ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

MSN Health (Redmond, WA: 69.47 million unique monthly visits)
“22 Proven Tips to Fight “Cabin Fever””
March 28, 2020

Getting outside for a walk, run, or bike ride can also make you happier instantly. "Exercising in natural environments was associated with greater feelings of revitalization, increased energy and positive engagement, together with decreases in tension, confusion, anger and depression," says a study published in Environmental Science and Technology. Practice the safe rules of social distancing while you're out but appreciate nature and enjoy the fresh air.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

CNN (Atlanta, GA: 36.55 million unique monthly visits)
“Plastic-eating bacteria could be small step toward tackling world’s pollution crisis”
March 30, 2020
Featuring an: ACS Expert

Polyurethane foam is widely used in building materials, mattresses, car parts, spandex clothing and shoes, among others. It's ubiquitous, but it's very flammable, so it's covered in potentially carcinogenic flame retardants that can disrupt the endocrine system, said Rolf Halden, a health engineering professor and director of Arizona State University's Biodesign Center for Environmental Health Engineering. He was not involved with the study.

Forbes (Jersey City, NJ: 28.31 million unique monthly visits)
“Five Tech Startups That Are Helping Us To Overcome The Coronavirus Effect”
March 29, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Berlin-based SaaS provider Morressier is helping research societies navigate these difficult times by providing an online platform to boost the dissemination and discoverability of research that would have been shared at physical events. It recently helped the American Chemical Society pull off a quick turn around after its Spring meeting was cancelled due to the current pandemic.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

RIA Science (Moscow, Russia: 12.52 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists have discovered whether coronavirus can be transmitted through water”
March 27, 2020

Environmental scientists at Stanford University gave the first description of potential transmission pathways for the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus in the environment and the factors that influence its spread. The results are published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 35 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits), Europa Press (Madrid, Spain: 1.38 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Metro.co.uk (London, England: 8.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Pangolins could be ‘missing link’ allowing coronavirus to jump from bats to humans”
March 27, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Pangolins are scaly, anteater-like creatures found in Asia that are routinely trafficked and smuggled for both food and medicine. A new scientific study, appearing in the Journal of Proteome Research, has found these mammals also carry coronaviruses similar to the one currently sweeping across the world.

More than 65 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits), Inverse (New York, NY: 2.44 million unique monthly visits), Tom’s Guide (Neuilly-sur-Seine, France: 1.18 million unique monthly visits) and Prokerala.com (Kerala, India: 1.13 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Wired (San Francisco, CA: 6.58 million unique monthly visits)
“The Heady, Intricate Beauty of Watching Whiskey Evaporate”
March 26, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

"I believe it is possible to identify counterfeits, but a lot of work needs to be done between now and then," says University of Louisville mechanical engineer Stuart Williams, coauthor on the paper in the journal ACS Nano. They for instance need to amass a library of images to evaluate against. "We have also observed that environmental factors—temperature, humidity—impact results, which is why we need to produce a standardized testing procedure and evaluate human error with this test."

More than 25 media outlets, including Ars Technica (New York, NY: 3.28 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

National Geographic Magazine (Washington, D.C.: 5.45 million unique monthly visits)
“Toxic ‘forever chemicals’ flow freely through this river–and now its fish”
March 25, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

PFAS has been manufactured in North Carolina since the 1950s, first by DuPont and then Chemours. In 2016, a study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology showed that PFAS discharged by Chemours into the Cape Fear River was making its way into drinking water.

Live Science (New York, NY: 5.26 million unique monthly visits)
“‘Submarine avalanches’ are burying microplastics deep under the ocean”
March 26, 2020

Underwater avalanches are likely burying bits of microplastic deep under the ocean. Researchers believe that right now about 10 million lbs. (4.5 million kilograms) of plastic makes its way into the ocean every year, and that this number could be about 10 times higher by 2025…. The study was published March 6 in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 205 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

South China Morning Post (Hong Kong, China: 4.41 million unique monthly visits)
“Coronavirus: loss of smell or taste could be a symptom, growing evidence suggests”
March 25, 2020

Doctors and public health experts have identified loss of smell as a potential symptom of the coronavirus that first spread from central China and has since become a devastating global pandemic…. Experts at the Aga Khan University in Pakistan published a study last week with the American Chemical Society that said the coronavirus could enter the brain through pathways close to the olfactory bulb, or the part of the brain that detects odours.

Four additional media outlets, including MSN Hong Kong (Hong Kong, China: 69.47 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science (Washington, D.C.: 2.84 million unique monthly visits)
“Mysterious chemical found in dead cat’s brain reopens debate over mercury poisoning disaster”
March 24, 2020

The finding suggests the Minamata disaster—and methylmercury poisoning more generally—is due for a rethink, the researchers argue in their study, published in Environmental Science & Technology in January. Methylmercury played no significant role in the poisoning, says Graham George, Pickering’s husband and co-leader of the experiment, who is also at the University of Saskatchewan.

Four additional media outlets, including the Smithsonian (Washington, D.C.: 2.46 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 1.42 million unique monthly visits)
“Cellular train track deformities shed light on neurological disease: Study”
March 29, 2020

Microtubules are tube-like proteins that act like train tracks for other cellular proteins to move along as they transport molecular cargo. In certain diseases, they become deformed, affecting this transport process. But scientists hadn't developed an experimental set-up that allows them to properly study this. The study was published in the journal ACS Applied Bio Materials.

More than 15 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Cannabidiol helps fight antibiotic-resistant bacteria”
March 24, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In another, not affiliated study, led by Eric D. Brown, Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University in Canada, researchers have found that another cannabis compound, CBG cured mice of MRSA infections as effectively as vancomycin, a drug widely considered to be the last line of defense against drug-resistant microbes. This study is currently under review at the ACS Infectious Diseases journal.

More than five additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Co-occurring contaminants in groundwater may heighten health risks for North Carolinians”
March 24, 2020

Contaminants that occur together naturally in groundwater under certain geological conditions may heighten health risks for millions of North Carolinians whose drinking water comes from private wells, and current safety regulations don't address the problem, a new Duke University study finds…. Coyte and Vengosh published their peer-reviewed paper March 13 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 10 media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Municipal solid waste treatment systems could be a reservoir of antibiotic-resistance genes”
March 25, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Municipal solid waste is trash -- such as plastic, food scraps and lawn clippings -- that goes into garbage bins and doesn't get recycled. Most of this waste is buried in landfills or is incinerated. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have shown that when disposed of in this way, municipal solid waste can be an important source of antibiotic-resistance genes in the air.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

New Atlas (Melbourne, Australia: 1.04 million unique monthly visits)
“Loop-loaded nanosheets accelerate discovery of artificial antibodies”
March 24, 2020

The body does a pretty good job of protecting itself from invading viruses and bacteria. Antibodies are one of the main lines of defense, but when a new threat emerges it takes time for the body to produce new antibodies to fight it. A new study led by Berkeley Lab has designed an effective system that should speed up discovery of new artificial antibodies…. The study was published in the journal ACS Nano.

New Atlas (Melbourne, Australia: 1.04 million unique monthly visits)
“World-first ultrasound biosensor promises real-time tumor tracking”
March 25, 2020

Ultrasound has become an indispensable tool for showing us internal structures of the human body, but could it come to offer a far more detailed and dynamic picture as the body responds to drugs or disease? Scientists in Australia have leveraged the technology to develop what they call the world’s first ultrasound biosensor, which they say could be used to inexpensively monitor tumors or reveal the impacts of stroke…. The research was published in the journal ACS Sensors.

Five additional media outlets covered the story.

PINKVILLA (Noida, India: 623,000 unique monthly visits)
“Dates and Diabetes: Can diabetics consume this fruit?”
March 27, 2020

As per another study which was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 10 participants of the research, who had 100 g of dates per day showed no increase in their blood sugar or triglycerides levels after 4 weeks. However, as mentioned above, one should cautious of the portion sizes.

Muscle & Fitness (New York, NY: 583,000 unique monthly visits)
“The Bodybuilder’s Ultimate Guide to Alcohol”
March 26, 2020

For those who are white wine fans, stick with the drier whites like Rieslings of Sauvignon Blanks. They have their own health benefits. A study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that antioxidants in white wine are similar to that in olive oil—boosting heart function.

One additional media outlet covered the story.

BuzzFeed (New York, NY: 16.5 million unique monthly visits)
“Trump Said He Wants To Give Coronavirus Patients An Experimental Drug Called Chloroquine”
March 19, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

“Usually new drugs take a decade or longer to develop, and cost billions of dollars,” the American Chemical Society’s Cynthia Liu, who led a March survey of possible drugs to treat the novel coronavirus, told BuzzFeed News. “We don’t have that time with this epidemic, so it is logical and smart to look to drugs we have already.”

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

NBC News (New York, NY: 11.95 million unique monthly visits)
“Many common household cleaning products can kill the coronavirus if you use them properly”
March 17, 2020
Featuring: an ACS Expert

“Richard Sachleben, an organic chemist and a member of the American Chemical Society, said most of the cleaning products we call soap are actually detergents that not only remove the germs from surfaces, but also kill them.”

More than 10 additional news outlets, including AOL.com (New York, NY: 10.38 million unique monthly visits) and PopCulture.com (Nashville, TN: 1.7 million unique monthly visits), featured the story.

The Economic Times (Gurgaon, India: 7.6 million unique monthly visits)
“IIT-KGP team develops energy-efficient tech for bio cell
March 22, 2020

Researchers at the IIT-Kharagpur have developed an energy-efficient method that could support a wide range of applications in clinical and biological research. Biological cells can be patterned by using the heat generated in closed electrical fields with the help of this method, the researchers said on Saturday…. The pioneering work was recently published in Analytical Chemistry, a flagship journal of the American Chemical Society.

More than six additional media outlets, including Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 1.42 million unique monthly visits) and Outlook India (New Delhi, India: 429,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mental Floss (New York, NY: 4.03 million unique monthly visits)
“How Hand Sanitizer Works (And Why It Isn't a Substitute for Soap)”
March 13, 2020
Publicized in: ACS video release

“You likely know it's mostly alcohol. So why doesn't hand sanitizer look, smell, and feel like the stuff doctors use to clean their tools? (Or for that matter, the kind we drink?) The difference is in the details, as the American Chemical Society's Reactions video explains below.”

Two additional media outlets, including The List (Indianapolis, IN: 991,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Ars Technica (New York: NY: 3.28 million unique monthly visits)
“Long narrow wires carry heat with little resistance”
March 22, 2020

One of the central issues in thermal management is thermal resistance, a material's tendency to limit the flow of heat. The thicker a material, the larger the temperature gradient required to achieve the same amount of cooling because the thermal resistance increases with thickness…. Except when it doesn’t. If the heat is carried by ballistic phonons, thermal resistance stays constant…. Nano Letters, 2020, DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c00320

Science Daily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits)
“Maggot analysis goes molecular for forensic cases”
March 18, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Maggots on a dead body or wound can help pinpoint when a person or animal died, or when maltreatment began in elder, child care or animal neglect cases. However, the current process for making this determination is time consuming and resource intensive. It also relies on species assessment by trained entomologists. Now, researchers report in ACS' Analytical Chemistry the development of a molecular maggot analysis method that's quick, easy and less subjective.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

Scientific American (New York, NY: 2.80 million unique monthly visits)
“Industry and sanitation are innocent of contaminating groundwater with arsenic”
March 17, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Microbes in the groundwater release arsenic because of their interaction with the sediments, and a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology says that the natural organic materials present in these sediments help to feed the reaction, and affect the rate and levels of arsenic release in the groundwater.

Three additional media outlets, including Science Daily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 2.44 million unique monthly visits)
“After the recession, fish could be used to make glowing tattoos”
March 18, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

A new development in flexible temporary electronic displays could make glowing tattoos a real thing.... The secret ingredient is biodegradable and easy enough to come by, according to a new study from out of Nanjing Tech University, based in China and published in the journal ACS Nano: gelatin derived from collagen in fish scales.

More than 25 additional media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits), New Scientist (London, England: 1.15 million unique monthly visits and New Atlas (Melbourne, Australia: 1.04 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits)
“Ethylene sensor could help monitor plant health”
March 18, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

To control flowering and fruit ripening, plants release the gaseous hormone ethylene. Environmental conditions, including drought, salinity and pathogens, can also cause levels of the hormone to fluctuate. Therefore, monitoring ethylene's release in real time could provide a farmer with important information about a plant's development and health. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed an easy-to-use, robust sensor that can do just that.

Eight additional media outlets, including Science Daily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Standard (Mumbai, India: 1.42 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists develop new technology to get cleaner water”
March 23, 2020

Scientists have developed a novel one-step fabrication process that improves the ability of nanocarbons to remove toxic heavy metal ions from water. This new technology could aid efforts to improve universal access to clean water…. The study was published in the journal ACS Applied Nano Materials.

More than 17 additional media outlets, including Science Daily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits) and New Atlas (Melbourne, Australia: 1.04 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Futurism (New York, NY: 1.18 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists say new nanomaterial could ‘replace human tissue’”
March 17, 2020

European researchers say they’ve invented a rubbery nanomaterial that seamlessly integrates with the human body — which could pave the way for everything from new reconstructive surgeries to extreme body modification…. The nontoxic material, described in depth by scientists at Chalmers University in Sweden in a new paper in the journal ACS Nano, is made of the same stuff as plexiglass.

Eight additional media outlets, including Science Daily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits) and Phys.Org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Book Riot (New York, NY: 957,000 unique monthly visits)
“Free Resources on the Coronavirus Pandemic to Help You Stay Informed”
March 17, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

For those of you wishing to take a deep dive into the current research from scientists and health care professionals, sources such as research articles and even book chapters are the way to go…. Coronavirus Research: A Free to Read Collection from the American Chemical Society.

Chicago Sun-Times (Chicago, IL: 677,000 unique monthly visits)
“What to do with your kids while self-quarantining at home”
March 16, 2020

Conduct an at-home science experiment. The American Chemical Society has a collection of science experiments for kids that use materials you probably already have at home, like milk, laundry detergent and Elmer’s glue. 

MSN IE (Dublin, Ireland: 69.47 million unique monthly visits)
“30 Things You Never Knew About Starbucks”
March 15, 2020

With 330 milligrams of caffeine, a grande coffee from Starbucks has about the same amount of caffeine as three cans of Red Bull. By comparison, a standard 16-ounce cup of brewed coffee contains around 190 milligrams. According to a report by Chemical & Engineering News, the daily safe dose of caffeine is only a little bit more than that grande coffee: 400 milligrams.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Daily Mail (London, England: 22.71 million unique monthly visits)
“Wearing clothes can release more microfibers than washing them, study finds”
March 9, 2020

Wearing clothes can release greater quantities of microfibres to the environment than washing them, a study has found. Scientists compared four different items of polyester clothing and how many fibres were released when they were being worn and washed…. The study, published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology, compared four different items of clothing in size large.

More than 150 media outlets, including independent.co.uk (London, England: 14.03 million unique monthly visits), Gizmodo (New York, NY: 5.60 million unique monthly visits), ITV (London, England: 3.68 million unique monthly visits) and ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yahoo! Finance (New York, NY: 14.97 million unique monthly visits)
“Coronavirus Advice: Cancel That Conference”
March 11, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

This month, as the coronavirus spread across the U.S., many scientists and medical professionals decided to do the opposite: They stayed home. The American Physical Society canceled its March meeting, the American Chemical Society axed its spring conference, and several major health care meetings were scrapped.

More than 50 media outlets, including Forbes (New York, NY: 28.31 million unique monthly visits), Bloomberg (New York, NY: 10.55 million unique monthly visits), Philadelphia Business Journal (Philadelphia, PA: 3.69 million unique monthly visits), Science (Washington, DC: 2.84 million unique monthly visits) and The Philadelphia Inquirer (Philadelphia, PA: 1.32 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Economic Times (Gurgaon, India: 7.60 million unique monthly visits)
“Biofuels can greatly reduce carbon emissions: Study”
March 11, 2020

In a recent paper published in Environmental Science and Technology, the researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Michigan State University (MSU), examined a number of different cellulosic biofuel crops to test their potential as a petroleum alternative in ethanol fuel and electric light-duty vehicles including passenger cars and small trucks.

More than 15 media outlets, including Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Consumer Reports (New York, NY: 6.42 million unique monthly visits)
“These Common Household Products Can Destroy the Novel Coronavirus”
March 10, 2020
Featuring an: ACS Expert

Just the friction from scrubbing with soap and water can break the coronavirus’s protective envelope. “Scrub like you’ve got sticky stuff on the surface and you really need to get it off,” says Richard Sachleben, an organic chemist and member of the American Chemical Society.

More than five media outlets, including The Oregonian (Portland, OR: 1.29 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Phys.org (Douglas, Isle of Man: 2.05 million unique monthly visits)
“New nano strategy fights superbugs”
March 12, 2020

Researchers at Rice University's Brown School of Engineering have a new strategy for "trapping and zapping" antibiotic resistant genes, the pieces of bacteria that, even though theirs hosts are dead, can find their way into and boost the resistance of other bacteria…. detailed in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science and Technology.

More than five media outlets, including News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Arizona Republic (Phoenix, AZ: 2.02 million unique monthly visits)
“Fight COVID-19 (Corona) Virus with Potent Antibacterial Cannabinoid Infused Hand Sanitizer Available Now from Global Cannabinoids”
March 12, 2020

A Journal of Natural Products research article, published in 2008 by the American Chemical Society, reported that cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabigerol (CBG), two of the most abundant cannabinoids found in hemp, "showed potent activity against a variety of MRSA strains."

More than 45 media outlets, including Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA: 564,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

Daily Kos (Washington, D.C.: 1.09 million unique monthly visits)
“Black Kos, Week In Review”
March 13, 2020

Alice Augusta Ball was born in Seattle, Washington, in 1894, the child of a middle-class family in which both parents and a grandfather were photographers…. At the University of Washington, she graduated with bachelor’s degrees in both pharmaceutical chemistry and pharmacy. She also published her first scientific paper in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, still one of the premier chemistry journals in the world, as an undergraduate.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“Magnolia bark compound could be potential new treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy”
March 11, 2020
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

In patients with epilepsy, normal neurological activity becomes disrupted, causing debilitating seizures. Now, researchers report in ACS Chemical Neuroscience that they have found a potential new treatment for this disorder by turning to traditional Chinese medicine. Tests of extracts from plants used in these ancient remedies led the team to one compound, derived from a magnolia tree, that could quell drug-resistant seizures in both fish and mice.

More than five media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 678,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.07 million unique monthly visits)
“NTHU research team develops new treatment for Parkinson’s disease”
March 12, 2020

Ultrasound is widely used for conducting physical examinations, and plans are underway for expanding its application to the treatment of Parkinson's disease, dementia, and diabetes…. Their innovative research has been published in the January issue of Nano Letters, and their non-invasive treatment has already been patented in Taiwan and the US.

More than five media outlets, including Bernama.com (Kuala Lumpur, India: 123,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

New Atlas (Melbourne, Australia: 1.04 million unique monthly visits)
“Biocompatible battery for medical implants is charged via ultrasound”
March 9, 2020

Implantable medical devices such as hearing aids or pacemakers are of huge value, but keeping them charged up can involve clunky external power sources or repeated invasive surgeries to replace depleted batteries. Scientists in Saudi Arabia are putting forward a potential solution to this problem, developing a tiny implantable device that can be recharged through the skin with ultrasound instead…. The research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 678,000 unique monthly visits)
“Special report highlights potential therapeutic agents, vaccines for COVID-19”
March 12, 2020
Publicized in: ACS news release

Since the first reports of a new coronavirus disease in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, COVID-19 has spread rapidly across the globe, threatening a pandemic. Now, researchers from CAS, a division of the American Chemical Society specializing in scientific information solutions, have issued a special report in ACS Central Science.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 3.06 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

HubPages (San Francisco, CA: 669,000 unique monthly visits)
“Hemp Battery Technology Hasn’t Yet Sparked”
March 12, 2020

It's been almost seven years since a group led by Clarkson University engineering professor David Mitlin presented an article published in American Chemical Society's [ACS] Nano journal at the society's conference in San Francisco showing that when used in supercapacitors, nanosheets of hemp fiber rivaled the performance of graphene, a conductive mineral compound.

Eat This, Not That! (New York, NY: 639,000 unique monthly visits)
“29+ Best Healthy Pizza Recipes for Weight Loss”
March 11, 2020

According to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, onions enable the body to better absorb the zinc that's provided in grains, which in this case, would be the naan. Vitamin C and zinc are a dynamic duo in preventing the onset of one of the various strains of the common cold.

CleanTechnica (Ventura, CA: 541,000 unique monthly visits)
“Plastic Crisis? No Problem, FLAM Is Coming With Bonus 3-D Printing”
March 15, 2020

Meanwhile, FLAM is not the only threat faced by the petrochemical industry. Cyanobacteria is closing in fast as a source of raw material for bioplastic, the beverage and auto industries are moving into alternative materials, and then there’s that whole “Green Chemistry” movement promoted by the American Chemical Society.

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