ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

Business Insider (New York, NY: 28.53 million unique monthly visits)
“A Pennsylvania teen is in a coma and on life support from vaping. His parents say he may need a new lung, if he survives.”
Sept. 4, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Some e-cigarettes produce formaldehyde, a chemical that can cause lung disease, as well as acrolein, a chemical commonly found in weed killer. In 2018, [research presented at a meeting of the] American Chemical Society found that people who inhaled acrolein sustained changes to their DNA.

More than 10 media outlets, including Healthline (San Francisco, CA: 23.97 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 28.53 million unique monthly visits)
“Forget the googles: These scientists want to inject night vision straight into troops’ eyeballs”
Sept. 4, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

The US military may be working overtime to reduce the weight of a standard-issue pair of night vision googles to the point where it feels like you're wearing nothing at all, but a group of scientists think they've cracked the code of "built-in" night vision thanks to dollop of special particles and a needle to the eyeball. A group of researchers attending the American Chemical Society's national meeting in San Diego, California, this month plan on presenting a method…

More than five media outlets, including Task & Purpose (New York, NY: 593,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Drugs.com (New York, NY: 26.36 million unique monthly visits)
“Coming Soon: A ‘Pot Breathalyzer’?”
Sept. 3, 2019

Driving while high on marijuana can be as dangerous and illegal as driving drunk, but unlike alcohol, there's no way to detect pot on your breath. That could change, however, as University of Pittsburgh scientists are working hard to develop a breathalyzer that can measure the psychoactive ingredient in pot…. The report was published in August in the journal ACS Sensors.

More than 10 media outlets, including U.S. News & World Report (Washington, D.C.: 23.92 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Express
(London, England: 13.55 million unique monthly visits)
“Type 2 diabetes: Best drink to have at breakfast to lower blood sugar”
Sept. 6, 2019

Black tea and green tea were found to help type 2 diabetes in a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. As part of the research, black tea and green tea were given to diabetic rats for three months. Alongside inhibiting diabetic cataracts, the tea was found to have a blood sugar-lowering effect.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 11.83 million unique monthly visits)
“Make a Candle Flame Jump”
Sept. 5, 2019

More to Explore:
Candle Science, from the National Candle Association
Flame Out, from the American Chemical Society
Fire-Fighting Foam, from Scientific American
A Candle Seesaw Balancing Act, from Scientific American

The Hindu
(Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“IACS fabricates hydrogels with tunable bactericidal activities”
Sept. 7, 2019

The research team led by Prof. Jyotirmayee Dash from the School of Chemical Sciences, IACS, found that the silver-containing hydrogel was capable of killing E. coli. The hydrogel reduced the cell size of the E. coli and disrupted its cell membrane, leading to leakage of cellular contents. The results of the study were published in the journal ACS Applied Bio Materials.

The Hindu
(Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Controlling tuberculosis by sniffing in a vaccine”
Sept. 7, 2019

A group at the University of Sydney in Australia has been creatively using these three principles to generate an inhalable vaccine against TB. Their publication appears in the latest issue of Journal of Medicinal Chemistry (Ashhurst. A, et al., J Med Chem. 2019 Aug 16. doi: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.9b00832.).

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

FOCUS
(München, Germany: 10.38 million unique monthly visits)
“Physicians have new explanation: That’s why diabetes increases the risk of cancer”
Sept. 5, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Diabetics are more at risk of developing certain cancers. In the context of which the two diseases are, researchers have so far disagreed. Recent study results from US scientists now provide new evidence….The scientists will present their research findings in autumn 2019 at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

NBC News
(Redmond, WA: 9.58 million unique monthly visits)
“What is in a vape? Everything you need to know”
Sept. 3, 2019

…Sucralose has been found to break down and form cancer-causing compounds when it's heated to temperatures typically found in e-cigarettes, according to a study in the journal Chemical Research in Toxicology.

One additional media outlet, WRCB-TV (Chattanooga, TN: 431,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 5.24 million unique monthly visits)
“The coffee diet demystified: Does it really work?”
Sept. 4, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Green, or unroasted, coffee beans can also produce a substantial decrease in body weight in a relatively short period of time. In a study presented at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), Researchers described how a group of overweight or obese people who consumed a fraction of an ounce of ground green coffee beans each day lost about 10 per cent of their body weight.

Mandatory (Lost Angeles, CA: 5.16 million unique monthly visits)
“Wine Will Save Your Pearly Whites, Enabling Study Suggests Reasons to Keep Pouring”
Sept. 6, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

…Yes, researchers discovered that red and white wines contain organic compounds that fight against almost 100 percent of dental bacteria. Additionally, the compounds were found to combat germs that cause most sore throats. Published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, it’s reported that various acids in wines attack the germs, (red being better than white) giving us all another great reason to keep pouring when our friends tell us to quit.

One additional media outlet, Maxim (New York, NY: 4.76 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Orange County Register (Anaheim, CA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“Bravo: U-ACRE founder receives CSU innovation and leadership award”
Sept. 5, 2019

Richard L. Deming, professor emeritus of chemistry and biochemistry, was named to this year’s class of American Chemical Society Fellows. The program was created by the ACS Board of Directors in 2008 to honor members for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession and the society. Deming was recognized at the society’s fall national meeting Aug. 26 in San Diego.

Free Republic (Fresno, CA: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“Disappearing act: Device vanishes on command after military missions”
Sept. 8, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

A polymer that self-destructs? While once a fictional idea, new polymers now exist that are rugged enough to ferry packages or sensors into hostile territory and vaporize immediately upon a military mission's completion….The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition.

Free Republic (Fresno, CA: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“New method to fabricate graphene sheet fabricated from camphor”
Sept. 4, 2019

“Camphor is a plant product with abundant carbon elements required to derive graphene. All it needs is restructuring — breaking and making of chemical bonds — of the carbon atoms. So we explored the possibility and achieved this rearranging of elements of camphor to get graphene mono-layers,” said Indrajit Mukhopadhyay, lead researcher at the Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University, while speaking to India Science Wire. The study results have been published in journal ACS Omega.

EatingWell Magazine (Shelburne, VT: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“Drinking Bottled Water? You’re Ingesting a LOT of Microscopic Plastic”
Sept. 6, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

According to a new study published this week in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, people who mostly drink from disposable plastic bottles of water are adding up to 90,000 plastic particles, or "microplastics," to their estimated annual total plastic intake, which-gross enough in itself-happens to average between 74,000 and 121,000 particles per year.

Five additional media outlets, including Star2 (Petaling Jaya, Malaysia: 606,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

EatingWell Magazine (Shelburne, VT: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“30 Healthy Low-Carb Foods to Eat”
Sept. 6, 2019

An easily portable serving of protein, one cheese stick contains just 80 calories for 6 grams of protein and less than 1 gram of carbohydrate. Plus, a small recent study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that eating cheese may produce good bacteria that keep your gut healthy.

Science (Washington, D.C.: 3.26 million unique monthly visits)
“Crystalline nets harvest water from desert air, turn carbon dioxide into liquid fuel”
Sept. 3, 2019

…At last week’s meeting of the American Chemical Society and in the 27 August issue of ACS Central Science, Yaghi reported that his team has devised a new and far more productive water harvester. By exploiting MOF-303’s ability to fill and empty its pores in just minutes, the team can make the new device complete dozens of cycles daily.

More than five media outlets, including Latest Nigerian News (Lagos, Nigeria: 613,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical News Today (Brighton, England: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Using a smartphone to detect a highly contagious virus”
Sept. 4, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

A new device uses a smartphone and a paper microfluidic chip to detect extremely low levels of norovirus….Yoon presented the research at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition in San Diego, CA, and the paper now appears in the journal ACS Omega.

More than five media outlets, including Engineering360 (Albany, NY: 1.36 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Making Protein Chemistry Batteries”
Sept. 4, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Texas A&M University researchers have synthesized several polymers that adopt different conformations, such as a random coil, an alpha helix and a beta sheet, to investigate their electrochemical characteristics. The Texas A&M researchers presented their results at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition early last week.

Lincoln Journal Star (Lincoln, NE: 2.10 million unique monthly visits)
“Ask UNL’s Food Doc: Shopping for facts not like shopping for groceries”
Sept. 3, 2019

According to NASA.gov, almost all climate scientists agree that global-warming trends are due to human activities. The National Academy of Sciences, the American Chemical Society and every major U.S. scientific society and 200 international organizations concur. So does the U.S. Department of Defense.

Science News (Washington, D.C.: 1.72 million unique monthly visits)
“A mini chemical lab could one day test for toxic nerve agents in the field”
Sept. 5, 2019

Williams and colleagues are building a nuclear magnetic resonance, or NMR, spectrometer to identify toxic chemicals without the big, heavy magnets of standard NMR systems (SN: 1/12/09). This technology could be used to test whether someone has deployed illegal chemical weapons, or to judge whether it’s safe to return to areas previously exposed to poisonous substances. Williams’ team presented the work August 26 in San Diego at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting.

AniNews.in (New Delhi, India: 1.56 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers discover how a cosmetic cream is molecularly structured”
Sept. 7, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Anyone who have experienced skin trouble is well aware of the relief that a creamy lotion provides. Now, researchers discovered how a cream or lotion is molecularly structured, and it’s something they weren’t expecting. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting and Exposition.

More than five media outlets, including webindia123.com (Kochi, India: 1.19 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Power of Positivity (Asheville, NC: 1.29 million unique monthly visits)
“15 Health Benefits of Apples (+5 Bonus Apple Recipes)”
Sept. 5, 2019

The Red Delicious is perhaps one of the most popular varieties in the United States with its luscious flesh and deep red skin. According to a publication by the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the phenolic compounds found in the Red Delicious and Northern Spy have the potential to provide additional antioxidant benefits to the consumer. The apple peels contain the highest levels of phenolic compounds, which is another very good reason to eat the entire apple rather than skinning them first.

Juraforum.de (Hannover, Germany: 1.12 million unique monthly visits)
“Nanoparticles found in lithium-sulfur batteries with neutrons”
Sept. 6, 2019

A HZB team for the first time precisely analyzed using neutron experiments, how and where nanoparticles of lithium sulfide and sulfur in the barrel deposit of charging cycles of the battery electrodes. The results can help increase the life of lithium-sulfur batteries….The study is published in ACS Nano

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Eat This, Not That! (New York, NY: 927,000 unique monthly visits)
“30 Starbucks Facts More Stimulating Than a Caffeine Rush”
Sept. 6, 2019

Coming in at 330 milligrams of caffeine, a grande coffee from Starbucks has more buzz than three cans of Red Bull. As a comparison, a standard 16-ounce cup of brewed coffee contains around 190 milligrams. According to a report by Chemical & Engineering News, the daily safe dose of caffeine is only a little bit more than that grande coffee: 400 milligrams.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

ARY Digital Network (Karachi, Pakistan: 850,000 unique monthly visits)
“An alternate theory for what causes Alzheimer’s disease”
Sept. 6, 2019

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common cause of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by plaques and tangles in the brain, with most efforts at finding a cure focused on these abnormal structures. But a University of California, Riverside, research team has identified alternate chemistry that could account for the various pathologies associated with the disease….Study results appear in ACS Central Science, a journal of the American Chemical Society.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

EnvironmentalExpert.com (Madrid, Spain: 448,000 unique monthly visits)
“Not all meat is created equal: How diet changes can sustain world’s food production”
Sept. 7, 2019

An environmental engineer has created a model that predicts how several different conservation approaches could reduce demand for a nonrenewable resource that is absolutely vital for feeding the world: phosphorus….The model, reported in the Sept. 4 issue of Environmental Science & Technology, can predict how several different conservation approaches could reduce demand for a nonrenewable resource that is absolutely vital for feeding the world.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medgadget (Wixom, MI: 430,000 unique monthly visits)
“Nanovolcanoes Record Electrical Activity Inside Heart Cells”
Sept. 5, 2019

“By reworking the geometry and materials, we developed an electrode that penetrates the cell membrane unassisted, thus eliminating the need for electroporation,” said Benoît Desbiolles, lead author of the study appearing in journal Nano Letters. “We also drew on previous research by our lab, which shows that mimicking the cell membrane stabilizes the cell-electrode interface.”

More than five media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Engineer (London, England: 260,000 unique monthly visits)
“Platinum-based catalytic system could cut cost of fuel cells”
Sept. 9, 2019

In the study, which was published in Nano Letters, the researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology described a possible new way to overcome sintering, a key cause degradation in platinum catalysts in which particles of platinum migrate and clump together. This reduces the specific surface area of the platinum and causes catalytic activity to drop.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science Blog (Los Angeles, CA: 185,000 unique monthly visits)
“Extracting Clean Fuel From Sunlight”
Sept. 3, 2019

In new research appearing in the Journal of the American Chemical Society (JACS), the flagship journal of the ACS, lead author Brian Wadsworth, along with colleagues Anna Beiler, Diana Khusnutdinova, Edgar Reyes Cruz, and corresponding author Gary Moore describe technologies that combine light-gathering semiconductors and catalytic materials capable of chemical reactions that produce clean fuel.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
“‘Resonance’ Raman spectroscopy with 1-nm resolution”
Sept. 4, 2019

Tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy resolved “resonance” Raman scattering with 1-nm resolution in ultrathin zinc oxide films epitaxially grown on a single-crystal silver surface (Nano Letters, "Resolving the Correlation between Tip-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Local Electronic States with 1 nm Resolution").

Four additional media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

SciTechDaily (Encinitas, CA: 146,000 unique monthly visits)
“Key Enzyme From Plants Could Guide Development of New Medicines”
Sept. 6, 2019

Researchers from the Salk Institute studying how plants evolved the abilities to make these natural chemicals have uncovered how an enzyme called chalcone isomerase evolved to enable plants to make products vital to their own survival. The researchers’ hope is that this knowledge will inform the manufacture of products that are beneficial to humans, including medications and improved crops. The study appeared in the print version of ACS Catalysis on September 6, 2019.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the s tory.

Tech Explore (Douglas, Isle of Man: 59,000 unique monthly visits)
“AI learns the language of chemistry to predict how to make medicines”
Sept. 3, 2019

University of Cambridge researchers have shown that an algorithm can predict the outcomes of complex chemical reactions with over 90% accuracy, outperforming trained chemists. The algorithm also shows chemists how to make target compounds, providing the chemical "map" to the desired destination. The results are reported in two studies in the journals ACS Central Science and Chemical Communications.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Pasadena Now (Pasadena, CA: 54,000 unique monthly visits)
“The Swiss Army Knife of Gene Editing Gets New Control in Caltech Laboratory”
Sept. 6, 2019

Now, Caltech researchers have applied principles from the emerging field of dynamic RNA nanotechnology to exert logical control over CRISPR/Cas9 within living cells. By engineering RNA strands to interact and thereby change shape in response to an RNA trigger sequence, the group demonstrates the ability to switch CRISPR/Cas9 from on to off and from off to on….described in a paper published on June 4, 2019, in the journal ACS Central Science.

More than five media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

Breaking news from the ACS Fall 2019 National Meeting

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Is Norovirus In The Water? Can A Smartphone Test Help?
Sept. 1, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

You may want your YouTube video to go viral. But you don't want your drinking water to do so, if the viral part of it is norovirus. That's why a research team from the University of Arizona is trying to "phone it in" when it comes to finding a way to quickly and inexpensively check water supplies for norovirus…. This American Chemical Society video describes how the test is supposed to work.

More than 50 media outlets, including NPR (Washington, D.C.: 21.97 million unique monthly visits), Futura Sciences (Saint-Raphaël, France: 3.83 million unique monthly visits) and Sciences Et Avenir (Paris, France: 1.20 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Hindustan Times (New Delhi, India: 16.27 million unique monthly visits)
“This is how a skin cream is made, and it’s not what we think”
Aug. 30, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Anyone who has gone through the stress and discomfort of raw, irritated skin knows the relief that comes with slathering on a creamy lotion. Now, researchers have found the first direct glimpse of how a cream or lotion is molecularly structured, and it’s not quite what they expected. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting and Exposition.

More than 15 media outlets, including Deccan Chronicle (Secunderabad, India: 3.00 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Digital Trends (Portland, OR: 12.55 million unique monthly visits)
“DARPA’s latest pursuit? Stealth gliders that dissolve when exposed to sunlight”
Aug. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Kohl’s previous research interests at Georgia Tech have focused on areas such as photosensitive materials for electronics packaging and sacrificial materials for creating compliant mechanical structures. His latest work, which was presented this week at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in California, combines both into one highly original package. His team has developed a type of sacrificial photosensitive polymer which vanishes in light.

More than five media outlets, including AME Info (Dubai, United Arab Emirates: 1.38 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Globo.com (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: 5.61 million unique monthly visits)
“The Dangerous Association of Diabetes with Cancer”
Aug. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

… According to John Termini, Ph.D. and a professor at the City of Hope Center's Department of Molecular Medicine, abnormal blood sugar levels are associated with DNA damage, which would explain a higher incidence of cancer in diabetic people…. The work was presented at the annual meeting of the American Chemical Society, held this week in San Diego (USA).

More than five media outlets, including All4Women.co.za (Johannesburg, South Africa: 1.12 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Premium Times (Abuja, Nigeria: 5.34 million unique monthly visits)
“U.S. researchers develop new skin patch for cancer treatment”
Aug. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

U.S. researchers have developed a fast-acting skin patch that could deliver medications to fight cancer, according to a study released recently. The study showed that the new skin patch could efficiently deliver medication in one minute to attack cells of melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer…. The study was presented at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting and Exposition…

More than 25 media outlets, including Informe21 (Caracas, Venezuela: 3.87 million unique monthly visits) and China,org.cn (Beijing, China: 2.09 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Intrinsic night vision could be on the horizon for humans”
Aug. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Scientists have used nanoparticles to develop the ability to see near-infrared light in mice. The study could have important implications for security, health, and a never-before-seen enhancement to human vision. Gang Han, PhD, the lead researcher on the project, presented the results of this research at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition.

More than 20 media outlets, including Bolsamania (Madrid, Spain: 1.20 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Gizmodo Australia (Sydney, Australia: 1.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Chocolate Interferes With THC Testing, Making It Hard To Measure The Potency Of Edibles”
Aug. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

… Regardless of the amount of the solvent used, the team found, the average readings from the 1,000 milligram samples were higher and more accurate than those pulled from the 2,000 milligram samples. The team’s findings were presented this week at the annual American Chemical Society (ACS) conference.

More than 25 media outlets, including Hudson Valley News12 (W. Nyack, NY: 351,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

…IN OTHER NEWS

Business Insider (New York, NY: 28.53 million unique monthly visits)
“No one knows why vapes are leading to lung injury and death, but a lung doctor says formaldehyde and a chemical used in weed killer may be partially to blame”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Most e-cigs also produce acrolein, a chemical often found in weed killer. In 2018, The American Chemical Society [reported that researchers] found that people who inhaled acrolein sustained changes to their DNA. "If the cell does not repair the damage so that normal DNA replication can take place, cancer could result," a press release on the research said.

One additional media outlet, Yahoo! News (Los Angeles, CA: 8.40 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medium
(San Francisco, CA: 24.11 million unique monthly visits)
“MIPT physicists create device for imitating biological memory”
Sept. 2, 2019

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have created a device that acts like a synapse in the living brain, storing information and gradually forgetting it when not accessed for a long time. Known as a second-order memristor, the new device is based on hafnium oxide and offers prospects for designing analog neurocomputers imitating the way a biological brain learns. The findings are reported in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

More than five media outlets, including Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medium (San Francisco, CA: 24.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Biophysicists discovered how “Australian” mutation leads to Alzheimer’s disease”
Sept. 2, 2019

A team of scientists…studied one hereditary genetic mutation to discover general molecular mechanisms that may lead both to early onset of Alzheimer’s disease and to the form of the disease caused by age-related changes in human body….The study findings were published in ACS Chemical Biology.

More than five media outlets, including News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, England: 23.54 million unique monthly visits)
“Don’t use a neti pot until you’ve read what can go wrong: At least three deaths in the US have been linked to patients using NHS-prescribed device incorrectly”
Aug. 26, 2019

…But some research casts doubt on how effective the chlorine in tap water is at this task. A study, published in 2015 in the Environmental Science and Technology journal, showed the amoeba survived longer in pipes with chlorinated water than laboratory tests suggested — 24 hours instead of just five minutes.

More than five media outlets covered the story.

UC Berkeley (Berkeley, CA: 18.03 million unique monthly visits)
“Water harvester makes it easy to quench your thirst in the desert”
Aug. 27, 2019

With water scarcity a growing problem worldwide, University of California, Berkeley, researchers are close to producing a microwave-sized water harvester that will allow you to pull all the water you need directly from the air — even in the hot, dry desert. In a paper appearing this week in ACS Central Science, a journal of the American Chemical Society,…describe the latest version of their water harvester, which can pull more than five cups of water (1.3 liters)…

More than 35 media outlets, including MarketWatch (New York, NY: 16.34 million unique monthly visits), Popular Mechanics (New York, NY: 11.85 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

IFL Science (London, England: 16.38 million unique monthly visits)
“Breathalyzer Sniffs Out Weed In People’s Breath Using Nanotechnology”
Aug. 28, 2019

…But now, scientists from the University of Pittsburgh have developed a breathalyzer, just like a breathalyzer for alcohol, that can tell if a person is under the influence of marijuana with more accuracy than ever. As reported in the journal ACS Sensors, the prototype device uses nanotechnology and machine learning to detect levels of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of marijuana, left lingering in the user's breath.

More than 45 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), Phys.org (London, England: 6.33 million unique monthly visits) and Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Sputnik International Russia (Moscow, Russia: 16.35 million unique monthly visits)
“Russian Scientists Work on Creating Molecular-Sized Microchip Elements”
Aug. 27, 2019

Modern silicon-based integrated circuits (ICs) have practically reached the limits of miniaturisation, while the use of organics can potentially allow the creation of microchip elements as large as a single molecule. Scientists…are actively conducting studies in this field. They have recently published the results of their modelling changes in agitated molecule of organic semiconductors in the Journal of Physical Chemistry C.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Refinery29 (New York, NY: 16.24 million unique monthly visits)
“Before You Pee In The Ocean, Read This”
Aug. 30, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

First of all, if you’re healthy, your urine should be about 95% water (this is why you hear about survivalists drinking their pee when water is in short supply). According to Live Science, it also contains about 3,000 other compounds, some of which include sodium, chloride, and potassium, which the ocean also contains, according to the American Chemical Society.

Taste of Home (Milwaukee, WI: 11.97 million unique monthly visits)
“11 Trending Superfood Veggies That Could Be the Next Kale”
Aug. 28, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Tiny, young leaves—less than 14 days old—are popping up all over on restaurant menus. They may be little, but microgreens are concentrated with up to six times the nutrients of mature leaves of the same plant, found a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Fast Company (New York, NY: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“The future of wearables? Linen thread that can be sewn into your body”
Aug. 26, 2019

…A new breakthrough out of Tufts University, just published in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, could fast-forward us into a new era of wearable electronics that are woven like clothing, and even might be sewn into our skin and organs to track our health. The scientists developed a transistor out of linen thread.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Ganga Mission study to check for ‘antibiotic resistance in rive”
Aug. 29, 2019

In 2014, researchers from Newcastle University in the U.K. and IIT-Delhi sampled water and sediments at seven sites along the Ganga in different seasons. They reported in the peer-reviewed Environmental Science and Technology that levels of resistance genes that lead to “superbugs” were about 60 times greater during the pilgrimage months of May and June than at other times of the year.

Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 10.81 million unique monthly visits)
“Sanara MedTech Inc. Announces the Election of Dr. Kenneth Thorpe and Ms. Ann Beal Salamone to its Board of Directors”
Aug. 29, 2019

Ms. Salamone holds more than 100 patents and patent applications. She is a past Chairman of the American Chemical Society, Division of Polymer Chemistry (8,000 members) and founder of the Intersociety Polymer Education Council with over 600,000 K-12 science teachers’ trainings to date. She has served on several National Institute of Health Small Business Innovation Research grant review panels.

More than 45 media outlets, including Morningstar StockInvestor (Chicago, IL: 9.44 million unique monthly visits), Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits) and Yahoo! Finance (New York, NY: 1.83 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NASDAQ (New York, NY: 9.39 million unique monthly visits)
“Marrone Bio Innovations CEO Dr. Pam Marrone Receives Innovation Award in Chemistry of Agriculture from the American Chemical Society”
Aug. 28, 2019

Marrone Bio Innovations, Inc. (NASDAQ:MBII), an international leader in sustainable bioprotection and plant health solutions, today announced that Dr. Pam Marrone, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, has received the 2019 American Chemical Society (ACS) Award for Innovation in Chemistry of Agriculture, sponsored by the Agrochemical Division of ACS and BASF Corporation, in honor of outstanding achievements in the discovery, development and commercialization of biopesticides.

More than 35 media outlets, including World News Network (New York, NY: 8.96 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

China Daily (Beijing, China: 5.83 million unique monthly visits)
“Chinese scientists develop light-responsive controlled-release pesticide”
Aug. 27, 2019

Chinese scientists have developed a light-responsive controlled-release pesticide to reduce pesticide loss and increase the utilization efficiency….The technology can be cost-effective and has broad application prospects. The research was published online in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

The Health Site (Mumbai, India: 5.24 million unique monthly visits)
“Want a brainy child? Plan your pregnancy diet around these 7 super foods”
Aug. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Being rich in antioxidants, blueberries can help in your baby’s cognitive development. This super fruit can also protect her from heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease, says a study presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society. In fact, they can potentially improve your child’s attention.

Mother Nature Network (Atlanta, GA: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“8 captivating facts about spider silk”
Aug. 26, 2019

"Quantitatively, spider silk is five times stronger than steel of the same diameter," explains a fact sheet from the University of Bristol School of Chemistry. It also draws comparisons with Kevlar, which has a higher strength rating but a lower fracture toughness than certain spider silks, according to the American Chemical Society (ACS). Spider silk is highly elastic, too, in some cases stretching four times its original length without breaking, and retains its strength below minus 40 degrees Celsius.

EatingWell Magazine (Shelburne, VT: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“30 Healthy Low-Carb Foods to Eat”
Aug. 30, 2019

An easily portable serving of protein, one cheese stick contains just 80 calories for 6 grams of protein and less than 1 gram of carbohydrate. Plus, a small recent study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that eating cheese may produce good bacteria that keep your gut healthy.

EatingWell Magazine (Shelburne, VT: 4.75 million unique monthly visits)
“12 Superfoods to Help You Eat Healthy for $1 or Less”
Aug. 30, 2019

A 1-ounce serving (23 nuts, 162 calories) has 37 percent of your daily value for vitamin E-a nutrient many Americans fall short on. Almonds also deliver some calcium, fiber and folate. Not only that, a serving of almonds has as many flavonoids as a cup of green tea, according to a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

Mid Day (Mumbai, India: 3.83 million unique monthly visits)
“New tuberculosis vaccine is promising”
Aug. 26, 2019

A new type of vaccine targeting tuberculosis (TB) has been successfully developed and tested by researchers. The early-stage vaccine which was shown to provide substantial protection against TB in a pre-clinical laboratory setting was published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than 20 media outlets, including The University of Sydney (Sydney, Australia: 2.12 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Lab-Grown Meat: One Startup Has an Idea That Could Dramatically Slash Costs”
Aug. 26, 2019

One of the biggest hurdles to growing these cells on a mass scale is the process. Post, the researcher behind the first burger, told the American Chemical Society that “cell culture is not a really efficient process…a lot of our colleagues still think we are absolutely crazy because they say you can’t make this efficient at all.”

Smithsonian (Washington, D.C.: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Milestone Carbon-Nanotube Microchip Sends First Message: ‘Hello World!’
Aug. 29, 2019

The technology still has a long way to go, and, in the end, it may not prove feasible. Katherine Bourzac at Chemical & Engineering News reports that the first carbon nanotube transistor was created at IBM in 1998. But the difficulties in producing the nanotubes at scale dampened enthusiasm for the technology. Over the past decade, teams of scientists at Stanford and MIT have continued to plug away at the problems of carbon nanotubes.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Natural Antibiotics With Herbalist Nicole Apelian From Alone”
Aug. 29, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Herbalists consider honey as one of the best natural antibiotics. It also contains antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic properties. A 2014 study presented at a meeting of the American Chemical Society found that honey has the ability to fight infection on multiple levels, making it more difficult for bacteria to develop resistance to it.

Hindu Business Line (Chennai, India: 3.01 million unique monthly visits)
“Lignin from agro-waste helps make useful nanocomposites”
Sept. 2, 2019

Agricultural waste can find many useful applications. Researchers…have developed a lignin-based nanocomposite which could potentially have commercial value. Microbial test results indicate that, in the long run, the lignin-based nanomaterial can act as an additive in coating and packaging materials…. The research results have been published in the journal ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering.

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales: 2.35 million unique monthly visits)
“Should you be worried about the vaping illness outbreak?”
Sept. 2, 2019

According to Action on Smoking and Health (ASH), it is estimated that there are now 3.2 million vapers in Britain, compared to 7.4 million smokers. Over half of vapers have quit smoking, while 40 per cent are current smokers who are trying to quit. There is strong evidence that vaping is less harmful than traditional smoking, but it is not without its risks. A study published in Environmental Science & Technology in 2016 identified harmful emissions in e-cigarettes, including possible carcinogens and irritants.

More than five media outlets, including Daily Post – Wales (Conwy, Wales: 983,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

GreenMedInfo (Naples, FL: 1.71 million unique monthly visits)
“This Coconut Oil Hack Can Reduce White Rice Calories 50-60%”
Sept. 2, 2019

An undergraduate, Sudhair James, presented his preliminary research at National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society last month: "What we did is cook the rice as you normally do, but when the water is boiling, before adding the raw rice, we added coconut oil-about 3 percent of the weight of the rice you're going to cook. After it was ready, we let it cool in the refrigerator."

The Good Men Project (Pasadena, CA: 1.51 million unique monthly visits)
“Science Can Double the Solar Dividend”
Aug. 30, 2019

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology report in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Nano that they have developed an insulating material that is 95% translucent. An aerogel is a foam made with silica and held together not with water but with air.

Times Union (Albany, NY: 1.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Plastic is ending up in Delaware’s waters, where it can kill”
Aug. 31, 2019

…"Plastic debris appears to act as a vector transferring PBTs (persistent, bioaccumulative, toxic substances) from the water to the food web, increasing risk throughout the marine food web, including humans," according to a 2012 study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Special National Meeting Edition

New York Times (New York, NY: 29.98 million unique monthly visits)
“Is It Time to Upend the Periodic Table?”
Aug. 27, 2019

…Gregory Girolami said in a joint interview with his wife, Vera Mainz. Both are inorganic chemists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Together with Carmen Giunta, a chemist at Le Moyne College in Syracuse, they organized a 150th anniversary symposium, held this week during the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in San Diego.

Healthline
(San Francisco, CA: 23.97 million unique monthly visits)
“Chocolate in Edibles May Affect THC Testing”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

… Now, new evidence suggests that THC potency testing may be even trickier than previously thought. Chocolate may be interfering with cannabis potency testing, causing results to be somewhat skewed, according to new research being presented at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition this week.

More than 35 media outlets, including Global News (Toronto, Canada: 3.32 million unique monthly visits), The Morning Call (Allentown, PA: 2.11 million unique monthly visits) and Chattanooga Times Free Press (Chattanooga, TN: 1.53 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NPR (Washington, D.C.: 21.97 million unique monthly visits)
“A Newer, Faster Way To Detect Norovirus In Water Supplies”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

An estimated 20 million people in the United States suffer acute intestinal illness from norovirus every year. Some of these infections come from contaminated water. NPR's Joe Palca has this report about a new, cheap, fast way of detecting the virus in water…. Yoon is presenting details about his invention today at the American Chemical Society National Meeting in San Diego.

More than 35 media outlets, including International Business Times (New York, NY: 15.77 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and UANews (Tucson, AZ: 4.30 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Breitbart (Lost Angeles, CA: 19.11 million unique monthly visits)
“Nanoparticles Could Grant Humans Permanent Night Vision”
Aug. 28, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Built-in night vision may not be far off. Scientists have developed nanoparticles that allow mice to see near-infrared light. Researchers are scheduled to describe the technological breakthrough on Tuesday at 12:30 p.m. ET at the American Chemical Society’s fall meeting, held this week in San Diego. Their presentation will be streamed live online.

More than 45 media outlets, including Clarín (Tacuarí, Argentina: 12.54 million unique monthly visits), Goo (Tokyo, Japan: 12.41 million unique monthly visits), Popular Mechanics (New York, NY: 11.85 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

MSN (Redmond, WA: 9.28 million unique monthly visits)
“Military researchers develop self-destructing material that ‘disappears in an instant’ to carry out covert missions without leaving any trace”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

A special type of polymer capable of disappearing without a trace is being tested by the US government. Scientists say the material, [presented] by researchers at [a meeting of] the American Chemical Society at the behest of the Department of Defense, could be used to deploy electronic sensors and deliver military equipment covertly by dropping off packages and leaving no sign that the device was ever there.

More than 10 media outlets, including Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

20 Minutos España
(Madrid, Spain: 6.42 million unique monthly visits)
“They design a portable device that allows precise detection of cancer during surgery”
Aug. 28, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin (United States) are developing the 'MasSpec Pen', a portable and biocompatible device to allow surgeons to distinguish between cancerous and healthy tissue with greater certainty in seconds, while they are at the operating table. The researchers report on the first results of its use in human surgeries during the National Fall Meeting and Exhibition of the 2019 of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

More than 20 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medindia.com
(Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits)
“Molecular Structure of Skin Creams Discovered”
Aug. 28, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

The first glimpse of how a cream or lotion is structured on the molecular scale, and it's not quite what they expected has been reported by researchers. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. ACS, the world's largest scientific society, is holding the meeting here through Thursday.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Before It’s News
(Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Protein Batteries for Safer, Environmentally Friendly Power Storage”
Aug. 28, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Proteins are good for building muscle, but their building blocks also might be helpful for building sustainable organic batteries that could someday be a viable substitute for conventional lithium-ion batteries, without their safety and environmental concerns….The researchers presented their results  at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

China.org.cn (Beijing, China: 2.09 million unique monthly visits)
“Spotlight: American Chemical Society annual meeting showcases innovation in chemical science”
Aug. 28, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

The 2019 national meeting and exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), one of the largest scientific conferences of the year held this week in San Diego, California, has demonstrated new discoveries and innovation in chemical science…. Hammond and her team have developed a fast-acting skin patch that efficiently delivers medication to attack melanoma cells.

More than five media outlets, including El Ciudadano (Recoleta, Chili: 1.12 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Traumatic brain injuries could be healed using peptide hydrogels”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

…Today, researchers report a self-assembling peptide hydrogel that, when injected into the brains of rats with TBI, increased blood vessel regrowth and neuronal survival. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

    

Special National Meeting Edition

The New York Times (New York, NY: 29.92 million unique monthly visits)
“How Much Pot in That Brownie? Chocolate Can Throw Off Tests”
Aug. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

How much marijuana is really in that pot brownie? Chocolate can throw off potency tests so labels aren't always accurate, and now scientists are trying to figure out why….Dawson's research is on the agenda at the American Chemical Society meeting in San Diego.

More than 340 media outlets, including WBZ-TV (Boston, MA: 24.89 million unique monthly visits), Los Angeles Times (Los Angeles, CA: 23.98 million unique monthly visits), Breitbart (Los Angeles, CA: 19.11 million unique monthly visits), KOVR-TV (West Sacramento, CA: 16.78 million unique monthly visits), Chron.com (Houston, TX: 16.25 million unique monthly visits), Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, GA: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Forbes
(Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“This New Approach May Reduce The Spread of Lyme Disease”
Aug. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

… Now, researchers from Louisiana State University have developed a new approach that goes right to the place where a tick transmits disease: its salivary glands (which produce saliva)…. The research will be presented today at the American Chemical Society (ACS) Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition in San Diego.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

CNBC
(Englewood Cliffs, NJ: 26.07 million unique monthly visits)
“MIT scientists say new skin patch to deliver cancer medication in 60 seconds shows promise in mice”
Aug. 25, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

An experimental patch designed to deliver cancer medications through the skin showed promise in mice and human skin samples, according to new research presented Sunday at the American Chemical Society conference in California, San Diego. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology developed the patch to fight melanoma, a deadly but highly treatable form of skin cancer.

More than 40 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Techno Holik (New Delhi, India: 10.75 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Healthline
(San Francisco, CA: 23.97 million unique monthly visits)
“Latest Theory on Why Diabetes Increases Cancer Risk”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

…“It’s been known for a long time that people with diabetes have as much as a 2.5-fold increased risk for certain cancers,” explained John Termini, PhD, a professor of molecular medicine at the City of Hope National Medical Center in California and lead author of a study presented this past weekend at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition in San Diego.

More than 20 media outlets, including The Economic Times (Gurgaon, India: 9.14 million unique monthly visits) and International Business Times India (Bangalore, India: 8.31 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Scientific American
(New York, NY: 11.83 million unique monthly visits)
“Disappearing Plastics Stay Strong in the Shadows and Melt Away in the Sun”
Aug. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

…These plastics could also be used to make environmental and medical sensors that dissolve after collecting data or temporary adhesives that come unstuck with the aid of a heat gun. “They are great for applications where you want things to disappear right away,” says Paul Kohl, a chemical and biomolecular engineering professor at Georgia Tech, who presented his team’s latest research on Monday at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in San Diego.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Will Illinois (Urbana, IL: 5.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Illinois Chemists Work To Make Environmentally Friendly Materials For Mattresses, Paints & More”
Aug. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

A team of Illinois chemists are developing a more environmentally friendly form of polyurethane, a hard-to-recycle polymer that’s used in a variety of everyday products…. The research is being presented this week by U of I graduate student Ephraim Morado at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Diego.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse
(New York, NY: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Organic, Protein-Packed Batteries Could Sustainably Store Clean Energy”
Aug. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Organic batteries that use protein to transfer electrons could one day hold the future of power storage. Researchers at Texas A&M University have discovered a means of using synthetic polypeptides to create electrodes, the positive and negative parts of a battery used to make a circuit. The findings were presented Monday at the American Chemical Society’s Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition, a four-day event that covers more than 9,500 scientific presentations.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical News Today (Brighton, England: 3.17 million unique monthly visits)
“Altering an unhealthy gut microbiome could stave off chronic disease”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

New research in mice suggests that "remodeling" an unhealthy microbiome into a healthy one could stave off chronic disease by improving cholesterol. Using peptides, scientists turned an unhealthy gut microbiome into a healthy gut that worked to help reduce cholesterol. This, they say, may help ward off certain diseases. They presented their findings at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting & Exposition, which took place in San Diego, CA.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

New Scientist (London, England: 3.15 million unique monthly visits)
“A smartphone app can detect tiny amounts of norovirus in water”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

A smartphone app can detect signs of norovirus, the most common cause of gastroenteritis. Jeong-Yeol Yoon and his colleagues at the University of Arizona in the US built the system using a microscope attachment for a smartphone and a separate light source. Combined they can detect low levels of norovirus in water…. The research was presented at a national meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Diego.

More than 10 media outlets, including News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science News (Washington, D.C.: 1.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Plant-based fire retardants may offer a less toxic way to tame flames”
Aug. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Flame retardants are going green. Using compounds from plants, researchers are concocting a new generation of flame retardants, which one day could replace the fire-quenching chemicals added by manufacturers to furniture, electronics and other consumer products…. Howell’s team presented the work August 26 in San Diego at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

AniNews.in (New Delhi, India: 1.56 million unique monthly visits)
“Pollen and spores could be used to remove pollutants from water”
Aug. 26, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

With a simple treatment and pollens and spores can be converted into tiny sponge-like particles that can grab on to pollutants and remove them from water, suggests a study. "Even very low levels of certain compounds, such as hormones, pharmaceuticals or those in household and personal care products, can cause toxic effects. However, they often can escape normal cleanup processes at wastewater treatment plants,"…The study will be presented at the American Chemical Society Fall 2019 National Meeting.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Europa Press (Madrid, Spain: 878,000 unique monthly visits)
“The nanoparticles could one day give humans built-in night vision”
Aug. 27, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Scientists have used nanoparticles to give ordinary mice the ability to see near infrared light. Advances in the process of creating versions of these nanoparticles will allow that in the future they could provide built-in night vision to humans. The researchers will present their results at the 2019 National Fall Exhibition and Exhibition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society.

More than five media outlets, including Science Blog (Los Angeles, CA: 185,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

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