ACS in the News

Weekly updates featuring some recent news media coverage of ACS.

Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
A stretchable nanostructured surface produces shifting holograms
May 10, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

We haven’t caught up to Star Wars yet, but science is edging closer to holographic message communication. A concept described this week in Nano Letters has created a flexible surface of nanostructures that switches between holograms as it stretches. The concept builds on previous research led by Ritesh Agarwal, at the University of Pennsylvania, in which gold nano-rods were embedded in an ultra-thin, flimsy surface to generate a holographic image.

More than 15 media outlets, including Newsweek (U.S.: 28.7 million unique monthly visits), Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits), Cosmos Magazine (New York, NY: 302,000 unique monthly visits), E&T Magazine (U.K.: 80,100 unique monthly visits) and The Statesman (India: 34,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Hello Giggles (New York, NY: 19.2 million unique monthly visits)
"The Weird Way Scientists Want To Use Chicken Poop"
May 8, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

You may think the only place poultry poop belongs is in the trash. But a group of scientists funded by Landmark University in Nigeria envision a more environmentally friendly use for chicken waste: turn it into biofuel, they say, and use it to run generators—and maybe, one day, cars. … But if the droppings can be scooped up and repurposed, they can go from dangerous to useful in a (relatively) easy few steps, the scientists claim in their research, published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Energy & Fuels.

CBS News (New York, NY: 15.8 million unique monthly visits)
"Nanotechnology prints colors that will never fade"
May 11, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Laser printers that "sculpt" images at miniscule scales could one day make color photos that don't fade over time the way ink does, according to a new study. … On old masterpieces, there's even a phenomenon called "metal soaps" based on the complex chemistry that occurs as paints age, according to Chemical & Engineering News.

Five media outlets, including Yahoo! News (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Nipping flu pandemics in the bud"
May 10, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The threat of a major flu pandemic is a perennial concern. Now scientists have developed a fast and easy-to-use point-of-care diagnostic test that could one day help doctors and hospitals head off the rapid spread of the flu. They report their new device in ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry.

Six media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

India.com (India: 7.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Bacteria, a new beauty tool?"
May 14, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Cosmetic companies have started developing and selling products designed to harness the skin microbiome to help treat a range of skin conditions from acne to eczema. Skeptics, however, warn that touting such an approach is premature because scientists are still working to understand the bacteria that live on our skin and interact with it. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, scopes out the scene.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), The Siasat Daily (India: 428,000 unique monthly visits), Outlook India (India: 206,000 unique monthly visits), Science Times (Irvine, CA: 138,400 unique monthly visits), ANI News (India: 38,600 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Vine Pair (New York, NY: 1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How To Make Whiskey, Explained"
May 15, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Drinking whiskey is an enjoyable experience. Now that I’ve stated the obvious, you should also know that drinking whiskey while knowing exactly what you’re drinking at a molecular level is extremely enjoyable. And thanks to PBS and the American Chemical Society, knowing what’s in your whiskey has never been easier.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"‘Heroes of Chemistry’ improve people’s lives through the transforming power of chemistry"
May 9, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Scientists who developed products that have led to significant advancements in human health, technology, the food supply, and the environment, will be inducted into a scientific “Hall of Fame” later this summer, becoming the newest Heroes of Chemistry, an honor bestowed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world’s largest scientific society.

Weather Nation (Centennial, CO: 59,700 unique monthly visits)
"Keeping cool in the summer leads to increased air pollution"
May 15, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

With the beginning of Summer right around the corner and hot weather ahead, the use of air conditioners will be increasing. Running these devices requires power plants to ratchet up electricity production, causing air polluting emissions to rise. An analysis of 27 states found that, on average, summer emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) go up by hundreds to thousands of metric tons per degree Celsius increase. The report appears in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"This Dolphin Getting Breathalyzed Is All of Us"
May 12, 2017

By now, you probably know that humans are really screwing up the ocean. Climate change aside, we often dump oil into it, ruining the lives of whatever animals live nearby. … As described in a study recently published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, the team captured and analyzed breath samples from a small group of dolphins from Barataria Bay, an area of the Gulf of Mexico near Louisiana affected by the oil spill.

Indian Express (India: 17.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists find a cheaper, greener way to grow semiconductor films"
May 15, 2017

Scientists have developed a greener and cheaper way to make single-crystalline semiconductor films, components at the heart of our electric gadgets, including smartphones, computers and solar panels. … The research was published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Seven media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Economic Times (New Delhi, India: 3.4 million unique monthly visits) and Deccan Chronicle (India: 227,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists find nanogaps in plasmonic gold wires enhance voltage when excited"
May 8, 2017

If they're quick about it, "hot" electrons excited in a plasmonic metal can tunnel their way across a nanoscale gap to a neighboring metal. Rice University scientists said the cool part is what happens in the gap. … Results from the Rice lab of condensed matter physicist Douglas Natelson appear in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Photonics.com (Pittsfield, MA: 145,500 unique monthly visits), ECN Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 122,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Nano (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits) and Controlled Environments (Rockaway, NJ: 44,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Wood-based filter removes toxic dye from water"
May 14, 2017

Scientists from the research institute Maryland NanoCenter have developed a wood-based filter, designed to remove toxic dyes from water. … The research is published in the journal ACS Nano, under the heading “Mesoporous, Three-Dimensional Wood Membrane Decorated with Nanoparticles for Highly Efficient Water Treatment.”

University of Michigan News (Ann Arbor, MI: 81,300 unique monthly visits)
"'Sister cell' profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis"
May 10, 2017

In work that could improve understanding of how cancer spreads, a team of engineers and medical researchers at the University of Michigan developed a new kind of microfluidic chip that can capture rare, aggressive cancer cells, grow them on the chip and release single cells on demand. … "When a tumor forms, some cancer stem cells maintain stemness, while others are differentiated. By understanding this, we will know more about tumor formation and discover ways to inhibit it," said Yu-Chih Chen, a research scientist in electrical engineering and computer science and co-first-author on a paper newly published in ACS Nano.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Gizmodo (U.S.: 117.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Mansplain Happy Hour With This Video On the Science of Whiskey"
May 2, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

There’s no feeling more rewarding than being the smartest person in the room. Sure, your friends might think it’s annoying. But just imagine the sheer joy of going to the bar, hearing what drink they ordered, and explaining it to them. Try doing it on a date! I myself have a phobia of explaining things to people I don’t know. But if your friend orders a whisky at the bar, this new video from the American Chemical Society and PBS’ Reactions channel is sure to help you enlighten them.

More than 10 media outlets, including Daily Mail (London, U.K.: 24.8 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), YubaNet.com (Nevada City, CA: 127,000 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 67.3 million unique monthly visits)
"A not-so-sweet new way to test for pee in pools"
May 4, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

… Water quality is a health concern in all public pools, and although it won't turn the water green, urine can pose hazards to swimmers' health. Unfortunately, it's difficult to detect in the chlorinated water of a huge pool. So how do you measure pee? Test for sweetness, University of Alberta chemists propose in research published this spring in the journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than 35 media outlets, including Smithsonian.com (Washington, DC: 9.9 million unique monthly visits), WDIV-TV (Detroit, MI: 656,600 unique monthly visits), WKMG-TV (Orlando, FL: 344,710 unique monthly visits), WCYB-TV (Bristol, VA: 200,922 unique monthly visits), WISC Channel 3000 (Madison, WI: 192,944 unique monthly visits), WFMZ-TV (Allentown, PA: 170,563 unique monthly visits), KEYT-TV (Santa Barbara, CA: 167,395 unique monthly visits), News 8000 WKBT (La Crosse, WI:128,100 unique monthly visits), News Channel 13 (Colorado Springs, CO: 123,035 unique monthly visits), and YourErie.com (Erie, PA: 107,538 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 42.4 million unique monthly visits)
"One Day, a Machine Will Smell Whether You’re Sick"
May 1, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Blindfolded, would you know the smell of your mom, a lover or a co-worker? Not the smells of their colognes or perfumes, not of the laundry detergents they use — the smells of them? … Mr. Haick and his colleagues published a paper in ACS Nano last December showing that his artificially intelligent nanoarray could distinguish among 17 different diseases with up to 86 percent accuracy.

More than 10 media outlets, including Minneapolis Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN: 8.3 million unique monthly visits), Houston Chronicle (Houston, TX: 3.7 million unique monthly visits) and Tampa Bay Times (Tampa Bay, FL: 841,409 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Economist  (London, U.K.: 28.6 million unique monthly visits)
"Fatal Attraction: The link between pollution and heart disease"
May 4, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Why air pollution causes lung disease is obvious. Why it also causes heart disease is, though, a conundrum. One suggestion is that tiny particles of soot migrate through the lungs, into the bloodstream and thence to the walls of blood vessels, where they cause damage. Until now, this has remained hypothetical. But a study published in ACS Nano, by Mark Miller of Edinburgh University, suggests not only that it is correct, but also that those particles are specifically carried to parts of blood vessels where they will do maximum damage—the arterial plaques associated with cardiovascular disease.

More than 10 media outlets, including Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), The National Law Review (Western Springs, IL: 115,600 unique monthly visits) and SciDevNet (London, U.K.: 30,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mother Nature Network (New York, NY: 15.4 million unique monthly visits)
"6 ways beer is good for you"
May 4, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

If you enjoy a beer at the end of the day, it may do more than just relax you after a long day at work. … Researchers found a compound in hops called xanthohumol might help to fight free radical damage in the brain and also slow down the onset of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. The idea, according to the study published in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, is that xanthohumol might guard brain cells from damage, preventing or slowing down diseases associated with the brain degeneration.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Imaging mRNA right where it is made — at the site of translation"
May 3, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Think of life as a house: if DNA molecules are blueprints, then messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are orders, describing the required parts (proteins) and when they should arrive. But putting in many orders doesn't always mean you'll get all of the parts on time -- maybe there's a delay with your vendor or delivery service. Similarly, mRNA levels alone do not dictate protein levels. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers report a method to address that issue.

Four media outlets, including Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

British Telecommunications (BT) (London, U.K.: 8.3 million unique monthly visits)
"Clothes of the future? Material that sheds skin and repairs itself"
May 6, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Scientists in Germany have created a new type of clothing material that can repair itself by shedding like snakeskin. Researchers from the University of Freiburg claim it could be possible to repair some damaged clothing by placing specially made material into water, with the damaged layers shedding to reveal new material. Their findings have been published in the American Chemical Society’s Langmuir journal and explain how a material coating that moults when damaged could be used to increase the lifespan of clothes.

More than 12 media outlets, including Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits) and SBTV News (London, U.K.: 23,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Popular Science (New York, NY: 4.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Your air conditioning habit makes summer smog worse"
May 3, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Summer smog may be getting worse because you can't take the heat, according to a study released today in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. Researchers have long known that ozone—smog’s main ingredient—is incredibly sensitive to warmer temperatures, which speed up chemical reaction rates, alter weather patterns, and sometimes trap pollution in place. At the same time, we know intuitively that on hotter days we tend to turn our air conditioners up, using more electricity.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), University of Wisconsin-Madison News (Madison, WI: 4.0 million unique monthly visits), Clean Technica (1.6 million unique monthly visits), ChemEurope.com (Germany: 47,500 unique monthly visits) and Science Newsline (Japan: 27,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Food & Wine (New York, NY: 2.8 million unique monthly visits)
"The Weird Way Scientists Want to Use Chicken Poop"
May 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

You may think the only place poultry poop belongs is in the trash. But a group of scientists funded by Landmark University in Nigeria envision a more environmentally friendly use for chicken waste: turn it into biofuel, they say, and use it to run generators—and maybe, one day, cars. … But if the droppings can be scooped up and repurposed, they can go from dangerous to useful in a (relatively) easy few steps, the scientists claim in their research, published in the American Chemical Society's journal Energy & Fuels.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), New Atlas (Victoria, Australia: 2.9 million unique monthly visits), Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits), Biofuel Daily (Sydney, Australia: 100,700 unique monthly visits) and Science Blog (85,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Los Angeles Daily News (Los Angeles, CA: 659,815 unique monthly visits)
"Federal agency probing Torrance refinery blast faces possible extinction"
May 3, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

The chief federal agency tasked with investigating the Torrance ExxonMobil refinery explosion is targeted for extinction by the Trump administration at the end of the federal fiscal year Sept. 30, and advocates are rallying to save the Chemical Safety Board. … Glenn Ruskin, a spokesman for the nonprofit American Chemical Society, said the group has mobilized to support the CSB and is encouraged by the level of congressional support it has seen from Republicans and Democrats alike to retain the agency.

Five media outlets, including Daily Breeze  (Torrance, CA: 203,962 unique monthly visits) and Long Beach Press-Telegram (Long Beach, CA: 49,988 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Canada Free Press (Canada: 415,300 unique monthly visits)
"‘Lab-on-a-glove’ could bring nerve-agent detection to a wearer’s fingertips"
May 5, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

There’s a reason why farmers wear protective gear when applying organophosphate pesticides. The substances are very effective at getting rid of unwanted bugs, but they can also make people sick. Related compounds — organophosphate nerve agents — can be used as deadly weapons. Now researchers have developed a fast way to detect the presence of such compounds in the field using a disposable “lab-on-a-glove.” The report on the glove appears in the journal ACS Sensors.

Four media outlets, including Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Natural Health 365 (U.S.: 200,600 unique monthly visits)
"Ginger and chili pepper combination block cancer cell growth"
May 2, 2017
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Both ginger and chili are delicious spices with well-known healing properties. … A study published in the online Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that the 6-gingerol in ginger and a chili pepper compound called capsaicin seem to work together cooperatively to help fight off cancer. This is because 6-gingergol binds to capsaicin to create a new, extremely strong compound that effectively works to inhibit tumor-growing cell receptors in the body.

Four media outlets, including Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits)
"The Chemistry of Redheads"
May 4, 2017
Publicized in: ACS news release

Chemically speaking, what sets redheads apart from the crowd is pigmentation — specifically melanins. Most humans produce the brown-black eumelanin that results in varying shades of skin color and hair from blonde to black. Redheads have a genetic variant that causes cells to produce instead reddish pheomelanin, resulting in pale skin and fiery locks. How red hair is produced by redheads’ cells might also explain why they have different sensitivity to pain. Watch the Reactions video here.

Yahoo! Finance (Sunnyvale, CA: 146.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Discovery from IBM Research Could Enable More Efficient Oil Extraction from Existing Wells"
May 3, 2017

IBM scientists recently discovered that a drop of oil doesn't look like a drop at all if it is small, to the scale of one billionth of a billionth of a liter, or attoliter. Rather, a nanoscale oil droplet looks more like a flat film against a solid surface. This discovery reveals that the simulation tools and techniques commonly employed by the oil industry do not take into account the increased energy required to extract these oil molecules. … Steiner's team also published A Platform for Analysis of Nanoscale Liquids with an Array of Sensor Devices Based on Two-Dimensional Material, in Nano Letters, detailing the novel measurement method for revealing nanoscale drop properties.

Four media outlets, including IBM News (Armonk, NY: 1.0 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes (New York, NY: 49.3 million unique monthly visits)
"There's A New Record For Tiny Structures"
May 2, 2017

Break out the world's tiniest trophy. These scientists just set a record for carving out the smallest manmade shapes using a focused beam of electrons. Researchers at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) used technology called electron beam lithography (EBL), to carve a plastic film into structures less than 2 nanometers across. … The team, led by electron microscopist Eric Stach and the director of BNL’s Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Charles Black, reported their achievement last month in Nano Letters.

Eight media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits) and Photonics Online (Pittsfield, MA: 145,500 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

International Business Times (U.K.: 28.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists May Have Just Found A Potential HIV Cure"
May 3, 2017

… Other researchers have made progress in creating a vaccination to guard against HIV. Researchers at the University of Nebraska genetically engineered an on-off switch in a weakened form of the virus, paving the way for a potential safe and effective vaccination, according to a study published in March in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology.

Vox (15.9 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists have shown they can march. Can they help win elections?"
May 2, 2017

For the past two weekends, the National Mall has been packed with people protesting President Trump in the name of science and the environment. … “[Scientific] community members have legitimate concerns about the implications of environmental activism in the research world because it undermines the standing of academics as objective seekers of truth,” David Sedlak, the editor-in-chief of Environmental Science & Technology, wrote.

Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits)
"Shape-memory aerogels created with rubber-like elasticity"
May 2, 2017

Polymeric aerogels are nanoporous structures that combine some of the most desirable characteristics of materials, such as flexibility and mechanical strength. It is nearly impossible to improve on a substance considered the final frontier in lightweight materials. But chemists from Missouri University of Science and Technology have done just that by making aerogels that have rubber-like elasticity and can "remember" their original shapes. … Leventis and his team's work can be seen in the Chemistry of Materials journal published by the American Chemical Society.

Seven media outlets, including The Science Times (Irvine, CA: 138,400 unique monthly visits), Azo Materials (Sydney, Australia: 60,000 unique monthly visits), The Rolla Daily News (Rolla, MO: 49,800 unique monthly visits), Missouri S&T News and Events (Rolla, MO: 34,200 unique monthly visits) and Lab Manager (Ontario, Canada: 29,600 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Health.com (New York, NY: 11.1 million unique monthly visits)
"The Rx Drug That Interferes With the Healthy Goodness of Whole Grains"
May 3, 2017

Kudos if you’ve already incorporated whole grains into your regular diet: Among other benefits, eating more of these fibrous foods has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. … Women who had used antibiotics up to three months before submitting a blood sample had enterolignan concentrations as much as 40% lower than those who hadn’t used the drugs, while men on antibiotics had concentrations up to 12% lower. … To confirm their findings, the researchers also conducted a controlled study on pigs, published in the Journal of Proteome Research.

Four media outlets, including Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, U.K.: 9.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Fungi Found In Toxic Lake Produce New Antibiotic"
May 3, 2017

A highly toxic mine pit may hold the answer to the growing threat of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Researchers have found that when grown together, two species of fungi found in the tailing pond of a Montana mine produce a new compound that kills multiple strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Published in the Journal of Natural Products, the unexpected discovery was made after researchers from the University of Montana began isolating the compounds produced by microorganisms living in the Berkeley Pit Lake, a former open pit copper mine that is now heavily contaminated.

Five media outlets, including Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Popular Mechanics (New York, NY: 4.5 million unique monthly visits)
"Do Cocktails Produce Chemical Reactions?"
May 6, 2017

Do most cocktails produce a chemical reaction, or do the ingredients simply taste good together? … "Getting down to the nitty-gritty, chemical reactions are 'when bonds are broken and formed,' " says Darcy Gentleman, Ph.D., of the American Chemical Society. “When you take something like sugar and dissolve that in water, there are new bonds created between the water and the sugar and some of the sugar-to-sugar bonds break. So by strict definition, you could say that's a reaction. But whether dissolving is a chemical reaction is a debate."

MIT Technology Review (Cambridge, MA: 3.2 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists Are Turning Alexa into an Automated Lab Helper"
May 3, 2017

Alexa, what’s the next step in my titration? Probably not the first question you ask your smart assistant in the morning, but potentially the kind of query that scientists may soon be leveling at Amazon’s AI helper. Chemical & Engineering News reports that software developer James Rhodes—whose wife, DeLacy Rhodes, is a microbiologist—has created a skill for Alexa called Helix that lends a helping hand around the laboratory.

UPI (Washington, DC: 3.0 million unique monthly visits)
"Scientists use glow stick to detect cancer cells"
May 1, 2017

Researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel have developed a new mechanism that produces a strong chemiluminescent probe to diagnose cancer. Chemiluminescence is the principle behind glow sticks but recently scientists have been trying to use the chemical light to diagnose diseases by identifying concentrations of biological samples. … The study was published in ACS Central Science.

More than 12 media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits), HNGN (3.9 million unique monthly visits), Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits), R&D Magazine (Rockaway, NJ: 158,900 unique monthly visits), The Science Times (Irvine, CA: 138,400 unique monthly visits), Jewish Press (Israel: 106,200 unique monthly visits) and Technology Networks (U.K.: 22,700 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Raleigh News & Observer (Raleigh, NC: 1.3 million unique monthly visits)
"How NC State research could help electric cars go faster"
May 3, 2017

Researchers at N.C. State University have developed a material that uses atom-thin water layers that could deliver energy faster and could lead to more efficient batteries. That, in turn, could lead to faster acceleration in electric cars, researchers said. … The paper, “Transition from Battery to Pseudocapacitor Behavior via Structural Water in Tungsten Oxide,” was published in the journal Chemistry of Materials.

Eight media outlets, including BGR (U.S.: 11.2 million unique monthly visits), Science Alert (9.1 million unique monthly visits), Before It's News (Mill Valley, CA: 1.7 million unique monthly visits) and Engineering.com (Mississauga, Canada: 643,100 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 685,600 unique monthly visits)
"Making Influenza Visible to the Naked Eye"
May 5, 2017

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, according to a new study in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. By engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus, the team was able to develop a test kit that emitted fluorescent light when illuminated with a hand-held lamp or blue laser pointer.

Seven media outlets, including Science Daily (Sandy Hook, CT: 15.1 million unique monthly visits), Phys.Org (Tilburg, Netherlands: 9.3 million unique monthly visits) and Notre Dame News (Notre Dame, IN: 65,200 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 570,000 unique monthly visits)
"Opioid-Alternative Painkiller, Kratom, Now Available in Oklahoma City"
May 1, 2017

Earthly Mist, a regional supplier of the herbal painkiller Kratom, opened its new store in Oklahoma City on April 17. … Findings published in the "The Journal of Medicinal Chemistry" recently indicate that Kratom's painkilling mechanisms do not induce addiction and do not diminish in effectiveness over time as many opioid painkillers do.

Five media outlets, including SWNS.com (Bristol, U.K.: 28,300 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

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Check out our ACS Publications “ACS in the News highlighting the latest ACS journal articles featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe! Sortable by journal, the institution of the authors, topic areas, or news release date.