ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Paving the way for more efficient hydrogen cars"
December 5, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Hydrogen-powered vehicles emit only water vapor from their tailpipes, offering a cleaner alternative to fossil-fuel-based transportation. But for hydrogen cars to become mainstream, scientists need to develop more efficient hydrogen-storage systems. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Chemistry of Materials have used metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to set a new record for hydrogen storage capacity under normal operating conditions.

Nine media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Manufacturing.net (Rockaway, NJ: 278,400 unique monthly visits) and ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Standard (India: 8.8 million unique monthly visits)
"New 'rewritable paper' is long-lasting and easy-to-use"
December 6, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Scientists have developed an easy-to-make "rewritable" paper that can be drawn or printed on over and over again, an advance that can help reduce paper consumption and potentially pollution. … The rewritable paper, reported in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces can also be wiped clean simply by changing the temperature.

More than 25 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), ProKerala.com (India: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), India Times (India: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), WebIndia123 (India: 1.4 million unique monthly visits) and Daily Excelsior (Jammu, India: 716,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"A banner year for pharma"
December 5, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

As 2018 draws to a close, the pharmaceutical industry is celebrating a prosperous year of new investments and therapeutic breakthroughs. These successes were driven by cutting-edge science and progress in finally translating long-standing technology into actual products, according to a cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

UPI (Washington, DC: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Wildfire ash can bind to, trap mercury"
December 5, 2018
Publicized in: ACS news release

New research suggests the particulate matter released by wildfires can trap mercury and prevent its absorption into local waterways. "Little is known about the origins, concentration, reactivity, and bioavailability of Hg in residual ash materials in post-fire landscapes," researchers wrote in a new paper on the subject, published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Earth.com (Reno, NV: 430,100 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 50,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Global News (Canada: 3.3 million unique monthly visits)
"5 essential tips to help you beat holiday belly bloat"
December 9, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

’Tis the time for turkey and gravy and cookies and cakes. And after waiting all year to indulge in some of your favourite holiday foods, it’s understandable that it would be tough to hold back when it comes to chowing down. … According to the American Chemical Society[’s Chemical & Engineering News], a low FODMAP diet includes taking away foods that contain FODMAP compounds and then systemically adding them back into a person’s diet in order to determine specific triggers.

More than 12 media outlets, including Q107 Radio (Toronto, Canada: 63,000 unique monthly visits), Jump Radio 106.9 (Ottawa, Canada: 50,000 unique monthly visits) and The Peak 95.1 FM (Collingswood, Canada: 9,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Irish Sun (Dublin, Ireland: 1.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Here’s how you can save a spoiled bottle of wine using a single penny"
December 9, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

Finding out that a bottle of your favourite wine has gone off is always an unpleasant surprise. But there is a way you can save your spoiled plonk... and it'll only cost you a penny. If a bottle of wine has gone off, you can revive it with a copper coin, according to the American Chemical Society[‘s Reactions].

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Uranium in mine dust could dissolve in human lungs"
December 5, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

New Mexico contains hundreds of historic uranium mines. Although active uranium mining in the state has ceased, rates of cardiovascular and metabolic disease remain high in the population residing close to mines within the Navajo Nation. According to a new study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters, inhaled uranium in dusts from the mines could be a factor.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Earth.com (Reno, NV: 430,100 unique monthly visits)
"How do fish survive freezing cold water?"
December 7, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

Today’s Video of the Day from the American Chemical Society series Reactions explains how fish manage to survive the freezing cold waters surrounding Antarctica. Even though the water in this region rarely rises above freezing, the fish are equipped with a type of antifreeze in their blood.

Nine media outlets, including Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and Cantech Letter (North Vancouver, Canada: 66,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"13 Holiday Foods That Are Actually Good for You"
December 8, 2018

If you’re serving an after-dinner drink this season, skip the eggnog and serve up some hot cocoa instead. Cocoa has antioxidants called flavonoids, which are linked to the reduced risk of cancer, heart disease, and stroke. A study conducted by researchers at Cornell University and published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that cocoa has twice the number of antioxidants found in red wine and three times the amount in green tea.

National Geographic Magazine Online (26.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Sea scallops suck up billions of plastic particles”
December 4, 2018

Sea scallops caught off the coast of England are capable of ingesting billions of tiny plastic particles, which disperse throughout the body to the kidney, gill, muscle, and other organs. This all takes place within six hours…The research team was led by the University of Plymouth in southeast England and involved scientists in Scotland and Canada. The results were published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 9.1 million unique monthly visits), Mind Body Green (8.8 million unique monthly visits), VICE (5.75 million unique monthly visits), Inverse (New York, NY: 3.75 million unique monthly visits), Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), Discover Online (Waukesha, WI: 2.08 million unique monthly visits) and Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits)
“Virus used to speed up modern computers”
December 7, 2018

Scientists have successfully used a virus to engineer a better type of memory in computers, which could boost their speed and efficiency. The research, published in the journal Applied Nano Materials, found that a key way to develop faster computers is to reduce the millisecond time delays using the virus M13 bacteriophage, that infects the bacterium Escherichia coli.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits), Hindustan Times (India: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), The Week (New York, NY: 6.8 million unique monthly visits), Futurism (1.2 million unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, U.K.: 16.4 million unique monthly visits)
"These Scientists Say They've Invented Something That Can Create Water Out Of Desert Air"
December 5, 2018

Our planet is nothing if not ironic. Earth is covered in water – millions of trillions of liters and gallons of the stuff – and only 2 percent of it is drinkable. Of that, 99.5 percent is frozen or buried below the ground. And of what’s left – well, human-made climate change is taking care of that. … In a paper, published in Environmental Science and Technology, the team describe the results of their small, “easy-to-assemble-at-household” prototype.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Creating Synthetic Silk from Microbes"
December 1, 2018

Spiders spin the stuff of engineers’ dreams. Their silk is as strong as steel, stretchy, nontoxic and biodegradable. But spiders are not easy to farm. … The researchers made these proteins into a powder and mixed it into a solution that can be spun into fibers as strong as natural ones, they reported in September in Biomacromolecules.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
“Toxic flame retardants are in children’s car seats”
December 3, 2018

Scientists have found toxic flame retardants in newly manufactured children’s car seats, sparking concerns about children’s health. Of the 18 children’s car seats tested, 15 contained new or traditional hazardous flame retardant chemicals. [The research was published in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology Letters.]

More than 10 media outlets, including Medindia.com (or.net) (Chennai, India: 3.31 million unique monthly visits), WDIV-TV Online (Detroit, MI: 2.10 million unique monthly visits), WVUE-TV Online (New Orleans, LA: 840,000 unique monthly visits and WCSC-TV Online (Charleston, SC: 827,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Using graphene to detect ALS, other neurodegenerative diseases"
December 5, 2018

The wonders of graphene are numerous -- it can enable flexible electronic components, enhance solar cell capacity, filter the finest subatomic particles and revolutionize batteries. Now, the "supermaterial" may one day be used to test for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS -- a progressive, neurodegenerative disease which is diagnosed mostly by ruling out other disorders, according to new research from the University of Illinois at Chicago published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Eight media outlets, including News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 50,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Newly developed molecules may provide more reliable relief for people with autoimmune diseases"
December 7, 2018

Living with an autoimmune disease can feel like an insider is attacking your body. … The new inhibitors may provide relief for people suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myelofibrosis and other autoimmune diseases with a reduction in side effects compared with current therapies. The research appears in the November edition of the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Seven media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Isle of Man, British Isles: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits) and Purdue Exponent (West Lafayette, IN: 55,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Orlando Sentinel Online (Orlando, FL: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“Environmental Nutrition: Turn up for Turnips!”
December 3, 2018

Among cruciferous vegetables, turnip sprouts were shown to have among the highest concentrations of glucosinolates, a compound known for its anti-cancer activity (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 2012).

Over 40 media outlets, including ArcaMax (Norfolk, VA: 1.46 million unique monthly visits), The Times Online (Chicago, IL: 1.08 million unique monthly visits), Billings Gazette Online (Billings, MT: 854,000 unique monthly visits), Missoulian Online (Missoula, MT: 849,000 unique monthly visits), Quad-City Times Online (Quad Cities, IA & IL: 848,000 unique monthly visits) and Pantagraph Online (Peoria-Bloomington, IL: 837,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Reader's Digest (New York, NY: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"9 Indigestion Home Remedies That Actually Work"
December 5, 2018

… Beers that have a bitter bite are rich in hops, an herb that helps stimulate digestion. A 2012 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that the more bitter acids the beer has, the better the release of gastric acid from stomach cells. Gastric acid helps with digestion and controlling the growth of gut bacteria.

Science Magazine (Washington, DC: 3.3 million unique monthly visits)
"A decade after a fatal lab safety disaster, what have we learned?"
December 5, 2018

This month marks 10 years since Sheharbano “Sheri” Sangji undertook her last experiment. …  Multiple prestigious bodies have issued reports advising institutions how to improve their safety cultures. In what Kaufman calls “a miraculous change,” the American Chemical Society has declared lab safety a core professional value.

Portland Press Herald (Portland, ME: 2.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Carpets could be causing trouble underfoot"
December 9, 2018

… What is known about how plastic microfibers behave in the body is not reassuring. In May 2017, British researchers Stephanie Wright and Frank J. Kelly described in the journal Environmental Science and Technology “anticipated hazards” from inhalation of plastic microfibers. Workers who process nylon and polyester fibers report symptoms of respiratory distress such as sneezing, breathlessness, coughing and wheezing.

Six media outlets, including Kennebec Journal (Augusta, ME: 697,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Futurity (Rochester, NY: 510,000 unique monthly visits)
"New 2D Sensors Can Cover Any Smooth Surface"
December 7, 2018

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Now, engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that. They have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices to report on what they perceive. … The results of their work appear in the journal ACS Nano.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 29.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Consumer group warns of 'dangerous' slime products and other hazardous toys"
November 20, 2018
Featuring an ACS Expert

A consumer advocacy group is warning parents of what it calls "dangerously high" levels of a chemical called boron in popular slime toys marketed to children -- although an expert disputed the findings and said the warning is overblown. … However, Rick Sachleben, a member of the American Chemical Society who has experience with boron, said it's important to distinguish the fact that "all forms of boron are not equally toxic." He said sodium borate, the known component used in slime, has "very low toxicity."

More than 45 media outlets, including CBD Detroit (Detroit, MI: 24.9 million unique monthly visits), NOLA (New Orleans, LA: 3.8 million unique monthly visits), ABC 15 (Phoenix, AZ: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), News 4 Jax (Jacksonville, FL: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), 10 News (San Diego, CA: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), WCPO (Cincinnati, OH: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), WXYZ (Detroit, MI: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), Click 2 Houston (Houston, TX: 2.1 million unique monthly visits) and Local 10 News (Miami, FL: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Gadgets Now (India: 10.9 million unique monthly visits)
"This electronic skin may aid human-machine interactions"
November 30, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Scientists have created a fast and inexpensive new method to develop an electronic skin that can aid robots and prosthetic devices to attain abilities akin to human skin that can detect pressure, temperature and other sensations that allow tactile interactions with the environment. … But in the new approach reported in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, the team patterned a circuit template onto a sheet of transfer tattoo paper with an ordinary desktop laser printer.

More than 18 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), WN Network (New York, NY: 9.0 million unique monthly visits), Business Standard (India: 8.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Prokerala (India: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Web India (India: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits) and Can India (India: 147,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Proton NMR spectroscopy shows hazelnuts from different regions have different metabolite profiles"
November 29, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Hazelnuts, like olive oil, cheese and other agricultural products, differ in flavor depending on their geographic origin. Because consumers and processors are willing to pay more for better nuts -- especially in fine chocolates and other delicacies -- testing methods are needed to reliably authenticate the nuts' country of origin. Researchers now report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that NMR analysis could fill the bill.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), New Food (U.K.: 122,000 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Science Codex (U.S.: 31,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Sharing benefits of digitized DNA"
November 28, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Today, scientists can sift through quadrillions of genetic sequences in open-access databases, searching (free-of-charge) for new ways to engineer crops, develop medicines or even create synthetic organisms. But a controversial proposal that aims to share the benefits of digitized DNA could affect scientists' ability to use these data, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN).

Four media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Earth.com (Reno, NV: 430,100 unique monthly visits)
"Tap water can contain contaminants that aren’t monitored in tests"
November 21, 2018
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A new study published by the American Chemical Society has revealed that some consumers are exposed to contaminants in their tap water that are not monitored. While the public tap water supply in the United States was found to generally meet all of the enforceable standards, routine testing for most contaminants is conducted before the water is distributed and not where it is used.

Eight media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 50,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"What's the difference between relative humidity and dew point?"
November 30, 2018
Publicized in: ACS video release

Meteorologists often report the amount of moisture in the air as relative humidity or dew point. These measures can be confusing to people who are just trying to determine if the weather outside will feel comfortable. Both relate to the chemistry of water dissolving in air, but in different ways. In this video, Reactions decodes these weather terms to help you make sense of the forecast.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits) and Earth.com (Reno, NV: 430,100 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"50 Ways to Lose Weight Without Exercise"
November 26, 2018

Here’s another reason to skip the gym: not only do studies show your body burns more calories when you exercise outdoors compared to indoors, but an Environmental Science & Technology study recently found that you’re also more likely to report a greater sense of pleasure, enthusiasm, and self-esteem and lower sense of depression, tension, and fatigue simply by walking in nature compared to on a dreary treadmill.

Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 30.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Skip the sutures. ‘Game-changing ‘superglue’ could heal serious knee injuries"
November 26, 2018

Are you plagued by joint problems? A groundbreaking new superglue-style material could help revolutionize treatments such as knee surgery by strongly adhering to the injured body part, and then conveying repair cells or drugs in order to stimulate tissue regeneration. … A paper describing the research, titled “Composite Double-Network Hydrogels To Improve Adhesion on Biological Surfaces,” was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than 10 media outlets, including News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Geek.com (New York, NY: 3.2 million unique monthly visits), CBS 8 (San Diego, CA: 1.5 million unique monthly visits), WBOC (Salisbury, MD: 439,000 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 29.9 million unique monthly visits)
"‘Enough Is Enough’: Science, Too, Has a Problem With Harassment"
November 19, 2018

… In 1970, the “zeros list” published annually by the Women’s Committee of the American Chemical Society reported that chemistry departments in 113 of the nation’s leading universities had zero women on their faculty.

Five media outlets, including Independent (London, U.K.: 107.8 million unique monthly visits) and Santa Fe New Mexican (Santa Fe, NM: 336,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNET News (San Francisco, CA: 29.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Everything you need to know about slime"
November 22, 2018

Slime has been a popular science project for decades, teaching kids about viscosity, polymers and chemical reactions. In the last few years it has become a bona fide cultural phenomenon, with viral how-to videos taking over social media. … The American Chemical Society has a recipe for a stretchier slime here.

Sputnik News (Russia: 16.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Made in Russia: Chemists Invent Unique Disease-Fighting 'Nano-Grenades'"
November 23, 2018

… The scientists' research, published in the Bioconjugate Chemistry academic journal, combined the best properties of two approaches to the creation of nanoparticles, experimenting with photosensitive nanomaterial technology and a chemical 'switch' method they recently developed.

More than 10 media outlets, including Business Standard (India: 8.8 million unique monthly visits), First Post (India: 7.7 million unique monthly visits), The Health Site (India: 5.3 million unique monthly visits), Prokerala (India: 3.0 million unique monthly visits) and Web India (India: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Light-Activated, Single-Ion Catalyst Breaks Down Carbon Dioxide"
November 26, 2018

A team of scientists has discovered a single-site, visible-light-activated catalyst that converts carbon dioxide (CO2) into "building block" molecules that could be used for creating useful chemicals. The discovery opens the possibility of using sunlight to turn a greenhouse gas into hydrocarbon fuels. … The team describes this single-site catalyst in a paper just published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits), Solar Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Space Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and Stony Brook News (Stony Brook, NY: 86,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Brown Recluse Silk Is Stronger Than Steel Because It’s Constructed Like a Cable"
November 21, 2018

Spider silk is often touted as some of the strongest material on Earth: According to some calculations, it can be up to five times stronger than steel cable of similar weight—though that comparison is not perfect. … In their latest study in the journal ACS Macro Letters, the team found that instead of being one long strand of protein, the ribbon of silk is composed entirely of 1 micron-long nanostrands stuck together in parallel. Typically, about 2,500 of these mini-strands clung together to form one strand of silk.

Eight media outlets, including Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits) and Science magazine (Washington, DC: 3.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Standard (India: 8.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Developed Enzymes With Remote Control"
November 23, 2018

For the first time ever, scientists have developed enzymes using radio frequency radiation. The study was published in ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering Journal. The method required making a special complex consisting of enzymes and magnetic nanoparticles. The particles then adsorb radio emission and convert it to heat that accelerates enzymatic processes by more than four times.

More than 10 media outlets, including News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Deccan Chronicle (India: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Web India (India: 1.4 million unique monthly visits), Siasat (India: 1.3 million unique monthly visits) and R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Innovative 'elastic' contrast media for more sensitive MRI diagnostics"
November 29, 2018

Researchers from the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) have found a new method for obtaining high-quality images in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), that requires less contrast medium compared to current methods. … In the study, which has been published in the "ACS Nano" journal, both groups now describe how these vesicles form an ideal contrast medium: They can "elastically" adjust their influence on the measured xenon.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 11.9 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Isle of Man, British Isles: 6.4 million unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 162,000 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

UCLA Newsroom (Los Angeles, CA: 6.1 million unique monthly visits)
"New technique for identifying ‘small’ molecules could accelerate drug discovery and manufacturing"
November 27, 2018

UCLA-led team of scientists has developed a new technique that will enable researchers to easily and quickly determine the structures of organic molecules using very small samples. … The final paper, which was published in ACS Central Science, describes a new method for using electron microscopes to examine small molecules. The approach enables scientists to analyze nanocrystals,… and identify them within about 30 minutes, instead of the several hours that the current process takes.

Seven media outlets, including News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits) and LA Business Journal (Los Angeles, CA: 85,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Orlando Sentinel (Orlando, FL: 4.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Environmental Nutrition: The quintessential quince"
November 26, 2018

Quince is a nutritious, tasty favorite that Americans are just beginning to appreciate. … A total of 26 plant compounds were identified in 13 varieties of quince, according to a laboratory study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (2013). The largest group of compounds was flavanols, with benefits like a reduced risk of cancer, heart disease and stroke.

More than 25 media outlets, including Madison.com (Madison, WI: 3.3 million unique monthly visits), Arca Max (1.5 million unique monthly visits) and The NWI Times (Munster, IN: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Pure Wow (U.S.: 3.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Why This New Chocolate Is Better Than Xanax"
November 30, 2018

There are few things in life better than chocolate (OK, maybe wine, cheese and Game of Thrones), but now there’s even more reason to love the cocoa confection. … Of course, normal chocolate can reportedly lower stress as well. In a study published in the Journal of Proteome Research, the flavonoids found in the cacao of dark chocolate reduced cortisol levels in participants, albeit by small amounts.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Identify the Lethal Dose of Kratom's Active Ingredients"
November 21, 2018

For thousands of people, the opioid-like plant kratom has been life-changing. … In a paper published October 31 in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, a team of researchers tested mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, the two main active molecules in kratom, on mice to establish their LD50 — a measure of lethal dosage. When researchers injected these chemicals into mice intravenously, they were lethal at around the same dosage as heroin.

Reader's Digest (New York, NY: 3.5 million unique monthly visits)
"13 Holiday Foods That Are Actually Good for You"
November 28, 2018

If you’re serving an after-dinner drink this season, skip the eggnog and serve up some hot cocoa instead. Cocoa has antioxidants called flavonoids, which are linked to the reduced risk of cancer, heart disease, and stroke. A study conducted by researchers at Cornell University and published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that cocoa has twice the number of antioxidants found in red wine and three times the amount in green tea.
Indy Star
(Indianapolis, IN: 3.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Here's how Juul and other vape products affect your body"
November 20, 2018

E-cigarette use continues to rise, especially among young people. … The American Chemical Society published a 2017 report that shows in addition to formaldehyde, e-cigarettes produce other chemicals including acetaldehyde and acrolein, which are linked to lung disease and cardiovascular disease.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.