ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

Yahoo! Lifestyle (New York, NY: 149.32 million unique monthly visits)
“Vaping Can Expose You to Nearly 2,000 Chemicals, Says New Study”
Oct. 15, 2021

In the study, which was published in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers at Johns Hopkins University uncovered nearly 2,000 chemicals in the aerosols produced by an e-cigarette. Even more concerning, at least six were identified as “potentially harmful.”

More than 11 media outlets, including MSN Health CA (Mississauga, Canada: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), Healthline (San Francisco, CA: 43.71 million unique monthly visits) and Smithsonian (Washington, DC: 2.79 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN UK (London, England: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists prove what mothers already knew: a glass of milk is best for a good night’s sleep”
Oct. 17, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In an attempt to find alternatives, scientists, funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, discovered that naturally sourced peptides in milk caused the same effect of drowsiness by binding the GABA receptor…. The study’s findings were published in the ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 50 media outlets, including The Daily Telegraph (London, England: 10.33 million unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 9.04 million unique monthly visits) and La Vanguardia (Barcelona, Spain: 6.44 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Asahi Shimbun (Tokyo, Japan: 7.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Porous material created from greenhouse gas CO2 to store CO2
Oct. 13, 2021

A team of researchers at Kyoto University has created a material capable of storing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide with one of the main ingredients being carbon dioxide itself…. The results of the research were posted on Oct. 12 to the Journal of the American Chemical Society website.

CBC Radio (Toronto, Canada: 7.41 million unique monthly visits)
“This chemist cooked up medieval gunpowder recipes and fired them out of a cannon”
Oct. 14, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Chemistry professor Dawn Riegner had a literal blast during her pandemic downtime, as she recreated gunpowder recipes and helped a friend studying medieval weapons…. They went on to recreate the gunpowder mixtures and launched them from a replica of a medieval cannon. They published their findings this summer in [ACS] Omega, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society.

CORDIS (Luxembourg City, Luxembourg: 6.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Atom manipulation in silicon dances to the tune of an ‘atomic waltz’”
Oct. 15, 2021

An international research team led by the University of Vienna, Austria, studied the behaviour of group V dopants – phosphorus, arsenic, antimony and bismuth – in silicon under electron irradiation. With partial support from the EU-funded ATMEN project, the team has now discovered a non-destructive way to move dopant atoms in a silicon lattice with atomic precision. In this novel mechanism called an indirect exchange, two neighbouring silicon atoms are involved in what an article the university posted on ‘Phys.org’ refers to as “a coordinated atomic ‘waltz’.” Published in ‘The Journal of Physical Chemistry C’, the team’s findings are possibly a key to the manufacture of solid-state qubits.

The Mainichi (Tokyo, Japan: 4.20 million unique monthly visits)
“Whale neurons unveil risk of environmental pollution: Japan-led research”
Oct. 18, 2021

A research group has succeeded in directly reprogramming somatic cells from melon-headed whales into neurons for the first time -- a development that is likely to contribute to research on neurotoxicity in marine mammals and show how pollutants affect them. The findings by the research group led by Mari Ochiai, assistant professor of environmental toxicology at Ehime University Center for Marine Environmental Studies, were published in the American academic journal Environmental Science & Technology.

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong: 3.47 million unique monthly visits)
“Why the United States dominates the Nobels”
Oct. 12, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

While China is catching up to the US in terms of total research funding (US$496 billion versus US$569 billion adjusted for purchasing power parity in 2017), it has challenges linked to academic freedom and ability to attract top talent, said H.N. Cheng, president of the American Chemical Society.

More than 20 media outlets, including MoneyControl (Mumbai, India: 3.20 million unique monthly visits) and France 24 (Paris, France: 2.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Acer launches bacteria-resistant PCs”
Oct. 13, 2021

For years, research has pointed to silver ions’ ability to fight bacteria. As a more recent report published in ACS Applied Bio Materials explains, “They can readily adsorb to most biomolecules (DNA, membrane protein, enzymes, or intracellular cofactors) in bacteria to inactivate their functions.”

Five media outlets, including Il Corriere (Milan, Italy: 4.30 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits)
“Storing data as mixtures of fluorescent dyes”
Oct. 13, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

As the world's data storage needs grow, new strategies for preserving information over long periods with reduced energy consumption are needed. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a data storage approach based on mixtures of fluorescent dyes, which are deposited onto an epoxy surface in tiny spots with an inkjet printer.

Three media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.89 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association (Chicago, IL: 1.72 million unique monthly visits)
“COVID-19 Precautions Help Musicians Make Music That's Beautiful and Safe”
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

When COVID-19 lockdowns began in March 2020, musicians around the world weren’t sure whether they could safely play their instruments in front of an audience. Music teachers at all grade levels also wondered whether they could instruct a room full of students without spreading infection. Would in-person music education have to be put on hold indefinitely? ... To pay for the study, published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Environmental Au, Weaver and Spede raised $330,000 over 22 days from 125 arts organizations around the world.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Creating a face mask that adapts to your environment”
Oct. 11, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

More detailed information on the AI-driven smart face mask can be found in the recent publication “Dynamic Pore Modulation of Stretchable Air Filter for Machined Learned Adaptive Respiratory Protection”, ACS Nano.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“New technology to detect SARS-COV-2 using sugars rather than antibodies”
Oct. 18, 2021

Researchers at the University of Warwick, Iceni Diagnostics Ltd and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire (UHCW) NHS Trust have demonstrated their technology to detect SARS-COV-2 using sugars rather than antibodies…. Journal reference: Baker, A. N., et al. (2021) Glycan-Based Flow-Through Device for the Detection of SARS-COV-2. ACS Sensors.

MSN Health & Fitness (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“New Study Shows Infants Consume Large Amounts of Microplastics”
Oct. 6, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

A new study [published by] the American Chemical Society shows that infants ingest 15 times more microplastics than adults…. During the study, the team of researchers looked for two common kinds of microplastics, polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate (PC) in stool samples. Out of the ten adults and six infants, the team found at least one type of microplastic in all of the fecal samples, but the researchers found 10 times the amount in the infant samples than the adult samples.

More than 30 media outlets covered the story.

MSN Food & Drink (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Here’s Why Kids Hate Some Veggies More Than Others”
Oct. 9, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

Chewing broccoli exposes chemical compounds to bacteria, producing sulfur compounds that can build up in children's mouths and impact how they perceive flavors, according to Damian Frank, the lead author of the study published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The more sulfur compounds researchers found in a child's mouth, the more the person hated broccoli and cauliflower.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 43.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Nobel Prize in Chemistry Awarded to Scientists for Tool That Builds Better Catalysts”
Oct. 6, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

Peter Somfai, a member of the Nobel Committee, compared the tool to a new player on a chessboard. “You can think about the game in a different way, and you can execute the game in a different way,” he said after the Nobel conference on Wednesday. H. N. Cheng, the president of the American Chemical Society, said Dr. List and Dr. MacMillan’s tool goes beyond a new player. “It’s more than just a chess piece. They have opened up the board,” Dr. Cheng said. “Now it is up to you to play the game.”

More than 490 media outlets, including The Washington Post (Washington, D.C.: 26.53 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 15.02 million unique monthly visits), CNN International (Atlanta, GA: 13.51 million unique monthly visits), ABC News (New York, NY: 12.86 million unique monthly visits) and Scientific American (New York, NY: 3.8 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 43.26 million unique monthly visits)
“This Chemist’s Pandemic Hobby? Firing Medieval Cannonballs.”
Oct. 7, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The team’s report on their gunpowder analysis and firings appeared recently in [ACS] Omega, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Chemical Society…. The medieval recipes of the team’s study featured different ratios of those main ingredients. But they also included a number of unusual additives. For instance, one recipe called for brandy. The team noted that they used Paul Masson, Grande Amber, a contemporary brand.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Bloomberg News (New York, NY: 13.00 million unique monthly visits)
“Vape Products Contain Potentially Harmful Chemicals, Researchers Say”
Oct. 6, 2021

Vaping exposes users to around 2,000 chemicals, including potentially harmful industrial compounds, according to a study of four popular brands by researchers at Johns Hopkins University. Most of the chemicals found were unidentified, but of those that were, six were cause for concern, according to the study published in Chemical Research in Toxicology, a peer-reviewed journal.

More than 35 media outlets covered the story.

Mashable (New York, NY: 5.31 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists find landmark treat spares a stunning 443 million Americans from skin cancer”
Oct. 9, 2021

The ozone high up in our atmosphere has indeed started recovering, and now scientists estimate the benefits to Americans will be extraordinary. New research published in the scientific journal ACS Earth and Space Chemistry found the Montreal Protocol (and amendments that later strengthened it) will in total prevent an estimated 443 million cases of skin cancer in Americans born between 1890 and 2100. That adds up to 2.3 million deaths. To boot, Americans will also avoid some 63 million cataract cases.

More than 15 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“TTUHSC investigator evaluates the potential of neurolysin as a therapeutic target for stroke”
Oct. 8, 2021

Karamyan's most recent collaborative study is a continuation of his previous work and evaluates the potential of Nln as a therapeutic target for stroke by seeking to identify small molecules capable of enhancing the activity and catalytic efficiency of Nln. That study, "Discovery of First-in-Class Peptidomimetic Neurolysin Activators Possessing Enhanced Brain Penetration and Stability," was published Aug. 26 in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN Health & Fitness (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Research has found the healthiest way to cook rice: the 'ACS method'”
Sept. 30, 2021
Publicized in: ACS meeting release

Researchers presenting at the American Chemical Society in Denver (ACS) have developed a way to cook rice which reportedly could reduce the calories absorbed by the body by up to 60%. To understand how it works, we need to look at what rice is made up of.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN Arabia (Dubai, United Arab Emirates: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“AI-powered face mask adapted for exercise”
Sept. 30, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

Wearing a face mask at the gym or while exercising in groups has been one of the frustrations of Covid for many athletes. Now a facial covering has been made using artificial intelligence, which can protect the wearer while remaining breathable…. The study was published in ACS Nano, a peer-reviewed scientific journal run by the American Chemical Society, a non-profit organisation chartered by the US Congress.

More than 20 media outlets covered the story.

xinmsn (Singapore: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Getting Your Kid To Eat Broccoli Is Making Them Taste Rotting Meat, Says New Study”
Oct. 1, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

The study was recently published by Australian researchers in the September 2021 issue of the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The researchers sought to understand why children do not like the taste of vegetables called brassicas. These are vegetables that are often fighting with the fork on the dinner table. This includes broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

MSN Lifestyle Canada (Mississauga, Canada: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“10 Foods You Shouldn’t Reheat in a Microwave”
Oct. 2, 2021

Processed meats often contain chemicals and preservatives that extend their shelf lives. Unfortunately, microwaving them can make those substances worse for your health. In microwaving processed meats, we might unknowingly be exposed to chemical changes such as oxidized cholesterol in the process, according to research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

xinmsn (Singapore: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“The Best and Worst Fruit to Eat – Ranked by Sugar Content!”
Oct. 2, 2021

Ocean Spray basically said that cranberries need sugar to taste good. But they don't! Eat them without the sugar in an antioxidant-packed oatmeal bowl. Create a one-cup serving of mixed fruits—cranberries, apples, and blueberries. Combine with walnuts and add to a bowl of oatmeal. In [research published by the] American Chemical Society, [an] analysis of the cancer-fighting phenol antioxidant content of 20 fruits, cranberries were found to have the highest amount.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Yahoo Finance (New York, NY: 32.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Peer-Reviewed Paper Explains Unprecedented Performance of BioLargo’s AOS Water Treatment Technology”
Oct. 4, 2021

The paper, published in the American Chemical Society's journal ES&T Water, examines the mechanism by which the BioLargo AOS produces such rapid and effective disinfection performance relative to past electrochemical water treatment technologies. The study used the Canadian Light Source particle accelerator to perform advanced measurements of the chemical reactions that occur inside the AOS during operation.

More than 15 media outlets covered the story.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 6.45 million unique monthly visits)
“West Point Chemists Re-Create Medieval Gunpowder Recipes”
Sept. 29, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

“The main goal was to check on the interpretation of one particular recipe that just seemed wrong,” says Riegner, who was lead author on the team’s paper, published this month in the journal ACS Omega. The issue turned out to be a translation error, not a scientific one, but that had piqued their interest. “Then it became: Well, what about all these other ingredients that the medieval gunners were putting in, and what was the thought process?”

More than 10 media outlets, including Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Gizmodo (New York, NY: 3.48 million unique monthly visits)
“Why Rideshares Suck, According to Science”
Sept. 28, 2021

A new study shows… that rideshare giants are actually costing us an estimated 32−37 cents in “external costs” from congestion, car wrecks, carbon pollution, and even noise. The research, published last week in Environmental Science & Technology, uses a mix of data from six rideshare markets and modeling to gauge the impact of rideshare vehicles versus personal ones. The study… boiled down the costs of each type of transport into a few buckets that include air pollution, greenhouse gas pollution, congestion, noise, and crashes.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Sputnik International Russia (Moskva, Russia: 3.21 million unique monthly visits)
“Plumbing Poverty: Millions of America’s Poorest Don’t Have Running Indoor Water – Report”
Sept. 29, 2021

One spring in northeastern Arizona was reported in 2015 as having uranium levels "at least five times greater than safe drinking water standards," according to a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. The contamination caused the early deaths of many children who drank from the spring or whose mothers drank the water while pregnant.

Mental Floss (New York, NY: 3.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Interactive Map Shows the Most Popular Halloween Candy in Each State”
Sept. 29, 2021
Publicized in: ACS video release

According to the American Chemical Society, a 180-pound person would need to consume 262 fun-sized candy bars to poison themselves. But if you're worried about contracting candy poisoning this Halloween, take comfort in the fact that you'd vomit long before you reached that point. Here are more facts about Halloween candy to indulge in.

Smithsonian (Washington, D.C.: 2.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Baby Poo Has Ten Times More Microplastics Than Adult Feces”
Sept. 28, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

Now, scientists have found the synthetic materials in infant poop, according to a small pilot study published in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. Based on body weight, microplastics in baby poop were ten times higher than those found in adult feces, reports Justine Calma for the Verge…. Despite the study's small sample size, the results show more research is needed to understand how microplastics affect people of all ages.

Five additional media outlets, including Mental Floss (New York, NY: 3.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Pocket-Lint.com (Ascot, England: 2.65 million unique monthly visits)
“26 weird and wonderful life-changing technologies from around the world”
Sept. 29, 2021

ADAPTED FROM ACS APPLIED MATERIALS & INTERFACES. Plastic waste is a serious problem. It's causing all sorts of issues for our environment and for marine life as it makes its way into the oceans. Now researchers from the University of Chemistry and Technology in Prague have begun a study using self-propelled microrobots designed to clear up the waste. These bots are said to be about the size of a red blood cell and are able to use solar power to move while destroying microplastics as they go.

Four additional media outlets, including MSN UK (London, England: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers use unnatural amino acids to create fluorescent proteins for studying biological systems”
Oct. 2, 2021

Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized our ability to study biological systems. Despite a wealth of fluorescence tools, some fundamental biological processes -; like the interactions between proteins and metabolites -; remain difficult to study. Assistant Professor Jeremy Mills and his group… have just published their research in the journal Biochemistry and present a novel solution to this problem.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Eat This, Not That! (Irvine, CA: 1.56 million unique monthly visits)
“The #1 Best Juice to Drink, Says Nutritionist”
Oct. 3, 2021

The amino acid L-citrulline found in watermelon helps move lactic acid out of muscles, reducing soreness and fatigue, another reason to drink it after a tough workout. Researchers in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that athletes who drank watermelon juice as an exercise beverage reported less soreness and slower heart rate 24 hours after working out.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Well + Good (New York, NY: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“The 7 Best Breakfast Foods for Brain Health, According to Dietitians”
Sept. 29, 2021

Who doesn’t love fresh berries with breakfast? A simple morning meal of plain Greek yogurt topped with fresh strawberries, blueberries, and chopped almonds is a brain-boosting way to start your day, says Amidor. A Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry review showed that anthocyanins, the pigment in berries that gives them their rich color, can help protect your brain cells from oxidation and boost communication between brain neurons.

Five additional media outlets, including MSN Health & Fitness (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Microneedle Patch COVID Vaccine Shows High Efficacy In Animal Models”
Sept. 28, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

COVID-19 vaccines might soon be delivered via a microneedle patch if results from an animal model are repeated in humans. A group of scientists has reported the recent breakthrough in the journal ACS Nano. Both in vitro and in mice, the team reported that a microneedle patch can deliver a COVID-19 DNA vaccine and elicit a strong immune response. The patch can be stored for 30 days at room temperature…

Two additional media outlets covered the story. 

MSN UK (London, England: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“‘Smart’ glasses that could slow down sight loss”
Sept. 21, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Can a dissolving patch help cure a common cause of baldness?... The patch administers the drugs via tiny needles, which also boost blood flow. Writing in the journal ACS Nano, the researchers said mice given the patches had faster hair regrowth compared with a standard topical treatment, minoxidil.

More than 10 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo Finance (New York, NY: 32.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Mosaic ImmunoEngineering Announces Publication of Data Supporting the Potential of Its SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Candidates under its Modular Vaccine Platform”
Sept. 23, 2021

The publication entitled, "Trivalent subunit vaccine candidates for COVID-19 and their delivery devices," published in The Journal of the American Chemical Society, details preclinical studies performed by UC San Diego researchers and Mosaic co-founders, demonstrating the ability of multiple vaccine candidates to produce antibodies in animal models that bind to target epitopes on the SARS-CoV-2 virus "S" protein.

More than 35 media outlets covered the story.

The Guardian (London, England: 31.72 million unique monthly visits)
“More microplastics in babies’ faeces than in adults’ – study”
Sept. 22, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

The research is published in the American Chemical Society’s Environmental Science and Technology Letters…. By analysing the faeces of six infants and 10 adults, and three newborns’ first stool, through a method called mass spectrometry, Kannan and his team looked into human exposure to two common microplastics – PET and polycarbonate (PC). Every sample had at least one type of microplastic in it. The level of PC microplastics were roughly the same in adults and infants, but infants had 10 to 20 times higher levels of PET microplastics.

More than 90 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits), The Independent (London, England: 13.69 million unique monthly visits), The Verge (New York, NY: 13.17 million unique monthly visits), Wired (San Francisco, CA: 6.45 million unique monthly visits) and Gizmodo (New York, NY: 3.48 million unique monthly visits) covered the story.

WebMD the Magazine (New York, NY: 25.43 million unique monthly visits)
“Your Kid’s Aversion to Broccoli May Be Genetic”
Sept. 23, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

Parents and their children often share numerous traits -- including a dislike for broccoli and other veggies in the same family. Noxious enzymes from bacteria in saliva may be the reason why, a new study suggests…. For the study, published Sept. 22 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Damian Frank and his colleagues from CSIRO… investigated differences in sulfur production in saliva from children and adults. They then analyzed how this production affected Brassica acceptance.

More than 250 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits), U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 15.02 million unique monthly visits), The Independent (London, England: 13.69 million unique monthly visits), The Daily Telegraph (London, England: 10.33 million unique monthly visits) and IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 15.02 million unique monthly visits)
“Saline Spray Could Slow COVID’s Spread in the Lungs: Study”
Sept. 24, 2021

In the study, a saline solution of sodium chloride at 1.1% reduced replication of the virus by 88% in tests of infected lung cells in the laboratory. "Reducing viral replication means reducing the severity of the disease and the inflammatory response. COVID-19 is a complex disease, comprising the viral replication stage, which hypertonic saline could treat, and then systemic inflammation, which is far more extensive.”… The findings were published online recently in the journal ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science.

More than 10 media outlets, including Drugs.com (Auckland, New Zealand: 6.28 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Snopes (Tacoma, WA: 6.66 million unique monthly visits)
“Does This Video Show a Nanobot Inseminating Egg with ‘Lazy’ Sperm?”
Sept. 23, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The assisted swimmer video initially made headlines when it was first published in a 2016 issue of the peer-reviewed journal Nano Letters, a publication by the American Chemical Society. The so-called “spermbot” was developed by researchers… in an effort to find new approaches to addressing infertility. Let’s be clear: The technology is a prototype that was recorded propelling immotile sperm toward an oocyte in a petri dish, or in vitro, and not in a living organism.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

The Seattle Times (Seattle, WA: 3.60 million unique monthly visits)
“In a first, Biden administration will draft rules on workplace heat dangers”
Sept. 20, 2021

A study published in May found that the growing risk of overlapping heat waves and power failures poses a severe threat to major U.S. cities. Power failures have increased by more than 60% since 2015, as climate change has intensified heat waves, according to the research in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Using computer models to study three large U.S. cities, the authors estimated that a combined blackout and heat wave would expose at least two-thirds of residents in those cities…

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 3.18 million unique monthly visits)
“News from the world of education”
Sept. 24, 2021

Researchers from the institute have developed a novel highly porous and water repellent superhydrophobic cotton composite material containing Metal-Organic Framework (MOF), which can absorb oil selectively from oil-water mixture. This has great capability for selective separation of the oils from oil/water mixtures, and can be applied in cleaning oil spills from water sources during transportation…. The results were published in the peer-reviewed journal ACS Applied Materials and Interface

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Quartz (New York, NY: 3.03 million unique monthly visits)
“Are cloth masks good enough to face the delta variant?”
Sept. 22, 2021

MacIntyre said it is “possible to design a high-performing cloth mask.” An experimental lab study she co-authored found a layered cloth mask can effectively block droplets. The study, published in May in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, recommends using a minimum of three layers—a combination of cotton/linen and polyester/nylon—to resemble the droplet-blocking performance of surgical masks.

More than 15 media outlets, including The Seattle Times (Seattle, WA: 3.60 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NewsBreak (Mountain View, CA: 2.45 million unique monthly visits)
“Primer, powder, and PFAS: ‘Forever chemicals’ are in half of America’s makeup products”
Sept. 22, 2021

A recent study found PFAS chemicals in nearly half of makeup tested. Research conducted at the University of Notre Dame was published in the Journal of Environmental Science and Technology Letters this summer. The researchers tested more than 200 cosmetics products…

More than five media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers investigate students’ belonging insecurity in a STEM course”
Sept. 21, 2021

For students in groups that are underrepresented in STEM, there's a danger that such a feedback loop could cause them to decide that science isn't for them, deterring potential scientists from even entering a STEM field. The research is published in the Journal of Chemical Education in a special issue on diversity, equity, inclusion and respect in chemistry education research and practice.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“World’s Whitest Paint Makes It Into The Guinness World Records”
Sept. 21, 2021

The paint, whose properties are detailed in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, uses barium sulfate, a substance used commercially in paper and cosmetics. The new paint came just months after the creation of an ultra-white paint revealed last October that could reflect 95.5 percent of solar radiation. These ultra-white paints are considered the opposite of vantablack, which absorbs 99.9 percent of light.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Japlonik (New York, NY: 1.06 million unique monthly visits)
“A Brief History Of Gasoline: Better Things For Deader Living … Through Chemistry”
Sept. 24, 2021

By way of example, in a speech before the American Chemical Society in 1926, company chairman Irenée duPont advocated the creation of a race of “supermen” controlled by mind-stimulating drugs. With great excitement he related a truly scary capitalist sci-fi fantasy for the assembled. “[B]y injecting proper compounds into an individual, we can make his character to order,” he proclaimed, for the purpose of heightening worker productivity and consumption.

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