ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million)
"What causes a cellphone battery to explode: Video reveals the chemistry behind the terrifying phenomenon"
September 13, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

Lithium-ion batteries have become a part of the digital revolution, but not without a serious setback - sometimes, they spontaneously explode. There's a few different reasons why this happens: overcharging, overheating, physical damage or faulty manufacturing can all result in an electrical short - and this is what happened to Samsung's Galaxy 7. … A new video by the American Chemical Society and PBS Digital Studios explains why batteries explode and how science can address this.

More than 10 media outlets, including Mental Floss (Tampa, FL: 20.7 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Irish News (Belfast, Ireland: 571,600 unique monthly visits), Evening Express (London, U.K.: 236,100 unique monthly visits), YubaNet (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits) and Product Design & Development (Rockaway, NJ: 104,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Fast paper-based tuberculosis test developed"
September 14, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Scientists have developed a fast, paper-based test to diagnose tuberculosis that can be read with a smartphone, a technology that is increasingly available in emerging economies. Diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) early can allow patients to receive the medicine they need and also help prevent the disease from spreading. …  The research was published in the journal ACS Sensors.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Reducing leather pollution with molten salts"
September 13, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

From handbags and jackets to car interiors, leather products are almost everywhere. But processing the leather for these luxury items creates a lot of potentially harmful pollution. Now, one group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering a new method for processing leather that is more eco-friendly.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Chem.info (Rockaway, NJ: 37,900 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Toward unbreakable encrypted messages"
September 13, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Chinese researchers recently announced a landmark advancement: They used a satellite orbiting Earth to beam pairs of quantum-entangled photons to two Tibetan mountaintops more than 700 miles apart. This distance blew the previous record out of the water. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, this is only the beginning for quantum communication.

Four media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

British Telecommunications (London, U.K.: 8.3 million unique monthly visits)
"This £30 keychain that detects food allergens could save your life"
September 11, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Eating out can often be a difficult experience for people with food allergies but researchers now have produced something that could help with that. Scientists have developed what they call a new “portable allergen-detection system” that looks like a keychain and they say it could help prevent trips to A&E. … The research is published in the journal ACS Nano.

Six media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Medgadget (U.S.: 120,300 unique monthly visits) and Mobi Health News (Portland, ME: 69,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Tech Republic (Century, FL: 5.4 million unique monthly visits)
"3D printing may be hazardous to your health: The case for a particle emissions standard"
September 11, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

There is little doubt that 3D printing is or will soon become a major disruptive technology. Futurists predict there will be a 3D printer in most homes and businesses, making everything from food to replacement parts. There is, however, cause for concern. … Regarding particulate pollution, this American Chemical Society August 30, 2017 press release expresses the organization's concern, stating, "... no research has been reported on strategies for preventing or reducing pollution from the machines [3D printers]."

Five media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and National Law Review (Western Springs, IL: 54,856 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

LiveScience (New York, NY: 5.2 million unique monthly visits)
"'Coffee-Ring Effect' Could Reveal What's in Your Tap Water"
September 12, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

The physics of the so-called "coffee-ring effect" — how particles in liquid cause darkened areas to form at the perimeter of a spill — is helping scientists to quickly and cheaply identify the mineral contents of tap water, according to new research. Residues left behind when tap water evaporates are "like fingerprints" for the water's properties and contents, Rebecca Lahr, an assistant professor in the chemistry department in Lyman Briggs College at Michigan State University, told the American Chemical Society (ACS) in a statement.

MIT News (Cambridge, MA: 4.3 million unique monthly visits)
"“Peel-and-go” printable structures fold themselves"
September 13, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

As 3-D printing has become a mainstream technology, industry and academic researchers have been investigating printable structures that will fold themselves into useful three-dimensional shapes when heated or immersed in water. In a paper appearing in the American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Materials and Interfaces, researchers from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and colleagues report something new: a printable structure that begins to fold itself up as soon as it’s peeled off the printing platform.

More than 20 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), My Broadband (South Africa: 2.7 million unique monthly visits), Engineering.com (Mississauga, Canada: 643,100 unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits) and Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 3.4 million unique monthly visits)
"What should you make of the health claims for turmeric?"
September 14, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

It gives curries their color and traditionally was used to dye the vibrant golden robes of Buddhist monks. It may be in your spice cabinet right now – but should turmeric also be in your medicine cabinet? … Kathryn M. Nelson, a principal scientist at the University of Minnesota’s Institute for Therapeutics Discovery and Development, is more skeptical. In January, she and colleagues published a review of curcumin’s chemistry in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that raised questions about curcumin’s therapeutic potential.

EarthSky (Austin, TX: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"More Cassini legacy: Titan’s bonkers atmosphere"
September 15, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

The 20-year-old Cassini mission to Saturn is ending today (September 15, 2017) with a fiery plunge by the craft into Saturn’s dense atmosphere. … Or – if you want to learn more about Cassini science – check out this episode of the video series Speaking of Chemistry. In it, Matt Davenport teams up JoAnna Wendel to give you the low-down on the strange chemistry in the atmosphere of Titan, Saturn’s large moon.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), YubaNet (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits) and EOS (Washington, DC: 111,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Columbus Dispatch (Columbus, OH: 838,700 unique monthly visits)
"Here’s to the tears that onions cause"
September 17, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Onions make us teary because a reaction in the onion releases a chemical called lachrymatory factor, or LF, that irritates the eyes.  … ″It hits your eyes, and then it hits your sensory nerves in your eyes and causes them to tear up,″ said Josie Silvaroli, an undergraduate at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland who helped describe the process in the July issue of the journal ACS Chemical Biology. ″It’s similar to tear gas.″

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Fish Food for Marine Farms Harbor Antibiotic Resistance Genes"
September 13, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

From isolated caves to ancient permafrost, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and genes for resistance have been showing up in unexpected places. As scientists puzzle over how genes for antibiotic resistance arise in various environments and what risks to human health they might pose, one team has identified a surprising way some of these genes are getting into ocean sediments: through food for marine fisheries. Their report appears in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology.

Five media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits) and Infection Control Today (Phoenix, AZ: 39,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Industrial Equipment News (Monona, WI: 50,200 unique monthly visits)
"Without Rubber, We Wouldn't Have Sports"
September 12, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

The latest episode of Reactions, from the American Chemical Society, focuses sports balls, and how they owe their resilience and reliability to rubber (not pigskin). Derivatives and spinoffs are everywhere in sports, and the chemical composition differs wildly from sport-to-sport.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Japanese nuclear disaster didn't affect fish or human health: B.C. oceanographer"
September 14, 2017

Radioactive contamination following a nuclear power-plant disaster in Japan never reached unsafe levels in the north Pacific Ocean for either marine life or human health, says a British Columbia scientist. … "We're confident in saying that the levels that we see now in our part of the Pacific from Fukushima are below those levels that represent a significant health risk either to the Pacific Ocean or to human beings in Canada or the west coast of North America," said Cullen, who is one of nine international authors of a study published last week on the findings in Environmental Science and Technology.

Six media outlets, including CBC News (Ottawa, Canada: 21.1 million unique monthly visits), The Star (Toronto, Canada: 6.4 million unique monthly visits) and Victoria News (Victoria, Canada: 43,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Skin patch melts 'love-handles' in mice"
September 13, 2017

Doctors hope the skin patches will provide a safe and effective means of treating obesity. US researchers have developed a skin patch that can melt fat in mice, and future tests will reveal whether it could treat obesity and diabetes in people, a study said Friday. The patch uses nanotechnology to raise the body's metabolism and transform energy-storing white fat into energy-burning brown fat, according to the report in ACS Nano, a publication of the American Chemical Society.

More than 100 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits), Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits), USA Today (Washington, DC: 29.9 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million), Inquisitr (U.S.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Tech Times (New York, NY: 15.6 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Health.com (New York, NY: 11.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Engadget (New York, NY: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), News Max (West Palm Beach, FL: 7.3 million unique monthly visits), CTV News (Toronto, Canada: 5.7 million unique monthly visits) and Men's Health (New York, NY: 5.5 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Want to Synthesize Salvia’s Hallucinogenic Molecule for a Surprising Reason"
September 11, 2017

You’re probably familiar with Salvia divinorum, the hallucinogenic plant used for religious purposes in some indigenous cultures, and for watching celebrities giggle in some decaying cultures. … “Careful attention to modeling gave a measure of confidence to the venture, although to some extent, it was still a leap of faith,” Jonathan Scheerer, an organic chemist at William & Mary college who not involved in the study told Chemical and Engineering News.

The Telegraph (London, U.K.: 55 million unique monthly visits)
"Red wine: the unexpected health benefits"
September 13, 2017

Another day, another story about red wine being good for you. Today's happy news comes from Australia, where a member of the national Wine Research Institute has been extolling the virtues of a drop of red. … "Our study suggests that a natural compound like resveratrol...could actually decrease some of the motor deficiencies that are seen in our aging population," the scientist who led the experiment told the American Chemical Society.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Tattoo Ink Can Go Deeper Than The Skin"
September 15, 2017

Could there be another hazard of getting a tattoo besides contracting infectious diseases like hepatitis? … Therefore, you may want to find out what is in your ink before you get tattooed. Sarah Everts wrote for Chemical and Engineering News that pigments in tattoo inks can be the ones also used in the textile, plastics and car paint industries, and include carcinogenic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

Four media outlets, including MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Horrific Flesh-Eating Parasite Called “The Next Plague” Could Spread In U.S. Spurring Vaccine Effort"
September 13, 2017

Leishmania is the second-most deadly parasite in the world. According to the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Institute, 20,000-30,000 people die from Leishmaniasis annually. Other estimates put the annual death toll at 50,000. About 350 million people are at risk across an estimated 90 countries, and some scientists have called the parasite the next plague. … As described in their study published today in ACS Central Science, the researchers injected virus-like particles into 12 mice genetically engineered to have immune systems similar to humans.

More than 15 media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits), Romper (New York, NY: 2.1 million unique monthly visits), Futurism (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits) and Seeker (San Francisco, CA: 1.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million)
"Could Seaweed be the key to treating traumatic brain injuries? Researchers say the algae may help heal damaged brain tissue caused by injury or stroke"
September 13, 2017

Seaweed could be the key to treating traumatic brain injuries, researchers say. Australian researchers believe the marine algae could be used to help heal damaged brain tissue caused by injury or stroke. An anti-inflammatory sugar molecule found in seaweed was combined with short peptides [small proteins] to create a 'hydrogel scaffold'. … And the new cells had grown by the seventh day, according to a study published in journal ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering.

Nine media outlets, including Business Insider (New York, NY: 37.9 million unique monthly visits), SBS Australia (Sydney, Australia: 5.7 million unique monthly visits), The Mercury (Australia: 255,800 unique monthly visits) and Fierce Biotech (Newton, MA: 197,400 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Guardian (London, U.K.: 23.5 million unique monthly visits)
"The entrepreneurs turning carbon dioxide into fuels"
September 14, 2017

… And at the annual American Chemical Society meeting in Washington DC last month, a small company called Dioxide Materials said that it had developed electrolysis technology that could split carbon dioxide into oxygen and carbon monoxide – a precursor for methanol – with twice the efficiency of previous systems.

Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits)
"World’s ‘Greenest Green’ Could Make Ultra High-Definition Displays Even Sharper"
September 13, 2017

Not all greens are created equal. There’s lime green, mint green, British racing green. And now there’s practically pure green, thanks to chemical engineers at ETH Zurich, who have created the world’s greenest green. They say it will improve color quality in the ultra high-definition displays of the future. … A paper detailing the research was published in the journal Nano Letters.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"New study on graphene-wrapped nanocrystals makes inroads toward next-gen fuel cells"
September 14, 2017

A powdery mix of metal nanocrystals wrapped in single-layer sheets of carbon atoms, developed at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), shows promise for safely storing hydrogen for use with fuel cells for passenger vehicles and other uses. And now, a new study provides insight into the atomic details of the crystals' ultrathin coating and how it serves as selective shielding while enhancing their performance in hydrogen storage. … The study was published in the Nano Letters journal.

Six media outlets, including Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Berkeley Lab (Berkeley, CA: 63,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and Solid State Technology (U.S.: 57,900 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Breitbart (8.0 million unique monthly visits)
"U. Texas Researchers Discover Potential Alternative to Opioids"
September 13, 2017

Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin discovered what they call a potentially powerful non-addictive painkiller that targets previously untapped receptors in the brain. … Last month, the ACS Chemical Neuroscience journal published the results of the team’s research, reflecting the first findings that show sigma receptors may be used to target and treat neuropathic pain.

Vice (U.S.: 7.3 million unique monthly visits)
"This Tattoo Can Monitor Your Heart Rate and Brain Waves"
September 11, 2017

Researchers have developed a tattoo-like sensor that could change the way that bodily functions are monitored. The Graphene Electrical Tattoo (GET), which was unveiled by a team of scientists at the University of Texas at Austin this summer, is one of the more practical wearable devices recently developed. …  Their work was published in the journal ACS Nano this summer.

Four media outlets, including International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Tilburg, Netherlands: 1.7 million unique monthly visits)
"Bisphenol A exposure through the skin from store receipts takes longer to be excreted"
September 11, 2017

A pair of researchers, one with the University of Alberta the other with Stockholm University, has found that it takes longer for people to excrete bisphenol A from the body than when the compound is consumed. In their paper published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, Jiaying Liu and Jonathan Martin describe their research and why they believe their findings suggest a trip to the store could present a health hazard for consumers.

Horse Talk (New Zealand: 59,200 unique monthly visits)
"New electrochemical biosensor can detect horse meat in food products"
September 12, 2017

An electrochemical biosensor has been developed by researchers in Spain that is capable of detecting meat products contaminated by horse. … The biosensor was created by researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid, who have reported on its development in the journal Analytical Chemistry.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), FoodNavigator.com (Crawley, U.K.: 55,200 unique monthly visits), New Food Magazine (San Francisco, CA: 24,200 unique monthly visits) and Laboratory Talk (Dublin, Ireland: 15,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"The 100 biggest science myths - all dispelled in one go"
September 8, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

Many of us manage to get through school with some pretty silly ideas still intact – such as the ‘fact’ that the moon has a ‘dark side’. … But what about the chewing gum? That must be true, surely? After all, generations of schoolchildren grow up with the scare story that if you swallow chewing gum it will stay inside your stomach for seven years – or forever. Well, says the American Chemical Society, it’s not quite as bad as generations of children have portrayed it – in fact, the tale is largely a myth.

Four media outlets, including IFL Science (London, U.K.: 9.5 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Huffington Post (New York, NY: 76.9 million unique monthly visits)
"If You Suffer From Deadly Allergies This Tiny Keychain Detector Could Save Your Life"
September 8, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

For people who suffer with life-threatening food allergies, eating any meal not prepared by your own hands is a real exercise in trust. But now researchers at Harvard Medical School have developed a handheld device (American Chemical Society) that people will be able to carry with them to test for allergens in less than ten minutes, and avoid a potential trip to hospital.

More than 20 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits), Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 17.3 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Tech Crunch (New York, NY: 13.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), British Telecommunications (London, U.K.: 8.3 million unique monthly visits), She Knows (Scottsdale, AZ: 5.7 million unique monthly visits) and New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 42.4 million unique monthly visits)
"Why Onions Make You Cry"
September 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Trying to figure out why humans cry is exhausting. We cry about death, violence, breakups, abandoned puppies, sweet kisses and words charged with all kinds of meanings. We don’t cry when we should, and we cry for no reason. But let’s take a moment to appreciate the clarity of crying while cutting onions. … “It turns into a gas. It hits your eyes, and then it hits your sensory nerves in your eyes and causes them to tear up,” said Josie Silvaroli, an undergraduate at Case Western Reserve University in Ohio who helped describe how these pieces fit together, structurally speaking, in a paper published in July in the journal ACS Chemical Biology.

Seven media outlets, including Palm Beach Post (West Palm Beach, FL: 334,799 unique monthly visits), Austin American-Statesman (Austin, TX: 229,861 unique monthly visits) and Dayton Daily News (Dayton, OH: 135,229 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Economist (London, U.K.: 28.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Antibiotic resistance in fish farms is passed on from fish food"
September 7, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

The mucky sediment below fish farms usually teems with antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The presence of such bacteria is a cause of increasing concern because resistance can limit the ability to fight diseases, but it is also not that surprising: pisciculturalists have a long history of dosing fish they are breeding and rearing with antibiotics. … As they report in Environmental Science and Technology, the researchers obtained five commonly used fishmeal products and subjected each one to a detailed genetic analysis.

Four media outlets, including Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million)
"Another reason to drink coffee? Four cups of the hot beverage each day slashes the risk of type 2 diabetes by 25% (and even decaf lovers can reap the benefits)"
September 7, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Good news for coffee lovers across the world. Another study has found a cuppa to be beneficial for your health. Four cups of the hot beverage each day can slash your risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 25 per cent, research suggests. But the rule only applies to those who drink decaffeinated coffee, espressos and cafetieres - not lovers of trendier filter versions. … The findings, published in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Natural Products, dispell the myth that the positive effects are solely from caffeine.

More than 18 media outlets, including Medical News Today (Bexhill-on-Sea, U.K.: 17.9 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Express (London, U.K.: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), The Sun (London, U.K.: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), NDTV (New Delhi, India: 2.8 million unique monthly visits), Diabetes.co.uk (London, U.K.: 1.5 million unique monthly visits) and Zee News (India: 471,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Ozone limits at play as EPA, industry and environmental groups weigh in"
September 6, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

After the Environmental Protection Agency initially announced a delay in enforcing stricter ozone limits, the agency now plans to meet the original October deadline for implementing the new standards. But according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, industry-supported legislation could put a hold on the new limits once again.

Four media outlets, including Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.
Prevention (New York, NY: 4.7 million unique monthly visits)
"This Natural Ingredient Is Known To Stop Hot Flashes—But Is It Safe?"
September 8, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Love it or hate it, licorice could be the secret to easing your menopausal symptoms. … In a presentation for the American Chemical Society, Richard van Breemen, PhD, director of the UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietary Supplements Research, found that three types of licorice—two North American species, Glycyrrhiza uralensis and G. inflata, and a European species called G. glabra—inhibited liver enzymes that help you metabolize drugs.

Well + Good (New York, NY: 1.8 million unique monthly visits)
"You Haven’t Even Tried The Healthiest Part of an Avocado Yet"
September 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

You already know that avocados are a major food group—that’s just 101 stuff. … Now, scientists are suggesting that avocados have even more benefits than previously thought, and they’re where you’d least expect them: in the husk of the avocado seed. Byrdie points out that in August, researchers from the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley presented some really interesting findings at the National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society in Washington, DC.

Science News (Washington, DC: 844,000 unique monthly visits)
"Sugars in breast milk may fight harmful bacteria directly"
September 8, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Scientists may have found a sweet new way to fight Group B Strep: Sugars in some women’s breast milk busted up colonies of the potentially harmful bacteria in a small lab study. The results, published online June 1 in ACS Infectious Diseases and presented August 20 in Washington, D.C., at the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting, raise all sorts of possibilities.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"The chemicals we leave behind"
September 7, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

Everything we use is made out of chemicals. So it's not surprising that we pick up a lot of foreign molecules from what we bump into all the time, from our multivitamins to the gas we put in our cars. Scientists are now starting to track these everyday chemicals in ways that could be helpful in health and forensic sciences. Video from the American Chemical Society.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science News for Students (Washington, DC: 844,000 unique monthly visits)
"Meet the world’s smallest monster trucks"
September 6, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Check out the world’s smallest monster truck. Called the Ohio Bobcat Nanowagon, its dimensions are about equal to the width of a strand of DNA. Oh, and a chemical curiosity hides under its hood. … Masson offered details of his nano-racer August 23 in a news conference, here, at the American Chemical Society fall national meeting.

Earth.com (Reno, NV: 430,100 unique monthly visits)
"How rubber makes sports possible"
September 6, 2017
Publicized in: ACS video release

Today’s Video of the Day comes from the American Chemical Society’s Reactions series and features a look at how rubber plays a crucial role in making sports possible. Natural rubber actually comes from trees, but the downside is that it becomes stiff with cold temperatures and too fluid at hot temperatures. But in 1839, Charles Goodyear discovered that if you add sulfur to rubber, it causes a chemical reaction that forces polyisoprene chains to stay together. The result is the secret to the unique bouncy and stretchy properties of rubber.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Technology Networks (Canada: 88,800 unique monthly visits)
"Mosquitoes’ Sweet -Tooth is Their Undoing"
September 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS National Meeting news release

Mosquitoes aren’t just blood thirsty. They also have a sweet tooth, relying on plant nectar to get the sugar they need to survive. Exploiting this weakness, scientists have developed an environmentally friendly eradication method. … The researchers are presenting their work today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

MSN (New York, NY: 143.2 million unique monthly visits)
"7 Things to Do This Fall for Better Health"
September 6, 2017

For a happier, healthier winter, take these essential steps in the fall. … In a study of patients who had undergone bypass surgery published in The Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers found that antioxidant-rich red grapefruit helped lower "bad" LDL cholesterol as well as triglyceride levels. Vitamin C has also been linked to reduced risk of heart disease.

Four media outlets, including Health.com (New York, NY: 11.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Bloomberg (New York, NY: 17.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Wrapped in Plastic, China’s Farmland Is Suffering: Quick Take Q&A"
September 6, 2017

Covering soil in plastic has been a boon for agriculture around the world, especially in China, where an area half the size of California is under polyethylene wrap. … That has spurred a huge expansion in its use, but one that has come at a cost: Scientists say the practice is causing environmental pollution on an epic scale. … Is biodegradable plastic mulch the solution? Ask Henry Y. Sintim and Markus Flury in Environmental Science and Technology.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"New fluorescent dyes could advance biological imaging"
September 4, 2017

With a new technique to craft a spectrum of glowing dyes, chemists are no longer chasing rainbows. … In a separate paper, published August 9, 2017 in the journal ACS Central Science, the team described a way to modify the dye structure's bottom ring.

Seven media outlets, including Howard Hughes Medical Institute (Chevy Chase, MD: 289,700 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits) and Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Newly-discovered semiconductor dynamics may help improve energy efficiency"
September 5, 2017

Researchers examining the flow of electricity through semiconductors have uncovered another reason these materials seem to lose their ability to carry a charge as they become more densely "doped." Their results, which may help engineers design faster semiconductors in the future, are published online in the journal ACS Nano.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Electronics 360 (New York, NY: 600,000 unique monthly visits), Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits) and ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits)
"This New Recipe For Cheap Hydrogen Fuel Uses Light And a Few Simple Ingredients"
September 5, 2017

Perhaps among all clean energy alternatives, nothing can be as clean as hydrogen. Burning hydrogen in fuel cells produces only water as a byproduct. In that sense, it's also truly renewable. … The key is to produce hydrogen from water using a combination of sunlight and photosensitive lipids. Their work was published in the journal ACS Nano.

Eight media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), News Medical (Sydney, Australia: 6.5 million unique monthly visits), Futurism (1.9 million unique monthly visits), Econo Times (San Francisco, CA: 259,900 unique monthly visits) and Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 84,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Boing Boing (San Francisco, CA: 4.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Powerful hallucinogen could bring relief to chronic itching"
September 5, 2017

People who suffer from chronic itching say it's more unbearable than pain. I'll never forget a 2008 story called The Itch in The New Yorker. It's about a woman whose scalped itched so much that "She had scratched through her skull during the night—and all the way into her brain." Chemical and Engineering News reports that a compound in the popular psychedelic plant Salvia divinorum was found to contain a compound that is found to provide itch relief to mice.

Romper (New York, NY: 2.1 million unique monthly visits)
"What Happens to Your Brain When You Get Pitocin? Science Explains"
September 5, 2017

Sometimes, labor doesn't happen all that quickly — or at the right time — and your healthcare provider decides it's medically necessary to speed things along with a drug like Pitocin. But while you get the gist of how Pitocin works in your body, what else does it affect? … Pitocin (also known as Pit) is synthesized using a chemical reactive and a chain of nine amino acids to replicate the natural pituitary function, according to Chemical & Engineering News.

Futurism (1.9 million unique monthly visits)
"New Nanomaterial System Helps Create Synthetic Fuel from CO2"
September 6, 2017

Syngas, or synthesis gas, is a fuel blend usually made up of carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. It is a vital precursor in the production of synthetic fuels and various chemicals. Now, a team of researchers has developed a new process for creating syngas using just water and carbon dioxide, using a tiny number of copper atoms on a gold surface. This nanomaterial supports an electrochemical reaction at room temperature. … References: Journal of the American Chemical Society

Five media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Clean Technica (1.6 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ACS Publications logo

ACS authors reach a worldwide audience

Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.