-fetched it seems. Solar researchers and company executives think there’s a good chance the economics of the $42 billion industry will soon be disrupted by something called perovskites, a range of materials that can be used to harvest light when turned into a crystalline structure. … Things began to change for perovskite with the first publication of research on the material by Miyasaka’s group in the Journal of the American Chemical Society in 2009.

More than 15 media outlets, including The Washington Post (Washington, DC: 34.2 million unique monthly visits), Domain (Australia: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), St. Louis Post-Dispatch (St. Louis, MO: 1.9 million unique monthly visits), The Japan Times (Japan: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), Renewable Energy World (270,700 unique monthly visits), Taipei Times (Taipei, Taiwan: 215,800 unique monthly visits), The Ogden Standard-Examiner (Ogden, UT: 159,600 unique monthly visits) and Indianapolis Business Journal (Indianapolis, IN: 95,100 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists discover new 'boat' form of promising semiconductor GeSe"
March  22, 2017

Princeton researchers have discovered a new form of the simple compound GeSe that has surprisingly escaped detection until now. This so-called beta-GeSe compound has a ring type structure like graphene and its monolayer form could have similarly valuable properties for electronic applications, according to the study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Nine media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Princeton University News (Princeton, NJ: 3.4 million unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), Solid State Technology (San Francisco, CA: 23,400 unique monthly visits) and Nanotechnology Now (Eugene, OR: 22,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Harvard University News (Cambridge, MA: 9.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm"
March 22, 2017

The ability to deliver cargo like drugs or DNA into cells is essential for biological research and disease therapy but cell membranes are very good at defending their territory. … Now, researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new method using gold microstructures to deliver a variety of molecules into cells with high efficiency and no lasting damage. The research is published in ACS Nano.

Nine media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits), Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 73,000 unique monthly visits) and Mass Device (U.S.: 23,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Artificial photosynthesis steps into the light"
March 23, 2017

Rice University scientists have created an efficient, simple-to-manufacture oxygen-evolution catalyst that pairs well with semiconductors for solar water splitting, the conversion of solar energy to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen and oxygen. … The results appear in two new studies. The first, on the creation of the films, appears in Chemistry: A European Journal. The second, which details the creation of photoanodes, appears in ACS Nano.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), The Engineer (London, U.K.: 113,600 unique monthly visits) and Azo Cleantech (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Romper (New York, NY: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The One Food To Eat Before Working Out To Maximize Your Performance"
March 21, 2017

Behold, the humble banana. This fruit with a fun name might be the most underrated workout fuel ever. … Lastly, eating bananas may also help improve your recovery time, as noted by a study of cyclists in the Journal of Proteome Research. Who knew this ubiquitous fruit could become your favorite workout buddy?

India.com (India: 7.1 million unique monthly visits)
"New worm-inspired material adapts to its environment"
March 20, 2017

Inspired by a sand worm, scientists have developed a new bio gel material which changes shape in response to its environment and could help control movements of soft robots. … The study was published in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), India Today (India: 6.2 million unique monthly visits), MIT News (Cambridge, MA: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), I4U (U.S.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), DNAindia.com (India: 738,100 unique monthly visits), Engineering.com (Mississauga, Canada: 643,100 unique monthly visits), Zee News (India: 471,700 unique monthly visits) and Business Standard (India: 360,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Research findings could help understand how Parkinson's develops on molecular level"
March 22, 2017

In a complex series of experiments they examined what the effects were of changing a single amino acid in the protein. The physicochemists were able to prove how this tiny change disturbs the binding of alpha-synuclein to membranes. "We hope that the finding of this selectively defective membrane binding will help us to understand how Parkinson's develops on a molecular level. … The research results were revealed in the prestigious specialist Journal of the American Chemical Society publication in its 16 March 2017 online edition; a print version is to follow.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

UCLA Newsroom (Los Angeles, CA: 4.9 million unique monthly visits)
"UCLA researchers make DNA detection portable, affordable using cellphones"
March 20, 2017

Researchers at UCLA have developed an improved method to detect the presence of DNA biomarkers of disease that is compatible with use outside of a hospital or lab setting. The new technique leverages the sensors and optics of cellphones to read light produced by a new detector dye mixture that reports the presence of DNA molecules with a signal that is more than 10-times brighter. … In a study published online in the journal ACS Nano, researchers from three UCLA entities — the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, the California NanoSystems Institute, and the David Geffen School of Medicine — showed how to take detection out of the lab and for a fraction of the cost.

Seven media outlets, including Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), University of California News (CA: 366,500 unique monthly visits), Medgadget (U.S.: 120,300 unique monthly visits) and Bioscience Technology (Rockaway, NJ: 73,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Verywell (U.S.: 4.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Tea for Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome"
March 23, 2017

Would it help to drink tea for fibromyalgia (FMS) or chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS)? It might. … An emerging line of research has to do with the role of oxidation in FMS, ME/CFS, and some other related illnesses. Specifically, it's the build up of nitric oxide, which leads to oxidative stress. … According to a 2017 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, polyphenols from tea (as well as cocoa, berries, and walnuts) may help reduce oxidative stress.

New Scientist (London, U.K.: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"3D-printed bacteria could make bespoke graphene-like materials"
March 20, 2017

How do you make a bespoke material with graphene-like properties? By putting bacteria to work using a 3D printer. Such bacteria could create brand new materials. … When placed on sheets of graphene oxide, certain bacteria can turn it into a reduced version of the compound, which shares many properties with graphene but is easier to produce in large amounts. … Journal reference: ACS Synthetic Biology.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), All3DP (533,500 unique monthly visits), 3Ders.org (333,500 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Alternative Daily (Jupiter, FL: 701,400 unique monthly visits)
"Why You Should Test Your Tap Water Immediately (And How To Do It)"
March 26, 2017

Since the tragic situation in Flint, Michigan, individuals across the country have become more aware of the water they drink. From government mandates to pesticide runoff, leaky storage tanks to industrial dumping, it’s quite possible that you’re consuming a wide range of contaminants on a daily basis. … More recently, within a 2016 study, published in the Environmental Science & Technology Letters, unsafe levels of PFASs (industrial chemicals) were found in 33 states, reaching six million Americans.

Lucky Peach (U.S.: 514,100 unique monthly visits)
"The Science of Scotch"
March 22, 2017

When you’re talking whiskey, “peaty” is shorthand for smoke flavors. A lot of whiskeys from Scotland are quite smoky, and they get this way from peat smoke. … Since peat could theoretically be made of different types and proportions of plant material—mosses, shrubs, grasses, sedges, rushes, and the like—it stands to reason that different kinds of peat, when burned, produce different volatiles that lead to different flavors. A 2009 paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry looked into exactly this hypothesis.

The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 386,500 unique monthly visits)
"Your favourite hot chocolate may be as salty as seawater"
March 21, 2017

The findings showed that each serving of chocolate powder is worse than eating a bag of crisps. … Reducing daily salt intake from 8g to 6g per day could prevent 14,000 deaths a year, the researchers noted. While high salt intake has been known to cause high blood pressure and other side effects, researchers have now found that a high-salt diet might also contribute to liver damage in adults and developing embryos. … The findings by Xuesong Yang from Jinan University, Guangzhou, China, and colleagues were published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

WHTM ABC 27 (Harrisburg, PA: 205,800 unique monthly visits)
"Slime craze creating glue shortage. Is it safe?"
March 22, 2017

It is slime. It’s a homemade science experiment that turns household ingredients like glue and borax into a stretchy, squishy creation. … But many parents wonder: is it safe? … The key for parents to realize is that many of the chemical compounds used in making “slime” can be an irritant or toxic if not handled appropriately. One such compound is borax, a chemical cousin to boron. … Therefore, the American Chemical Society has a recipe for slime that includes diluting 1/4 teaspoon of borax into one tablespoon of water.

NPR (Washington, DC: 131.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Just How Much Pee Is In That Pool?"
March 1, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

You know that sharp odor of chlorine from the swimming pool you can recall from earliest childhood? It turns out it's not just chlorine, but a potent brew of chemicals that form when chlorine meets sweat, body oils, and urine. But up until now, just how much urine has been difficult to measure, says chemist Xing-Fang Li of the University of Alberta. Li and her colleagues report they can now tell roughly how much pee is in a pool by measuring the artificial sweeteners carried in most people's urine. … The study was published Wednesday in Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than 250 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits), Bustle (New York, NY: 119.3 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), The Independent (London, U.K.: 107.8 million unique monthly visits), BBC News (London, U.K.: 85.0 million unique monthly visits), Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits), The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 55.0 million unique monthly visits), Reuters (New York, NY: 49.8 million unique monthly visits), Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits), USA Today (Washington, DC: 29.9 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), WebMD (Orlando, FL: 27.6 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Inquisitr (U.S.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), The New York Post (New York, NY: 23.6 million unique monthly visits), The Guardian (London, U.K.: 23.5 million unique monthly visits), Research Gate (22.8 million unique monthly visits), CBC News (Ottawa, Canada: 21.1 million unique monthly visits), News.co.au (Australia: 20.6 million unique monthly visits), The Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits) and CBS News (New York, NY: 15.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Stop calling turmeric a superfood"
March 2, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Turmeric, the popular spice that gives curry and mustard its yellow-orange hue, has had a long reputation as a so-called superfood….Unfortunately, if not surprisingly, a recent review published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry is making the case that all of this praise and attention is way overblown.

Five media outlets, including The Week (New York, NY: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fox News (New York, NY: 37.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Angelina and her kids eat bugs. Here's why that's not a bad idea."
February 27, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Curious about Angelina Jolie's snack preferences?...A study published last year in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry found that insects can provide as much magnesium, iron, and other nutrients as steak.

More than 10 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Health Magazine (New York, NY: 13.5 million unique monthly visits) and Men's Journal (New York, NY: 900,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Economist (London, U.K.: 28.6 million unique monthly visits)
"The 48 uses of dragon’s blood"
March 2, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Mythology is rich with tales of dragons and the magical properties their innards possess. One of the most valuable bits was their blood….A new study has provided a factual twist on these fictional medicines. Barney Bishop and Monique van Hoek, at George Mason University in Virginia, report in The Journal of Proteome Research that the blood of the Komodo dragon, the largest living lizard on the planet, is loaded with compounds that could be used as antibiotics.

More than 15 media outlets, including Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Quartz (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits) and The Australian Financial Review (Melbourne, Australia: 1.0 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Jackfruit seeds could help ease looming cocoa bean shortage"
March 1, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Chocolate lovers could soon have a harder time satisfying their sweet tooth….But in a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, scientists report that compounds found in jackfruit seeds produce many of the same aromas as processed cocoa beans and are a potentially cheap, abundant substitute for use in chocolate manufacturing.

Six media outlets, including Modern Farmer (Hudson, NY: 782,600 unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits) and eMax Health (Hickory, NC: 127,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

HelloGiggles (New York, NY: 19.2 million unique monthly visits)
"8 simple ways to prevent a UTI"
March 3, 2017
Publicized in: EAC National Meeting news release

Dealing with a urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most dreadful things on the planet….Several years ago, the American Chemical Society presented a study that showed how effective cranberries can be in preventing UTIs.

Care2.com (Redwood City, CA: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The Surprising Food that Reduces Heart Disease Risk"
February 28, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Let’s face it: most of us had a parent who would command us to eat our vegetables….Currently, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. New research in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry shows that microgreens grown from red cabbage may reduce cardiovascular disease risk.

Four media outlets, including Pakistan Today (Lahore, Pakistan: 202,100 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Pulling the curtain back on the high cost of drugs"
March 1, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Extreme price hikes for a handful of pharmaceuticals in recent years have severely soured public sentiment toward the industry. Drugmakers are pushing back with a public relations campaign to highlight the new treatments they bring to the table. But industry watchers say what they might need instead is more transparency and perspective, according to the cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Vice (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Once and For All, MSG is Fine for You"
March 3, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

Ask the average person if they'd prefer a Chinese restaurant that doesn't cook with MSG, and they'll probably say yes….The American Chemical Society put it best: "MSG can temporarily affect a select few when consumed in huge quantities on an empty stomach, but it's perfectly safe for the vast majority of people."

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Toward a safer permanent hair dye that mimics melanin"
March 1, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Coloring hair has become a common practice, particularly for people who want to hide their graying locks….Now scientists have developed a potentially safer alternative by mimicking the hair's natural color molecule: melanin. Their report appears in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"The Farm of the Future: Indoor and Vertical"
February 28, 2017
Publicized in: EAC news release

There's a new trend in agriculture called vertical farming. As humans learned to farm, we arranged plants outside in horizontal fields, and invented irrigation and fertilizer to grow bumper crops. … Video by the American Chemical Society.

Five media outlets, including Electronics 360 (U.S.: 667,000 unique monthly visits) and Knowridge (Sydney, Australia: 31,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Knowridge (Sydney, Australia: 31,500 unique monthly visits)
"How depression can muddle thinking"
February 27, 2017
Publicized in: EAC PressPac

Depression is associated with sadness, fatigue and a lack of motivation….The findings, published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, could lead to the development of new depression treatments that would address associated cognitive problems.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"House cats have ‘high levels of dangerous chemicals in their blood’"
February 27, 2017

House cats have high levels of dangerous chemicals in their bloodstream, a study says. Researchers at Stockholm University in Sweden found that cats who stay at home are exposed to brominated flame retardants….The study was published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including Hindustan Times (India: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), India.com (India: 7.1 million unique monthly visits), India Today (India: 6.2 million unique monthly visits), Consumer Affairs (Lake Tahoe, NV: 3.6 million unique monthly visits), I4U (U.S.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), The Hindu (Chennai, India: 804,500 unique monthly visits) and DNAindia.com (India: 738,100 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ABC News (New York, NY: 24.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Penicillin mold cultured by Alexander Fleming auctioned for more than $14,000"
March 3, 2017

A mold sample may seem like an unlikely prize, but a sample of penicillin mold pulled in more than $14,000 when it was sold at auction this week in the U.K….He found that the bacteria near the mold had been killed, according to the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including WJBD 100.1 Radio (Salem, IL: 169,700 unique monthly visits), KWBE 1450 AM Radio (Beatrice, NE: 33,200 unique monthly visits), KTIC 107.9 Radio (West Point, NE: 32,400 unique monthly visits) and MyCentralOregon.com (Bend, OR: 27,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Graphene sheets capture cells efficiently"
March 3, 2017

A single cell can contain a wealth of information about the health of an individual...The findings are reported in the journal ACS Nano in a paper co-authored by Neelkanth Bardhan, an MIT postdoc, and Priyank Kumar PhD '15, now a postdoc at ETH Zurich; Angela Belcher, the James Mason Crafts Professor in biological engineering and materials science and engineering at MIT and a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research; …

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), MIT News (Cambridge, MA: 4.3 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"A New Eco-Friendly Rubber Could Make The Industry Cleaner And Less Costly"
March 3, 2017

Since 2001, when the gene of the compound needed to create rubber was first identified, there has been a lot of pressure on scientists and tire industries to get some traction in the search for eco-friendly rubber. Recently, researchers at the University of Minnesota discovered a method, published in the journal ACS Catalysis, that could make the industry greener by using carbon from natural sources such as grass, trees and corn instead of fossil fuels like petroleum.

News Max Health (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Probiotic Combination May Curb Allergy Symptoms"
March 2, 2017

With spring in sight, sneezing and watery eyes can't be far behind….A Japanese study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that the antioxidant EGCG (methylated epigallocatechin gallate) in green tea blocks the production of histamine and also cuts the production of immunoglobulin E, both of which trigger allergy symptoms.

LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Penicillin: Discovery, Benefits and Resistance"
February 27, 2017

Penicillin is a drug used to fight bacterial infection. Its accidental discovery ushered in a new age of medicine….It isn't really known who first realized that mold contained medicinal qualities, but it is acknowledged that ancient Egyptians would poultice wounds with moldy bread, according to the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Medical Daily (New York, NY: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Alzheimer's And Dementia Research Update: New Drug Approach Destroys Hallmark Disease Protein"
March 3, 2017

We don't completely understand the pathology behind Alzheimer's, one of America's most deadly diseases, but we do know that proteins called amyloid-β peptide play a major role in how it develops….Now, a new study published online in Journal of the American Chemical Society suggests they may be closer than ever.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Washington State University News (Pullman, WA: 1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Research advances energy savings for oil, gas industries"
February 27, 2017

A Washington State University research team has improved an important catalytic reaction commonly used in the oil and gas industries that could lead to dramatic energy savings and reduced pollution….The work was funded by the American Chemical Society’s Petroleum Research Fund with computational support from Argonne National Laboratory.

Four media outlets, including Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Yorkshire Post (Leeds, U.K.: 267,900 unique monthly visits)
"YP Letters: Time for the truth about fracking risks"
February 27, 2017

Analysis published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, and reported on the BBC, revealed an astonishingly high number of chemical spills related to fracking in the US. The report highlighted 6,648 spills in just four states alone — Colorado, New Mexico, North Dakota and Pennsylvania.

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