Skip Navigation

ACS is committed to helping combat the global COVID-19 pandemic with initiatives and free resources. Learn More

Open each chapter to view lesson plans, student activity sheets, and other resources. Use the linked multimedia to help explain science concepts to students.

  • Chapter 1 – Matter is Made of Tiny Particles

    Through investigating solids, liquids, and gases and the phenomena of dissolving, evaporation, and condensation, students develop models to investigate matter at the particle level.

    • Lesson 1.1 - Matter Is Made of Tiny Particles  image
      Lesson 1.1 - Matter Is Made of Tiny Particles

      Students squeeze a flexible plastic bottle filled with air and another filled with water to investigate the questions: Is an “empty” bottle really empty? and Can you force the molecules of a gas or a liquid to be closer together?

    • Lesson 1.2 - Dissolving M&Ms image
      Lesson 1.2 - Dissolving M&Ms

      Students place M&Ms in water and in a sugar solution to investigate the question: Will an M&M dissolve as well in a sugar solution as it does in plain water?

    • Lesson 1.3 - Dissolving and Back Again image
      Lesson 1.3 - Dissolving and Back Again

      Students dissolve salt in water and allow the water to evaporate to investigate the question: What process causes salt to dissolve in water and then the water to evaporate?

    • Lesson 1.4 - The Water Cycle image
      Lesson 1.4 - The Water Cycle

      Students use water, ice, and plastic wrap to model the ocean and cold upper atmosphere to investigate the question: What are the main processes in the water cycle that make it rain?

  • Chapter 2 – Substances Have Characteristic Properties

    Students investigate the solubility, density, and other properties of solids and liquids to identify substances based on their unique characteristics.

    • Lesson 2.1 - Using Dissolving to Identify Substances image
      Lesson 2.1 - Using Dissolving to Identify Substances

      Students compare the dissolving of salt and sugar and then conduct a dissolving test on unknown substances marked A, B, and C to investigate the question: Can substances be identified by how well they dissolve in water?

    • Lesson 2.2 - Identifying an Unknown Liquid image
      Lesson 2.2 - Identifying an Unknown Liquid

      Students test four known liquids and an unknown liquid on two different paper surfaces to investigate the question: Can you identify liquids based on how they interact with different surfaces?

    • Lesson 2.3 - Mixing Liquids to Identify an Unknown Liquid image
      Lesson 2.3 - Mixing Liquids to Identify an Unknown Liquid

      Students test four known and one unknown liquid with water to investigate the question: Can you identify an unknown liquid based on how different liquids interact with water?

    • Lesson 2.4 - Density and Sinking and Floating image
      Lesson 2.4 - Density and Sinking and Floating

      Students repeatedly reduce the size of a clay ball while placing it in water to investigate the question: Does changing the amount of material in an object change the object’s density?

    • Lesson 2.5 - The Density of Liquids image
      Lesson 2.5 - The Density of Liquids

      After seeing the teacher compare the weight of equal volumes of water and corn syrup, students compare the weight of equal volumes of water and vegetable oil to investigate the question: Is vegetable oil more or less dense than water?

  • Chapter 3 – Substances Can Mix and React to Form New Substances

    Students use baking soda, calcium chloride and other common substances to discover that when certain substances combine, a chemical reaction takes place, and new substances are formed.

    • Lesson 3.1 - What’s the Difference between Baking Soda and Baking Powder?  image
      Lesson 3.1 - What’s the Difference between Baking Soda and Baking Powder?

      Students design and conduct a test using baking soda and baking powder with vinegar to investigate the question: Will baking soda or baking powder produce more gas when vinegar is added?

    • Lesson 3.2 - Exploring Baking Powder image
      Lesson 3.2 - Exploring Baking Powder

      Students help design a test using baking soda, corn starch, and cream of tartar to investigate the question: Which two of the three ingredients in baking powder react to make it bubble when water is added?

    • Lesson 3.3 - Forming a Precipitate image
      Lesson 3.3 - Forming a Precipitate

      Students combine an Ivory Soap solution with an Epsom salt solution to produce a solid “soap scum” to investigate the questions: What happens when you mix soap with hard water? and Is soap scum different from soap?

    • Lesson 3.4 - Chemical Reactions & Color Change image
      Lesson 3.4 - Chemical Reactions & Color Change

      Students add laundry detergent powder (a base) and cream of tartar (an acid) to a red cabbage indicator to investigate the question: What can the color of an indicator tell you about the substances added to it?

    • Lesson 3.5 - Different Substances React Differently image
      Lesson 3.5 - Different Substances React Differently

      Students combine citric acid with calcium chloride and citric acid with baking soda to investigate the question: What are the similarities and differences between the two reactions? and Do substances react in a characteristic way?

  • Chapter 4 – Mass is Conserved in Physical and Chemical Change

    Through exploring melting, dissolving, and chemical change, students discover that mass is conserved during all these processes.

    •  Lesson 4.1 - Conservation of Mass image
      Lesson 4.1 - Conservation of Mass

      Students measure the mass of substances before and after melting, dissolving, and a chemical change to investigate the question: Is mass conserved during physical and chemical changes?

  • Chapter 5 – Engineering Design

    Students learn about and use the engineering design process to develop a device that uses a chemical reaction to make a cell phone float.

    • Lesson 5.1 - Engineering a Floatation Device image
      Lesson 5.1 - Engineering a Floatation Device

      Students test citric acid and cream of tartar with baking soda to investigate the question: Which reaction produces more gas? and How much of each reactant should be used to fill a bag with gas to make a cell phone float?

Illustration of students performing science activity

Students Learn Science…
by Doing Science