ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring recent news media coverage of ACS. Please contact newsroom@acs.org to recieve this information by email each week.

BBC News Online (London, England: 16.33 million unique monthly visits)
“Sponge offers hope of ‘less toxic’ chemotherapy”
January 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Scientists believe they may have found a way to make cancer chemotherapy treatment less toxic to the body. They have begun testing a tiny sponge that sits inside a vein and removes excess chemo drugs from the blood once they have attacked the target tumour. Experts say the early work, in the journal ACS Central Science, offers hope of avoiding treatment side-effects, such as hair loss and nausea.

More than 100 media outlets, including UC Berkeley (Berkeley, CA: 18.03 million unique monthly visits), IFL Science (London, England: 16.38 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 8.79 million unique monthly visits), Dunya (Lahore, Pakistan: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), Premium Times (Abuja, Nigeria: 5.34 million unique monthly visits) and The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 5.24 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

Healthline (San Francisco, CA: 23.97 million unique monthly visits)
“This Genetically Modified Houseplant Can Detoxify the Polluted Air in Your Home”
January 8, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Many of us go to great lengths to keep the air clean in our homes….But unfortunately, many of the hazardous particles in our homes are too tiny for conventional filters to catch. Now, researchers from the University of Washington genetically modified the pothos ivy — a popular houseplant — to help get the job done. The modified plants are able to sufficiently remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as benzene and chloroform, from the air in homes at useful rates, according to a new study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including CBC Radio One Online (Toronto, Canada: 731,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Salon (San Francisco, CA: 23.93 million unique monthly visits)
“As temperatures rise, toxic algae blooms paint Florida coast red”
January 10, 2019

In October 2015, the journal Environmental Science & Technology published a letter penned by researchers at the University of Florida and the University of North Carolina who warned “because of climate change, we are at a crossroad with regard to control of harmful algal blooms, and must aggressively tackle the problem before it becomes so difficult that in many ecosystems we are faced with the option of allowing these micro-organisms to go unchecked.”

Breitbart (Los Angeles, CA: 19.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists build artificial bug eyes”
January 10, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Some insect eyes have thousands of visual receptor units, each boasting a lens, cornea and photoreceptor cells. Scientists at Xi’an Jiaotong University in China used a multistep approach to replicate the complex visual system. “The hierarchical eyes were accomplished by a combination of modified laser swelling, air-assisted deformation and controlled crystal growth,” researchers said in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and United Press International Online (Washington, D.C.: 4.77 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 16.38 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists Just Discovered An Entirely New Complex Carbohydrate In Barley”
January 9, 2019

Publishing their findings in the American Chemistry Society’s journal ACS Central Science, researchers at the University of Adelaide describe a new form of cereal polysaccharide derived from the cell wall of barley – one of the world’s most economically important crops. The complex carbohydrate is a combination of glucose, the most common simple sugar, and a component of dietary fiber called xylose. Based on its sugar proportions, the new carb is likely used by the plant to fortify the structure of its cell walls or to act as a viscous gel.

More than 30 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Tech Times (New York, NY: 10.20 million unique monthly visits, covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Sunscreen and cosmetics compound may harm coral by altering fatty acids”
January 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In particular, sunscreen chemicals shed by swimmers are thought to contribute to coral reef decline. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry say that one such chemical, octocrylene (OC), which is also in some cosmetics and hair products, accumulates in coral as fatty acid esters that could be toxic to the marine organism.

More than 30 media outlets, including Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 8.79 million unique monthly visits), Xinhua Net (Beijing, China: 6.11 million unique monthly visits), The New Indian Express (Chennai, India: 5.35 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo India (Bangalore, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.64 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“’Environmentally friendly’ flame retardant could degrade into less safe compounds”
January 10, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

To reduce the risk of fire, many everyday products -- from building materials to furniture to clothing -- contain flame retardants. In recent years, some of these compounds were shown to have harmful effects on the environment, causing them to be replaced by more eco-friendly alternatives. However, a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, indicates that heat or ultraviolet light could break down a "safe" flame retardant into potentially harmful compounds.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceNet.cn (Beijing, China: 870,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Technique allowed continuous study of cobalt nanoparticles as they grew”
January 7, 2019

The research provides the proof-of-principle for a new technique to study crystal formation in real-time, with potential applications for other materials, including alloys and oxides. Data from the study produced "nanometric phase diagrams" showing the conditions that control the structure of cobalt nanocrystals as they form. The research, reported November 13 in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, was sponsored by the National Science Foundation…

More than 10 media outlets, including R&D Magazine Online (Rockaway, NJ: 160,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

 

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Cartilage could be key to safe ‘structural batteries’”
January 11, 2019

In a study published in ACS Nano, the researchers describe how they made a damage-resistant rechargeable zinc battery with a cartilage-like solid electrolyte. They showed that the batteries can replace the top casings of several commercial drones. The prototype cells can run for more than 100 cycles at 90 percent capacity, and withstand hard impacts and even stabbing without losing voltage or starting a fire.

More than 15 media outlets, including Futurity (Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 8.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Termites may help extract clean energy from coal: Study”
January 9, 2019

Termites may hold the key to transforming coal -- a big polluting chunk of the global energy supply -- into cleaner energy for the world, according to a study. The study, published in the journal Energy and Fuels, found that a community of termite-gut microbes converts coal into methane, the chief ingredient in natural gas.

More than 10 media outlets, The Week – Online (Kochi, India: 172,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Xinhua Net (Beijing, China: 6.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Chinese scientists develop anticorrosion method for steel in marine engineering”
January 8, 2019

Based on the research, scientists are also developing new types of corrosion-resistant steel which can not only withstand the harsh marine environment but are also compatible with coral growth. They can be applied to island and reef construction as well as restoration of coral reefs. The research was published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 10 media outlets, including en.chinagate.cn (Beijing, China: 631,000 unique monthly visits) and Peoples Daily Online (Spanish) (Beijing, China: 390,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Popular Science Online (New York, NY: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“The iconic periodic table could have looked very different”
January 7, 2019

Heinrich Werner’s modern incarnation. Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Types of graphic classifications of the elements. I. Introduction and short tables, G. N. Quam, Mary Battell Quam. Copyright (1934) American Chemical Society.

More than 5 media outlets, including World Economic Forum (Geneva, Switzerland: 4.16 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Reader’s Digest Online (White Plains, NY: 3.51 million unique monthly visits)
“16 Classic Home Remedies with Surprising New Benefits”
January 7, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

A lab study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that red wine (with or without alcohol) eliminated the kind of bacteria that contribute to tooth decay. Researchers think it’s a combination of wine’s antioxidants and the fact that it “sticks” to your teeth, which gives it time to effectively destroy germs.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3..13 million unique monthly visits)
“Progress For Making Bio Based Plastic”
January 8, 2019

Tokyo Institute of Technology scientists have developed and analyzed a novel catalyst for the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, which is crucial for generating new raw materials that replace the classic non-renewable ones used for making many plastics. The team’s study paper has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Sharecare (Atlanta, GA: 3.12 million unique monthly visits)
“What are the health benefits of chocolate?”
January 10, 2019

Research has demonstrated that the antioxidants in cacao are exceptionally easily absorbed and ever so useful to our body. Cornell University food scientists found that cocoa powder has nearly twice the antioxidants of red wine and up to three times what is found in green tea. The findings were published in an article entitled “Cocoa Has More Phenolic Phytochemicals and a Higher Antioxidant Capacity than Teas and Red Wine” in the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry.

Hindu Business Line Online (Chennai, India: 3.01 million unique monthly visits)
“Albumin better indicator of diabetes: study”
January 14, 2019

Based on findings of their new research, scientists at the National Chemical Laboratory, Pune have suggested that measuring levels of free albumin and albumin attached to glucose molecules in the blood can be a better diagnosis test for diabetes and help in its management…. The study has been published in journal ACS Omega.

University of Notre Dame (Notre Dame, IN: 1.85 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers make important discovery for ‘smart’ films and encapsulation”
January 7, 2019

A study from the University of Notre Dame has found that the properties of a material commonly used to create conductive or protective films and encapsulate drug compounds – and the conditions in which this material will disassemble to release that medication – may be different than initially thought. Published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the study aimed to identify the conditions under which polyelectrolyte complexes, or PECs, would assemble and stay assembled.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and AZoM.com Australia (Sydney, Australia: 188,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

EarthSky (Austin, TX: 1.70 million unique monthly visits)
“Oxygen and life: a cautionary tale”
January 9, 2019

In other words, if astronomers discovered oxygen in the atmosphere of another rocky planet like Earth, orbiting a distant star, they’d likely consider that oxygen a strong signal of possible life on that planet. But now a new study casts doubt on that conclusion. It shows that oxygen can be generated in the absence of life as well … originating, if you will, from an alien imposter. The new peer-reviewed findings were announced by Johns Hopkins University and published in the December 11, 2018 issue of ACS Earth and Space Chemistry.

University of Bath (Bath, England: 1.58 million unique monthly visits)
“Ultra-sensitive sensor with gold nanoparticle array”
January 10, 2019

The nanoparticles were fabricated by researchers at Northwestern University, Illinois (USA). David C. Hooper, Christian Kuppe, Danqing Wang, Weijia Wang, Jun Guan, Teri W. Odom, and Ventsislav K. Valev (2018) “Second Harmonic Spectroscopy of Surface Lattice Resonances” is published in Nano Letters DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.8b03574

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

University of Calgary (Calgary, Canada: 1.16 million unique monthly visits)
“Schulich team develops ‘super sponge’ for oil spill cleanup”
January 9, 2019

They call it “magnetic boron nitride (MBN)” but what a team of engineering researchers at the University of Calgary has developed, to put it simply, is a super sponge for soaking up aquatic oil spills…. Nassar’s team has published details of their success in the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research journal, and the paper follows a precursor study from earlier in 2018, in which the Nassar team showed MBN was non-toxic, a vital factor when using nanomaterials.

Five media outlets, including R&D Magazine Online (Rockaway, NJ: 160,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

WVUToday (Morgantown, WV: 854,000 unique monthly visits)
“WVU physics student develop machine-learning model for energy and environmental applications”
January 10, 2019

Featured on the cover of the December 19, 2018 issue of Journal of the American Chemical Society, Panapitiya and his co-authors used the geometric properties of gold, including the number of bonds and atoms, to test the model. They obtained an 80 percent accuracy prediction rate, the highest rate possible for machine-learning models calculating adsorption energies nanoparticles based only on geometric properties.

EIN News (Washington, D.C.: 657,000 unique monthly visits)
“World’s Preeminent Environmentally Responsible Chitin Plant Opens in Virginia, USA”
January 7, 2019

Mari Signum’s technology uses environmentally benign Ionic Liquids in a recirculating system - a pioneered process developed at the University of Alabama and now licensed to Mari Signum exclusively. This incomparable processing method replaces many industries’ reliance on toxic petrochemicals. The company’s patented technology earned a “Green Chemistry Challenge Award” October 15, 2018 from the American Chemical Society.

One News Page (New York, NY: 433,000 unique monthly visits)
“NREL details great potential for floating PV systems”
January 9, 2019

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) researchers estimate that installing floating solar photovoltaics on the more than 24,000 man-made U.S. reservoirs could generate about 10 percent of the nation's annual electricity production. Their findings, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, reveal for the first time the potential for floating PV to produce electric.

More than 15 media outlets, including Electrical Contractor Online (Bethesda, MD: 57,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Reader’s Digest Online: Canada (Montreal, Canada: 397,000 unique monthly visits)
“Foods That Lower Blood Pressure Naturally”
January 11, 2019

If you think eggs are not heart healthy, you should know that past studies have shown that yolks don’t raise heart disease risk. Now, recent research has found that egg whites deserve a place on the list of foods to lower blood pressure, according to a study presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Canada Free Press (Toronto, Canada: 329,000 unique monthly visits)
“How compostable plastic works (VIDEO)”
January 11, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

Due to the demands of eco-conscious consumers, manufacturers are making more and more disposable plastic products from compostable polylactic acid. However, there are a few things everyone should know before tossing these plastics in the compost bin. In this video, Reactions explains how polylactic acid becomes compost.

More than five media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Wiscnews.com (Madison, WI: 194,000 unique monthly visits)
Chemistry students at Beaver Dam High School hear from cancer researcher”
January 7, 2019

Dr. Steve Weitman, who helped develop the first cancer drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for children with leukemia, was front and center Monday. Hemling said that Weitman was part of the Science Coaches program, a joint educational outreach initiative by the American Chemistry Society and American Association of Chemistry Teachers dedicated to enhancing science skills in students across the United States.

R&D Magazine Online (Rockaway, NJ: 160,000 unique monthly visits)
“Scientists Push Quantum Optic Networks Closer to Reality”
January 9, 2019

Scientists have moved quantum optic networks a step closer to reality. The ability to precisely control the interactions of light and matter at the nanoscale could help such a network transmit larger amounts of data more quickly and securely than an electrical network…. Ma and six co-authors published their findings in Nano Letters in a paper entitled, ​“Anisotropic photoluminescence from isotropic optical transition dipoles in semiconductor nanoplatelets.”

Materials Today (Oxford, England: 136,000 unique monthly visits)
“Mushroom-like nanowires stand up for elastronics”
January 7, 2019

A dense forest of mushroom-like gold nanowires grown on soft, flexible substrates could enable a new generation of wearable or implantable stretchable electronic devices, believe researchers [Wang et al., ACS Nano (2018), DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.8b05019]. Elastronics – electronic devices that can bend and flex repeatedly without impacting on performance – are ideally suited to on-the-skin monitoring or diagnostic applications.

Genetic Literacy Project (North Wales, PA: 127,000 unique monthly visits)
“Scientist can identify organic and conventional milk with a simple chemistry test”
January 11, 2019

Though consumers and regulators may be easy to fool, it is exceedingly difficult to trick scientists. A new paper in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry shows how chemists can use isotope analysis to discriminate between conventional and organic milk…. Isotopes are atoms of the same element….that have different numbers of neutrons….Though isotopes are chemically identical, they can be easily detected by chemists in the laboratory.

IYPT2019 in the News

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 23.97 million unique monthly visits)
“Fareed Zakaria GPS”
January 13, 2019

ZAKARIA: Did you know that 2019 is the International Year of the Periodic Table of Elements?
And what better way to celebrate the 150th anniversary of that landmark scientific innovation than to quiz you on your chemical knowledge. My question of the week: Which country is named for an element on the periodic table? India, Poland, Lesotho or Argentina? Stay tuned and we'll tell you the correct answer….The answer to my "GPS" challenge this week is D, Argentina, named for the element whose symbol is Ag, from the Latin argentum. Of course, this is the metal known as silver. If you ever feel you want to try to memorize the elements, try using Tom Lehrer's classic song to help you along.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.11 million unique monthly visits)
“2018 was record year for FDA drug approvals”
January 4, 2019

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved an all-time high number of drugs in 2018. Of the 59 new molecular entities that obtained the FDA’s approval to go to market, there was an assortment of small molecules, biologics, and new modalities, according to an article by Lisa M. Jarvis in Chemical & Engineering News.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“DNA design that anyone can do”
January 3, 2019

After the sequences are generated, the user can order them to easily fabricate the specified shape. In this paper, the researchers created shapes in which all of the edges consist of two duplexes of DNA, but they also have a working program that can utilize six duplexes per edge, which are more rigid. The corresponding software tool for 3-D polyhedra, called TALOS, is available online and will be published soon in the journal ACS Nano.

More than 20 media outlets, including Tasnimnews (Tehran, Iran: 10.18 million unique monthly visits) and Value Walk (Passaic, NJ: 1.72 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Carrying and releasing nanoscale cargo with ‘nanowrappers’”
January 3, 2019

This holiday season, scientists…have wrapped a box of a different kind. Using a one-step chemical synthesis method, they engineered hollow metallic nanosized boxes with cube-shaped pores at the corners and demonstrated how these "nanowrappers" can be used to carry and release DNA-coated nanoparticles in a controlled way. The research is reported in a paper published on Dec. 12 in ACS Central Science, a journal of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Ten media outlets, including R&D Magazine Online (Rockaway, NJ: 160,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Plain Dealer Online/Cleveland.com (Cleveland, OH: 11.51 million unique monthly visits)
“Is organic food better for you than conventionally produced food?”
January 2, 2019

When it comes to meat and milk, organic products can have about 50% more omega-3 fatty acids, a type of unsaturated healthy fat, than conventionally produced products. In a recent six-year study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers found that organic onions had about a 20% higher antioxidant content than conventionally grown onions.

Five media outlets, including MLive (Farmington Hills, MI: 10.83 million unique monthly visits) and TheSyracuse.com (Syracuse, NY: 3.16 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Xinhua Net (Beijing, China: 6.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Ultra-high sensitive pressure sensor developed for wearable devices”
January 4, 2019

Chinese researchers have developed a pressure sensor with ultra-high sensitivity and fast response time….The researchers developed the high-performance wearable pressure sensor based on microstructured electrodes, according to the article published in the scientific journal American Chemical Society (ACS) Applied Materials and Interfaces.

More than 5 media outlets, including China Economic Net (Beijing, China: 2.98 million unique monthly visits) and Ecns.cn (Beijing, China: 1.09 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Bigmir)net (Ukraine: 5.42 million unique monthly visits)
“Astrobiologists: Oxygen is not a sign of life on the planets”
January 4, 2019

Oxygen may not be as definitive a sign of the presence of extraterrestrial life, as astrobiologists had previously believed, according to a new study….The study is published in the journal ACS Earth and Space Chemistry.

More than 20 media outlets, including SPACE.com (New York, NY: 4.77 million unique monthly visits) and EarthSky (Austin, TX: 1.70 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

World Economic Forum (Geneva, Switzerland: 4.16 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists have combined a house plant with a rabbit gene. This is why”
January 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Scientists at the University of Washington (UW) may have found an unexpected way to tackle persistent indoor air pollution: a common houseplant modified with rabbit DNA. The results, published in Environmental Science and Technology Wednesday, showed that the gambit paid off. The researchers put both regular and modified plants in test tubes with the offending gases. The gas levels in the tubes with the unaltered plants didn't change at all. But the concentration of benzene in the tube with the rabbit-enhanced plant decreased by 75 percent in eight days.

More than five media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Toronto, Canada: 329,000 unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Equipment Online (Rockaway, NY: 135,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Neatorama (Santa Clarita, CA: 3.81 million unique monthly visits)
“An e-bandage that uses electricity to heal wounds fast!”
January 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Image credit: American Chemical Society
The human body has an amazing ability to heal in case of an injury but there are instances when certain factors interfere with the healing process and the inevitable results are pain, infection, ulcers and scars. However, scientists have developed a new type of e-bandage having therapeutic properties that wouldn’t just protect the wounds on the skin but would also help in healing them faster.

Five media outlets, including Follow News (640,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NaturalNews.com (Tucson, AZ: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“SHOCK: 90% of table salt contains tiny pieces of plastics”
January 4, 2019

We now know that salt isn’t quite the enemy it has been made out to be when it comes to your blood pressure, but it could be having another negative impact on your health as a new study shows that 90 percent of the table salt used around the world contains tiny pieces of plastic….The study, which was carried out by researchers at Incheon National University in South Korea and published in Environmental Science & Technology, looked at 39 brands of salt taken from 21 different countries.

Penn News (Philadelphia, PA: 1.97 million unique monthly visits)
“The nanotopography of an atomic world”
January 4, 2019

Now, researchers in Penn’s Department of Physics & Astronomy are paving the way for the future of nanomaterial applications by providing insights into how these thin 2D membranes form. The study from the lab of Marija Drndić, published in the journal Nano Letters, also offers a view of what these materials look like at the nanometer scale.

The Conversation UK (London, England: 657,000 unique monthly visits)
“The periodic table is 150 – but it could have looked very different”
January 2, 2019

Heinrich Baumhauer’s spiral. Reprinted (adapted) with permission from Types of graphic classifications of the elements. III. Spiral, helical, and miscellaneous charts, G. N. Quam, Mary Battell Quam. Copyright (1934) American Chemical Society.

Canada Free Press (Toronto, Canada: 329,000 unique monthly visits)
“How baby aspirin saves lives (VIDEO)”
January 3, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

Low-dose “baby” aspirin is rarely given to children anymore. Instead, people at risk of a heart attack may take a daily aspirin to decrease their risk. In this video, Reactions explains how low-dose aspirin works to inhibit blood clotting and help prevent heart attacks.

Four media outlets, including HealthNewsDigest.com (Greentown, PA: 48,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Cornucopia Institute (Cornucopia, WI: 167,000 unique monthly visits)
“As Bacteria Grow Resistance, New Antibiotics Become More and More Rare”
January 4, 2019

It’s a story that has become increasingly common. Infections that were once easily treatable now require extraordinary doses of one or more antibiotics. Meanwhile, intravenous antibiotics with nicknames like “last resort” come off the shelf more and more often. These stories portend a bleak future, one in which small wounds could lead to death, a common occurence of a bygone era, say scientists who spoke to Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) about the antibiotic crisis.

WLRN-FM Online (Miami, FL: 166,000 unique monthly visits)
“This South Florida Company Wants To Clean The Seas – And Prove It Can Make Money Doing It”
January 3, 2019

Around 9 million tons of plastic finds its way into the ocean every year, according to a report in the journal Science. Most of it arrives in the ocean via rivers. In fact, a study published by the Environmental Science & Technology journal estimates that just 10 river systems carry up to 90% of the plastic that makes its way to the ocean.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
“Scientists move quantum optic networks a step closer to reality”
January 2, 2019

“In order to integrate nanoplatelets into, say, photonic devices, we have to understand how they interact with light or how they emit light,” noted Xuedan Ma, nanoscientist at the Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM), a DOE Office of Science User Facility at Argonne. Ma and six co-authors published their findings in Nano Letters.

Four media outlets, including Electronic Component News Online (Rockaway, NJ: 157,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Utility Dive (Washington, D.C.: 156,000 unique monthly visits)
“Floating solar PV could power 10% of nation but O&M questions remain, NREL says”
January 4, 2019

NREL published the first top-level analysis on the developmental potential of floating solar panels in December, in the Environmental Science & Technology journal, as the researchers pursue funding for further analysis. Researchers plotted utility prices by state and the amount of availability in man-made bodies of water that had restricted use and were within 50 miles of transmission lines, to see the where the development potential was greatest.

More than five media outlets, including Talk Business Quarterly (Little Rock, AR: 97,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Perfect Daily Grind (East Sussex, England: 55,0000 unique monthly visits)
“Why Does Coffee Degas & What Does It Mean For Brewers & Roasters?”
January 2, 2019

But carbon dioxide in your beans isn’t a bad thing: it has an important role in coffee quality. “It is an indicator for freshness, plays an important role in shelf life and in packaging, impacts the extraction process, is involved in crema formation, and may affect the sensory profile in the cup,” says a 2018 report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits)
“Engineers Get A Grip On Slippery Surfactants”
January 4, 2019

A Rice University group's innovative surfactant theory removes limitations of a 100-year-old model for interfacial behavior in enhanced oil recovery…. That could help producers squeeze even more oil out of wells that would otherwise be considered played out. The work led by Chapman and Rice graduate student Xiaoqun Mu appears in the American Chemical Society journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

Technology Networks (Sudbury, England: 34,000 unique monthly visits)
“Neutrons – A New Weapon Against Cancer”
January 2, 2019

The results of the study, published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, are significant because if galectin binding to malignant cells is a primary culprit in the progression of breast cancer, a drug that acts as an inhibitor of this binding may be effective as a therapeutic agent. Thus, knowledge of the key hydrogen-bonding interactions provides us with a better understanding of how to optimize the design of galectin-3 inhibitors.

FOX News (New York, NY: 32.52 million unique monthly visits)
“Alien planets rich in oxygen may not necessarily be home to life, shocking study says”
January 2, 2019

A new study published in December suggests that exoplanets rich in oxygen may not necessarily contain alien life; despite the fact, the element is a critical component for life on Earth….He's study was funded by the NASA Exoplanets Research Program Grant NNX16AB45G and was published in the journal ACS Earth and Space Chemistry.

More than 15 media outlets, including Forbes Online (Jersey City, NJ: 29.76 million unique monthly visits), Popular Mechanics Online (New York, NY: 11.87 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 10.16 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo News (Los Angeles, CA: 8.40 million unique monthly visits) and SPACE.com (New York, NY: 4.77 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 29.77 million unique monthly visits)
“Rabbit gene turns houseplant into air detoxifier”
December 21, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

A team of scientists at the University of Washington in the United States made the golden pothos (Epipremnum aureum) remove toxic gases from the air by inserting a rabbit gene called CYP2E1 into its DNA…. The researchers are now working on adding another protein to the plants that would remove formaldehyde from the air, according to the study, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 150 media outlets, including U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 23.95 million unique monthly visits), The New Indian Express (India: 5.32 million unique monthly visits), Inverse (New York, NY: 3.75 million unique monthly visits), Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.14 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo Finance (New York, NY: 1.83 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Smartphone system to test for lead in water”
December 19, 2018

The latest discovery, described in the journal Analytical Chemistry, combines nano-colorimetry with darkfield microscopy, integrated into the smartphone microscope platform to detect levels of lead below the safety threshold set by the EPA.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Could We Dump Facebook and Return to Personal Websites – Five Best Ideas of the Day: December 20, 2018”
December 21, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

This self-powered electric bandage could accelerate wound healing. By the American Chemical Society

More than 60 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), SlashGear (Gilbert, AZ: 4.76 million unique monthly visits), Medindia.net (Chennai, India: 3.31 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo India (Bangalore, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits) and Prokerala.com (Kerala, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNN International Online (Atlanta, GA: 22.24 million unique monthly visits)
“When hospitals pour drugs down the drain”
December 28, 2018
Featuring an ACS Expert

Dr. David J.C. Constable, science director of the American Chemical Society's Green Chemistry Institute, explained the rationale behind the WHO report, though he was not involved in it or in decisions made at the EPA. "When you take a drug, it is given at a dose which causes a desired therapeutic effect. However, it will cause some physiological response at a lower dose," Constable wrote in an email. "This difference in response vs effect gives a significant margin of safety for most drugs." This is why WHO says concentrations well below therapeutic effect are very low risk to human health, he said.

More than 20 media outlets, including KPRC-TV Online (Houston, TX: 2.10 million unique monthly visits), WDIV-TV Online (Detroit, MI: 2.10 million unique monthly visits), WPLG-TV Online (Pembroke Park, FL: 2.07 million unique monthly visits), WJXT-TV Online (Jacksonville, FL: 2.06 million unique monthly visits) and WISC-TV Online (Madison, WI: 2.05 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Quartz (New York, NY: 16.34 million unique monthly visits)
“The US Drug Enforcement Administration is jonesing for helium and it needs it bad”
December 20, 2018

Prices for helium have gone up 250% over the past decade and stayed high, due at least partially to lower US production. Some researchers said they gave up their summer salaries and worked for free in order to cover their helium costs, according to a 2016 policy report (pdf) by the American Physical Society, Materials Research Society, and American Chemical Society.

Penn State News (University Park, PA: 13.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Bacterial protein could help find materials for your next smartphone”
January 2, 2019

Two new studies by researchers at Penn State describe the protein, which is 100 million times better at binding to lanthanides — the rare-earth metals used in smartphones and other technologies — than to other metals like calcium. The first study, which appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, describes the protein, and the second paper, which appears online in the journal Biochemistry, describes its unique structure, which likely plays a role in its remarkable selectivity for lanthanides.

More than 20 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), Techno Holik (India: 10.84 million unique monthly visits) and The Tribune (Chandigarh, India: 1.51 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Penn State News (University Park, PA: 13.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Predicting the properties of a new class of glasses”
January 2, 2019

In the most recent paper, published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, the researchers used another modeling method originally developed for another class of glasses called chalcogenide glasses. "James Phillips proposed that we can think about glasses in the same way a civil engineer would think about designing a truss structure like in a bridge or the Eiffel Tower," Mauro said.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Discovery could lead to munitions that go further, much faster”
December 20, 2018

Researchers from the U.S. Army and top universities discovered a new way to get more energy out of energetic materials containing aluminum, common in battlefield systems, by igniting aluminum micron powders coated with graphene oxide….The research team published their findings in the October edition of ACS Nano with collaboration from the RDECOM Research Laboratory, the Army's corporate research laboratory (ARL), Stanford University, University of Southern California, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Argonne National Laboratory.

More than 10 media outlets, including Army Research Lab (Adelphi, MD: 8.91 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Machine-learning research unlocking molecular cages’ energy-saving potential”
December 18, 2018

The porous organic cage molecules being studied at OSU are able to selectively capture gas molecules, potentially enabling huge energy savings in the myriad gas separations conducted in the chemical sector. "These porous molecular solids are like sponges that soak up gases discriminately," said Cory Simon, assistant professor of chemical engineering and corresponding author of a study published in ACS Central Science.

More than 10 media outlets, including Oregon State University (Corvallis, OR: 291,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Getting yeast to make artificial sweets”
December 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The holiday season can be a time of excess, but low- or no-calorie sweeteners could help merry-makers stay trim. Stevia is a zero-calorie sweetener that is sometimes called "natural" because it is extracted from the leaves of a South American plant. Now, a report in ACS Synthetic Biology describes a way to prepare large quantities of stevia using yeast, which would cut out the plant middleman and could lead to a better tasting product.

More than 10 outlets, including Canada Free Press (Toronto, ON: 326,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Fish bones yield new tool for tracking coal ash contamination”
December 26, 2018

Strontium is a naturally occurring trace element in coal that retains unique isotopic ratios even after the coal is burned and coal ash comes into contact with an aquatic environment. Past studies have used strontium isotope ratios to track coal ash's impacts on water quality, "but this is the first time we've been able to prove they can also be used as fingerprints to track coal ash's impacts in living organisms," said Avner Vengosh, …The Duke team published its peer-reviewed findings Nov. 21 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than five media outlets, including LabRoots (Yorba Linda, CA: 151,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN MY (Malaysia: 10.03 million unique monthly visits)
“Experts say you should eat the SKIN of fruit and veg – even bananas and pineapples”
January 1, 2019

According to a 2004 study in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, powerful­ antioxidants called super flavonoids found in orange and tangerine peels can reduce levels of total cholesterol and “bad” LDL­ cholesterol, without lowering the “good” HDL levels. Antioxidants mop up damaging free radicals which are produced by our bodies when we breathe and eat and are linked to disease.

Xinhua Net (Beijing, China: 6.11 million unique monthly visits)
“New technology moves “solar windows” closer to reality”
December 27, 2018

Chinese scientists said they have come up with a more efficient luminescent solar concentrator (LSC), which can be applied on "solar windows" to turn sunlight into electricity. Researchers at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics said they designed a "quantum-cutting" approach to double the efficiency of LSC devices. Their research has been published in the December issue of Nano Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including China.org.cn (Beijing, China: 2.11 million unique monthly visits) and The Nation (PK) (Lahore, Pakistan: 2.10 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

                                

Medindia.net (Chennai, India: 3.31 million unique monthly visits)
“Biomarkers to Identify Cystic Fibrosis in Infants”
December 21, 2018

Biomarkers from a single drop of blood could allow earlier and more definitive detection of cystic fibrosis, according to the scientists at McMaster University. …The findings, published online in the Journal of Proteome Research, are significant because current newborn screening methods are not accurate enough to identify the disorder in the population, which can manifest itself in many different ways, requiring additional testing and causing further stress for anxious parents.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, UK: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.14 million unique monthly visits)
“Two Ways Found To Convert CO2 Into Fuel”
December 27, 2018

In a closely related article in the journal Nano Letters, the researchers describe investigations into the electronic properties of multilayer graphene grown on cubic silicon carbide. “We discovered that multilayer graphene has extremely promising electrical properties that enable the material to be used as a superconductor, a material that conducts electrical current with zero electrical resistance. This special property arises solely when the graphene layers are arranged in a special way relative to each other,” said Jianwu Sun.

UCF Today (Orlando, FL: 1.82 million unique monthly visits)
“UCF Researchers Develop Method to Hide Images and Information in Plain Sight”
December 17, 2018

“We found we can create a surface where we preferentially control absorption of light,” says Debashis Chanda, an associate professor of physics, optics and nanoscience who has developed the technique. … And not only can information be hidden this way, the information can also be changed so that the secret messages invisible to the human eye can appear and reappear. These further developments were published recently as a cover article in the journal ACS Photonics.

More than 5 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Beritagar (Merawat, Indonesia: 1.64 million unique monthly visits)
“Why kimchi has a distinctive aroma”
December 27, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

You who like to eat Kimchi must have been very familiar with their distinctive aroma. This sour, fresh and unique aroma can upload your appetite. Actually, what causes Kimchi to have such a scent? The American Chemical Society (ACS) reports that Kimchi is a food that is processed by fermentation and involves "good microbes".

More than 5 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Toronto, ON: 326,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, UK: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Metal-based chemotherapy enhances the effect of cancer immunotherapy”
December 18, 2018

Due to their powerful tumor-killing effect, metal-based chemotherapies are frequently used in cancer treatment. However, it was hitherto assumed that they damaged the immune system… it has now been demonstrated that the opposite is true: metal-based chemotherapies can even boost the immune response against cancer and hence strengthen immunotherapies, because they render the cancer cells "visible" and eliminate inhibitory components of the immune system, amongst other things. The article appeared in "Chemical Reviews"…

More than five media outlets, including Medical Xpress (1.52 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CleanTechnica (Ventura, CA: 1.51 million unique monthly visits)
“The US Department of Energy Roots For Floating Solar Panels. Do You?”
December 30, 2018

The new study, which you can find in the American Chemical Society’s Environmental Science & Technology journal, looks at bodies of water with the right conditions for covering, at least partially, with flotillas of PV panels. Not all of these would be suitable, say, from a wildlife conservation perspective. However, the study only looked at human-made bodies of water, which ups the odds of using many of the sites without creating new headaches for conservationists.

More than 15 media outlets, including PressReleasePoint (Chicago, IL: 715,000 unique monthly visits) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (Washington, D.C.: 436,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, ON: 1.51 million unique monthly visits)
“Essential Science: Why does wine smell bad?”
December 17, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

For the study, the scientists developed a model wine that was composed of a mixture of polysulfanes. Taking this wine, the researchers treated it with antioxidants like sulfur dioxide and ascorbic acid. These additives are introduced to many wines as preservatives during bottling. The new research has been published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The research paper is titled: “Liberation of Hydrogen Sulfide from Dicysteinyl Polysulfanes in Model Wine.”

Connecticut Post Online (Bridgeport, CT: 1.09 million unique monthly visits)
“How much plastic is in your body?”
December 26, 2018

The effect of microplastics on human health remains largely unknown. King’s College London scientist Stephanie L. Wright wrote in a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology: “Chronic exposure is anticipated to be of greater concern due to the accumulative effect that could occur. This is expected to be dose-dependent, and a robust evidence-base of exposure levels is currently lacking.” In other words, the more plastics in the environment, the higher the threat.

More than 15 media outlets, including The Advocate Online (Stamford, CT: 438,000 unique monthly visits), New Haven Register Online (New Haven, CT: 438,000 unique monthly visits) and News-Times Online (Danbury: CT: 436,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Engineering.com (Mississauga, ON: 433,000 unique monthly visits)
“Should Santa Wear a Flame Retardant Suit?
December 24, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

A flame-retardant suit could save Santa from a seriously un-jolly circumstance. But many believe these molecules belong on the naughty list due to the potential risks they pose to human health.  If you're curious whether a flame-retardant Santa suit would be worthwhile--and worth the trade-off of any possible downsides--check out the video to see the American Chemical Society's breakdown of the chemistry involved.

R&D Magazine Online (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits)
“U.S. Army Research Lab’s Top 10 Coolest Science, Tech Advances from 2018”
December 17, 2018

A new explosive called BODN is 50 percent more powerful than today's most common explosive TNT. …Energetic materials can be notoriously unstable and prone to explode. BODN includes molecular features that make it stable. Unlike TNT, BODN is non-toxic. But like TNT, it is easy to melt for manufacturing of artillery shells. Researchers also developed a cost-effective synthesis process for the production of BODN. This research is published in Chemical & Engineering News.

Labroots (Yorba Linda, CA: 151,000 unique monthly visits)
“Novel Imaging Technique Enables Real-time Monitoring of Drug-induced Protein-protein Interaction”
December 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In one of their proof-of-concept test, the researchers tested the technique on a PPI induced by IMiDs an immunomodulatory drug. The interaction between cereblon and Ikaros can lead to the degradation of the latter.  SPPIER was able to allow scientists to image the PPI with high resolution and decent signal-to-noise ratio. Similar results were also observed in a few other PPIs…. Their work was published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

Scienmag (London, UK: 56,000 unique monthly visits)
“The Chemistry Year In Review”
December 19, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Many of us view the year’s end as a time for reflection, and chemists are no different. As we say goodbye to 2018, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society, highlights the year’s biggest chemistry trends, most memorable molecules and more in a special issue. As part of its wrap-up, the magazine peers into its crystal ball to predict the hottest chemistry advances to watch for in 2019.

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