ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

USA Today (McLean, VA: 36.99 million unique monthly visits)
“Truffles: Why are they so expensive?”
March 16, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

…Truffles get their peculiar odor from a multitude of chemicals. In white truffles, bis(methylthio)methane is the key compound, according to [research published in] the American Chemical Society. In black truffles, dimethyl sulfide and 2-Methylbutanal are found. In addition to those scent molecules, truffles have pheromones, chemical substances that affect animals and insect behavior.

More than five media outlets, including Great Falls Tribune (Great Falls, MT: 269,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNN
(Atlanta, GA: 29.91 million unique monthly visits)
“This artificial leaf wants to help fight climate change”
March 14, 2019

A man-made leaf may hold the potential to help combat carbon dioxide emissions that lead to climate change….The researchers behind the leaf, who published their work in a recent paper in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, are the latest group to try to mimic the work that real leaves do in order to fight emissions.

Four media outlets, including Att net (Dallas, TX: 1.19 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mercola.com
(Hoffman Estates, IL: 11.95 million unique monthly visits)
“The Impressive Benefits of Cumin: More Than Just a Curry Ingredient”
March 14, 2019

The valuable components of this oil mainly come from health-promoting compounds such as cuminal, B-pinene, B-myrcene, P-cymene, y-terpinene and p-mentha-1,4-dien-7-ol. Here are some of cumin oil's benefits… May have antioxidant benefits — Published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, a study noted that the volatile oils from ginger and cumin were found to have antioxidant activity.

ScienceDaily
(Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Powering deviced – with a desk lamp?”
March 13, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Batteries power most of our devices, and even some cars. But researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces a step toward running electronic devices in homes and offices on the light coming from lamps scattered around the room. The team developed special light harvesters, like those used for solar power, optimized to produce energy from ambient indoor lighting.

More than 15 media outlets, including One News Page (New York, NY: 433,000 unique monthly visits) and AZoM.com Australia (Sydney, Australia: 188,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily
(Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Selection of an optimum structure from approximately eight billion candidates may make society more energy efficient”
March 15, 2019

Scientists designed a multilayered metamaterial that realizes ultra-narrowband wavelength-selective thermal emission by combining the machine learning (Bayesian optimization) and thermal emission properties calculations (electromagnetic calculation)…. Ultranarrow-Band Wavelength-Selective Thermal Emission with Aperiodic Multilayered Metamaterials Designed by Bayesian Optimization. ACS Central Science.

ScienceDaily
(Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Improving Li-ion batteries by coating their cathode with BaTiO3 nanodots”
March 12, 2019

Scientists have found a way of greatly improving the performance of LiCoO2 cathodes in Li-ion batteries by decorating them with BaTiO3 nanodots…. Enhancement of Ultrahigh Rate Chargeability by Interfacial Nanodot BaTiO3 Treatment on LiCoO2 Cathode Thin Film Batteries. Nano Letters.

ScienceDaily
(Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Nitrogen pollution’s path to streams weaves through more forests (and faster) than suspected”
March 15, 2019

Nitrogen in rain and snow falls to the ground where, in theory, it is used by forest plants and microbes. New research…shows that more nitrogen from rain and snow is making it to more streams than previously believed and flowing downstream in forests of the United States and Canada. The study, "Unprocessed atmospheric nitrate in waters of the Northern Forest Region in the USA and Canada," was published this week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than five media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Seattle Times
(Seattle, WA: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Take a common houseplant, add a little rabbit DNA and voilá! You get a super air purifier”
March 18, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

By modifying a common houseplant, a semiretired researcher at the University of Washington says he has developed a natural air filter that will clear homes of airborne toxins. “I think it’s going to be big,” he says…. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation, peer reviewed and published in the prestigious Environmental Science & Technology journal.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“A gel to selectively remove oil or water”
March 16, 2019

A natural biopolymer, chitosan (a kind of polysaccharide obtained from a chitin shell such as the shrimp’s), which is water-soluble, has been chemically modified by researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Guwahati to selectively remove either an oil or water phase from an oil-water mixture…. a paper published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.

MSN IN (Delhi, India: 10.03 million unique monthly visits)
“23 Toxic Chemicals You Come into Contact with on a Daily Basis”
March 12, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The use of the antimicrobial chemical triclosan was banned in soaps by the FDA, but one household product it’s still in? Toothpaste, including the most popular brands. As revealed by a 2017 study in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, it can accumulate on your toothbrush and easily absorb into your bloodstream, putting you at risk of issues with your hormones and gut.

Northwestern University (Evanston, IL: 9.88 million unique monthly visits)
“Chad A. Mirkin to receive prestigious Perkin Medal”
March 14, 2019

Mirkin has been recognized for his accomplishments with more than 130 national and international awards,…He has served on the editorial advisory boards of more than 20 scholarly journals and is a current associate editor of the Journal of the American Chemical Society and the founding editor of the journal Small, one of the premier international nanotechnology journals.

NJ.com (Iselin, NJ: 9.38 million unique monthly visits)
“SDA sophomore named 2019 Miss Colleen; Horizon Health closing a site”
March 12, 2019

… A member of the American Chemical Society, his interests have included the examination of the preparation of precursors for the production of semi-conductors, as well as the combination of chemicals in marine paints. Dr. Yearwood’s current research involves the analysis of environmental toxins in Newtown Creek River, a federal Superfund site located in Long Island City, NY.

blog.naver.com (Seongnam, South Korea: 4.56 million unique monthly visits)
“Tiny ‘blinkers’ enable simultaneous imaging of multiple biomolecules”
March 13, 2019
Publicized in: ACS press release

…Now, researchers have engineered tiny "blinkers" that reveal single molecules of RNA or protein inside cells based on the duration and frequency of each flash.The research, published in the ACS journal Nano Letters, could allow scientists to see the locations of many different biomolecules in a cell simultaneously, possibly leading to better diagnostics and treatments.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medindia.com
(Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits)
“New Way to Analyze Mucus Binding Developed”
March 15, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A novel way of analyzing mucus binding that could lead to better drug development has been developed by researchers and reported in ACS' Biomacromolecules…. Jacob Witten, Tahoura Samad and Katharina Ribbeck developed a new technique to measure an array of molecules and how they bind mucin and other biopolymers in mucus.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“3D Printed Bionic Mushroom Produces Electricity”
March 16, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In the quest to replace fossil fuels, scientists are always on the lookout for alternative, environmentally friendly sources of energy. But who could have imagined a bionic mushroom that produces electricity? It sounds like something straight out of Alice in Wonderland, but researchers have now generated mushrooms patterned with energy-producing bacteria and an electrode network. They report their results in the ACS journal Nano Letters.

KGTV-TV (San Diego, CA: 2.10 million unique monthly visits)
“UC San Diego creates easy way to test for Fentanyl”
March 16, 2019

Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a new way to field test for Fentanyl, a dangerous opioid that is deadly even in trace amounts. Similar to diabetes testing strips that measure glucose levels, the scientists at the Center for Wearable Sensors created a testing strip that can detect Fentanyl….They recently published their success in an article in the Chemical and Engineering News.

Science News (Washington, D.C.: 1.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Students worldwide are striking to demand action on climate change”
March 14, 2019

For the past several months, growing numbers of students around the world have been cutting class — not to play but to protest…. And the longer people wait to cut back releases of greenhouse gases, the more difficult it may be. For instance, the longer U.S. auto and energy companies wait, the higher the costs for any action would be, according to an October 2017 study in Environmental Science & Technology.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Bacteria from seawater provide new leads to treat malignant melanoma”
March 13, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers report in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters that a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers create a hydrogel contact lens to treat serious eye disease”
March 12, 2019

…In their study, recently published in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, the UNH researchers, along with researcher Jung-Jae Lee from the University of Colorado Denver Campus, outline how the hydrogel deactivates MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 which are the major factors in corneal melting. The research was done in vitro and ex vivo (on extracted cornea tissue) and suggests that the new hydrogel could be a viable therapeutic option for treating corneal melting.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Medindia.com (Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Meteo Italiano (Rome, Italy: 1.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Alzheimer’s: beneficial effects of beer against this disease”
March 13, 2019

According to a recent discovery, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, beer would help protect brain cells against a type of damage linked to neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s. Obviously, studies continue on this and this does not mean that we can drink beer in large quantities but that new therapies could be used to counter this pathology over time

Futurity
(Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits)
“‘Defective’ molecular sieve catches more toxic chemicals”
March 14, 2019

Cleaning pollutants from water with a defective filter sounds like a non-starter, but a new study shows that right-sized defects help a molecular sieve soak up more perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) in less time…. The research appears in the ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ZME Science (Bucharest, Romania: 462,000 unique monthly visits)
“Microdosing DMT might reduce depression and anxiety”
March 12, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

… Meanwhile, a new study published this week in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience provides the first evidence that microdosing psychedelics — specifically dimethyltryptamine (DMT) — has biological effects that may lead to evidence-backed novel therapies.

More than five media outlets, including Genetic Literacy Project (North Wales, PA: 124,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ZME Science (Bucharest, Romania: 462,000 unique monthly visits)
“Treated wastewater could release antibiotic-resistance genes into the wild”
March 12, 2019

These compounds end up in the water supply, potentially driving the spread of antibiotic resistance….The paper “Evaluating Antibiotic Resistance Gene Correlations with Antibiotic Exposure Conditions in Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactors” has been published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Reader’s Digest (Montreal, Canada: 397,000 unique monthly visits)
“Is Sea Salt Better for You Than Regular Salt? Here’s Your Answer.”
March 16, 2019

According to a study published in the Environmental Science and Technology Journal, sea salt has more than trace minerals, too. In many cases, there’s also plastic leeched onto sea salt. Yes, plastic! The problem is, thanks to the plastic bags and other debris in waterways, most sea salt brands contain plastic microparticles.

Canada Free Press (Toronto, Canada: 329,000 unique monthly visits)
“Are we running out of helium (VIDEO)?”
March 14, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

Did you realize that just like certain animals here on Earth, there are endangered elements, too? For example, we’re constantly losing helium, a gas that defies gravity and escapes our atmosphere into space. This incredible element is in high demand all over the globe. It’s also way too expensive to create in the laboratory, and that’s bad news for more than just your birthday party! This week on Reactions, we will explore innovations of the industrial era of helium, how much we have left and whether or not this element will go extinct.

Three media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

AZoM.com Australia (Sydney, Australia: 188,000 unique monthly visits)
“Researchers Create Bio-Inspired Living Materials with Unparalleled Control and Versatility”
March 15, 2019

Taking a cue from this complexity existing in nature, the researchers at Berkeley Lab created a bacterium that is capable of attaching an array of nanomaterials to its cell surface. In addition, the team can accurately regulate the makeup and the way the components are closely packed together, thus producing a stable hybrid living material. The results of the study have been recently reported in ACS Synthetic Biology.

Space Daily (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA: 187,000 unique monthly visits)
“Physicists proposed fast method for printing nanolasers from rerovskites”
March 14, 2019

An international research team has developed a new method of synthesizing miniature light sources. It is based on a special laser which produces millions of nanolasers from a perovskite film in a few minutes. Such lasers look like small disks, work at room temperature and have an tunable emission wavelength from 550 to 800 nm….The study was published in ACS Nano.

More than five media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 160,000 unique monthly visits)
“Superlattice Patterns Change Electronic Properties of Graphene”
March 13, 2019

Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. Physicists at the University of Basel have now shown for the first time the combination with a third layer can result in new material properties also in a three-layer sandwich of carbon and boron nitride. This significantly increases the number of potential synthetic materials, report the researchers in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 160,000 unique monthly visits)
“Graphene and Cobalt Used to Create New Electromagnetic Devices”
March 12, 2019

…Now, a European team led by the IMDEA Nanociencia Institute has developed a methodology to prepare such a system. It consists of a device made of stacked graphene films (a single atomic graphite layer) placed on ferromagnetic cobalt, arranged in turn on a platinum layer with a certain crystallographic orientation. The details are published in Nano Letters.

InsideSources (Washington, D.C.: 153,000 unique monthly visits)
“U.S. Can Do More to Address Humanitarian Crisis in Central America”
March 15, 2019

What is more, efficient, state-of-the-art energy infrastructure plays an important role in reducing greenhouse gas emissions — particularly when compared to other methods of transportation…. A separate Environmental Science & Technology report concluded “pipeline transportation produced between 61 percent and 77 percent fewer (greenhouse gas) emissions than by rail.”

Daily Commercial (Leesburg, FL: 152,000 unique monthly visits)
“For a brighter outlook, find your food on the dark side”
March 13, 2019

Need something to drink along with all these healthy foods? Reach for a glass of green tea. According to a report in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the antioxidants in green tea, absorbed by tissue in the eyes, help protect against glaucoma and other diseases.

Associations Now (Washington, D.C.:147,000 unique monthly visits)
“Pi Day Hits a Landmark Anniversary for Number Crunchers and Pastry Lovers”
March 13, 2019

With several associations as boosters, Pi Day became an official national holiday a decade ago, with March 14 dedicated to the mathematical constant 3.14 and promotion of math education….It was a sincere wish driven by organizations like IEEE, TechAmerica, the American Chemical Society, the Biotechnology Industry Organization, the Association for Competitive Technology, and TechNet.

SciDev.net (London, England: 140,000 unique monthly visits)
“Pacific tuna stocks affected by ocean warming”
March 16, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Several studies have indicated that global warming caused by greenhouse gases is affecting fish, an important source of protein for half of the world’s population…. Allain is one of the authors of a study on tuna distribution published January in Environmental Science and Technology that suggests a need for better management of tuna stocks in the Pacific. 

Laboratory Equipment (New York, NY: 135,000 unique monthly visits)
“Tool Developed to Probe Behavior of Plastic Down to the Molecular Scale”
March 13, 2019

… Richard Register, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering, and Rodney Priestley, associate professor of chemical and biological engineering, co-advised Christie during his project. The Princeton professors are co-authors with Christie on two studies describing the tool and its early findings, published in ACS Central Science in February 2018 and Physical Review Letters in December 2018.

BruDirect.com (Pahang, Malaysia: 123,000 unique monthly visits)
“Research Shows That Berries Are One Of The Best Ways To Prevent Cancer”
March 13, 2019

Berries are a delicious and nutritious addition to any meal or beverage. Several studies suggest that these antioxidant-rich fruits also possess potent cancer-fighting properties….In a separate study, which was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers verified that the following berries had anti-cancer benefits: blackberries, black raspberries, blueberries, cranberries, red raspberries, [and] strawberries.

The Science Times (Irvine, CA: 115,000 unique monthly visits)
“New biological sensor can help diagnose cancer and epilepsy better”
March 17, 2019

"Our device is a versatile platform for real-time, label-free, highly sensitive detection of disease biomarkers, DNA mismatches and viruses," said Xi Chen, a UC Merced graduate student, a UC-National Lab In-residence graduate fellow at Lawrence Livermore and a first author in a cover article in the journal Nano Letters. He said the biosensor eventually could even be implantable.

The Atlantic (Washington, D.C.: 23.91 million unique monthly visits)
“A New Chapter in the Science of Psychedelic Microdosing”
March 5, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Microdosing straddles a line between homeopathic remedy and experimental biohacking as a promising tool that hasn’t yet made its way through the clinical system’s rigorous checks and balances. Now a new study published Monday in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience provides the first biological evidence that psychedelic microdosing could have unique therapeutic effects that differ from the effects of a full dose.

More than 20 media outlets, including ScienceAlert (Sydney, Australia: 5.32 million unique monthly visits), Medindia.com (Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Healthier dairy products with bacterial films and nanofiber membranes”
March 7, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Bacterial biofilms are typically the target of heavy-duty cleaning regimens, but these films aren't always bad news. In fact, growing them on thin sheets of nanofibers is a great way to produce a fermented milk product that can deliver hardy probiotics to the digestive tract, according to research just published in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than five media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Toronto, Canada: 329,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma”
March 6, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed. Now, researchers report in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters that a bacteria from seawater has inspired promising leads for an entirely new way to treat the disease.

More than 10 media outlets, including Medindia.com (Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“CO2 mineralization in geologically common rocks for carbon storage”
March 10, 2019

Humanity needs to improve when it comes to reducing carbon emissions to prevent the worst effects of climate change. If the world is to meet the IPCC's minimum target of keeping global temperature increases below 1.5 °C, every possible avenue for CO2 remediation must be explored…. As reported in The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, simulations were initially run to predict what happens when carbon dioxide collides with a cleaved quartz surface…

More than five media outlets, including Terra Daily (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA: 68,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“International research team confirms twofold ability of molecules”
March 7, 2019

Bacteria, plants, insects, or even fish use antifreeze proteins to protect themselves from the cold. The proteins block the growth of ice crystals…. The study brought together researchers from Bielefeld University, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot (Israel). It is being published March 7, 2019 in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

Four media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Continuous manufacturing process can make generic lomustine, other products”
March 7, 2019

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants the pharmaceutical industry to get away from making drugs using the traditional batch method and switch to a more modern process known as continuous manufacturing…. a research paper published in Organic Process Research and Development about how to make a generic form of lomustine, prescribed to people with Hodgkin lymphoma and certain brain cancers.

Three media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Theory shows how monocrystals of hexagonal boron nitride come together”
March 5, 2019

Very small steps make a big difference to researchers who want to create large wafers of two-dimensional material. Atom-sized steps in a substrate provide the means for 2D crystals growing in a chemical vapor furnace to come together in perfect rank. Scientists have recently observed this phenomenon, and now a Rice University group has an idea why it works. The Rice theory appears in the American Chemical Society journal Nano Letters.

More than 15 media outlets, including AZoM.com Australia (Sydney, Australia: 188,000 unique monthly visits) and Space Daily (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA: 187,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Successful development of high-performance color filter-free image sensor”
March 5, 2019

The image sensor used currently contains a color filter to accurately take the photo of an object. However, it has been pointed out for its shortcomings such as the declined efficiency of an electronic device, increased processing cost, and thick volume of sensor caused by the insertion of color filter…. Bifunctional Etalon-Electrode To Realize High-Performance Color Filter Free Image Sensor, ACS Nano

Four media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“NPL’s device produces high-quality, single-layer graphene”
March 9, 2019

Researchers at Delhi’s National Physical Laboratory (CSIR-NPL) have designed a low-pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) device that allows high quality, single-layer graphene measuring 4 inches in length and 2 inches in width to be grown…. Results of the study were published in ACS Omega.

Newsweek (New York, NY: 9.37 million unique monthly visits)
“Periodic Table 150th Birthday: How Are New Elements Discovered?”
March 6, 2019

To find out more about the table and how new elements are added to it, Newsweek spoke to Molly Strausbaugh, assistant director at the Chemical Abstracts Service—a division of the American Chemical Society.

Associated Press
(New York, NY: 8.45 million unique monthly visits)
“Chemical research clearinghouse was big data before big data”
March 9, 2019

Before there was Google, Amazon or even an internet, there was big data in what may seem an unlikely place: a chemical research clearinghouse in the heart of the American Midwest. For more than a century, Chemical Abstracts Service in Columbus has been gathering and summarizing chemical research breakthroughs from around the globe and then sharing them with researchers, technology developers and businesses.

More than 50 media outlets, including Washington Times (Washington, D.C.: 10.82 million unique monthly visits), World News Network (New York, NY: 8.96 million unique monthly visits) and The News Tribune (Seattle-Tacoma, WA: 1.11 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Morningstar StockInvestor (Chicago, IL: 9.44 million unique monthly visits)
“Oxurion NV Business Update”
March 7, 2019

Preclinical studies involving THR-149 were published in The Journal of Medicinal Chemistry in March 2018 and presented by Oxurion's senior scientist Dr Tine Van Bergen at the Annual Meeting 2018 of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Eye Complications Study Group (EASDec). The data demonstrate the potency and efficacy of bicyclic peptide inhibitors of pKal, such as THR-149, via a VEGF-independent pathway.

Four media outlets, including Bakersfield Californian (Bakersfield, CA: 269,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science News (Washington, D.C.: 1.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Nanosponges sop up toxins and help repair tissues”
March 7, 2019

Hu’s group in Taiwan is taking the nanosponge concept in a new direction. The researchers made nanoparticles coated with membranes from red blood cells and used the particles to trap influenza viruses. The method, reported in 2017 in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, might one day improve diagnosis of influenza and other viral infections.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Engineered breast milk could someday be used to treat sick babies”
March 7, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Treating sick babies with engineered breast milk could someday be a reality, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. Modified cells in the liquid could potentially deliver vaccines, fix birth defects or provide proteins that some babies can't make on their own.

More than five media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Getting closer to a scary ‘post-antibiotic world’”
March 8, 2019

The products of wastewater treatment have been found to contain trace amounts of antibiotic resistant DNA. These products are often reintroduced to the environment and water supply, potentially resulting in the spread of antibiotic resistance….Their findings, published in Environmental Science & Technology, indicate that even low concentrations of just a single type of antibiotic leads to resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Ecowatch (Cleveland, OH: 1.19 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Hearld – Cook County (Arlington Heights, IL: 1.56 million unique monthly visits)
“Texas A&M Chemist Kim Dunbar Earns 2015 American Chemical Society Award”
March 6, 2019

Kim Dunbar was selected to receive the ACS Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Inorganic Chemistry sponsored by Strem Chemicals Inc. In the article Kim Dunbar is recognized for "outstanding achievements in the field of coordination compounds as magnetic and conducting materials and for extraordinary service in inorganic chemistry."

More than 15 media outlets, including EIN News (Washington, D.C.: 657,000 unique monthly visits) and KITV-TV (Honolulu, HI: 316,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Geofencing Market Business Research & Global Segmentation By Apple, Microsoft, Google, IBM, Esri, Samsung Electronics, Pulsate, Gimbal, Radar, Swirl Networks, Simpli.fi, Bluedot Innovation, Localytics”
March 8, 2019

According to ACS Chemical Neuroscience, in 2016, in U.S., global pharmaceutical industry was stated to be USD 446 Billion alone. According to Outlook report, The U.S. media and entertainment industry is USD 735 billion which includes commercials, television program, streaming content, radio, broadcast, and other.

Four media outlets, including Middle East North Africa Financial Network (Amman, Jordan: 480,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CleanTechnica (N/A: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Thank A House Plant: Hydrogen-Based Energy Storage Inspired By Mother Nature”
March 9, 2019

On the storage end, researchers have been tinkering around with liquid organic H2 carrier (LOHC) systems inspired by plant-based chemistry since at least the 1980s. In 2016, the American Chemical Society journal Accounts of Chemical Research published a review of LOHC literature in 2016 titled, “Liquid Organic Hydrogen Carriers (LOHCs): Toward a Hydrogen-free Hydrogen Economy”.

SelfGrowth.com (Morganville, NJ: 1.47 million unique monthly visits)
“Essential Oils for Cough, Cold and Congestion”
March 7, 2019

The essential oil of cypress is greatly valued for its ability to help the respiratory system and fight infections. The cypress oil can eliminate nasal congestion and can eliminate the accumulation of phlegm in the lungs and respiratory tract…. A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry in 2004 found that camphene, a component in cypress oil, inhibited the growth of nine different bacteria.

The Times of India – New Delhi Edition (New Delhi, India: 1.14 million unique monthly visits)
“Turns out, tequila can help in weight loss!”
March 8, 2019

The American Chemical Society [reported] research on the effect of tequila on the blood sugar levels. They discovered that sugar found in the agave plant (which is what tequila is made from) is non-digestible and thus cannot raise your blood sugar level. To take this research ahead, researchers carried out a test on mice.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 503,000 unique monthly visits)
“This fix could take regular violins to Stradivari levels”
March 6, 2019

About 30 years ago at Texas A&M, Nagyvary was the first to prove a theory that he had spent years researching: that a primary reason for the pristine sound, beyond the excellent craftsmanship, was the chemicals Stradivari and others used to treat their instruments due to a worm infestation at the time. A review [distributed] by the American Chemical Society verified his findings.

Wits University (Johannesburg, South Africa: 430,000 unique monthly visits)
“Father of Green Chemistry an Honorary Royal Fellow”
March 8, 2019

The Royal Society of Chemistry has admitted Professor Roger Sheldon as an honorary fellow. This rare distinction recognises Sheldon’s contributions to biocatalysis, green chemistry, and catalytic oxidation….In February 2018, Sheldon co-published a paper entitled “Role of Biocatalysis in Sustainable Chemistry” in the high-impact journal, Chemical Reviews.

Kurzweil Accelerating Intelligence (Needham,MA: 375,000 unique monthly visits)
“Nanobots: The rise of the molecular machines (video)”
March 8, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

Nanomachines — including nano-sized motors, rockets and even cars — are many orders of magnitude smaller than a human cell, but they have huge promise. In the future, they could deliver drugs anywhere in the body, clean up oil spills and might even be used as artificial muscle cells. Find out more about these molecular machines (and the challenges that nanobot researchers still face) in Reactions’ latest video, produced in collaboration with the University of Nebraska’s SciPop series.

Canada Free Press (Toronto, Canada: 329,000 unique monthly visits)
“The chemistry behind kibble (video)”
March 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

Have you ever thought about how strange it is that dogs eat these dry, weird-smelling bits of food for their entire lives and never get sick of them? There are many different dog food formulas on the market, designed for such things as weight loss, long shelf life or a balanced diet. This week on Reactions, you’ll learn what’s behind the chemistry used to make the perfect dog food kibble.

Five media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Princeton Alumni Weekly (Princeton, NJ: 229,000 unique monthly visits)
“Doctoral research helps develop tool to probe plastics’ behavior down to the molecular scale”
March 9, 2019

For engineers trying to come up with novel materials such as temperature-resistant plastics or flexible glass, the transition temperature is critical. Yet it isn’t well-understood, especially at the level of matter’s molecular building blocks — the nanoscale, mere billionths of a meter in size…. published in ACS Central Science in February 2018…

Science Blog (Los Angeles, CA: 185,000 unique monthly visits)
“New separation technique could lead to reduced carbon dioxide emissions”
March 6, 2019

A Washington State University research team has developed a new way to separate carbon dioxide out of industrial processes — an important key in reducing industrial carbon emissions that contribute to global warming…. They recently published their work in the journal, ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces.

R&D Magazine (New York, NY: 160,000 unique monthly visits)
“Researchers Produce First Scalable Graphene Yarns for Wearable Textiles”
March 5, 2019

Multi-functional wearable e-textiles have been a focus of much attention due to their great potential for healthcare, sportswear, fitness and aerospace applications…. As published in ACS Nano, the process developed by the team based at the National Graphene Institute has the potential produce tons of conductive graphene-based yarn, using existing textile machineries and without adding to production costs.

More than five media outlets, including ECN – Electronic Component News (New York, NY: 157,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

R&D Magazine (New York, NY: 160,000 unique monthly visits)
“Researchers 3D Print Efficient Live Cells”
March 8, 2019

Researchers have created a new bioink that allows them to print catalytically active live cells into various self-supporting 3D geometries with fine filament thickness, tunable cell densities and high catalytic productivity…. The study was published in Nano Letters.

Information Today (Medford, NJ: 122,000 unique monthly visits)
“ACS Leads the Charge to Address Sexual Harassment”
March 7, 2019

To combat sexual and gender-based harassment and advance professional and ethical conduct, the American Chemical Society (ACS) joined forces with more than 50 other organizations to form the Societies Consortium on Sexual Harassment in STEMM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine).


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