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ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

MSN MY (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Mind-Blowing Video Reveals The Formation of Salt Crystals From Individual Atoms”
Jan. 23, 2021

But on the atomic level, we have a poor understanding of how crystals form, particularly nucleation – the very first step in the crystallisation process…. That's what makes the work of a team of researchers led by chemist Takayuki Nakamuro of the University of Tokyo in Japan so exciting. Using a special technique in development since 2005, they have filmed the crystallisation of salt on the atomic scale for the first time…. The research has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than 10 media outlets covered the story.

Yahoo Finance (New York, NY: 32.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Spectroscopy® Announces L. Robert Baker the Winner of the 2021 Emerging Leader in Atomic Spectroscopy Award”
Jan. 20, 2021

In addition to the Emerging Leader in Atomic Spectroscopy Award, Baker has received multiple other awards, including the Benjamin Boussert Memorial Award from the University of California, Berkeley; the Early Career Award from the Department of Energy; the Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research; the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award; and the Journal of Physical Chemistry-Physical Chemistry Division Lectureship Award from the American Chemical Society.

More than 30 media outlets, including Associated Press (New York, NY: 5.81 million unique monthly visits) and BusinessWire.com (San Francisco, CA: 2.30 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

HowStuffWorks (Atlanta, GA: 5.62 million unique monthly visits)
“Is the Dream of Cold Fusion Still a Possibility?”
Jan. 22, 2021

"The spinoffs are perhaps one of the biggest impacts that our research in this area has had," Munday says. "Through the Google collaboration, we have collectively published more than 20 papers in high impact journals such as Nature, Nature Materials, Nature Catalysis, various American Chemical Society journals, etc. and have been granted two patents to-date.

Livestrong.com (Santa Monica, CA: 3.38 million unique monthly visits)
“6 Cooking Mistakes That Make Your Homemade Meals Less Healthy”
Jan. 23, 2021

You can take it one step further by replacing salt with spices that complement the dish you're making. That way, you don't have to worry about your food tasting bland. Plus, spices are linked to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory health benefits, per a March 2019 study in the ​Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry​.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“New method reveals how pharmaceuticals induce cancer cell death”
Jan. 19, 2021

Cancer cells are smart when it comes to anti-cancer drugs, evolving and becoming resistant to even the strongest chemotherapies over time. To combat this evasive behavior, researchers have developed a method… to see, at single-cell/organelle level, how pharmaceuticals induce cancer cell death and how cancer cells adapt. The research… was published on Jan. 12 in Analytical Chemistry, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers discover potent antifungal agent from attine ant farms”
Jan. 20, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

Attine ants are farmers, and they grow fungus as food. Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces bacteria are their farmhands, producing metabolites that protect the crop from pathogens. Surprisingly, these metabolites lack common structural features across bacteria from different geographic locations, even though the ants share a common ancestor. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science they have identified the first shared antifungal compound among many of these bacteria across Brazil.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

Interesting Engineering (San Francisco, CA: 1.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists Use AI and Urine to Diagnose Prostate Cancer”
Jan 22, 2021

The current method of diagnosing prostate cancer, the most common type of cancer in men, is typically invasive so as to get a decent accuracy rate. A collaboration of scientists from the Biomaterials Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) and the Asan Medical Center in South Korea has put its heads together to find a more accurate and less invasive solution — and it's managed to do so. The team's study was published in ACS Nano.

More than 40 media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.89 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“COVID-19 model reveals key role for innate immunity in controlling viral load”
Jan. 21, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Since SARS-CoV-2 was identified… researchers have worked feverishly to study the novel coronavirus. Although much knowledge has been gained, scientists still have a lot to learn about how SARS-CoV-2 interacts with the human body, and how the immune system fights it. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science have developed a mathematical model of SARS-CoV-2 infection that reveals a key role for the innate immune system in controlling viral load.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.08 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers develop a new approach to detect pancreatic cancer”
Jan. 21, 2021

A protein found commonly in human blood might help with the detection of hard-to-diagnose pancreatic tumors. Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the Alfried Krupp Hospital in Essen and the University of Witten/Herdecke have developed approach using the protein's structure and its function as a proxy for this. In a first study in ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science, the team shows how its method can also be used to differentiate between benign and malignant tumors.

More than 10 media outlets covered the story. 

MSN IN (Ahmedabad, India: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“In protecting the wearer, two masks can be better than one, scientists say”
Jan. 18, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

The idea that multiple mask layers block the virus more effectively has been tested and shown by previous research. In a study last year in the American Chemical Society’s journal ACS Nano, researchers had identified a combination of two fabrics as possibly the best for filtering out respiratory particles — either cotton plus natural silk, or cotton plus chiffon… That study and others have also stressed the importance of a proper fit.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“How The COVID-19 Virus Gets into Our Cells”
Jan. 18, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Biology continues to be a hard subject. COVID-19 shows us how hard it can be. Here is a really nice article in Chemical & Engineering News about structural biochemistry in the coronavirus age, and how the technology of obtaining protein crystal structures has evolved over the years…

Chron.com (Houston, TX: 11.98 million unique monthly visits)
“Florida Poly professor’s research selected for WHO COVID-19 database”
Jan. 12, 2021

The World Health Organization (WHO) has selected leading-edge research on fighting COVID-19 by Dr. Ajeet Kaushik, assistant professor of chemistry at Florida Polytechnic University, to be featured in its database of global literature on coronavirus disease…. Kaushik also was among the authors of a paper published in ACS Applied Bio Materials titled “Electrochemical SARS-CoV-2 Sensing at Point-of-Care and Artificial Intelligence for Intelligent COVID-19 Management,”…

More than 25 media outlets, including Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 2.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers bring modern twist to learning periodic table”
Jan. 15, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Journal of Chemical Education introduced an innovative way to make learning about the elements much more approachable by using ‘pseudo’ periodic tables filled with superheroes, foods and apps…. Over 75% of students taught with this strategy identified it as somewhat, very or extremely useful.

More than 15 media outlets, including Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 5.20 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Economist (London, England: 3.18 million unique monthly visits)
“The case for more state spending on R&D”
Jan. 16, 2021

In the 1960s researchers at DuPont published more articles in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the field’s leading journal, than mit and Caltech combined. The production of scientific knowledge and the desire to solve real-world commercial problems were closely entwined. Science was being pulled into the economy, not just pushed; this was the environment in which, in the 1960s, the term R&D was invented.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Craft brewers now have a new tool for sniffing out trace flavor compounds”
Jan. 14, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Craft-beer aficionados relish the endless flavor variations that can be achieved by mixing and matching different varieties of hops…But some of the chemical compounds that contribute to those flavors are present in such trace amounts that it's difficult for brewers to measure and track them during the brewing process. Now German scientists have devised an automated, efficient method for doing just that, according to a recent paper published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Medicinal plant-derived compound destroys brain-eating amoeba in lab studies”
Jan. 13, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a deadly disease caused by the "brain-eating amoeba" Naegleria fowleri, is becoming more common in some areas of the world, and it has no effective treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have found that a compound isolated from the leaves of a traditional medicinal plant, Inula viscosa or "false yellowhead," kills the amoebae by causing them to commit cell suicide in lab studies, which could lead to new treatments.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

MSN Arabia (Dubai, United Arab Emirates: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Side Effects of Eating Chocolate, According to Science”
Dec. 23, 2020

One particular type of antioxidant in cocoa, a flavanol known as oligomeric procyanidins (PCs), has been found to prevent laboratory mice from gaining excess weight, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. To get the flavanol benefits, you have to opt for dark chocolate.

More than five media outlets, including Eat This, Not That! (Irvine, CA: 1.56 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN South Africa (Cape Town, South Africa: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Fruity energy, spidery lenses: Nature-inspired solutions in 2020”
Dec. 24, 2020

Bamboo has attracted interest as a versatile construction material. But how to make it strong enough? In a May study published in the ACS Nano, researchers said they had found an answer. By partially removing the lignin -- an organic substance which forms woody tissue -- and microwaving the bamboo, researchers said its strength nearly doubled.

More than 25 media outlets, including France 24 (Paris, France: 2.15 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.89 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN News (Redmond, WA: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“54 great online educational tools for kids”
Dec. 26, 2020

Offered by the American Chemical Society, ChemMatters seeks to “demystify everyday chemistry.” Resources are available on a variety of topics for all ages.

MSN NZ (Auckland, New Zealand: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“50 gut-friendly foods you should be eating”
Jan. 7, 2021
Publicized in: ACS national meeting release

When summer comes around, there’s nothing quite like tucking into a sweet pint of strawberries. Research presented at the 256th National Meeting and Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS) suggests that eating strawberries can decrease inflammation in the gut. That is great news for people who tend to suffer from Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD) and related digestive issues.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

MSN UK (London, England: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“Even our tea bags contain plastic – but there are 6 brands that are plastic-free”
Jan. 8, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

This problem is linked to tea bags where the actual bag itself is made out of plastic material, not the paper bags that are more common. These plastic tea bags are more often linked to the higher end brands. The scientists found that one plastic tea bag releases around 11.6 billion microplastics and 3.1 bollion smaller nanoplastic particles into the cup. The findings were published in the Journal of Environmental Science & Technology.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

xinmsn (Singapore: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“5 Cleaning Products You Should Be Using in 2021”
Jan. 9, 2021
Featuring an: ACS expert

The friction that is created when you scrub with soap and water is enough to break the coronavirus’s protective envelope, according to Consumer Reports. That means you must use some elbow grease along with the soap and water, though. Richard Sachleben, a chemist and member of the American Chemical Society, tells Consumer Reports: “Scrub like you’ve got sticky stuff on the surface and you really need to get it off.”

MSN MY (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 67.15 million unique monthly visits)
“50 Best Foods for Men”
Jan. 11, 2021

Derived from an Amazonian palm tree, açai berries are the size of grapes and taste a bit like chocolate blueberries. A study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry discovered that the black-purple berries contain higher levels of antioxidants than do pomegranates and blueberries.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Apple: The Immune-Boosting Fruit”
Dec. 23, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A 2017 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggested the followings: 1. Soaking them for 15 minutes in a solution of a teaspoon of baking soda and two cups of water. 2. Followed by a thorough rinse with water.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 41.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists debut promising material for solar energy storage for months”
Dec. 30, 2020

Researchers from Lancaster University have discovered a crystalline material that can not only capture energy from the sun but can also store it for several months at room temperature, before releasing it on demand in the form of heat. This kind of technology can be especially useful in places where there is a lot of sunlight during the summer months but not enough during the winter months…. Complete Research was published in the journal of Chemistry of Materials.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.91 million unique monthly visits)
“The breakthroughs that could spot breast cancer even earlier: From smart bras to blood tests and a simple urine checker… the fascinating innovations experts hope will save more lives every year”
Jan. 4, 2021

When the tears of breast cancer patients and healthy patients, collected on a strip of filter paper, were analysed using the test, a clear difference was found, according to a study published last year in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. Further research is now needed to see how accurate the test is. 'As with all these new approaches, the question is, will it work in real life?' says Dr Crosby.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 15.02 million unique monthly visits)
“AHA News: Trendy Microgreens Offer Flavor You Can Grow at Home”
Jan. 8, 2021
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Most microgreens are rich in concentrated vitamins and antioxidants. A 2012 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry looked at 25 commercially available microgreens and found they contained nutrient levels up to 40 times higher than more mature leaves. Other research also has shown microgreens contain a wider variety of antioxidants and micronutrients called polyphenols.

More than 10 media outlets, including Drugs.com (Auckland, New Zealand: 6.28 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Times of India (Gurgaon, India: 9.88 million unique monthly visits)
“Cutting edge: Pioneering drug delivery system”
Jan 6, 2021

His work on mRNA therapeutics and lipid nanoparticles is published in the past few years with reputed journals…. His path-breaking research focused on engineering enhanced lipid nanoparticles for mRNA delivery leading to potent therapeutic applications. These works were published in leading high impact journals, ACS Nano Letters and Nature Communications and have also been patented.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 5.20 million unique monthly visits)
“Drug discovery study identifies promising new compound to open constricted airways”
Jan. 5, 2021

In a preclinical study published Nov. 5 in ACS Pharmacology and Translational Science, Dr. Liggett and colleagues identified and characterized 18 new compounds (agonists) that activate bitter taste receptor subtype TAS2R5 to promote relaxation (dilation) of human airway smooth muscle cells.

More than 20 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Livestrong.com (Santa Monica, CA: 3.38 million unique monthly visits)
“10 Foods You Should Stop Storing in the Fridge”
Dec. 23, 2020

In a widely-cited July 2006 study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers studied watermelon stored for 14 days at three different temperatures: 70 degrees Fahrenheit (room temperature), 55 degrees Fahrenheit and 41 degrees Fahrenheit. Levels of the antioxidant lycopene levels increased up to 40 percent and beta-carotene levels increased up to 139 percent in watermelon kept at room temperature.

Ars Technica (New York, NY: 2.91 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists ID potential biomarkers to peg time of death for submerged corpses”
Dec. 26, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Correctly estimating time of death looks so easy in fictional police procedurals, but it's one of the more challenging aspects of a forensic pathologist's job. This is particularly true for corpses found in water… A team of scientists at Northumbria University in Newcastle, UK, have hit upon a new method for making that determination, involving the measurement of levels of certain proteins in bones. They described their findings in an April paper in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 2.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Proteomic data derived from Immunovia’s IMMray™-platform allows differential diagnosis of difficult to distinguish autoimmune diseases”
Jan. 7, 2021

Immunovia AB, ("Immunovia") a diagnostic company that develops highly accurate blood tests for the early detection of cancer and autoimmune diseases, today announced results from a study in their development pipeline, published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Proteome Research. These are the first proteomic data allowing a differential analysis of four different inflammatory rheumatic diseases (IRDs).

More than 85 media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Novel microcopy methods used to study tiny traction forces during T-cell activation”
Dec. 21, 2020

What is now clear, however, is that not only chemistry plays a role in the docking of antigens to the T-cell; micromechanical effects are important too…. This was made possible by a cooperation between TU Wien, Humbold Universität Berlin, ETH Zurich and MedUni Vienna. The results have now been published in the scientific journal "Nano Letters".

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers identify natural products with potential to disrupt viral spread”
Jan. 5, 2021

In a review appearing in the Journal of Natural Products, marine chemists… and immunologist Lena Gerwick describe the basic biology of three families of RNA viruses and how they infect human cells. These viruses use RNA instead of DNA to store their genetic information, a trait that helps them to evolve quickly. The team then describes the natural products that have been shown to have capabilities to inhibit them, highlighting possible treatment strategies.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers analyze evaporation and propagation of respiratory droplets of COVID-19 patients”
Jan. 6, 2021

They found that, under some conditions, respiratory droplets traveled farther than the six feet the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends for safe social distancing, and that the effect increased in cooler and more-humid environments…. "We are so fortunate that vaccines were recently made available; however, our effort to understand the transmission of respiratory diseases should continue," said Zhu, who co-wrote a paper on the project that was published in the journal Nano Letters.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Surface-textured nanocrystals for biofilm eradication”
Jan. 8, 2021

The COVID-19 pandemic is raising fears of new pathogens such as new viruses or drug-resistant bacteria. To this, a Korean research team has recently drawn attention for developing the technology for removing antibiotic-resistant bacteria by controlling the surface texture of nanomaterials.A joint research team from POSTECH and UNIST has introduced mixed-FeCo-oxide-based surface-textured nanostructures (MTex) as highly efficient magneto-catalytic platform in the international journal Nano Letters.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.67 million unique monthly visits)
“Single-dose nanoparticle COVID-19 vaccine elicits virus-neutralizing antibody response in mice”
Jan. 8, 2021
Publicized in: ACS news release

Across the world, health care workers and high-risk groups are beginning to receive COVID-19 vaccines, offering hope for a return to normalcy amidst the pandemic. However, the vaccines authorized for emergency use in the U.S. require two doses to be effective, which can create problems with logistics and compliance. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that elicits a virus-neutralizing antibody response in mice after only a single dose.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 2.87 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Star (Petaling Jaya, Malaysia: 1.18 million unique monthly visits)
“5 most nutrient-packed microgreens you should consider”
Jan. 7, 2021

Red cabbage- These microgreens come in shades of petite red to violet stemmed with variegated green leave hues. A 2016 study by the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that it can help lower lipid and cholesterol levels.

The Star (Petaling Jaya, Malaysia: 1.18 million unique monthly visits)
“How plastic in the future may be made from sewage sludge”
Jan. 6, 2021

Researchers in the United States have discovered an efficient, cost-effective way to make biodegradable plastics from unused and potentially polluting waste. Now, after several attempts, a team… have discovered an efficient and cost-effective way of using leftover sludge to produce biodegradable plastics. Published in the journal American Chemical Society (ACS) Omega, the research centres around a strain of bacteria found in mangroves called Zobellella denitrificans ZD1.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Listening To Music Enhances The Therapeutic Effects of Psychedelics”
Jan. 4, 2021

Subsequently, clinical guidelines for psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy have tended to insist on the use of classical music, yet a new study in the journal ACS Pharmacology and Translational Science suggests that this may not be the most appropriate genre after all. To conduct their research, the study authors administered psilocybin to ten participants in an attempt to help them quit smoking.

One additional media outlet covered the story. 

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