ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

Gizmodo (New York, NY: 36.70 million unique monthly visits)
“A Common Household Chemical May Cause Thyroid Problems for Cats”
July 10, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Many older cats suffer from health problems caused by a hyperactive thyroid, and while there’s no single cause of the condition, hormone-disturbing chemicals in the environment are thought to be an important factor. A new study involving some furry volunteers suggests that these chemicals include fire retardants commonly found in homes….The study’s findings were published Wednesday in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 30 media outlets, including Drugs.com (Auckland, New Zealand: 26.36 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 23.92 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Drugs.com
(Auckland, New Zealand: 26.36 million unique monthly visits)
“Is Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?”
July 10, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Mattresses are known to release minute amounts of gaseous chemicals called volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These VOCs come mainly from the polyurethane used in the mattress, but also from other chemicals used in flame retardants and plastics, the researchers said….The new study was published July 10 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 20 media outlets, including U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 23.92 million unique monthly visits) and Newsmax (Boca Raton, FL: 10.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mercola.com
(Hoffman Estates, IL: 11.95 million unique monthly visits)
“Collagen benefits skin and joints, study confirms”
July 15, 2019

As it turns out, hydrolyzed collagen does allow certain peptides to enter your bloodstream intact, before they’re broken down into their component parts. Specifically, a peptide known as prolyl-hydroxyproline (Pro-Hyp), which plays a role in skin health and repair,13,14 has been shown to remain intact. As noted in a 2017 study15 published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry

Arizona Republic
(Phoenix, AZ: 10.81 million unique monthly visits)
“Chi-Huey Wong On the Methods of Oligosaccharide Synthesis Automation”
July 14, 2019

As a result of his development of carbohydrate-based vaccines for the treatment of breast cancer and other infectious diseases,…Wong was awarded The American Chemical Society Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry in 2005, the F.A. Cotton Medal for Excellence in Chemical Research in 2008, the American Chemical Society Arthur C. Cope Award in 2012, and The Wolf Prize in Chemistry in 2014.

More than 40 media outlets, including Associated Press (New York, NY: 8.45 million unique monthly visits), Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo! Finance (New York, NY: 1.83 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Standard
(Mumbai, India: 8.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Novel AI system translate proteins into music, and back”
July 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) enabled system for translating protein structures into music and converting it back to create new proteins never seen before in nature…. The system, described in the journal ACS Nano, translates the 20 types of amino acids, the building blocks that join together in chains to form all proteins, into a 20-tone scale.

More than five media outlets, including Outlookindia.com (New Delhi, India: 1.34 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Kathmandu Post
(Kathmandu, Nepal: 5.02 million unique monthly visits)
“Worried about pesticides? Scrub them away.”
July 11, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A 2017 Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry study on homemade washing agents found a baking soda and water solution could be beneficial for fruit and vegetables. The study, performed specifically on apples, found a slurry of one percent baking soda and water was found to be more effective than either tap water or a bleach solution, and eradicated almost all pesticides from the apple’s surface.

More than five media outlets, including Yahoo! India (Bangalore, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NaturalNews.com (Tucson, AZ: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers discover natural treatment for blindness caused by degenerative eye diseases”
July 10, 2019

In a new study published in the Journal of Natural Products, researchers… investigated the biological activity of homoisoflavonoids. They wanted to evaluate their effectiveness and that of synthetic derivatives in preventing the unwanted growth of blood vessels in the eye. The researchers reported that some of the compounds inhibited the formation of new blood vessels and the rapid increase in number of a disease-relevant cell type called retinal microvascular endotholial cells.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“New Anticancer Agents May Better Control Tumor Growth in Nearly Every Cancer Type”
July 9, 2019

… Now, researchers at Purdue University have discovered a novel set of MYC promoter G-quadruplex stabilizers that have demonstrated anticancer activity in human cancer cell cultures. The discovery is published in the July 8 edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Purdue University researchers have discovered potential anticancer agents that stabilize the MYC promoter G-quadruplex and downregulate the expression of the MYC oncogene.

More than 10 media outlets, including Purdue University (West Lafayette, IN: 7.57 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers report how a popular antidepressant drug could rewire the brain”
July 10, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Prozac®, the trade name for the drug fluoxetine, was introduced to the U.S. market for the treatment of depression in 1988. Thirty years later, scientists still don't know exactly how the medication exerts its mood-lifting effects. Now, researchers report that, in addition to the drug's known action on serotonin receptors, fluoxetine could rearrange nerve fibers in the hippocampus of mouse brains. They report their results in ACS Chemical Neuroscience.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers open the door to a new era of medicinal chemistry”
July 14, 2019

Since 2007 there has been a significant decline in the number of patent records involving new chemical entities, and many molecules observed during the HTS (High Throughput Screening) boom, were not considered attractive. Despite this, dominant methods and principles of organic chemistry have drastically evolved and resulted in building molecules with an increased 3D complexity…. in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than five media outlets, including Bolsamania (Madrid, Spain: 1.20 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers develop new nanotheranostic system that solves many problems”
July 9, 2019

Theranostics is an emerging field of medicine whose name is a combination of "therapeutics" and "diagnostics". The idea behind theranostics is to combine drugs and/or techniques to simultaneously - or sequentially - diagnose and treat medical conditions, and also monitor the response of the patient…. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces

Three additional media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Richmond.com (Richmond, VA: 1.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Here’s how to help make Richmond schools nicer this summer”
July 14, 2019

A chemistry professor at the University of Richmond has been awarded a grant for nickel research. Miles Johnson received $55,000 from the American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund for his project, which uses nickel as a metal catalyst to develop new chemical compounds. The grant will pay for five undergraduate summer researchers. Johnson has taught at UR since 2016.

Wonderful Engineering (Lansing, MI: 1.26 million unique monthly visits)
“This Biosensor Collects Sweat And Will Replace Blood Sampling”
July 13, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The bandage-like biosensor is economical and doesn’t feature any sort of electric components, thereby simplifying the whole process….They are currently figuring out how to enhance the sensitivity of the biosensor. A paper on their research has already been published in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

WIPB-TV (Muncie, IN: 1.11 million unique monthly visits)
“All Things Bakelite: The Age of Plastic”
July 13, 2019

At the American Chemical Society meeting where he announced the invention of Bakelite, he said his greatest discovery was his wife Celine….By a lucky coincidence Bakelite was introduced as a consumer product material at the same time the industrial design profession was developing.

San Francisco Examiner (San Francisco, CA: 1.10 million unique monthly visits)
“DDT contaminants in marine mammals may threaten California condor recovery”
July 11, 2019

The California condor’s dramatic recovery from near-extinction was aided by removal of toxic substances from the land, which accumulated in animals whose carrion they ate…. Previous research has indicated the potential for harm. DDT-related compounds are accumulating in Southern California bottlenose dolphins, according to a study from Scripps Institution of Oceanography. It was published in 2016 in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than five media outlets, including The Columbian (Vancouver, WA: 858,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Uncova (Lagos, Nigeria: 655,000 unique monthly visits)
“John Dabiri: Nigerian-American Biophysicist”
July 14, 2019

Dabiri was offered a tenured position at Caltech at the age of 29. He gave the 2010 Convocation Address at Caltech. In 2014, he was appointed the undergraduate Dean at Caltech and he was elected as a Fellow of the American Chemical Society. He was named Professor of the Month at Caltech in February 2012.

Activist Post (Newark, NJ: 652,000 unique monthly visits)
“Science Fiction No More: Researchers Develop ‘Terminator’-Like Liquid Metal”
July 11, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

… the metal was used to connect two electrodes; one submerged in hydrochloric acid and another not submerged at all. Amazingly, the liquid metal was able to stretch vertically and then move horizontally, partially exposing itself to the air. Researchers compared this breakthrough to an amphibian making its way onto land. The study is published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
“Carbon nanotube tape stays sticky in extreme temperatures”
July 10, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In very hot or cold environments, conventional tape can lose its stickiness and leave behind an annoying residue. But while most people can avoid keeping taped items in a hot car or freezer, those living in extreme environments such as deserts and the Antarctic often can't avoid such conditions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' journal Nano Letters…say they have developed a new nanomaterial tape that can function over a wide temperature range.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
“Carbon nanotube films enable method to recycle waste heat”
July 12, 2019

The ever-more-humble carbon nanotube may be just the device to make solar panels – and anything else that loses energy through heat – far more efficient. Rice University scientists are designing arrays of aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes to channel mid-infrared radiation (aka heat) and greatly raise the efficiency of solar energy systems…. introduced their technology in ACS Photonics

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 29.91 million unique monthly visits)
“A failed high school chemistry experiment results in nearly $60 million in damages”
July 3, 2019

The experiment was intended to demonstrate colors of flame produced by the combustion of various metals or salts. When Yanes attempted it in his sophomore chemistry class, it generated an explosion that caused a fire, the lawsuit states. Several months after the incident, the American Chemical Society's Committee on Chemical Safety put out a safety alert recommending that schools no longer use the experiment.

More than 80 media outlets, including CNN International (Atlanta, GA: 22.24 million unique monthly visits), St. Louis Post-Dispatch (Saint Louis, MO: 8.95 million unique monthly visits), WXYZ-TV (Detroit, MI: 2.12 million unique monthly visits), KNXV-TV (Phoenix, AZ: 2.12 million unique monthly visits) and KMGH-TV (Denver, CO: 2.11 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Livestrong.com
(Santa Monica, CA: 26.46 million unique monthly visits)
“11 Transformative Cooking Hacks for the Advanced Chef”
July 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

If you add a splash of beer to that marinade, you could help reduce the formation of potentially cancerous substances in grilled meats, determined research published in a March 2014 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Beer reduces the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that can form when meats are cooked at very high temperatures.

U.S. News & World Report
(Washington, D.C.: 23.92 million unique monthly visits)
“8 Ways to Stay Hydrated Besides Drinking Water”
July 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Coconut water is the liquid that forms inside a coconut, and the drink has more potassium and less sodium and carbohydrates than popular sports drink alternatives, according to [research presented at a meeting of] the American Chemical Society. Try rehydrating with this tropical beverage after a mild workout.

One additional outlet, WTOP-FM (Chevy Chase, MD: 3.51 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Bustle
(New York, NY: 16.35 million unique monthly visits)
“5 Health Benefits Of Drinking Coffee Hot Vs. Iced”
July 2, 2019

Sometimes you don't even need to drink coffee in order to receive its benefits. A 2008 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that the aroma of coffee can alter the activity of certain genes in the brain. In a study of sleep deprived lab rats, researchers found different gene expressions between rats that were able to sniff the coffee and those that didn't.

Hindustan Times
(New Delhi, India: 16.27 million unique monthly visits)
“Brighter, long-lasting smartphone screens in the offing”
July 8, 2019

Scientists have developed a new technique that could make smartphone and TV displays brighter, with better contrast and longer life….The research, published in the journal ACS Nano, shows that by controlling the chemistry of the OLED materials it is possible to produce OLEDs that give off a special type of polarised light, which can bypass the anti-glare filter.

More than 10 media outlets, including Techno Holik (New Delhi, India: 10.75 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Scientific American
(New York, NY: 11.83 million unique monthly visits)
“An innovative way to detect the most dangerous strains of Escherichia coli
July 2, 2019

…One such test was announced by a study led by Chris Lo, professor of analytical and environmental toxicology at the University of Alberta, and published on March 22, 2010 [in] the American Chemical Society[‘s journal Analytical Chemistry].

Zero Hedge
(Alexandria, VA: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientist Discovers Toxic Chemicals In Beer And Wine Bottles”
July 4, 2019

Researchers from the University of Plymouth in the UK have made a discovery that could shock alcoholics: designs and writings on glass bottles of beer, wine, and spirits, contain toxic substances such as lead and cadmium, reported Daily Mirror. The study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, examined both the glass and enameled designs on transparent and colored bottles that were readily available at national supermarkets in the UK.

Four additional media outlets, including Prisonplanet.com (Austin, TX: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fars News Agency (Tehran, Iran: 10.64 million unique monthly visits)
“Translating Proteins Into Music, and Back”
July 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

The system was developed by Markus Buehler, the McAfee Professor of Engineering and head of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at MIT, along with postdoc Chi Hua Yu and two others. As described in the journal ACS Nano, the system translates the 20 types of amino acids, the building blocks that join together in chains to form all proteins, into a 20-tone scale. Any protein's long sequence of amino acids then becomes a sequence of notes.

More than 10 media outlets, including IBNLive (Noida, India: 1.18 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Morningstar StockInvestor (Chicago, IL: 9.44 million unique monthly visits)
“India Saddles Consumer-Goods Makers With Fixing Plastic Trash Problem”
July 5, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Nonrecyclable packaging is a problem globally, but particularly acute in countries with poor waste management. Many Indian households lack regular collection services so they burn trash or dump it on the side of the road. Much of the waste ends up in waterways. Of plastic found in the world's oceans, 90% is traced to 10 rivers, according to a 2017 study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Eight of the rivers are in Asia and two flow through India.

Four additional media outlets, including Toronto Star (Toronto, Canada: 9.38 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MindBodyGreen (Brooklyn, NY: 8.80 million unique monthly visits)
“5 Natural Ingredients You Can Use As DEET-Free Mosquito Repellent”
July 3, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

You've probably heard about catnip in the context of, well, cats. But it also has other properties that are worth knowing about! In fact, research presented [in a journal of] the American Chemical Society—one of the world's largest scientific societies—showed that catnip was actually more effective at repelling mosquitoes than DEET.

Democratic Underground (Washington, D.C.: 4.76 million unique monthly visits)
“AI Searches of the Scientific Literature to Make Discoveries in Materials Science”
July 5, 2019

Here is a video by Dr. Cynthia Burrows of the University of Utah, editor of Accounts of Chemical Research giving the raison d'être for her journal, which as that scientists can simply not read all of the journals that they would like to read. Young scientists will have tools for sorting through the prodigious scientific literature that we didn't have years ago. I remind my son of this point frequently, asking him to imagine a world without Google Scholar, Scopus, CAS and Scifinder.

Science (Washington, D.C.: 3.26 million unique monthly visits)
“This former playwright aims to turn solar and wind power into gasoline”
July 3, 2019

…McGinnis and his team haven't published those separation results yet. But researchers led by Yang Decai from Dalian University of Technology (DUT) in China reported in August 2018 in Nano Letters that a similar carbon nanotube membrane was highly selective and fast at separating ethanol and butanol (another alcohol) from water.

Medical News Today (Brighton, England: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Gold nanoparticles promise safe cancer drugs, better vaccines”
July 2, 2019

Now, for the first time, scientists have investigated how gold nanoparticles interact with B lymphocytes, or white blood cells, which are smaller and less easy to manage. The new study is the work of researchers from Switzerland and the United Kingdom, and it features in a recent ACS Nano paper.

Two additional media outlets, including AZONano (Manchester, England: 61,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Two Steps For Sugar From Cellulose and Hemicellulose”
July 3, 2019

Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) researchers leading an international collaboration have developed a two-step method to more efficiently break down carbohydrates into their single sugar components, a critical process in producing green fuel. The research group published their results in the American Chemical Society journal Industrial & Engineering Chemical Research.

Hindu Business Line (Chennai, India: 3.01 million unique monthly visits)
“Neem chemical can disable cotton pest in multiple ways: study”
July 2, 2019

The neem plant, Azadirachta indica, is known to contain a potent phytochemical Azadirachtin-A (Aza-A) that can ward off several pests. Scientists from India and Germany have now deciphered the mechanism by which Aza-A does this…. The study results are published in the journal ACS Omega.

Four additional media outlets, including Down To Earth (New Delhi, India: 171,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.
           
San Antonio Express-News (San Antonio, TX: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Woodlawn Lake Independence Day celebration brings in families, campers”
July 4, 2019

If a participant reads eight books, each program gives that participant the chance to win prizes like a free book, T-shirt or "grand prizes." Near the back of the celebration kids enjoyed a variety of science exhibits provided by the American Chemical Society and Café College. The science exhibits included making bottled rockets, making molecules out of marshmallows, DUI slime, making elephant toothpaste and a demonstration of liquid nitrogen's effect on flower petals.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers synthesize artificial cells to detect histamine”
July 3, 2019

…They developed a riboswitch - a gene switch that senses chemical signals - that can respond to histamine, a chemical compound that is naturally produced in the body. In the presence of this chemical, the riboswitch turns on a gene inside the artificial cells. Such a system, could one day be used as a new way of administering medicine, said Yokobayashi, a corresponding author on a recent study in Journal of the American Chemical Society, which describes the approach.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Fresno Bee (Fresno, CA: 1.12 million unique monthly visits)’
“Tiny pieces of plastic pollute Monterey Bay – and they’re likely in SLO County waters, too”
July 5, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Concentrations of micro-pollutants can also be amplified when larger animals, such as fish, load up on smaller plastic-containing organisms. A 2019 Environmental Science and Technology study characterizes seafood as one of the top three contributors to human consumption of microplastics.

Environmental Working Group (Washington, D.C.: 1.10 million unique monthly visits)
“Lead Contaminates California Schools, Billions To Bail Out Nuke Energy and More”
July 5, 2019

Chemical & Engineering News: US EPA finds little risk in latest chemical assessments
1,4-dioxane also contaminates drinking water from public utilities in 27 US states, serving more than 7 million people, according to a 2017 report by the Environmental Working Group, an advocacy group.

ARY Digital Network (Karachi, Pakistan: 850,000 unique monthly visits)
“Nanotechnology treatment shows promise against multiple sclerosis”
July 8, 2019

A nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells has reversed multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice and could eventually be used to help humans, according to a new study led by University of California, Irvine researchers…. For this study, published in the journal ACS Nano, researchers avoided that problem by extracting nano-sized particles called exosomes from the stem cells and injecting them into rodents with MS.

One additional outlet, FierceBiotech (Washington, D.C.: 693,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

en.chingate.cn
(Beijing, China: 631,000 unique monthly visits)
“Chinese scientists develop easier way to test for lead in water”
July 2, 2019

A Chinese research team has developed an effective colorimetric method to detect lead contamination in water via fluorescent test strips…. The new time-saving method is both eco-friendly and effective, and greatly helps reduce costs, said the researcher. The study was published in the Analytical Chemistry, a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the latest advancement in analytical chemistry.

Breaking Israel News (Jerusalem, Israel: 601,000 unique monthly visits)
“New Antibacterial Fillings from Tel Aviv University Could Combat Tooth Decay”
July 4, 2019

There is hardly a human being on earth who doesn’t suffer from tooth decay, which is among the costliest and most widespread bacterial diseases….Now researchers at Tel Aviv University offer hope that cavities can be conquered. They developed novel dental restorative (filling) materials with potent antibacterial capabilities. The research was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Three additional media outlets, including Israel21c (Jerusalem, Israel: 148,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News & Record/Greensboro.com (Greensboro, NC: 597,000 unique monthly visits)
“Student Notebook”
July 5, 2019

The student chapter of the American Chemical Society at High Point University was awarded an honorable mention for the 2017-2018 academic year from the American Chemical Society Committee on Education. This special recognition is reviewed and awarded by peer universities and is based on the chapter’s programs, activities and outreach.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits)
“X-rays show how solid-state batteries crack”
July 5, 2019

X-ray computed tomography offers a real-time view of how cracks form near the edges of the interfaces between materials in solid-state batteries. The findings could help researchers find ways to improve the energy storage devices. The research appears in the journal ACS Energy Letters.

Bloomberg News (New York, NY: 43.90 million unique monthly visits)
“People Are Dying From Eskom’s Pollution in South Africa”
June 27, 2019

… That study and one produced by another environmental group estimate that more than 2,000 South Africans die prematurely from power plant pollution. China, which has a population more than 20 times greater than South Africa, suffered 3,153 “excess” deaths from coal plants in 2011, according to a study published by the American Chemical Society in [Environmental Science & Technology in] 2017.

More than 10 media outlets, including MyBroadband (Lyttelton, New Zealand: 5.14 million unique monthly visits) and Fin24 South Africa (Cape Town, South Africa: 3.27 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Time
(New York, NY: 43.46 million unique monthly visits)
“What the Science Really Says About Grilled Meat and Cancer Risk”
June 25, 2019

…A 2010 review of the evidence on cancer and “well-done” meat,…concluded that “the majority of these studies have shown that high intake of well-done meat and high exposure to meat carcinogens, particularly HCAs, may increase the risk of human cancer.” Heterocyclic amines (HCAs), which some experts also refer to as heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs), are a class of chemical that forms in cooked red meat and, to a lesser extent, in poultry and fish, according to a 2011 study in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

More than five media outlets, including Cooking Light (Birmingham, AL: 11.91 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes
(Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers Use Music To Study Proteins And Design New Ones”
June 28, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Researchers at MIT created an app to turn proteins into music, to access complicated protein information in a new way. Based on these protein-derived musical pieces, they trained neural networks to create new music, which could then be turned into protein structures. MIT researchers developed an app that can turn a protein's amino acid sequence into music. More than just an amusing activity, this music can train neural networks to create entirely new proteins. AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY

More than 35 media outlets, including Ars Technica (New York, NY: 16.24 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 10.20 million unique monthly visits) and Vice (Montreal, Canada: 5.75 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes
(Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Can This Bacteria In Your Gut Improve Your Running?”
June 25, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

…Here is an American Chemical Society video featuring Jonathan Scheiman, PhD, who led the study and is the co-founder and CEO of FitBiomics. The second part of the study involved, you guessed it, mice. Not just mice but mice running on treadmills. The research team gave 16 mice Veillonellaceae atypica bacteria from one of the marathon runners and a second group of 16 mice another bacteria called Lactobacillus bulgaricus via a feeding tube that led from the mice's mouths to their stomachs.

Livestrong.com
(Santa Monica, CA: 26.46 million unique monthly visits)
“10 Microwave Hacks That Make Healthy Cooking a Breeze”
June 27, 2019

The microwave makes it really easy to eat vegetables, says Tammy Lakatos Shames, RDN and co-author of The Nutrition Twins' Veggie Cure. If you avoid buying them fresh for fear they'll go rancid and turn to mush, then stock up on frozen options instead….A January 2015 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that frozen vegetables contained just as many vitamins as fresh ones, and sometimes more.

Livestrong.com
(Santa Monica, CA: 26.46 million unique monthly visits)
“11 Healthy Grilling Tips for the Best Barbecue Ever”
June 28, 2019

… A beer-based marinade may help reduce the formation of potentially harmful PAHs on your meat as it grills. Research in a March 2014 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry showed that dark beer had the strongest effect on reducing eight major types of PAHs by nearly 70 percent compared to unmarinated pork. Lighter beers also had some effect, and wine and tea marinades can work, too.

247Sports
(Brentwood, TN: 16.29 million unique monthly visits)
“OSU recruiting video accentuates Columbus’ strong points”
June 25, 2019

…The region is the home to the Battelle Memorial Institute, the world’s largest private research and development foundation; Chemical Abstracts Service, the world’s largest clearinghouse of chemical information; and NetJets, the world’s largest fractional ownership jet aircraft fleet. It is also home to four companies in the U.S. Fortune 500 – American Electric Power, Cardinal Health, Limited Brands and Nationwide Insurance.

ZDNet
(San Francisco, CA: 11.86 million unique monthly visits)
“The Science of Breaking Bad, book review: Walter White’s chemistry explained”
June 26, 2019

In an interview with the American Chemical Society's weekly in-house magazine early in the show's first season, Breaking Bad creator Vince Gilligan said that it was important to him to get the science right, and that he would welcome help from the chemistry community.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Diving into water treatment strategies for swimming pools”
June 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

With summer in full swing, many people are cooling off in swimming pools. However, some of the substances that are made when chlorine in the water reacts with compounds in human sweat, urine or dirt aren't so refreshing. Now, researchers have compared the effectiveness of different water treatment processes in mitigating these so-called disinfection byproducts (DBPs). They report their results in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 20 media outlets, including Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 8.79 million unique monthly visits), Deccan Chronicles (Secunderabad, India: 3.00 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Globe and Mail (Toronto, Canada: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Zurich Insurance to shift investment away from oil sands in broad carbon policy”
June 25, 2019

…In a report last fall, the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said the 1.5-degree target is...To support that claim, Zurich pointed to a 2015 study that was published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology by University of Calgary researchers who relied on data from 2011 to 2013.

Tasnimnews (Tehran, Iran: 10.18 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers Find Ways to Improve Energy Storage Devices – Science news”
June 29, 2019

Researchers have used X-ray computed tomography (CT) to visualize in real time how cracks form near the edges of the interfaces between materials in solid-state batteries….For the study, which was published June 4 in the journal ACS Energy Letters and was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the research team built a solid-state battery in which a solid ceramic disc was sandwiched between two pieces of solid lithium. The ceramic disc replaced the typical liquid electrolyte.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! Lifestyle (New York, NY: 8.84 million unique monthly visits)
“Novel System Uses Turmeric to Stop Cancer Cell Growth”
June 28, 2019

A new drug delivery system using curcumin - the main ingredient in turmeric - successfully inhibits the growth of bone cancer cells…It could lead to better post-operative treatments for people with osteosarcoma, the second most prevalent cause of cancer death in children, according to the research published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

Five additional media outlets, including Managed Care (Yardley, PA: 50,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 8.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Beer, wine bottles contain toxic substances: Study”
June 29, 2019

…The study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, also showed the elements had the potential to leach from enamelled glass fragments, and when subjected to a standard test that simulates rainfall in a landfill site, several fragments exceeded the US Model Toxins in Packaging Legislation and could be defined as "hazardous".

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo! India (Bangalore, India: 2.95 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IEEE Spectrum (New York, NY: 6.71 million unique monthly visits)
“From Brrrr to Vroom: New Additives Promise Better Performance for Electric Cars in Cold Weather”
June 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

New additives can help lithium-ion batteries perform over a wider range of temperatures, a potential boon for electric cars, a new study finds. Electric cars struggle with extreme temperatures, which can degrade the electrolyte solutions that conduct ions between the negative electrodes, or anodes, and positive electrodes, or cathodes, within lithium-ion batteries…. The scientists detailed their findings June 19 in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

One additional outlet, Geek.com (New York, NY: 3.16 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Xinhua Net (Beijing, China: 6.11 million unique monthly visits)
““Living” nanomaterials examined for first time”
July 1, 2019

Researchers now can better understand how nanomaterials grow, form and evolve with a new technique called variable temperature liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (VT-LPTEM)…. the new technique allows researchers to investigate these dynamic, sensitive materials with high resolution….The research was published online this week in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Xinhua Net
(Beijing, China: 6.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Glacier surface biological dust can strongly accumulate atmospheric mercury on Qinghai-Tibet Plateau: research”
June 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Dark-colored biological dust called cryoconite found on the surface of glaciers during the intensive melting season creates a large accumulation of atmospheric mercury deposition on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, researchers say. The glacier surface biological dust is a granular aggregate, comprised of both mineral and biological material, and is known to accumulate atmospheric mercury contaminants, according to recent research published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

One additional media outlet, Ecns.cn (Beijing, China: 1.09 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 5.24 million unique monthly visits)
“Antibiotic resistance: Your kitchen sponge could be the new weapon against it”
June 25, 2019

…Researchers have also discovered a new drug compound which kills antibiotic resistant gram-negative bacteria that can cause infections including pneumonia, urinary tract infections and bloodstream infections. The research, published in the journal ACS Nano, describes the new compound which kills gram-negative E. coli,…

Mother Nature Network
(Atlanta, GA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“How safe are e-cigarettes?”
June 26, 2019

When e-cigarettes were introduced to the U.S. market in 2007, they were billed as a safe alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. But since then various studies have found that these e-cigs may not be so harmless after all. Researchers found that almost all e-cigarette vapor contains two cancer-causing chemicals: propylene glycol and glycerin. The 2016 study was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Before It’s News
(Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Medicines Made of Solid Gold to Help the Immune System”
June 28, 2019

…The use of these nanoparticles is expected to improve the efficacy of pharmaceutical products while limiting potential adverse effects. These results, published in the journal ACS Nano, will lead to the development of more targeted and better tolerated therapies, particularly in the field of oncology. The methodology developed makes it also possible to test the biocompatibility of any nanoparticle at an early stage in the development of a new nanodrug.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“The Catalytic Speed Limit Has Been Broken”
June 26, 2019

A team of University of Minnesota researchers has discovered new technology that can speed up chemical reactions 10,000 times faster than the current reaction rate limit. These findings could increase the speed and lower the cost of thousands of chemical processes used in producing fertilizers, foods, fuels, plastics, and more. The team’s research paper has been published online in ACS Catalysis, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

Hindu Business Line (Chennai, India: 3.01 million unique monthly visits)
“Mango leaf extract can prevent steel from corroding: study”
June 25, 2019

…In a bid to develop a ‘green’ alternative, researchers from the National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, have fabricated an anticorrosive material made from mango leaves. They have tested the substance on commercial steel specimen and subjected it to harsh environmental conditions. The mango leaf–based product was found to be efficient in inhibiting corrosion…. The results were published in the journal ACS Omega.

Three additional media outlets, including Down to Earth (New Delhi, India: 171,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers examine strains between bone and graft from animal models”
June 25, 2019

For the first time, scientists have been able to study how well synthetic bone grafts stand up to the rigors and 'strains' of life, and how quickly they help bone re-grow and repair….In a recently published study in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Bruker announces novel phenomics solutions at Metabolomics 2019”
June 26, 2019

…Combining the annotation capabilities of MRMS with NMR is the basis of a de novo strategy for the structural elucidation of urinary metabolites. Dr. Matthew Lewis and the group at the UK National Phenome Centre at Imperial College London have detailed this novel molecular profiling workflow in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“New process turns carbon dioxide into eco-plastics”
June 25, 2019

Scientists have developed a means by which they can manipulate bacteria to generate biofuel and degradable bioplastics by utilizing airborne carbon dioxide, water vapor, and nitrogen, via a light-initiated biochemical reaction…. The new process is described in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, with the research paper titled "Nanorg Microbial Factories: Light-Driven Renewable Biochemical Synthesis Using Quantum Dot-Bacteria Nanobiohybrids."

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Hydrogel offers real promise in treating diabetes”
June 27, 2019

Researchers at EPFL have developed a hydrogel that offers unrivaled protection against transplanted cell rejection. The School's Technology Transfer Office has licensed the new product to Cell-Caps, a Geneva-based startup specialized in cell encapsulation for treating diabetes…. They published details of the process in the journal Bioconjugate Chemistry.

More than five media outlets, including Diabetes.co.uk (Coventry, England: 974,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

3DPrint.com
(New York, NY: 1.22 million unique monthly visits)
“Diversity and Collaboration Fuel Additive Manufacturing at Henkel”
June 25, 2019

From a gender perspective, the chemical industry is definitely not what one would generally consider diverse. But this is beginning to change. In a Chemical & Engineering News survey taken a decade or so ago, only 8.7% of 413 different management positions were held by women. By 2017, when the same study was conducted again, the numbers had shifted dramatically with women holding 32% of positions that have “business responsibility.”

Lipstick Alley
(New York, NY: 933,000 unique monthly visits)
“Air pollution can put you at risk of breast cancer, experts say”
June 25, 2019

We all know air pollution can damage our lungs, worsening illnesses such as asthma. Last summer, researchers writing in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters warned that air pollution is shaving up to two years off the lives of people in big cities. But it’s not just our lungs that are in danger. These fumes also contain chemicals that can cause cancer — in particular, endocrine disrupters, which are chemicals that interfere with hormones and are recognised risk factors for breast cancer.

More than five media outlets, including Mogaz News (en) (Giza, Egypt: 427,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Tri-City Herald
(Kennewick, WA: 831,000 unique monthly visits)
“Tri-Cities chemist wins national recognition for her career-building help”
June 30, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

A recently retired Pacific Northwest National Laboratory chemist will receive the 2020 Award for Volunteer Service of the American Chemical Society. Janet Bryant will receive the annual award, which comes with $5,000 and the honor of giving the keynote award at the ChemLuminary Awards ceremony during the society’s annual meeting.

BizNews.com (Johannesburg, South Africa: 611,000 unique monthly visits)
“New desalination methods offer hope – with side-effects”
June 30, 2019

A team from Columbia University’s engineering department published a study in Environmental Science & Technology Letters in April detailing what they call a “radically different desalination technology” not dependent on filters or distillation. Called temperature swing solvent extraction (TSSE), the method works as follows: a solvent whose water solubility varies with temperature is added to saltwater, and at room temperature the solvent draws in water molecules (but not salt).

The Register-Guard (Eugene, OR: 430,000 unique monthly visits)
“OSU researchers improve use of nanoparticles to kill cancer with heat”
July 1, 2019

An improved technique developed by Oregon State University researchers shows promise in killing hard-to-reach cancerous tumors using clusters of minuscule bits of matter….developed specific clusters of magnetic nanoparticles that their research suggests may be able to kill cancers deep in the human body, according to a new study….Findings were published in ACS Nano, a peer-reviewed scientific journal.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

AZoM.com Australia (Sydney, Australia: 188,000 unique monthly visits)
“Solving the Knotty Question of Soft-Pretzel Aroma”
June 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Whether at Oktoberfest, the movie theater or a shopping mall, the enticing aroma of soft pretzels is unmistakable. Now, researchers have identified the key compounds that give these twisted knots their distinctive scent. They report their results in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Blog (Los Angeles, CA: 185,000 unique monthly visits)
“Engineers Design Surfaces That Send Rain Flying Away”
June 27, 2019          

Now, a study by researchers at MIT demonstrates a new approach to minimizing the contact between droplets and surfaces. While previous attempts, including by members of the same team, have focused on minimizing the amount of time the droplet spends in contact with the surface, the new method instead focuses on the spatial extent of the contact, trying to minimize how far a droplet spreads out before bouncing away. The new findings are described in the journal ACS Nano

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits)
“3D body mapping could identify, treat organs, cells damaged from medical conditions”
June 27, 2019

…One big challenge remains for the market – how to monitor and continuously test the performance of engineered tissues and cells to replace damaged ones. Purdue University researchers have come up with a 3D mapping technology to monitor and track the behavior of the engineered cells and tissues and improve the success rate for patients who have already faced a debilitating disease. The technology is published in the June 19 edition of ACS Nano.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

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