ACS in the News

Weekly press highlights of the latest ACS journal articles and other coverage featured in high-profile news media outlets all around the globe. 

Reuters (New York, NY: 43.78 million unique monthly visits)
“Lead measured in teeth of kids living near former battery-recycling plant”
May 15, 2019

Elevated levels of lead and arsenic have long been documented in the air and soil surrounding facilities that recycle batteries. The Exide plant, located just southeast of downtown Los Angeles, recycled 11 million car batteries a year and released 3,500 tons of lead over 30 years. It closed in March 2015 as part of a legal settlement for hazardous waste violations, researchers note in Environmental Science and Technology.

More than 35 media outlets, including Business Insider (New York, NY: 36.68 million unique monthly visits), Yahoo! News (Los Angeles, CA: 8.40 million unique monthly visits), Reuters UK (London, England: 3.67 million unique monthly visits) and CNA (Singapore, Singapore: 3.01 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The New York Times (New York, NY: 29.98 million unique monthly visits)
“Alone, They Stink. Together They Create Dark Chocolate’s Alluring Aroma.”
May 15, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

In a paper published last week in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, the researchers behind this endeavor reveal that dark chocolate’s aroma comes down to 25 molecules, in just the right concentrations — some of which you might find rather disgusting if you sniffed them on their own.

More than 75 media outlets, including New Zealand Herald (Auckland, New Zealand: 9.13 million unique monthly visits), National Post (Toronto, Canada: 3.17 million unique monthly visits), Ottawa Citizen (Ottawa, Canada: 1.55 million unique monthly visits) and The Province (Vancouver, Canada: 1.54 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“Ragweed compounds could protect never cells from Alzheimer’s”
May 15, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

As spring arrives in the northern hemisphere, many people are cursing ragweed, a primary culprit in seasonal allergies. But scientists might have discovered a promising new use for some substances produced by the pesky weed. In ACS' Journal of Natural Products, researchers have identified and characterized ragweed compounds that could help nerve cells survive in the presence of Alzheimer's disease (AD) peptides.

More than 15 media outlets, including News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Tip Hero (Portland, OR: 11.54 million unique monthly visits)
“Experts Say That Your Body Will Change in These 8 Ways When You Start Eating 3 Dates Per Day”
May 14, 2019

The high fiber content in dates can work to make you feel fuller longer and can help prevent blood glucose spikes (which can make you hungry). On top of that, dates have a lot of metabolism-increasing antioxidants in them, such as anthocyanins, phenolics, and carotenoids, according to a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

The Hindu (Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“IIT Bombay fabricates wearable supercapacitor”
May 18, 2019

Researchers at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay have fabricated a wearable supercapacitor that can store and deliver large amount of electrical energy, exceeding other similar devices. The wearable energy storage device can be stitched on to any fabric and can deliver power ranging from microwatt to milliwatt…. published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

MLive (Farmington Hills, MI: 10.83 million unique monthly visits)
“Former Upjohn scientists awarded for ‘pioneering’ work in steroid development”
May 17, 2019
Featuring an ACS Landmark

Scientists from The Upjohn Company behind a “pioneering achievement” in steroid chemistry were awarded a prestigious national designation Friday. The American Chemical Society has granted National Historic Chemical Landmark status to the steroid chemistry achievements of Kalamazoo scientists who worked at The Upjohn Company from 1950 to 1990…

IDN Media (Surabaya, Indonesia: 10.20 million unique monthly visits)
“The Reason for Pissing in the Pool Is Dangerous, Even though It’s Only Few”
May 20, 2019
Publicized in: ACS video release

American Chemical Society's Reactions in its final episode explained that urinating in a swimming pool, in addition to all the unclean "compositions" carried by our bodies, caused serious health hazards. These hazards include respiratory problems such as asthma and irritated red eyes.

MSN MY (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 10.03 million unique monthly visits)
“12 diseases doctors can actually detect through smell”
May 14, 2019

…An invention called “NaNose” – a breathalyser-type device developed by an Israeli company – is up to 90 percent accurate at diagnosing lung cancer; the device detects a special “odour” emitted by the cancer cells. Doctors can use the same technology to identify Parkinson’s disease, other cancers, kidney failure, multiple sclerosis and Crohn’s disease – and the accuracy rate is at 86 percent, according to a study published in the journal ACS Nano.

TreeHugger (New York, NY: 4.77 million unique monthly visits)
“Do you remove your shoes inside?”
May 14, 2019

An EPA study, reported in Environmental Science & Technology provided the first proof that unhealthy herbicides can be tracked into residences on shoes. The researchers found that the herbicide 2,4-D could be easily imported inside via shoes for up to a week after application....Exposure to 2,4-D can cause immediate and relatively minor problems like skin rashes and gastrointestinal upsets; long-term health effects of the herbicide are unknown, the EPA said.

ThomasNet (New York, NY: 2.60 million unique monthly visits)
“New PET/MRI Scanner Provides Superior Soft Tissue Contrast and Molecular Imaging Ability”
May 15, 2019

In a paper published in the American Chemical Society journal [ACS Omega] researchers from Bourgogne University showed that the use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) using multi modal – PET/MRI - showed promising improvements in imaging capabilities.

More than five media outlets, including News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Longer-acting, injectable HIV treatments on the horizon”
May 18, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

An HIV diagnosis was once a death sentence, but now people who receive treatment survive for decades with the disease. Keeping the virus at bay usually requires taking a pill every day, which aside from being inconvenient for some, is an unwelcome daily reminder of the disease. That's why drug companies are developing longer-acting, injectable HIV treatments, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Five media outlets, including Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.49 million unique monthly visits), covered the story. 

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.49 million unique monthly visits)
“A new approach to targeting cancer cells”
May 17, 2019

A University of California, Riverside, research team has come up with a new approach to targeting cancer cells that circumvents a challenge faced by currently available cancer drugs…. Study results appear in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Enhanced anticancer compound may allow precise activation and tracking of treatment”
May 15, 2019

…The new compound has unique chemical properties that allow for precise activation and can be used for tracking its activity in vivo thanks to the emission of fluorescence. Research was published online in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Medical Xpress (Douglas, Isle of Man: 1.49 million unique monthly visits)
“Decoy antibiotics could get around bacteria’s defences”
May 15, 2019

Imperial medical students have helped to devise a new type of 'decoy' drug to tackle infections that are resistant to antibiotics. In lab tests on bacterial cultures, the new drug successfully killed a strain of drug-resistant bacteria. It works by delivering two antibiotics, one of which is effectively hidden…. Their results are published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

Headlines & Global News (New York, NY: 1.24 million unique monthly visits)
“When Biodegradable Plastic Isn’t”
May 16, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

…Manufacturers offer biodegradable or compostable plastic bags, but in many cases, these claims have not been tested in natural environments. Now, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that the bags do not degrade in some environments any faster than regular polyethylene.

More than five media outlets, including Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Pulse Ghana (Accra, Ghana: 970,000 unique monthly visits)
“Beating bad breath this Ramadān”
May 18, 2019

The Wrigley Company carried out a study on miswāk which was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. The study found that mints laced with miswāk extract were 20 times more effective in killing bacteria than ordinary mints. After half an hour, the mints laced with miswāk extract killed about 60% of the bacteria whereas the ordinary mints managed only 3.6%.

Eat This, Not That! (New York, NY: 927,000 unique monthly visits)
“12 Health Benefits of Drinking Wine”
May 16, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

According to a study from the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, red wine was shown to kill some cavity-causing bacteria. Former research has suggested that the polyphenols in both wine and grape seed extract can actually stunt bacterial growth. We’re not saying to totally ditch the toothpaste and mouthwash, but you shouldn’t worry so much about red wine staining your teeth as you should celebrate the fact that it may be preventing you from your next cavity.

KRIV-TV (Houston, TX: 594,000 unique monthly visits)
“Fish slime could be new source for antibiotics, according to latest study”
May 17, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

Researchers identified bacteria “with promising antibiotic activity against known pathogens,” when they studied the thick slime on fish. The mucus traps and destroys microbes in a fish’s environment, such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. Some of the compounds in the mucus also have antibacterial activity…. The research was presented in April at the American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition.

Sky News (Isleworth, England: 18.92 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists figure out new way to remove salt from water”
May 7, 2019

Scientists say the method can desalinate very high-salinity brines, up to seven times the concentration of seawater. This is more than both the method currently used for seawater desalination, known as reverse osmosis, and the water evaporation method can achieve. The method was published in the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology Letters.

More than 35 media outlets, including MSN MY (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: 10.03 million unique monthly visits) and Heart Digital (London, England: 1.31 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Metro.co.uk
(London, England: 13.55 million unique monthly visits)
“Connect: The great vape debate – no everybody is convinced it’s a safe alternative to smoking”
May 10, 2019

Of course, vaping isn’t risk-free. A study published in Environmental Science & Technology identified harmful emissions in vapour, including possible carcinogens and irritants, though at a much lower level than conventional cigarettes. x-smokers are seeing the benefits, though: a study commissioned by the UKVIA found 68 per cent of smokers didn’t think they’d quit before vaping came along, despite having made other attempts to do so, while 47 per cent of vapers feel healthier.
           
Penn State News
(University Park, PA: 13.33 million unique monthly visits)
“Substrate defects key to growth of 2D materials”
May 9, 2019

In recent publications in the journals ACS Nano and Physical Review B, researchers in Penn State's Departments of Materials Science and Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, and Engineering Science and Mechanics show that if the TMDs are grown on a surface of hexagonal boron nitride, 85 percent or more will point in the same direction.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Care2
(Redwood City, CA: 11.90 million unique monthly visits)
“9 Reasons to Start Using Orange Essential Oil”
May 11, 2019

Who doesn’t love the aroma of peeling a fresh, juicy orange? The scent alone makes them worth eating. That aroma is due to the plentiful amount of essential oil in the peel of the orange…. Research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry found that orange essential oil is an effective remedy against depression.

LiveScience
(New York, NY: 11.85 million unique monthly visits)
“Is It Safe to Drink Moonshine?”
May 11, 2019
Featuring an ACS Expert

Methanol is far more dangerous than ethanol, said Anne Andrews, a professor of psychiatry, chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, Los Angeles. In the human body, methanol is converted to formaldehyde — the same substance in embalming fluid — and then to formic acid, which is highly toxic to cells, Andrews told Live Science.

Women’s Health
(New York, NY: 11.84 million unique monthly visits)
“The 19 Best Vegan Protein Powders, According To Nutritionists”
May 10, 2019

What’s more, sprouted grains may improve absorption of protein and certain micronutrients, which can help people with digestive issues, according to a study published in the Journal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry.

The Hindu
(Chennai, India: 11.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Kolkata researchers use novel compound to kill cancer cells”
May 11, 2019

Researchers at Kolkata’s the Indian Institute of Chemical Biology (CSIR-IICB) and the Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science (IACS) have designed and synthesised about 25 quinoline derivatives that show potent anticancer activity.…The results of topo1 inhibition activity, cellular mechanisms and the cancer cell line studies carried out at IACS and the compounds designed and synthesised by IICB researchers were published in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.
           
Food & Wine
(Birmingham, AL: 9.39 million unique monthly visits)
“Dry Red Wines ‘Big Tannins’ Are Literally Bigger, Study Says”
May 8, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Though the phenomenon is well-known, a new study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry delved deeper into some of the specific physical mechanisms of what makes certain red wines drier than others — and though we may often call tannins “big,” the research points out that drier reds can contain tannins that are literally larger.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

The Mercury News
(San Jose, CA: 8.95 million unique monthly visits)
“Lead found in baby teeth of children who lived near California battery plant”
May 7, 2019

“We know teeth are essentially a marker for lead in your body,” said Jill Johnston, assistant professor of environmental health at USC’s Keck School of Medicine and principal author of the study. “So we can suspect higher levels in teeth mean higher levels in other parts of the body,” Johnston said during an interview Monday, a day after her study appeared in the May 5 edition of the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than five media outlets, including KTLA-TV (Los Angeles, CA: 3.16 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Fanpage
(Naples, Italy: 8.50 million unique monthly visits)
“The unmistakable smell of dark chocolate has no more secrets”
May 8, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Scientists have managed to unravel the secrets of the unmistakable smell of dark chocolate that we just need to feel to experience an increase in salivation…. The study, entitled "Characterization of the Key Aroma Compounds in Two Commercial Dark Chocolates with High Cocoa Contents," was published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than 30 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), ANSA (Rome, Italy: 5.68 million unique monthly visits), Il Messaggero (Rome, Italy: 3.46 million unique monthly visits) and Medindia.com (Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Yale Environment 360 (New Haven, CT: 6.06 million unique monthly visits)
“Bee Alert: Is a Controversial Herbicide Harming Honeybees?”
May 7, 2019

For example, in a study published last year in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Pingli Dai of the Institute of Apicultural Research in Beijing, China, and his colleagues found that elevated exposures to glyphosate can lower both the weight of bee larvae and the larval survival rate.

News-Medical.Net
(Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Mining microbial treasures from human-made noxious sites”
May 8, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Nonetheless, scientists have discovered microorganisms in this abandoned copper mine and other human-made noxious sites. These extreme environments induce microbes to synthesize potent, never-before-seen molecules that could find uses in human medicine, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Four additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“New study pinpoints better strategies to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh”
May 8, 2019

Bangladesh's government is taking measures to address the problem, and plans to invest $200 million toward cleaning up water supplies. A new study, published last week in Environmental Science and Technology, could help to inform how that money would be best spent.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Promising radioisotope couple for cancer diagnosis and therapy”
May 9, 2019

Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Omega a promising combination of radioisotope-carrying molecules for use in radiotheranostics — a diagnosis-and-treatment approach based on the combination of medical imaging and internal radiation therapy with radioactive elements.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientific research articles show that imipridones target mitochondrial function in cancer cells”
May 7, 2019

Oncoceutics, Inc. announced the publication of two scientific research articles demonstrating that members of the imipridone family ONC201 and ONC212 directly activate a mitochondrial protease called caseinolytic protease P (ClpP)…. Another research article, published in the journal ACS Chemical Biology, similarly demonstrates that ONC201 and ONC212 directly bind to and activate ClpP.

MSN Health & Fitness (New York, NY: 1.61 million unique monthly visits)
“12 Diseases Doctors Can Actually Detect Through Smell”
May 8, 2019

An invention called 'NaNose'—a breathalyzer-type device developed by an Israeli company—is up to 90 percent accurate at diagnosing lung cancer; the device detects a special 'odor' emitted by the cancer cells. Doctors can use the same technology to identify Parkinson's disease, other cancers, kidney failure, multiple sclerosis, and Crohn's disease—and the accuracy rate is at 86 percent, according to a study published in the journal ACS Nano.

Core77 (New York, NY: 1.53 million unique monthly visits)
“Will Transparent Wood Become a Viable Construction Material?”
May 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

"We prepared a material that is multifunctional—it can transmit light very well and also it can store heat. We combined these two functions in a single material," expained Céline Montanari, one of the researchers on the project, when she presented their work at the American Chemical Society last month.

Digital Journal (Toronto, Canada: 1.50 million unique monthly visits)
“Teaching CRISPR and antibiotic resistance to high school students”
May 8, 2019

By using freeze-dried cell-free reactions bypass those complications and costs the researchers developed test kits that are safe to use and which are cheap to produce. The development of the kits is detailed in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and Northwestern University (Evanston, IL: 9.88 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Best Health (Toronto, Canada: 1.25 million unique monthly visits)
“13 Grilling Mistakes That Could Make You Sick”
May 9, 2019

These potentially cancer-causing chemicals form when the proteins in meat are exposed to high temperatures. If pork is on the menu, consider marinating it for four hours in a dark lager or a pilsner. This’ll reduce the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are similar to HCAs, according to research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

More than five media outlets, including Reader’s Digest (Montreal, Canada: 397,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

WAGA-TV (Atlanta, GA: 1.20 million unique monthly visits)
“Fish slime could be new source for antibiotics, according to latest study”
May 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

As antibiotics become more resistant to dangerous bacteria, researchers are looking into whether fish slime could provide a way to protect humans from those pathogens.
The team, which consists of a collaboration between Oregon State University and California State University Fullerton, studied the bacteria that gets collected in the protective mucus that coats a fish….The research was presented in April at the American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition.

More than 10 media outlets, including WJBK-TV (Southfield, MI: 1.19 million unique monthly visits) and WNYW-TV (New York, NY: 1.19 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Her.ie (Dublin, Ireland: 710,000 unique monthly visits)
“Apparently, tequila can help you lose weight and we’ll cheers to that”
May 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

New research has found that the agave spirit can aid in weight loss, so we definitely know what we're ordering next time we're at the bar. The study was [reported] by the American Chemical Society and - here's the science-y bit now - the sugars that are found in tequila are called agavins. They're non-digestible so they won't raise your blood sugar.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
“A cautionary tale for researchers working on selective DNA nanostructures drug delivery”
May 9, 2019

Many studies indicating that DNA nanostructures can enter cells more readily than simple DNA strands are flawed, according to researchers at McGill University.
In a paper published in the American Chemical Society journal ACS Central Science ("Uptake and Fate of Fluorescently Labeled DNA Nanostructures in Cellular Environments: A Cautionary Tale"), the McGill scientists demonstrate that many DNA cage nanostructures aren’t taken up by cells to a significant extent.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
“Like submicroscopic spacecrafts: graphene flakes to control neuron activity”
May 9, 2019

Like in a science fiction novel, miniscule spacecrafts able to reach a specific site of the brain and influence the operation of specific types of neurons or drug delivery: graphene flakes, the subject matter of the new study of the group of SISSA professor Laura Ballerini, open up truly futuristic horizons.…the study recently published in the journal Nano Letters ("Graphene Oxide Flakes Tune Excitatory Neurotransmission in Vivo by Targeting Hippocampal Synapses").

More than five media outlets, including News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)

Nanowerk (Honolulu, HI: 157,000 unique monthly visits)
“Flexible, transparent monolayer graphene device for power generation and storage”
May 8, 2019

Researchers at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology developed single-layer graphene based multifunctional transparent devices that are expected to be used as electronics and skin-attachable devices with power generation and self-charging capability (ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, "Single-Layer Graphene-Based Transparent and Flexible Multifunctional Electronics for Self-Charging Power and Touch-Sensing Systems").

Four additional media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Food Stuff SA (Cape Town, South Africa: 58,000 unique monthly visits)
“Further understanding the power of honey through its proteins”
May 9, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Although much is known about honey’s many useful properties, surprisingly little is known about its proteins. Now, researchers report in ACS’ Journal of Natural Products new data on honey proteins that could lead to new medicinal applications.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits)
“Soaking up pharmaceuticals and personal care products from water”
May 8, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Unfortunately, conventional wastewater treatment cannot completely remove pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed an adsorbent membrane that they say could be used to purify water contaminated with PPCPs.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Scienmag (London, England: 45,000 unique monthly visits)
“Novel molecular multi-step photoswitches caught in the act”
May 8, 2019

Scientists… have been able to follow the entire sequence of structural transformations in a new class of molecular switches for the first time. By identifying ‘control knobs’ to direct their operation, better control of their performance is now possible. The results were published in the print edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society on 8 May (online on 10 April).

Five additional media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Business Insider (New York, NY: 36.68 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists dug up biodegradable bags that were buried for 3 years and found they don’t break down nearly as fast as expected”
May 2, 2019

Researchers found that bags labeled biodegradable and compostable were still able to carry a full load of shopping after being left to degrade in the elements for three years - they don't decay nearly as fast as you'd expect…. The research has been published in Environmental Science & Technology.

More than 85 media outlets, including PBS (Arlington, VA: 21.99 million unique monthly visits), IFL Science (London, England: 16.38 million unique monthly visits), Quartz (New York, NY: 16.34 million unique monthly visits), ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and stuff.co.nz (Wellington, New Zealand: 10.00 million unique monthly visits, covered the story.

Fox News Channel
(New York, NY: 32.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Fish mucus shows promise as antibiotic, even against superbugs”
May 1, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

After decades of antibiotic overuse, researchers are open to exploring new options. What promising antibiotics have experts rolled up their sleeves for? The slimy mucus that coat fish…. The findings were presented at the American Chemical Society’s spring 2019 meeting in Florida. However, keep in mind that research is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Forbes
(Jersey City, NJ: 29.79 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers Have Found A Way To Make Organic Solar Cells More Robust”
May 3, 2019

Organic solar cells have several advantages over their traditional silicon counterparts. But they are highly susceptible to damage from moisture, oxygen and light. Researchers have now worked out how to make these next-generation cells more resistant to harsh environmental variables, bringing them closer to widescale commercialization…. The research is published in the journal ACS Energy Letters.

More than 10 media outlets, including PressReleasePoint (Chicago, IL: 689,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

KCNC-TV
(Denver, CO: 26.40 million unique monthly visits)
“Study: Chemical In Human Sweat Sticks To Indoor Walls At ‘Surprisingly High Rates’”
May 3, 2019

Lactic acid, the main chemical in human sweat, evaporates from the skin and sticks to walls at “surprisingly high rates,” according to a team of University of Colorado Boulder researchers….“We found that 97 percent of the lactic acid emitted in the museum ended up on a surface,” Demetrios Pagonis, lead author on the study published in the latest issue of Environmental Science & Technology, was quoted as saying.

Bustle
(New York, NY: 16.35 million unique monthly visits)
“6 Weird Dehydration Remedies To Know About For When You’re Thirsty As Heck”
May 5, 2019
Publicized in: ACS national meeting news release

A fascinating bit of research presented by the American Chemical Society in 2013 looked at the value of a New Orleans favorite: the Chinese-Creole soup Yak-a-mein, traditionally eaten as a hangover cure after a heavy night. It involves lots of spiced broth, noodles, meat, and eggs, and the ACS found that it's actually a pretty great rehydration method.

Bustle
(New York, NY: 16.35 million unique monthly visits)
“These Non-Toxic Candles Are Completely Natural, & Are Perfect For Unwinding After A Stressful Day”
May 6, 2019

Scientists found that the smoke produced by certain candles can be linked to illnesses as serious as cancer. Burning candles made from paraffin wax is apparently an "unrecognised source of exposure to indoor air pollution," the NHS website quotes from the 238th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society.

Hindustan Times
(New Delhi, India: 16.27 million unique monthly visits)
“New technique brings colour tuning capabilities to LED bulbs”
April 30, 2019

Researchers claim to have developed a new technique which could enable LED bulb to tune bright white and warmer colours at the same time…. Notably, the technique is compatible with current LEDs that are at the core of commercial solid-state LED lighting according to a study published in the journal…ACS Photonics.

More than 10 media outlets, including Deccan Chronicle (Secunderabad, India: 3.00 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Mercola.com
(Hoffman Estates, IL: 11.95 million unique monthly visits)
“How to Avoid Hormone Disrupting Chemicals”
May 1, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Finally, because receipts are often stored next to paper currency in people's wallets, paper currency may also be contaminated with BPA. In a study published in Environmental Science and Technology, researchers analyzed paper currencies from 21 countries for the presence of BPA, and the chemical was detected in every sample.

Mercola.com
(Hoffman Estates, IL: 11.95 million unique monthly visits)
“Grass Fed or Lab Fed – Which Is Better for Your Health and the Environment?”
May 6, 2019

Meat substitutes often require water, chemicals and fossil fuel inputs, and in that respect, differ little from conventional agriculture. For example, an Environmental Science and Technology study published in 2015 revealed that lab-grown meat, where the meat is cultured from stem cells, actually requires more energy than conventional agriculture!

LiveScience
(New York, NY: 11.85 million unique monthly visits)
“What Are PFAS?”
May 1, 2019

…So, people are trying to do something to fix the pollution problem. For example, a water treatment group in North Carolina is building a new facility that will contain large filters of granular activated carbon to suck PFAS out of contaminated drinking water, Chemical & Engineering News reported last month. The company's goal is to extract 90% of the PFAS from the water before delivering the utility to customers.

Fast Company
(New York, NY: 11.82 million unique monthly visits)
“This popular kids’ toy doubles as a robot that holds 24,000 times its own mass”
May 3, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

The research—published May 1 in American Chemical Society’s journal Applied Polymer Materials—describes a method to turn thermoplastic polystyrene sheets into grippers. Soft grippers are typically made of hydrogels or elastomers, which require solvents or continuous pneumatic pressure to change shape, both of which have drawbacks.

More than 10 media outlets, including Canada Free Press (Toronto, Canada: 329,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

NBC News
(Redmond, WA: 9.58 million unique monthly visits)
“Fight against plastic pollution targets a hidden source: Our clothes”
May 5, 2019

Patagonia, based in Ventura, California, worked with researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 2014 to explore the extent of microfiber pollution. That research, which culminated in a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology in 2016, examined microfiber shedding from four synthetic fleece Patagonia jackets and one from another brand.

Two additional media outlets covered the story.

World News Network
(New York, NY: 8.96 million unique monthly visits)
“Drug companies warm up to continuous manufacturing”
May 1, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

…But recently, the demands of chemically complex and targeted drugs coming to market have caused many pharmaceutical companies to rethink the way they make medicines, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

Three additional media outlets covered the story.

Army Research Lab
(Adelphi, MD: 6.01 million unique monthly visits)
“Wearable sensors could leverage biotechnology to monitor personal, environmental data”
April 30, 2019

ARL scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the California Institute of Technology and Indi Molecular, Inc., developed a protein catalyzed capture, or PCC, agent technology that improves previous versions of receptors and could enable the monitoring of personal and environmental data from Soldiers in the field. The research, funded by the Army's Institute of Collaborative Biotechnologies since 2012, is presented in a comprehensive review article for Chemical Reviews.

More than five media outlets, including Laboratory Equipment (Rockaway, NJ: 135,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Maxim
(New York, NY: 4.76 million unique monthly visits)
“Wine Kills Germs That Cause Sore Throats and Dental Plaque, Says Awesome Study”
April 30, 2019

In the study, published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers discovered that the acidity and alcohol concentration in wine isn’t what’s responsible for the antibacterial properties, as was previously believed. Instead, it’s due to a number of organic compounds found in both red and white wines.

Democratic Underground (Washington, D.C.: 4.76 million unique monthly visits)
“Scientists: Ingestion Of Plastics By Plankton Could Damage Ability of Oceans To Absorb CO2
April 30, 2019

(Salps) ingest algae at the sea surface and produce dense faecal pellets, which rapidly sink to the deep sea, carrying with them some of this captured carbon,” explained Alina Wieczorek of NUIG. Experiments in Villefranche found that when salps ingest microplastics and incorporate them into their faecal pellets they did not sink as fast, according to research published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

Five media outlets, including The Irish Times (Dublin, Ireland: 3.83 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

World Economic Forum (Geneva, Switzerland: 4.16 million unique monthly visits)
“This sensor uses a newly-discovered protein to hunt for rare-earth metals”
May 3, 2019

These elements are called rare earths, and they include chemical elements of atomic weight 57 to 71 on the periodic table. Rare earths are challenging and expensive to extract from the environment or from industrial samples, like waste water from mines or coal waste products. We developed a protein-based sensor that can detect tiny amounts of lanthanides in a sample, letting us know if it’s worth investing resources to extract these important metals. Image: Journal of American Chemical Society

More than five media outlets, including Sustainability Matters (Wahroonga, Australia: 10,000 unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Inverse (New York, NY: 3.72 million unique monthly visits)
“Pollutants From Household Furniture Linked to Aging-Related Effects on Body”
May 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

Some environmental pollutants begin their lives as common household items. A metal used in household wires or a compound used to treat furniture may seem innocuous, but over time these pollutants find their way into human bodies where they can extract lasting effects on health, happiness, and according to research released Wednesday in Environmental Science & Technology, how our bodies age from the inside out.

More than 10 media outlets, including Medindia.com (Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Truthout (Sacramento, CA: 3.53 million unique monthly visits)
“Hydroponically Grown Produce Threatens Real Organic Agriculture”
May 2, 2019

A 2003 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry compared hydroponic and conventional field-produced lettuce, and found that the hydroponic lettuce “had significantly lower lutein, β-carotene, violaxanthin, and neoxanthin contents than the conventionally produced lettuce.”

Medindia.com (Chennai, India: 3.29 million unique monthly visits)
“Cranberry Oligosaccharides May Help Fight Urinary Tract Infections”
May 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

…Although clinical trials of this popular folk remedy have produced mixed results, some studies have shown that drinking cranberry juice can keep bacteria that cause UTIs from sticking to cells lining the urinary tract. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Natural Products have identified cranberry oligosaccharides in the urine of cranberry-fed pigs that could be responsible for this activity.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits) and News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

Science (Washington, D.C.: 3.26 million unique monthly visits)
“In search of blue”
May 3, 2019

…Subramanian's first thought was that Smith, who had recently switched from marine biology to chemistry, had made a mistake. His second thought was something that someone at Dupont had once told him: Blue is really hard to make. It's so hard, in fact, that Subramanian's new color became a phenomenon. The New York Times called within days after his paper on YInMn blue, as he dubbed it, appeared in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Before It’s News (Mill Valley, CA: 3.13 million unique monthly visits)
“Storing Trillions of Gigabytes of Data for Millions of Years in Molecules”
May 2, 2019

“Think storing the contents of the New York Public Library with a teaspoon of protein,” says Brian Cafferty, first author on the paper that describes the new technique…The work was performed in collaboration with Milan Mrksich and his group at Northwestern University and is published in ACS Central Science.

NC State News (Raleigh, NC: 2.99 million unique monthly visits)
“Field Study Finds Pellet-Fed Stoves Cut Pollutant Emissions 90%, Nearing Gas-Stove Performance”
April 30, 2019

A study by North Carolina State University researchers finds that a new cookstove design, which makes use of compressed wood pellets, reduces air pollution by about 90% for a range of contaminants associated with health problems and climate change…. The paper, “Pellet-fed gasifier stoves approach gas-stove like performance during in-home use in Rwanda,” is published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers use 3D printer to make paper organs”
May 1, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

Long before scientists test new medicines in animals or people, they study the effects of the substances on cells growing in Petri dishes. However, a 2D layer of cells is a poor substitute for the much more complex 3D structure of tissues in organs. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Nano Letters have used a 3D printer to make paper organs, complete with artificial blood vessels, that they can populate with cells.

More than 10 media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Researchers synthesize peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with low cost and superior catalytic activity”
April 30, 2019

A KAIST research team doped nitrogen and boron into graphene to selectively increase peroxidase-like activity and succeeded in synthesizing a peroxidase-mimicking nanozyme with a low cost and superior catalytic activity. These nanomaterials can be applied for early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease…. his research, led by PhD Min Su Kim, was published in ACS Nano (10.1021/acsnano.8b09519) on March 25, 2019.

More than five media outlets, including ScienceDaily (Rockville, MD: 11.82 million unique monthly visits), covered the story.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“Consumer demand challenges perfumers to find natural, yet sustainable scents”
May 2, 2019
Publicized in: ACS PressPac

…Today, perfume makers have more than 3,000 synthetic scent molecules in their palettes. However, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, consumer demand for natural ingredients has challenged perfumers to find natural, yet sustainable, scents.

News-Medical.Net (Manchester, England: 1.63 million unique monthly visits)
“RIT faculty-researcher develops microfluidic device for early detection of Ebola virus”
May 3, 2019

A faculty-researcher at Rochester Institute of technology has developed a prototype micro device with bio-sensors that can detect the deadly Ebola virus. With this type of device, those infected can be treated earlier, and the early detection process can potentially decrease the spread of infections…. Du's research was published in the April 2019 issue of ACS Sensors.

The Times of India – New Delhi Edition (New Delhi, India: 1.14 million unique monthly visits)
“The best way to clean pesticides from your fruits, as per science”
April 30, 2019
Publicized in: ACS news release

As per a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, this common product found in every household can help to clean fruits and veggies properly. While conducting a study, scientists washed apples with three different products- Clorox bleach, baking soda, and plain tap water- and tracked the number of pesticides left in it.

WCMH-TV (Columbus, OH: 1.10 million unique monthly visits)
“COSI Science Festival wraps up with large crowds celebrating learning”
May 4, 2019

The exciting celebration was filled with opportunities to explore science while having fun learning about the world around us….Parents and youngsters of all ages lined Dorrian Green Park and genoa Park, and an area that extended to Washington Blvd. and Town St. Saturday's finale included the 150th anniversary of the periodic table at the Genoa Park Steps along the Riverfront, joined by Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) presenters.

Environmental Working Group (Washington, D.C.:1.10 million unique monthly visits)
“Dirty Duke Energy, Assessing the Combined Risk of Water Contaminants and More”
May 3, 2019

Chemical & Engineering News: US EPA recommends cleanup level for PFOS and PFOA in groundwater. David Andrews, a senior scientist at the Environmental Working Group, says because recommendations aren’t legally binding, there’s no guarantee that those liable for pollution, notably industry or the military, will abide by them.

PressReleasePoint (Chicago, IL: 689,000 unique monthly visits)
“Former CEO Chris Pappas’ Exit Interview with Chemical Week”
May 1, 2019

In 2017, Pappas received the Leadership Award for Outstanding Corporate Reinvention from The Chemical Marketing and Economics (CME) group of the American Chemical Society’s New York Section for his visionary leadership, focus on safety and technology, financial discipline, and for Trinseo’s growth which tripled in value during the preceding three years.

The New Orleans Advocate (New Orleans, LA: 35,000 circulation)
“Cornerstone Chemical, company involved in cyanide plant lawsuit, has history of infractions”
April 27, 2019
Featuring an ACS Expert

Preston MacDougall, a chemistry professor at Middle Tennessee State University, said cyanide’s deadly reputation probably exceeds its actual danger, but he also warned residents to look at a company’s individual history when assessing the risk a chemical or a plant poses.

ACS Publications logo

ACS authors reach a worldwide audience.

Contact

Email newsroom@acs.org to recieve this information by email each week.